Public Programs Archive


2020


Students Speak: Discussions about Art, Activism, and Museums as Social Spaces

A collaborative student-led series hosted by the Office of Intercultural Student Engagement and the University Art Museum, with dialogues surrounding topics of art museums and social justice. UAlbany students will be able to participate in this open dialogue through Zoom. Please contact the UAM or ISE for a Zoom link to participate: [email protected] or [email protected]

The Museum as a Social Space for Community Connection and Healing
Thursday, September 10, 2020, 7pm


Thursday, March 5, 12 – 3 pm

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Art + Feminism 2020

Wikimedia’s gender inequity is well-documented. Join us for a communal updating of Wikipedia entries on subjects related to the women artists included in the exhibition Affinities and Outliers. Co-sponsored with University Libraries.

UAM


Saturday, March 7, 1 – 3 pm

Art Lab with Christine Snyder (MFA ’16): Rubber Stamp

Join this artist-led hands-on artmaking workshop. The project is based on the artwork included in the exhibition by Hilda Katz. All materials are provided.


UAM


Saturday, February 22, 1 – 3 pm

Art Lab with Christine Snyder (MFA ’16): Abstract Collage

Join this artist-led hands-on artmaking workshop. The project is based on the artwork included in the exhibition by Olle Baertling. All materials are provided.
UAM


Saturday, February 29, noon – 1 pm

Yoga at the Museum with Carrie Will

Yoga Care: The Capital Region’s Traveling Yoga Studio will provide all supply mats and props.
Donations welcome.


 


2019


ACE Conversations and Workshops

A series of informal discussions about relevant topics in the field of art and sports with faculty, staff, and students across the disciplines. 

RISK Change/Activism Roundtable Discussion 
Tuesday, December 3, 4:30 p.m.

Supported by a UAlbany Strategic Allocation of Resources (StAR) grant.


ACE Artist Residencies and Talks

Exhibiting artists Radamés “Juni” Figueroa, Baseera Khan, and Ashley Teamer will engage UAlbany students, faculty, and staff through cross-departmental conversations, workshops, class visits, performances, and exhibition tours. As part of their two-day residency each artist will speak about their work followed by a Q&A.

Talk by Artist-in-Residence Radamés “Juni” Figueroa

Tuesday, September 24, 4:30 p.m.

Talk by Exhibiting Artist Ronny Quevedo

Tuesday, October 8, 4:30 p.m.

Performance and Talk by Artist-in-Residence Baseera Khan

Tuesday, October 22, 4:30 p.m.

Talk by Artist-in-Residence Ashley Teamer
Tuesday, November 12, 4:30 p.m.


Yoga at the Museum
November 16, 11:45 am – 12:45 pm with Carrie Will

You are a living, breathing work of art. Naturally, you should do yoga in an art museum! Yoga Care: The Capital Region’s Traveling Yoga Studio will hold classes at the Museum. These classes are suited for all levels of yoga practitioners from the brand-new beginner to the seasoned yogi. Yoga Care will supply some yoga mats and props, please bring a mat if you have one. Donations for yoga are welcome but not mandatory.


Airball Workshop with Artist
Tomm Roeschlein

Tuesday, October 1, 4:30 p.m.

Artist Tomm Roeschlein (b. 1986, Indiana) presents Airball, a piece exploring the connections between the fundamentals of athletic movement and the choreography of modern dance. The event will start as a workshop, with participants engaging in blending these disciplines and will culminate in a performance of the game Airball. The museum will become the court, and the audience will be encouraged to interact with the participants. By engaging participants with new steps and phrases through this hybrid of dance and athletic instruction, the game of Airball will come to life.

Tomm Roeschlein is a Filipino American photographer and artist. He lives and works in Hudson, New York. His work focuses on communities and the individuals that make them up. He has exhibited in Baba Yaga at Grand Buffet, Hudson, New York (2019) and Incident Report, Hudson, New York (2018). 


Homecoming Events

Saturday, October 19

11 am – noon
ACE Exhibition Tour with New Director/Chief Curator Corinna Ripps Schaming – University Art Museum

11 am – 4 pm – Museum Collections Study Space
Visit the  Museum’s Collections Study, Space and see Double Play, an exhibition showcasing artwork from the University at Albany Fine Art Collections that uses sports as a visual element. Double Play was curated by Max Seiler, Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation Intern.


The Master of Fine Arts Thesis Exhibition Reception

Reception: Friday, May 10, 5 – 7 p.m.
University Art Museum
Fine Arts Building 


Art Lab

Create hands-on projects related to exhibitions on view with teaching artist Christine Snyder (MFA ’16)
Saturdays; February 2, March 2, March 30, 1 – 3 p.m. 
Free and open to the public.
Appropriate for all ages.


Art, Women, Race, and Class Reading Group

Read/Gather/Discuss: Angela Davis’s Women, Race, and Class (1981).
Every Wednesday, February 6 – April 3, noon – 1 p.m. Full schedule can be found here


Yoga in the Museum

Yoga Care: The Capital Region’s Traveling Yoga Studio will host classes for all levels. Donations welcome.
Saturday, February 23, noon – 1:15 p.m., taught by Cody Bloomfield
Saturday, March 23, noon – 1:15 p.m., taught by Carrie Will


Artist Nicole Cherubini in Conversation with UAlbany Faculty

Exhibiting artist Cherubini delves into topics of art and gender politics with art historians Rakhee Balaram and Sarah Cohen, Department of Art and Art History

Tuesday, March 26, noon – 1 p.m.


The Creative Life: Susan Orlean

Acclaimed author in conversation with WAMC’s Joe Donahue.
Friday, March 1, 8 p.m.
UAlbany Performing Arts Center
Co-sponsored by New York State Writers Institute and UAlbany Performing Arts Center

More info...


Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Tuesday, February 26, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Bring your laptop to update Wikipedia entries on gender, art, and feminism. An all-day community event. Guests can stay for under an hour or for the entire day.
Co-sponsored by Information Literacy Department, University Libraries

More info... 


Artist Talk with Carrie Schneider

Gallery walk-through and conversation.
Tuesday, February 19, 4:30 p.m.


Artist Talk with Photographer Oliver Wasow 

A lecture about Wasow’s recently published book of photographic portraits Friends, Enemies and Strangers (2018).
Tuesday, February 5, 4:30 p.m.

More info... 

 


2018


Artist Talk with exhibiting artist Jungjin Lee
Tuesday, February 6, 7:00 pm

Known for her laborious and handcrafted photographic work printed on handmade mulberry paper, Jungjin Lee creates cross-cultural photographic landscapes which intermixes techniques and materials of Eastern and Western traditions of both painting and photography. For This Place, Lee travelled to Israel and the West Bank four times during 2010 and 2011, usually staying for about a month. She focused on the desert regions in the south, particularly the Negev. Jungjin Lee will discuss her Unnamed Road series of large abstract landscapes of the Negev Desert.

This event is co-sponsored by UAlbany’s Department of Art and Art History.


Games Bringing People Together
Saturday, February 10, 12:00 – 4:00 pm

Across the world games bring people together and act as a touchstone for peace. Join The Guild at UAlbany in celebrating the impact of games by playing at the Art Museum. Come play a variety of board games, members will be available to teach unfamiliar/new games and all are welcome.


Art Lab with Christine Snyder (MFA ’16)
Saturday, February 17, March 3, March 24, 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Teaching artist Christine Snyder leads a series of three hands-on, interactive art projects, each inspired by an artist in This Place. Participants will receive a hand out with information on the inspiring artists: Martin Kollar, Jungjin Lee, Thomas Struth, and Jeff Wall. Art Labs are free, appropriate for all ages, open to students, community members, artists, and non-artists. All supplies will be provided. The labs are as follows:

February 17 – Magazine Collage (highlighted artist: Jeff Wall)
March 3 – Graphite Drawing (highlighted artist: Jungjin Lee)
March 24 – Comparing and Contrasting Two Works of Art (highlighted artists: Thomas Struth and Martin Kollar)

Art Lab is supported by the Jack and Gertrude Horan Memorial Endowment Fund for student outreach and Stewart’s Shops.


Photography is Dead. Long Live Photography! A roundtable discussion on the past, present, and future of the medium
Tuesday, February 20, 4:30 – 6:00 pm

At a moment when images are more ubiquitous than ever, when we live, as Lynne Tillman has written, “in a glut of images,” many practitioners believe the medium, as an artistic form, is in a crisis of one form or another. The mass deployment of highresolution cellphone cameras, accessible image-editing software, social media sharing platforms, machine vision and optical recognition systems, as well as executive artificial intelligence, all leave artists wondering where we stand. According to Teju Cole, “…we may be on our way to becoming androids, but we are not there yet: we still have a hunger for poetry and lyricism, an intense hunger that is difficult to satisfy.” This roundtable seeks to engage photographic artists at a wide range of points in their careers to offer a “snapshot” of our current moment.

Panelists: Melinda McDaniel, Artist, Assistant Professor, Program Director, Art + Extended Media, Sage College of Albany; Justin Baker, Artist, Assistant Professor of Art, Hudson Valley Community College; Owen Barensfeld, Artist, MFA Candidate, Studio Art, UAlbany Dept. of Art & Art History; Judah Shepherd, Artist, 60-credit Departmental BA Candidate, Studio Art, UAlbany Dept. of Art & Art History
Moderator: Danny Goodwin, Artist, Associate Professor of Art and Director of the Studio Art Program, UAlbany Dept. of Art & Art History


Pop up Yoga at the Museum
Saturday, February 3, 12:00 – 1:15 pm, taught by Meghan Reynolds Hogan
Saturday, March 10, 12:00 – 1:15 pm, taught by Cody Gillham

You are a living, breathing, work of art. Naturally, you should do yoga in an art museum! Come to the University Art Museum’s Pop-up Yoga classes.

Yoga Care: The Capital Region’s Traveling Yoga Studio will host two yoga classes for all levels in the museum. Yoga Care will supply some yoga mats and props, please bring a mat if you have one.

The museum is free and open to the public. Donations for yoga are welcome but not mandatory.

Art Lab is supported by the Jack and Gertrude Horan Memorial Endowment Fund for student outreach and Stewart's Shops.


My Place: Storytelling with Gregor Wynnyczuk
zTuesday, March 27, 5:00 – 7:00 pm

An open-mic storytelling event hosted by Gregor Wynnyczuk and centered on the theme of finding one’s place – whether it be geographically, or in relation to others. Potential storytellers will be asked to consider the following prompt: Places can resonate with us. We may feel we belong in some places, and don’t in others. But ‘our place’ is also a societal construct. We often serve a role or function that is determined by others. We may have something we want to contribute, but may feel it is not our place to do so. Consider a story about finding your place – whether it be geographically, or in relation to others. There will be a maximum of 12 storytellers and each will be allotted five minutes and thirty seconds in which to tell his/her story. Emcee Gregor Wynnyczuk will manage the sign-up period, which will begin at 5:00 pm.


Art + Food + Dialogue
Tuesday, April 3, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

The Museum will host a closing celebration of the exhibition This Place and the Teagle Initiative, Teaching and Learning with Museum Exhibitions: An Inter Institutional Approach. In addition to conversation and light fare, UAlbany/Teagle Initiative faculty liaisons, artist Danny Goodwin, Department of Art & Art History and author Edward Schwarzchild, Department of English will lead a discussion by participating faculty and students who taught with and learned from This Place. The general public is encouraged to attend this free event.

This Place is organized by Chronicle of a People Foundation, Inc., New York; the tour is managed by Curatorial Assistance, Pasadena, California. The exhibition was curated by Charlotte Cotton and is organized for the Tang Teaching Museum by Rachel Seligman, assistant director for curatorial affairs. At all four institutions, the exhibition is supported by the Teagle Foundation.

The University Art Museum presentation is organized by Corinna Ripps Schaming, interim director/curator. The exhibition and public programs are supported by the Office of the President, Office of the Provost, The University at Albany Foundation, The Bernard D. Arbit Fund, and University Auxiliary Services.


Pop up Yoga at the Museum
Saturday, July 7, 12:00 – 1:15 pm, taught by Carrie Will
Saturday, August 11, 12:00 – 1:15 pm, taught by Meghan Reynolds Hogan
Saturday, September 8, 12:00 – 1:15 pm, taught by Cody Gillham

You are a living, breathing, work of art. Naturally, you should do yoga in an art museum! Come to the University Art Museum’s Pop-up Yoga classes.

Yoga Care: The Capital Region’s Traveling Yoga Studio will host two yoga classes for all levels in the museum. Yoga Care will supply some yoga mats and props, please bring a mat if you have one.

Donations for yoga are welcome but not mandatory. Free parking in campus visitor lots on Saturdays.


Art Lab with Christine Snyder (MFA ’16)
Saturday, July 14, August 25, September 15, 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Teaching artist Christine Snyder leads a series of three hands-on, interactive art projects, each inspired by the exhibitions Younger Than Today: Photographs of Children (and sometimes their mothers) by Andy WarholMickey Mouse has grown up a Cow, and Triple: Alex Bradley Cohen, Louis Fratino, and Tschabalala Self. Art Labs are free, appropriate for all ages, open to students, community members, artists, and non-artists. All supplies will be provided. The labs are as follows:

July 14 – Styrofoam Printmaking (highlighted artist: Andy Warhol)
August 25 – Tissue Paper Portrait Collage (highlighted artists: Cohen, Fratino, Self)
September 15 – Rubber Stamp Making (highlighted artist: Andy Warhol))

Art Lab is supported by the Jack and Gertrude Horan Memorial Endowment Fund for student outreach and Stewart’s Shops. Parking at the University Art Museum is free on Saturdays.


Curator’s Talk with Corinna Ripps Schaming
Wednesday, August 1, noon

This informal talk will focus on the exhibition Younger Than Today: Photographs of Children (and sometimes their mothers) by Andy Warhol featuring over 50 Polaroids and photographs related to childhood, sibling relations, and the influence of the maternal.


The Creative Life: Conversation with Bibbe Hansen
Wednesday, September 5, 7 p.m.
Pre-event Public Reception: 5:30 p.m.
University Art Museum

American performance artist, musician, and Andy Warhol film star Bibbe Hansen will discuss her creative inspiration, artistic practice, and career with WAMC’s Joe Donahue.


Conversation with curator Joe Mama-Nitzberg and artist Abbey Williams
Tuesday, September 11, 4:30 pm

Joe Mama-Nitzberg curator of Mickey Mouse has grown up a Cow and exhibiting artist Abbey Williams will discuss the works in this exhibition.


2018 Artists of the Mohawk Hudson Region and FLOW: Alumni Artists from Mohawk Hudson Region Exhibitions 2009-2017 Exhibition Artists’ Reception and Awards Ceremony
Friday, October 19, 5 – 8 p.m.
University Art Museum
Free event parking available in State Quad Student Parking Lot off University Drive East.


Exhibition Tours
Saturday, October 20, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
University Art Museum

Join selected exhibiting artists from the 2018 Artists of the Mohawk Hudson Region Exhibition for an informal tour at the University Art Museum. Learn more about contemporary artists living and working within a 100-mile radius of the Capital Region. Illustrated catalogues will be available for purchase. Also on view is FLOW: Works by Alumni Artists from Mohawk Hudson Exhibitions 2009-2017. This event is free and open to the public.


The Creative Life: Conversation with Jean Shin
Thursday, November 1, 7 pm
Pre-event Public Reception: 5:30 p.m.
Performing Arts Center, Uptown Campus

Sculptor, public installation artist, and juror of the 2018 Artists of the Mohawk Hudson Region exhibition, Jean Shin will discuss her creative inspiration, artistic practice, and career with WAMC’s Joe Donahue.


FLOW Artists’ Reception and Tour of new Collections Study Space
Tuesday, November 13, 5 – 7 p.m.
University Art Museum and Collections Study Space

The new Collections Study Space, located near the Museum is designed to safely house the University Fine Art Collections of over 3,000 objects that reflect 50 years of modern and contemporary art, including paintings, photographs, prints, drawings and sculpture by many of the most prominent artists of the 20th and 21st centuries. The Collections Study Space offers innovative teaching and learning resources across the disciplines and includes a viewing and study gallery for fine art, archives and special collections in a classroom context.


2017


Pop up Yoga at the Museum
Saturday, November 11, 12pm-1:15pm
taught by Meghan Hogan
Saturday, December 9, 12pm-1:15pm
taught by Carrie Will

You are a living, breathing, work of art. Naturally, you should do yoga in an art museum! Come to the University Art Museum’s Pop-up Yoga classes.

Yoga Care: The Capital Region’s Traveling Yoga Studio will hold two classes this semester at the Museum. These classes are suited for all levels of yoga practitioners from the brand new beginner to the seasoned yogi. Yoga Care will supply some yoga mats and props, please bring a mat if you have one.

The museum is free and open to the public. Donations for yoga are welcome but not mandatory.


Lecture by Poet and Art Critic John Yau—Above and Below the Radar: Artists Working Today
Tuesday, November 28, 4:30 pm

Eminent art critic and poet John Yau is one of today's most consistently engaged voices on contemporary art. Inspired by the poets of the New York School, he has made the dialogue between visual art and poetry the hallmark of his work and career. His reviews have appeared in Artforum, Art in America, Art News, Bookforum, and the Los Angeles Times. He was the former arts editor for the Brooklyn Rail and in 2012, he helped start the online magazine Hyperallergic Weekend.

Co-sponsored by the UAlbany Department of Art and Art History and NYS Writers Institute.


Artist Talk and Screening with Photographer and Video Artist Sara Cwynar
Tuesday, November 14, 7:00 pm

Brooklyn-based artist Sara Cwynar’s photographs and videos explore the cross-histories and residual power of everyday objects and images. Her most recent film Rose Gold (2017) is a research-oriented meditation on the emotional impact of color. Focusing on Apple’s Rose Gold iPhone, Cywnar tracks how the phone acts as a talisman of desire for objects, people, power, and money and how features such as touch and 3D resonate directly with the user’s emotions and imagination.

Co-sponsored by UAlbany Department of Art and Art History. Made possible in part with public funds from The NYS Council on the Arts’ Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.


The Creative Life, Lois Lowry, acclaimed children’s author
Friday, November 10, 7:00 pm
Page Hall, UAlbany’s Downtown campus

A prominent voice in children’s literature, Lois Lowry is known for books that explore such complex issues as racism, terminal illness, murder and the Holocaust. She received the Newbery Medal for both The Giver (1993), about a futuristic utopian world, and Number the Stars (1989), a historical novel set in Nazi-occupied Denmark. The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the American Library Association to the author making “the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” Number the Stars also received the National Jewish Book Award for Children's Literature.

Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center, and University Art Museum.


Exhibition Tours with Dr. Robert R. Shane
Saturday, October 21, 11 am and 1 pm

Join art historian Dr. Robert R. Shane for an in depth discussion of the artists on view in the exhibition When We Were Young: Rethinking Abstraction from the University at Albany Art Collections (1967-present). Dr. Shane is Associate Professor of Art History at the College of Saint Rose, and a contributing essayist to the exhibition.


UAM 50th Anniversary and Homecoming Welcome Reception

Friday, October 20, 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Free and open to the public.

Co-sponsored by UAlbany Alumni Association. Celebrate the Museum’s 50th anniversary and the opening of When We Were Young: Rethinking Abstraction from the University at Albany Art Collections (1967-present) with students, faculty, exhibiting artists, alumni, and special guests.


Art Lab with Christine Snyder (MFA ’16)
Saturday, 1:00 – 3:00 pm
October 14, October 28, November 18, December 2

Rethink abstraction with teaching artist Christine Snyder in a series of four hands-on, interactive art projects, each inspired by an artist in When We Were Young. Participants will receive a hand out with information on the inspiring artists: Chryssa, Gene Davis, Luis Molinari-Flores, and Marietta Hoferer. Art Labs are free, appropriate for all ages, open to students, the public, artists, and non-artists. All supplies will be provided. The labs are as follows:

October 14 – Cut Paper Collage (highlighted artist: Chryssa)
October 28 – Tape Art (highlighted artist: Gene Davis)
November 18 – Coloring Book (highlighted artist: Luis Molinari-Flores)
December 2 – Paint an Ornament (highlighted artist: Marietta Hoferer)

Supported by the Jack and Gertrude Horan Memorial Endowment Fund for student outreach.

Funding for the When We Were Young: Rethinking Abstraction from the University at Albany Art Collections (1967–present) exhibitions and publications is provided by UAlbany’s Office of the President and Office of the Provost, The University at Albany Foundation, University Art Museum Endowed Director’s Fund, and University Auxiliary Services.


Sara Greenberger Rafferty and Cameron Martin Artists’ Gallery Walk Through
Friday, June 30, 4:15 pm

Please join us for an informal gallery walk through followed by a Q+A. This event is free and open to the public.


Artists’ Reception
Sara Greenberger Rafferty:Gloves Off
Cameron Martin: Abstracts

Friday, June 30, 5 – 7 pm

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Art History. Made possible in part with public funds from The NYS Council on the Arts’ Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.


The Creative Life, David Salle, internationally renowned painter

Thursday, March 23, 7:00 pm
Recital Hall, Performing Arts Center

WAMC’s "Roundtable" host Joe Donahue will lead a conversation with Salle on his new book, How to See: Looking, Talking, and Thinking About Art (2016).

Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center, and University Art Museum.


Dave McKenzie Artist Talk and Video Screening

Tuesday, February 14, 4:30 pm
Boor Sculpture Studio

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Art History. Made possible in part with public funds from The NYS Council on the Arts’ Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.


 

Gerard & Kelly Lecture: In Time and Out of Sync

Wednesday, February 3, 7 pm
University Art Museum

In this performative lecture, the artists discuss recent projects and their engagement with legacies of feminism and queer theory in making time-based work.


Gerard & Kelly Workshop:Witness the Process

Thursday, February 4, 9 am - noon
University Art Museum

Observers are welcome to watch the artists as they conduct a workshop in which the score for their performance installation, Reusable Parts/Endless Love (2011), is transmitted to UAlbany students.


Gerard & Kelly Performance:Reusable Parts/Endless Love

Friday, February 12, 7 pm & 8:15 pm
Performing Arts Center

Advance Tickets: $15 general public $10 students, seniors & faculty-staff
Day of Show Tickets: $20 general public $15 students, seniors & faculty-staff
For advance tickets, call the Box Office at 518-442-3997.

In this score-based, thought-provoking performance installation originally commissioned by Danspace Project at St. Mark's Church, the performers transmit and transform the instructions for a kiss into a machine-like production of unscripted representations of intimacy. Doing away with fixed seating, the artists place the audience in a “catch-as-catch-can” interactive experience inviting them to roam freely to watch the action or stay out of its way.


Poets Randall Horton and Jacqueline Jones LaMon Seminar

Tuesday, February 16, 4:15 pm
Standish Room, Science Library

Poets Randall Horton and Jacqueline Jones LaMon Reading
Tuesday, February 16, 7:00 pm
University Art Museum

Randall Horton, author of the poetry collections Pitch Dark Anarchy (2013) and The Definition of Place (2006), is the recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award and the Bea González Poetry Prize. His memoir, Hook (2015), explores his downward spiral from student to drug addict, cocaine smuggler, and incarcerated felon. Upon release from prison Horton earned a Ph.D. in English at UAlbany.

Jacqueline Jones LaMon is the author of the poetry collections Last Seen (2011), winner of the Felix Pollak Poetry Prize, and Gravity, U.S.A. (2006), winner of the Quercus Review Poetry Series Award. She is the new president of Cave Canem, America’s leading Black poetry organization, committed to cultivating the artistic and professional growth of Black poets.

Co-sponsored by New York State Writers Institute in connection with the exhibition Race, Love, and Labor on view at the University Art Museum through April 2, 2016.


David Shapiro Seminar
Informal discussion with Missing People director David Shapiro
Friday, February 26, 4:15 pm
University Art Museum

David Shapiro’s Documentary Missing People Screening
Missing People film screening followed by commentary and Q&A with director David Shapiro

Friday, February 26, 7 pm
Page Hall, 135 Western Avenue, Downtown Campus

Missing People directed by David Shapiro (United States, 2015, 76 minutes, color), is a nonfiction mystery about a woman who investigates her brother’s long unsolved murder. In the process she collects and researches the violent work and life of an artist from New Orleans. The film won the Best Documentary Award at the Hamptons International Film Festival. David Shapiro, filmmaker, artist, and UAlbany alum ’85, directed the acclaimed 2000 documentary Keep the River on Your Right: A Modern Cannibal Tale, winner of many major film festival awards.

Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute in connection with the exhibition Race, Love, and Labor, and the School of Criminal Justice’s Crime, Justice, and Social Structure Film Series.


1st Tuesday at the Museum Student Event
Tuesday, May 3, 5 – 8 pm


Artist Talk: Exhibiting artist Colin C. Boyd (MFA ’08)
Museum Student Event

Tuesday, September 6, 7 pm
University Art Museum

As part of the exhibition Future Perfect, Boyd created a fully functional studio in the museum where he is shooting a stop-motion animation that presents an imagined post-human Earth.

Colin Boyd’s selected group exhibitions include Howdy-Doody, Collar Works, Troy, NY; Abecedarius 26+1 Works by Colin C. Boyd and Michael Oatman, The Arts Center of the Capital Region, Troy, NY; Big and Bold: Contemporary Paintings, Collage and Sculpture from the Collection, the Albany Institute of History & Art, Albany, NY; An Armory Show, Opalka Gallery, Sage College of Albany, Albany, NY; Curiosities, MASS MoCA Kidspace, North Adams, MA. His site specific installation Cormorants and the Whale is on view at the Albany International Airport.


TEDxSchenectady 2016: The Future is NOW

Saturday, September 10, 12- 4 pm
Schenectady County Public Library
99 Clinton St, Schenectady

Future Perfect co-curator Danny Goodwin will look beneath the chaos of our day-to-day lives and envision a fragile, complicated place where visual art helps us unravel and accept the reality of a world that we simultaneously inhabit and create. So, if artists are informed by their culture (they are) and if art also shapes culture (it does), and if ours is a civilization in decline (it is), what does the art of today’s world tell us about ourselves? Goodwin will discuss the work of a select group of contemporary artists who are providing possible answers.

Danny Goodwin’s photographic, video and installation work has been seen in solo and group exhibitions at Jack the Pelican Presents, Art Resources Transfer, Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Momenta Art, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art, NYC; the California Museum of Photography in Riverside, CA; Washington Project for the Arts in Washington, D. C.; Penn State, Altoona, PA; Cartel Gallery, London; and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Goodwin is a 2005 Artists' Fellowship recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA). He is Associate Professor and Director of Photography and Related Media in the Department of Art and Art History at the University at Albany.


The Creative Life: A Conversation Series at UAlbany - Joyce Carol Oates
Thursday, September 15, 7:30 pm
UAlbany Performing Arts Center

Novelist, poet & essayist, Pulitzer Prize finalist, New York Times best-selling author

Created and produced by the University Art Museum, NYS Writers Institute and UAlbany Performing Arts Center in collaboration with WAMC Public Radio, this new series features leading figures from a variety of artistic disciplines in conversation about their creative inspirations, their craft and their careers. “Roundtable” host Joe Donahue conducts live on-stage interviews followed by a Q&A with the audience.


Artists’ Reception:Future Perfect: Picturing the Anthropocene
Friday, September 16, 5-7 pm
University Art Museum

Please join us for an artists' reception to celebrate the University Art Museum's exhibition, Future Perfect: Picturing the Anthropocene. Wine and refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public.


Career Talk: Eban Goodstein, Director Bard Center for Environmental Policy and Director, Bard MBA in Sustainability
How to Get a Job Saving the Planet: Sustainability Leadership Careers in NGO’s, Business and Policy
Tuesday, September 20, 3pm
University Art Museum

The good news for young people looking for careers is that saving the planet is a growth field. Goodstein will discuss how to get from college to a sustainability career in four steps.

Lecture: Eban Goodstein, Director Bard Center for Environmental Policy and Director, Bard MBA in Sustainability

 

Republicans, Democrats and Sustainability: Recovering Bipartisan Environmental Politics
Tuesday, September 20, 7pm
University Art Museum

Dr. Eban Goodstein is Director of Bard Center for Environmental Policy, and Bard’s MBA in Sustainability. Goodstein also directs the C2C Fellows network at Bard CEP, focused on helping undergraduates and recent graduates develop leadership careers in policy, business and NGO’s. He has coordinated climate education events at over 2,500 colleges, universities, high schools and other institutions across the country. Goodstein is the author of numerous articles, a college textbook, Economics and the Environment as well as Fighting for Love in the Century of Extinction: How Passion (2007) and Politics Can Stop Global Warming and The Trade-off Myth: Fact and Fiction about Jobs and the Environment (1999).

Co-sponsored by the UAlbany Office of Environmental Sustainability.


Artist talk: essayist and blogger Jennifer Kabat

Tuesday, September 27, 7pm
University Art Museum
From the Hudson River School to drones, Kabat’s talk is a meditation on travel, writing, and the search for meaning in contemporary art and American culture.

A recent finalist for Notting Hill Editions’ Essay Prize, Jennifer Kabat, is working on a book of linked essays, Growing Up Modern, which explores ideology and the landscape from the modernist suburb where she grew up to where she lives now, in the Catskill Mountains. Harper’s, The White Review, and Los Angeles Review of Books are all publishing selections from the book. Kabat, who teaches at New York University, has been awarded a Creative Capital/Warhol Foundation arts writers grant for her criticism.


Brown Bag Talk: Mary Ellen Mallia, Director of Environmental Sustainability
Ten easy ways to reduce your environmental impact

Thursday, September 29, noon – 12:45
University Art Museum

With the advent of the Anthropocene, thinking intentionally about our choices and their impact on the environment is more critical than ever. This presentation will provide participants with a myriad of ways they can lessen their environmental impact.

Mary Ellen Mallia is the Director of Sustainability at the University at Albany. Her office is in charge of coordinating sustainability activities related to curriculum, operations, research and engagement. Mary Ellen received her B.S. in Economics from Siena College, her M.A. in Education from the University at Albany, and her Ph.D. in Ecological Economics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Since becoming director in January of 2008, Mary Ellen has helped develop robust educational and engagement activities to complement the campus’ sustainable operation initiatives. Currently she serves on the steering committees of the New York Coalition for Sustainability in Higher Education (NYCSHE) and the Farm to Institution New York State (FINYS) group.


Discussion: Breathing Lights with Adam Frelin, Barbara Nelson, Judie Gilmore
Tuesday, October 4, 7pm
University Art Museum

The Breathing Lights project was awarded a $1 million Public Art Challenge grant through Bloomberg Philanthropies to realize a multi-city, temporary public art installation that involves illuminating hundreds of vacant buildings in Troy, Albany and Schenectady. Buildings will be lighted from the inside, implying, through an intermittent glow in front windows, that these structures can be reclaimed to become homes once again. The installation is meant to engender discussion among neighbors, governments and institutions about solutions to urban blight.

Artist Adam Frelin works in sculpture, video, photography and performance and has shown widely at venues including as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA; Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA; Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT; and the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, St. Louis, MO. He has received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts, and the College Art Association. Frelin is Associate Professor of Art at University at Albany.

Barbara Nelson, architect and long-time Troy resident, has a strong belief that community design and public art can be catalysts to better disadvantaged communities and neighborhoods. In October Nelson became executive director of TAP Inc., the Capital Region’s Community Design Center which was founded in 1969. TAP’s portfolio is focused on urban revitalization, architectural preservation, sustainability, fair housing and removal of architectural barriers. For 24 years she served as architect and planner in the Campus Planning and Facilities Design office at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. For six of those years she taught courses as an adjunct in the School of Architecture.

Judie Gilmore is an independent arts consultant, curator, and writer who works with creative organizations and individuals on public projects, site-specific installations, and project and organizational development. She is currently the Project Director for Breathing Lights. Previously, Gilmore served as the Director of Strategic Initiatives at the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program where she developed large-scale public art initiatives that focused on neighborhood economic development, behavioral health, workforce development and prisoner re-entry.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Art History and UAlbany Office of Environmental Sustainability.

 

 

Exhibition Tour and Gallery Talk
Saturday, October 8, 11am and 1pm
University Art Museum

Janet Riker, Museum Director and co-curator of the exhibition will conduct an informal talk and tour of Future Perfect.

Janet Riker is Director of the University at Albany Art Museum. Prior to moving the Capital Region in 2004, she was Director of the Rotunda Gallery (Brooklyn Information and Culture) in Brooklyn and previously served as Director of the Queensborough Community College Art Gallery, Bayside, NY, and Assistant Curator at the Drawing Center in NYC. She has organized dozens of group exhibitions of contemporary visual arts, served on selection panels, public commissioning bodies, and lectured widely on contemporary art and artists’ issues. In 2004 Riker received the Betty Smith Arts Award and was cited by the New York City Council for her contribution to the arts in Brooklyn; in 2016 she received the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award and the UAlbany President’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service.


The Creative Life: A Conversation Series at UAlbany - Savion Glover
Saturday, October 15, 1 pm
Page Hall on the downtown campus
Dancer, choreographer & hoofer, Tony Award nominee & winner, Broadway, television & film star

Created and produced by the University Art Museum, NYS Writers Institute and UAlbany Performing Arts Center in collaboration with WAMC Public Radio, this new series features leading figures from a variety of artistic disciplines in conversation about their creative inspirations, their craft and their careers. “Roundtable” host Joe Donahue conducts live on-stage interviews followed by a Q&A with the audience.


Artist Talk: Exhibition artist Tommy Hartung
Tuesday, October 18, 7 pm
University Art Museum

In his film THE BIBLE, Tommy Hartung brings the Old Testament into conversation with current events through a combination of stop-action animation, found footage, fictive news bulletins, and hand-made sets. Join Hartung for an informal discussion of his work and current projects.

Hartung’s solo exhibitions include SOLO*MAN, Rose Museum, Waltham, MA; Tommy Hartung: THE BIBLE, Bonnefanten Museum, Maastricht, The Netherlands; MA Hammer Projects: This Is the End, Hammer Museum, UCLA, Los Angeles; THE BIBLE, On Stellar Rays, NYC; Tommy Hartung, Braverman Gallery, Tel Aviv; White Flag Projects, St. Louis, MO; and MoMA PS1, Long Island City, NY. Selected group exhibitions include Unorthodox, Jewish Museum in NYC; Contagious Living, Fahrenheit, Los Angeles; the International Film Festival Rotterdam; Black Cake, Team Gallery, NYC; and Ground Control to Major Tom, Cookie Butcher, Antwerp. Hartung received the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors grant.

Made possible in part with public funds from The NYS Council on the Arts’ Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.


New York Campus Crunch and Farmer's Market
Thursday, October 20, 11 am – 2 pm
Small Fountain

The New York Campus Crunch is a state-wide celebration of local food on college campuses. Students, staff, and faculty from across New York will crunch into an apple at 12:00pm to affirm their commitment to food that is healthy for people and the planet. We will be joining the Big Apple Crunch effort , hosted by GrowNYC, Food Day and the Mayor’s Food Policy Office and American Farmland Trust in an attempt to set the world record for the “Most Participants in an Apple-Crunching Event” at 1 million crunches. We want it to be the crunch heard‘round the world!

Sponsored by UAlbany Office of Sustainability.


Film Screening: Snowpiercer with commentary by screenwriter Kelly Masterson
Friday, October 21, 7 pm
Page Hall, 135 Western Avenue, Downtown Campus

Directed by Bong Joon-ho (South Korea/Czech Republic/United States/France, 2013, 126 minutes, color & b/w); starring Chris Evans, Ed Harris, John Hurt, Song Kang-ho, Tilda Swinton

Based on the French graphic novel, Le Transperceneige, Snowpiercer is widely hailed as a classic of the new climate fiction genre (“cli-fi”). Survivors of a future Ice Age live out their lives on a train as it travels in a continuous loop around the globe. USA Today called it, “a rare hybrid that perfectly blends the dazzle of a futuristic action thriller with the intellectual substance of an art film.” Nominated for 94 film awards, it received a total of 19.

Kelly Masterson, screenwriter of Snowpiercer, also wrote the screenplays Before The Devil Knows You’re Dead (2007), Good People (2014), starring James Franco, and Killing Kennedy (2013), starring Rob Lowe.

Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute.


Conversation: Noa Wertheim, co-founder, Vertigo Dance Company and Mary Ellen Malia, Director, UAlbany Environmental Sustainability
Tuesday, October 25, 7 pm
University Art Museum

Vertigo has won international acclaim for its community-centered and environmentally conscious approach to dance. At the Vertigo Eco-Art Village, located midway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, Wertheim combines artistic expression, social responsibility and sustainability. In addition to being home to Vertigo Dance Company, Eco-Art Village hosts workshops in art and practical ecology, an artists-in-residence program for local and international artists, performances, and outreach programs for various groups, including special needs.

Co-sponsored by the Performing Arts Center.


Performance: Vertigo Dance Company
Wednesday, October 26, 7:30 pm
Performing Arts Center

Internationally celebrated not only for their artistic innovation but also for their unwavering commitment to the intersections of creativity, social responsibility and ecological sustainability, this contemporary dance company from Israel presents Vertigo 20 by weaving together twenty years of the company's creations from its inception.

For ticket prices and reservations: www.albany.edu/pac or call the box office 518-442-3997.

Co-sponsored by the Performing Arts Center.


Brown Bag Talk: Eleanor Stein, Adjunct, University at Albany and Albany Law School

CLIMATE CHANGE & HUMAN RIGHTS: Treaties and courts are beginning to recognize a human right to a livable climate: why has it taken so long, and what will this mean?
Thursday, October 27, noon – 12:45 pm
University Art Museum

CLIMATE CHANGE & HUMAN RIGHTS: Treaties and courts are beginning to recognize a human right to a livable climate: why has it taken so long, and what will this mean?

Eleanor Stein served as an Administrative Law Judge at the New York State Public Service Commission from 1994-2014; until November 2015 she was Project Manager for the Commission’s Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) initiative for a more customer-centered, renewable, and distributed energy future. In 2015 she received a Master of Laws degree with distinction in climate change law and policy from the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow. She teaches Law of Climate Change: Domestic & Transnational at Albany Law School and the Power Dialog at the University at Albany. Her areas of interest include public policy dispute resolution, mobilizing public participation in energy matters, and climate justice. She is on the Board of EcoViva, a US-based project in solidarity with climate adaptation and sustainability in rural El Salvador. She is an expert with America’s Power Plan.


Artist’s Talk: JoAnne Carson

Tuesday, November 1, 7 pm
University Art Museum

UAlbany Professor of Art and participating artist JoAnne Carson, will discuss her work, as well as ideas that have emerged through her re-curation of works from the UAlbany Fine Arts Collection included in Future Perfect.

JoAnne Carson’s sculptures, paintings, and drawings have been shown in solo and two-person exhibitions at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; and Claire Oliver Gallery, Joan Washburn Gallery, Ruth Siegel Gallery, and Plus Ultra Gallery, all in NYC. Group exhibitions include the American Academy of Arts and Letters Ceremonial Exhibition; the Whitney Biennial; the New Orleans Museum Frederick Weisman Collection; the Albright Knox Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia's Awards in the Visual Arts; and the Fleming Museum, Burlington, VT. Carson has received a Guggenheim fellowship, the Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome, a Purchase Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Awards in the Visual Arts.


Brown Bag Talk: Beth Feingold, Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, UAlbany, School of Public Health

Thursday, November 3, noon – 12:45 pm
University Art Museum
Public Health in the Anthropocene
What might the unique challenges be to safeguarding environmental public health in the Anthropocene?

Dr. Feingold's research interests are in the use of geospatial methods to understand the link between landscapes and health, with particular interest in issues related to industrial food animal production, climate and health, population-health-environment interactions, land use change, environmental justice, and urban environmental health.


Performance: Ethel/ Documerica

Thursday, November 3, 7:30 pm
Performing Arts Center

This wildly popular post-modern, indie-classical quartet presents a multimedia concert melding multiple screen video projections with original music by some of today’s top composers. Juxtaposing vintage 1970s photographs from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Project Documerica, the program explores a compelling snapshot of a tumultuous era that powerfully connects to today’s ecological and social issues.

For ticket prices and reservations: www.albany.edu/pac or call the box office 518-442-3997.

Co-sponsored by the Performing Arts Center.


Reading/Discussion: Jeff Goodell, journalist and nonfiction writer, and Jennifer Haigh, fiction writer

Thursday, November 10, 7 pm
University Art Museum

Jeff Goodell is a contributing editor for Rolling Stone and a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine. He is the author of Big Coal: The Dirty Secret Behind America’s Energy Future (2006), a look at the economic, environmental, and social issues surrounding the coal industry. He is also the author of How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth’s Climate (2010), winner of the Grantham Prize (Award of Special Merit). In a starred review Booklist called it, “…a lively and invaluable introduction of the simultaneously alarming and promising field of geoengineering.” His forthcoming book, due out in 2017, is The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World.

Jennifer Haigh is the author of four critically acclaimed novels: Mrs. Kimble (2003), which received the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award for distinguished first book of fiction; Baker Towers (2005), The Condition (2008), and Faith (2011). In her new novel Heat and Light (2016), Haigh explores the allure of fracking for the residents of a ravaged coal town. The Washington Post called it “the best fracking novel ever…. a tour-de-force of multiple point-of-view narration.”

Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute.


Artists Talk: Exhibiting artist Letha Wilson

Tuesday, November 15, 4:30 pm
University Art Museum

Wilson’s solo and two-person exhibitions include Look with Your Hands at Grimm Gallery in Amsterdam; Terra Firma at Brand New Gallery in Milan; Letha Wilson at Galerie Christophe Gaillard in Paris; and Monuments and Landmarks, Art in General, NYC. Selected group exhibitions include Weird Science, Marianne Boesky Gallery in NYC; What Is a Photograph?, International Center of Photography, NYC; Implicit Horizon, Mixed Greens, NYC; Video A: Miguel Soares and Letha Wilson, Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT; Waste Not, Want Not, Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, NY; Paradise Lost, Frederieke Taylor Gallery, NYC; and AIM 24, Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, NY. Wilson received a New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship (Deutsche Bank Fellow) in Photography in 2013.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art and Art History.


Brown Bag Talk: Vesna Kuiken, Visiting Assistant Professor, English Department

Thursday, November 17, noon–12:45 pm
University Art Museum

The Intimate Narration of Shell-Heaps: Jewett and the Native Americans

The talk focuses on the figure of shell-heaps (“kitchen middens”) in Sarah Orne Jewett’s nineteenth-century novel The Country of the Pointed Firs, and the relationships between geology, history, and the extermination of Native Americans.

Vesna Kuiken is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the English Department at SUNY-Albany. She received her PhD in American Literature from Columbia University, and is currently working on a book manuscript entitled Composite Environments: Nature and the Politics of Remedy in American Literature – an interdisciplinary work that charts the relationship between literature, ecological preoccupations, medical practices, and biological science in nineteenth-century Americas. Her essays appeared in the collection American Impersonal: Essays with Sharon Cameron, J19, and The Nineteenth-Century Prose.


Ecopoetics Today: A Reading and Discussion with Evelyn Reilly and James Sherry Moderator, Michael Leong, Assistant Professor, Department of English

Tuesday, November 29, 7:00pm
University Art Museum

Evelyn Reilly has written three books that attempt to manifest a poetics of the Anthropocene: Styrofoam (2009) and Apocalypso (2012), both published by Roof Books, and Self, portions of which have appeared in Pallaksch and are soon to appear in Big Energy Poets of the Anthropocene, edited by Heidi Lynn Staples and Amy King. Her poetry has been published in many journals and anthologies, including The Arcadia Project: Postmodernism and the PastoralThe & NOW Awards 2: The Best Innovative WritingIn|Filtration: A Hudson Valley Salt Line; and will be included in the forthcoming Earth Bound: Compass Points for an Ecopoetics, edited by Jonathan Skinner.

James Sherry is the author of 12 books of poetry and prose. He has been writing about language and environment since the late 1980s, publishing Our Nuclear Heritage (1991) and Oops! Environmental Poetics (2014) in an effort to link humanity and nature as a single complex entity. His latest book, Entangled Bank (2016), is a series of poems emerging from Darwinian language and structures. Sherry is the publisher of Roof Books and started the Segue Foundation in 1977 in New York City.

 


Brown Bag Talk: Jill Schneiderman, Professor of Earth Science, Vassar College The Plastician Age of the Anthropocene Epoch

Jill Schneiderman will discuss her research on microplastics in Cape Cod sand dunes particularly as it relates to debates about divisions of geologic time in the 19th century and today.

Thursday, December 1, noon – 12:45 pm
University Art Museum

Jill S. Schneiderman is professor of earth science at Vassar College where she teaches earth science, including a writing seminar on the Anthropocene, and feminist science studies. As a Fulbright Scholar at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad she examined the relationship between gender and water issues on the island. She is the editor of and contributor to four books: Liberation Science: Putting Science to Work for Social and Environmental Justice ( 2013), For the Rock Record: Geologists on Intelligent Design (2009), Exploring Environmental Science with GIS (2005), and The Earth Around Us: Maintaining a Livable Planet (2003).


Lecture: Radley Horton, Associate Research Scientist at the Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University, affiliated with NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

Radley Horton will discuss climate change, heat waves, and the impacts on health to residents of New York City, the Northeast, and the US.

Tuesday, December 6, 4 – 5 pm
University Art Museum

Radley Horton is an Associate Research Scientist at the Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University, affiliated with NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. He was a Convening Lead Author for the Third National Climate Assessment, Northeast Chapter and the Lead Principal Investigator for the NOAA-Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments-funded Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast. Horton is also the Columbia University lead for the Department of Interior-funded Northeast Climate Science Center. Radley is a PI on an NSF funded Climate Change Education Partnership Project. He is also Deputy Lead for NASA’s Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group, charged with linking NASA’s science to its institutional stewardship. Radley has been a Co-leader in the development of a global research agenda in support of the United Nations Environmental Program’s Programme on Vulnerability, Impacts, and Adaptation (PROVIA) initiative. Radley teaches in Columbia University’s Sustainable Development department.

A joint project of the Dept of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, UAlbany and Wadsworth Center, NYSDOH. Co-sponsored by the UAlbany Institute for Climate and Health.


Brown Bag Talk: Mathias Vuille, Associate professor, Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences

The Andes without snow and ice – climate adaptation in the Anthropocene era.

Climate change is leading to rapid loss of snow and ice in the Andes with significant consequences for water resources and human life. The presentation will highlight some of our ongoing efforts to advance adaptation toward a sustainable future in this unique mountain environment.

Thursday, December 8, noon – 12:45 pm
University Art Museum

Mathias Vuille is an Associate Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences at the University at Albany, State University of New York. He received his PhD from the University of Bern in Switzerland and then worked at the University of Massachusetts for 12 years before joining the University at Albany in 2008. He is a climate scientist who works on glacier retreat and climate change adaptation in the tropical Andes. He has worked on and led adaptation projects in the Andes on behalf of UNESCO, the US State Department, the Interamerican Development Bank and the World Bank.


2015


Wednesday, February 25, 7 pm
Lecture by exhibiting artist Anna Craycroft
University Art Museum

Craycroft will discuss her project, The Agency of the Orphan, 2006-present, an intimate collection of archives and observations that calls into question why the archetypal orphan portrayed in books and movies has such a hold on the public imagination.


Show & Tell
Wednesday, July 29, 7 pm

Artists from the 2015 Mohawk Hudson Region share their influences in an unconventional format. Expect the unexpected! Gregor Wynnyczuk, Master of Ceremonies


1st Tuesday at the Museum Student Event
Tuesday, October 6, 5 – 8 pm


Artist's Reception and Homecoming Welcome Wine Tasting Event

Friday, October 9, 5 - 7 pm


Exhibition Tours
Saturday, October 10, 11 am and 1 pm


1st Tuesday at the Museum Student Event
Tuesday, November 3, 5 – 8 pm


Picturing the Anthropocene: A Conversation
Presenters: Danny Goodwin, Christopher Pastore, Mary Valentis, Mathias Vuille
Monday, November 16, 7 pm
Boor Sculpture Studio


Gallery Walk Through with exhibiting artist Brian Tolle '86
Tuesday, November 17 at noon


Lecture by Alexander Ross
Monday, November 23, 4:30 pm
Boor Sculpture Studio


1st Tuesday at the Museum Student Event
Tuesday, December 1, 5 – 8 pm


2014


Tuesday, October 7, 7 pm
Artist Talk by Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley
featuring the U.S. debut screening of Swinburne’s Pasiphae

Exhibiting artist Mary Reid Kelley and collaborator Patrick Kelley will present an artist talk on Tuesday, October 7 at 7 pm in the museum that is free and open to the public. This is part of a 2-day artists’ residency on campus that will also include informal class visits and exhibition tours with the artists and studio visits with M.F.A. candidates in the Fine Arts Department.

Supported by University Auxiliary Services, the Ellsworth Kelly Foundation, and public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts' Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes


The University at Albany Foundation presents
Looking at Lemon: Transforming Life through Literature
in conjunction with the Performing Arts Center, NYS Writers Institute, and University Art Museum.

This series of events is focused on the life and work of Lemon Andersen, writer, performance artist, screen actor and Tony Award-winning poet. Lemon is also a three-time felon who grew up in Brooklyn, the child of a Puerto Rican mother and Norwegian American father, both heroin addicts who died of AIDS before he was fifteen, leaving Lemon an orphaned teenager fending for himself.  A high school drop-out who spent years in jail and on probation, Lemon’s attempts at rehabilitation faltered until he attended a poetry reading and found a sense of purpose in the art of words. 



Lemon: The Movie
Friday, October 24 at 7:30 PM – Page Hall (downtown campus), New York State Writers Film Series
Saturday, November 1 at 9 PM – Performing Arts Center, Campus Programming Board Film Series
Free admission

This intricately crafted documentary traces Lemon's struggle to free his family from poverty and pain by embarking on a harrowing journey to bring his life story to the stage. It follows his desperate battle to keep the past where it belongs and move into a brighter future. Redemption may lie within Lemon's grasp when none other than Spike Lee steps in to produce his show. The stakes are high. With the power of a cliffhanger, the film asks the larger question: Can any of us really escape the past? Produced by Laura Brownson and Beth Levison of Dandelion Films, the movie features the music of hip-hop phenoms Mos Def, Talib Kweli and Aloe Blacc.


Thursday, November 6, 7 PM
An Evening with Lemon Andersen
University Art Museum

In an intimate and informal setting, Lemon addresses the audience about his life and work, focusing on what nurtures him as an artist and how that has been the salvation in his life.

An original cast member of the Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam on Broadway (2002-2003), Lemon Andersen shared the 2003 Tony Award for Best Special Theatrical Event. A veteran of major spoken word performance venues, including the Nuyorican Poets Café and the Apollo Theater, Lemon is also the author of two poetry collections, Ready Made Real (2004) and County of Kings (2009), which earned the Grand Prize at the 2010 New York Book Festival. As an actor, he has appeared in four films directed by Spike Lee, including Sucker Free City (2004), She Hate Me (2004), Inside Man (2006), and Miracle at St. Anna (2008).  Lemon also appeared in The Soloist (2009) starring Robert Downey, Jr. and Jamie Foxx. 

Copies of his book County of Kings will be available for purchase and signing


      County of Kings by Lemon Andersen
      Thursday, November 13 at 7:30 PM with a pre-show discussion beginning at 7 PM – Performing Arts Center
      Advance Tickets: $15 general public / $10 students, seniors & faculty-staff
      Day of Show Tickets: $20 general public / $15 students, seniors & faculty-staff

      Originally developed and directed by Elise Thoron, American Place Theatre took Lemon’s life story and adapted it into a solo play now performed by Michael Angel Viera. Weaving hard-edged drama with urban poetry and gritty prose, the work follows Lemon’s coming-of-age memoir of the same name touching on young love, the birth of hip hop, slinging crack, ballet, stealing car parts, prison and poetry in an astonishing journey toward self-discovery.  County of Kings is a Literature to Life stage presentation of Young Audiences New York.

      Additional support provided by the Alumni Association, Office of Intercultural Student Engagement, University Auxiliary Services, Diversity Transformation Fund administered through the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and Holiday Inn Express. Promotional assistance provided by the Campus Programming Board


      Tuesday, November 11, 7:30 pm
      Reading by Angela Pneuman from her new novel Lay it on my Heartand Amy Biancolli author of Figuring Sh!t Out: Love, Laughter, Suicide, and Survival
      Art Museum, Fine Arts Building

      Angela Pneuman, former Ph.D. student and Presidential Fellow at UAlbany and Kentucky native, is widely hailed as an exciting new voice in Southern literature. Her first novel, Lay it on my Heart (2014), recounts the challenges that confront a Kentucky girl after her “prophet” father is committed to a psychiatric hospital. Rebecca Wells, author of the bestselling Ya-Ya Sisterhood novels, said, “I know the voices of Southern girls, and when they sing true, my heart expands. Angela Pneuman is a flute.” A former Stegner Fellow at Stanford, Pneuman is also the author of the story collection, Home Remedies (2007).

      Amy Biancolli, Arts writer and columnist for the Albany Times Union, author of House of Holy Fools: A Family Portrait in Six Cracked Parts (2004), which earned her Albany Author of the Year, reads from her memoir Figuring Sh!t Out: Love, Laughter, Suicide, and Survival (2014)

      Cosponsored by the New York State Writers Institute and UAlbany’s English Department


          2013


          Thursday, February 28 12-12:45 pm
          Employee Assistance Program (EAP) "Art Break" Tour
          University Art Museum

          Join Museum Director Janet Riker and UAlbany Creative Writing Instructor Brian Phillip Whalen for a brief tour of the museum exhibition Day After Day: The Diaristic Impulse followed by an informal conversation about diaries, journals, and the urge to chronicle one’s life whether through Facebook and Twitter posts or as a springboard for serious writing.  Mr. Whalen is a PhD candidate, who writes both poetry and prose; he is currently working on a collection of short stories.

          Employee Assistance Program-sponsored events are open to UAlbany and Research Foundation faculty, staff, family members, UAS employees, GSEU members and retirees. To RSVP email:[email protected] or call 442-5483

           


          Tuesday, March 5, 7 pm
          Reading by fiction writers Scott Hutchins and Edward Schwarzschild. Edward Schwarzschild's short story will appear in the Day After Day exhibition catalogue.
          University Art Museum

          Edward Schwarzschild teaches writing and literature in UAlbany's Department of English and holds a joint appointment as a fellow at the New York State Writers Institute. He was selected as a Fulbright Teaching Fellow, teaching courses in contemporary literature and American writing and visual arts in Zaragoza, Spain. Schwarzschild is the author of the novel, Responsible Men, named a "Best Book of the Year" by The San Francisco Chronicle and a finalist for the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His latest book, The Family Diamond, is a collection of stories about family, love, and loss, set in and around Philadelphia. 

          Scott Hutchins is a former Truman Capote fellow in the Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford University. His work has appeared inStoryQuarterlyFive Chapters, The Owls, The Rumpus, The New York Times, San Francisco Magazine and Esquire, and was recently set to music.  He is the recipient of two major Hopwood awards and the Andrea Beauchamp prize in short fiction.  In 2006 and 2010, he was an artist-in-residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. His novel A Working Theory of Love was published in October 2012 by the Penguin Press.


           


          2012


          Monday, March 26
          7:00 pm
          Lecture by Bob Nickas, author, curator, and critic
          University Art Museum

          Bob Nickas is an independent critic and curator based in New York. He has organized more than eighty exhibitions since 1984, and served as curatorial adviser at PS1 Contemporary Art Center in New York from 2004 to 2007. Among his exhibitions at PS1 are Lee Lozano: Drawn From Life—1961–1971William Gedney—Christopher Wool: Into the Night; Stephen Shore: American Surfaces; Wolfgang Tillmans: Freedom from the Known; and The Painted World. He collaborated with Cady Noland on her installation for Documenta IX in 1992; contributed a section to Aperto at the 1993 Venice Biennale; and served on the curatorial teams that organized the 2003 Biennale de Lyon in Lyon, France and Greater New York 2005 at PS1/MoMA in New York. His books include Painting Abstraction: New Elements In Abstract Painting (Phaidon, 2009) and Catalogue of the Exhibition (2nd Cannons Publications, 2011), a retrospective survey of his shows.

          Co-sponsored by New York State Writers Institute. Supported by University Auxiliary Services.


          Tuesday, March 20
          7:00 pm
          Lecture by Judith Braun, artist
          University Art Museum

          Judith Braun has been involved in the New York art world since the early 1980s. Her career began and flourished in organizations such as Art in General, Artists Space, The Drawing Center, NurtureArt, and White Columns. She finished her M.F.A. degree at the University of at Albany in 1983 and, after moving to New York, participated in Democracy: Cultural Participation with the renowned collaborative Group Material. In 1994, Braun’s work was selected for the Bad Girls Show at the New Museum, which has been credited as the first exhibition to explore the impact of third-wave feminism on the visual arts. Braun has shown at, and is currently represented by, Fruit and Flower Deli in Stockholm, Sweden and Galerie Conrads in Düsseldorf, Germany, where she’ll have her second solo show in 2012. Also upcoming is a group exhibition at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Last year Braun had the unique experience of being a contestant on Bravo’s first art-related reality TV show, “Work of Art.”


          Monday, March 5
          7:00 pm
          Lecture by Elana Herzog, installation artist and sculptor exhibiting in Material Occupation
          University Art Museum

          Elana Herzog lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She is best known for installations in which textiles are aggressively stapled to wall surfaces and then deconstructed to produce residual drawings that consist of shredded fabric and perforated gypsum in some areas, and densely stapled and built-up materials in others. Selected solo exhibitions include Lmak Projects in New York (2011); The Elephant in the Room at New/Now Gallery at the New Britain Museum of American Art in New Britain, Connecticut (2010); Un-Warped and De-Weft at the Daum Museum in Dedalia, Missouri (2009); and Plaid at Smack Mellon in Brooklyn, New York (2007). Selected group exhibitions include Extended Drawing at Tegnerforbundet in Oslo, Norway (2011); The Jewel Thief at the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs, New York (2010); Apparently Invisible at the Drawing Center in New York, New York (2009); and Motion Blur at Gustavsbergs Konsthalle in Gustavsbergs, Sweden (2009). She received an M.F.A from State University of New York at Alfred, New York.

          Supported by UAlbany Center for Jewish Studies.


          Tuesday, February 21
          7:00 pm
          Lecture by Joshua Mosley, multi-media artist
          University Art Museum

          Joshua Mosley employs a combination of hand-drawn, computer-generated, and stop-motion techniques to investigate philosophical topics that emerge from everyday situations. He is a professor in, and chair of, the Department of Fine Arts in the School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his M.F.A. and B.F.A. from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Mosley is a recipient of the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award, a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, and a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship. His work has been exhibited and screened at the 2007 Venice Biennale in Venice, Italy; the Museum of Modern Art in New York; the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth in Fort Worth, Texas; the Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Basel, Switzerland; the Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois; the Reina Sofia in Madrid, Spain; the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the SITE Santa Fe Eighth International Biennial in Santa Fe, New Mexico; and the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego in San Diego, California.

          This project is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts' Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.


          2011


          ACT (Art & Culture Talks) brings together artists, critics, writers, poets, and scholars to address key issues in contemporary art and culture through rigorous and provocative talks, conversations, debates, seminars, screenings, and readings in an informal setting.

          As an integral part of the University Art Museum’s outreach effort, ACT strives to bring the University community and the people of the Capital Region into closer engagement with each other and with the important cultural issues of our time.


          Monday, November 7
          7:00 pm
          Lecture by Ken Johnson, author of Are You Experienced?: How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art (2011)

          Ken Johnson, MA '78 is a freelance critic, who writes regularly for the New York Times. He has been writing art criticism professionally for more than 20 years. He graduated from Brown University in 1976 with a degree in art, followed in 1978 by a master's degree in studio art with a concentration in painting from UAlbany. In 1983, he started writing art reviews for the Albany Times Union and other capital region publications. In 1987 he began writing articles on contemporary artists for Arts Magazine, and a year later he moved on to Art in America, where he wrote reviews and articles regularly for the next nine years. Since 1997, he has been writing art criticism for the New York Times, where he reviews six to eight current exhibitions each week. He is the author of the recently released book, Are You Experienced? Art and the Psychedelic Revolution, published by Prestel Books.


          Wednesday, September 7
          7:00 pm
          Lecture by artist Wolfgang Staehle
          University Art Museum

          Wolfgang Staehle is widely recognized as one of the pioneers of Internet art. Born in Stuttgart, Germany in 1950, he has been living in New York since 1976. In 1991 he founded THE THING, an independent media project that began as a bulletin board system (BBS) and became one of the seminal on- and offline forums for Net art. His works have been shown at Fondation Cartier in Paris, Gagosian Gallery in New York, Transmediale 02 in Berlin, Wood Street Galleries in Pittsburgh, Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil in Rio de Janeiro, the Tate Modern in London, and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C.

           


          Tuesday, March 29
          7:00 pm
          Reading and talk by science fiction and fantasy author John Crowley
          University Art Museum

          John Crowley, acclaimed author of science fiction, fantasy, and historical fiction, received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the World Fantasy Convention in 2006, and the Award in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1992. His works include the novels Four Freedoms (2009), Lord Byron’s Novel: The Evening Land (2005), four volumes of the highly praised fantasy series AEgypt (1987–2007), and Little, Big (1981), which received the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel. Since 1993 he has taught creative writing at Yale University.


          Monday, March 21
          7:00 pm
          Lecture by artist Pepon Osorio
          University Art Museum

          Pepón Osorio was born in Santurce, Puerto Rico in 1955 and lives and works in Philadelphia. Osorio is best known for his large-scale installations, which are influenced by his experience as a social worker in The Bronx. His pieces usually evolve from interaction with the neighborhoods and people he works among. Recent solo exhibitions include NeoHooDoo: Art for a Forgotten Faith at the Menil Collection, Houston (2008); How We Live Together at the 27th São Paulo Bienal in Brazil (2007); and Trials and Turbulence at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts in New York (2005). His work has also been shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art and el Museo del Barrio in New York, the Smithsonian Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C., and el Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico and el Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico.


          Monday, February 28
          7:00 pm
          Lecture, "The Artist as Writer as Artist" by Daniel Kunitz, art critic and executive editor of Modern Painters
          University Art Museum

          Daniel Kunitz will address contemporary artists who present their own writings––be they discursive essays, stories, or poems––as visual art.
          He is currently executive editor of Modern Painters and contributing editor of the Paris Review. Formerly he was managing editor of the Paris Review, U.S. editor of ArtReview, and an art critic for Village Voice. His essays, reviews, and articles have appeared in Harper'sVanity FairTLSLA Times, and many other publications. He is a faculty member in the Art Practice Department at the School of Visual Arts in New York. Kunitz received a DEUG, Université de Paris-Sorbonne; a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and an M.F.A. from Columbia University.


          Tuesday, February 15
          7:00 pm
          Lecture and book signing for Phyllis Galembo: Maske by photographer Phyllis Galembo and art historian and essayist Chika Okeke-Agulu
          University Art Museum

          Phyllis Galembo began photographing the characters and costumes of African masquerade in Nigeria in 1985, developing her theme throughout Africa and the Caribbean over the next twenty-five years. She has exhibited worldwide, including the recent exhibitions Call and Response: Africa to AmericaThe Art of Nick Cave and Phyllis Galembo at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina(2010); Phyllis Galembo: Masquerade, a Decade at Reflex Art Gallery in Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2009); West African Masquerade: Photographs by Phyllis Galembo atThe Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York (2007); Dressed for Thrills: Halloween and Masquerade Costumes at F.I.T. Museum in New York (2003); and Manifestations of the Spirit atthe Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (2001). Her books include Dressed for Thrills, 100 Years of Halloween Costumes and Masquerade (2003) and Vodou: Visions and Voices of Haiti (1998). Galembo received an M.F.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is currently a professor of photography at the University at Albany.

          Chika Okeke-Agulu specializes in classical, modern, and contemporary African and African diaspora art history and theory. He edited the first-ever issue of African Arts (2006) dedicated to African modernism, and has published articles and reviews in African Arts; Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism; Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art; Art South Africa; and Glendora Review.  He has organized several exhibitions and written catalogue essays for them, including the Nigerian Pavilion at the first Johannesburg Biennale (1995), and was an academic consultant for Documenta 11 in Kassel, Germany (2002). As an artist, Okeke-Agulu has had more than thirty-five one-man and group exhibitions of his work in Nigeria, South Africa, Senegal, Britain, Germany, South Korea, Switzerland, Sweden, and the United States. He has received numerous academic and professional awards, including Woodrow Wilson Fellow (2010–11) and Clark Fellow at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute (2008). He received a Ph.D. in art history from Emory University, Atlanta and currently teaches art history at Princeton University.


          2010


          Marjorie L. and Ronald E. Brandon Art and Culture Talks

          ACT (Art & Culture Talks) brings together artists, critics, writers, poets, and scholars to address key issues in contemporary art and culture through rigorous and provocative talks, conversations, debates, seminars, screenings, and readings in an informal setting.

          As an integral part of the University Art Museum’s outreach effort, ACT strives to bring the University community and the people of the Capital Region into closer engagement with each other and with the important cultural issues of our time.


          Monday, February 22
          7:00 pm
          Talk by exhibiting artist Carroll Dunham
          University Art Museum

          Carroll Dunham was born in 1949 in New Haven, Connecticut. He lives and works in New York City. He has had recent solo exhibitions at Barbara Gladstone Gallery in New York (2009); Paintings on Wood 1983­–87 at Per Skarstedt Gallery in New York (2008); Recent Paintings at Atle Gerhardsen in Berlin (2008); Carroll Dunham Prints: A Survey at Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts (2008); Carroll Dunham Monotypes at Atle Gerhardsen in Berlin (2007); and Carroll Dunham at White Cube in London (2006). Dunham received a Skowhegan Medal for Distinction in Painting in 2004. He received a degree in 1972 from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

          Carroll Dunham Prints: A Survey is organized by the Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts and on view at the UAM through April 3, 2010.

          Supported by University Auxiliary Services.


          Tuesday, March 2
          7:00 pm
          Lecture and screening by artist Olaf Breuning
          University Art Museum

          Olaf Breuning was born in 1970 in Schaffhausen, Switzerland and lives and works in New York. He works in photography, video, sculpture, drawings, and installation. He has had recent solo exhibitions at the Kodama Gallery in Osaka, Japan (2009); Langhans Gallery in Prague (2009); FotoMuseo Fotographica in Bogotá, Columbia (2009); Metro Pictures in New York (2008); and Art Projects for Art Basel in Miami Beach (2008). Recent group exhibitions include Unfictions at EMPAC in Troy, New York (2009); Looking at Music at the Museum of Modern Art in New York (2008); and the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York (2008). Breuning did post-graduate studies in photography from 1993 to 1996 at HSFG (Höhere Schule für Gestaltung) in Zurich, Switzerland.

          Supported by the Experimental Television Center’s Presentation Funds
          Program, which is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts.


          Wednesday, March 17
          7:00 pm
          Talk by Shelly Bancroft and Peter Nesbett, co-publishers of Art on Paper magazine and founders and co-directors of Triple Candie, a not-for-profit contemporary art venue in Harlem.
          University Art Museum

          Shelly Bancroft and Peter Nesbett are married to each other and live in
          New York City. They are the co-publishers of Art on Paper magazine, a bimonthly publication devoted exclusively to works on paper— drawings, photographs, ephemera, prints, and artists’ books. The award-winning magazine has been in continuous publication since 1970, when it was founded as the Print Collector’s Newsletter. Bancroft and Nesbett co-founded and have served as co-directors of Triple Candie, a not-for-profit contemporary art venue in Harlem, since 2001. Triple Candie was highlighted as one of twenty-five worldwide trendsetters in the September 2007 issue of ARTnews. Bancroft holds a master’s degree in contemporary art history from the University of Washington, Seattle and a bachelor’s degree in painting from Michigan State University. Nesbett holds a post-master’s certificate from the Institute for Not-for-Profit Management at Columbia University, a master’s degree in art history from University of Washington, Seattle, and a bachelor’s degree in visual studies from Cornell University.

          Supported by University Auxiliary Services.


          Tuesday, May 4
          7:00 pm
          Talk by artist Dawn Clements
          University Art Museum

          Dawn Clements  was born in 1958 in Woburn, Massachusetts and lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Her recent solo exhibitions include The Boiler (Pierogi) in Brooklyn, New York (2010); Portrait Rooms at Mark W. Potter Gallery, The Taft School, Watertown, Connecticut (2009); Pierogi Leipzig in Leipzig, Germany (2008); Movie, Allcott Gallery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2007); and Drawings at Herter Gallery, University of Massachusetts at Amherst (2006). Her recent group exhibitions include the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York (2010); Same Sweet Dream, curated by Martina Batan, at Dieu Donné in New York (2009); Edward Hopper and Contemporary Art at Kunsthalle Wien in Vienna, Austria (2008); Cosmologies at James Cohan Gallery in New York (2007); and Twice Drawn at The Tang Museum, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York (2006). Clements received a B.A. from Brown University in 1986 and an M.F.A. in painting from University at Albany in 1989.


          Tuesday, October 12
          7:00 pm
          Reading/Discussion by Annie Cohen-Solal, author of Leo and His Circle: The Life of Leo Castelli (2010)
          University Art Museum

          Famed art dealer Leo Castelli shaped American art for the 20th century and beyond. In her acclaimed new biography, Leo and His CircleAnnie Cohen-Solal explores the life of the man who introduced us to Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg, and many other seminal artists. Cohen-Solal was a friend of Castelli’s, and she has used the access that afforded her to create a rich, detailed picture of him including the troubled history of his Jewish ancestors in Europe over many generations. Cohen-Solal’s previous books include Painting American (2001) and Sartre: A Life (1985), which has been translated into sixteen languages. She holds a Ph.D. from the Sorbonne and is currently Visiting Arts Professor at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Born in Algeria, she first came to New York in 1989 as the Cultural Counselor to the French Embassy in the United States.

          Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute, the UAlbany Art Department, UAlbany Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.
          Supported by UAlbany University Auxiliary Services (UAS), Marjorie L. Brandon, and the Ellsworth Kelly Foundation.


          2009


          Tuesday, February 10
          7:00 p.m.
          "Being and Sometimes Not Being," lecture and screening by artist Dave McKenzie
          University Art Museum

          Dave McKenzie, a New York-based artist who works in sculpture, video, and performance, will present a lecture about the connections between his work and the intersections of artwork and everyday occurrence. During the lecture, he will also screen some of his video works from the last several years. McKenzie’s work has been exhibited at the Gallery at REDCAT, Los Angeles; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Small A Projects, Portland; and Gallery 4000, Chicago. His work has also been included in PERFORMA 07, New York; Freestyle, Studio Museum in Harlem; Queens International, Queens Museum of Art; 24/7, Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius; and Listening to New Voices, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City. He lives and works in Brooklyn.


          Monday, February 23
          7:00 p.m.
          Talk by artist and curator Matthew Higgs
          UniversityArt Museum

          Matthew Higgs will discuss his approach to the practice of art as an artist, curator, and writer, with an emphasis on running New York's oldest alternative space, White Columns. Higgs is a curator, critic, and artist currently living and working in New York. Since the early 1990s, he has sought to develop a practice that considers the intersections and overlaps between these disciplines. Over the past fifteen years he has organized more than 200 exhibitions and projects in Europe and North America. His writings have appeared in more than fifty books, catalogs, and periodicals, including ArtforumFrieze, and Afterall. In the past two years, he has contributed to books on artists such as John Baldessari, Ken Price, Kay Rosen, Elizabeth Peyton, Marilyn Minter, John McCracken, Christian Marclay, Oliver Payne & Nick Relph, and Uta Barth, among others. Since 2004, Higgs has been the director and chief curator at White Columns, where he has organized more than 100 individual exhibitions and projects, to show the work of more than 400 international artists of all generations. Matthew Higgs will be the juror of the 2009 Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region exhibition.


          Monday, March 2
          7:00 p.m.
          "Digging in the Shadow of the Pyramids: Recent Discoveries at Giza," lecture by Peter Lacovara, curator and archeologist
          University Art Museum


          Friday, March 27
          6:00 p.m.
          Sound/poetry performance by composer and conductor
          Peter Kotik
          University Art Museum


          Monday, April 6
          7:00 p.m.
          “Responsive Art: Working in the Environment,” panel discussion with Amy Lipton, Jason Middlebrook, and Frances Richard on the juncture between responsiveness and responsibility in site-specific works.
          University Art Museum

           


          2008


           

          Tuesday, December 2
          7:00 p.m.
          "Andy Warhol: Myth and Reality" Lecture by Roberta Bernstein, art historian, Professor Emeritus of Art History, UAlbany and former assistant to Andy Warhol.

          University Art Museum


          Monday, May 5
          7:00 p.m.
          "LikeWatching Sausage Being Made:The Nitty Gritty on Artists, Galleries and Money" Lecture by gallerist Ed Winkleman
          University Art Museum

          Edward Winkleman is the owner/director of Winkleman Gallery in NewYork, NY. Considered one of contemporary art’s most spirited voices, he is also the author of an eponymous blog about art and politics (edwardwinkleman.blogspot.com), which receives over 30,000 hits a month, a contributing editor for the international online forum Art World Salon, and the author of various articles for online and print art publications. Winkleman’s ACT lecture will focus on the nuts and bolts of working with a commercial gallery and what it means conceptually to have so much of the current art world dialog revolve around the market.


          Tuesday, April 1
          7:00 p.m.
          "TheAllure of the Literal” Lecture by artists Jennifer and Kevin McCoy
          University Art Museum

          Jennifer and Kevin McCoyare new media artists whose ground breaking sculptural objects, video projections, and live events explore the powerful hold that technology and cinematic clichés play in shaping our dreams and everyday experiences. Artistic collaborators since 1990, the McCoys have exhibited at The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, P.S.1 Center for Contemporary Art, Postmasters Gallery,The New Museum, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, TheWalker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, The British Film Institute Southbank in London, among other venues. They are recipients of numerous awards including a Creative Capital Foundation grant, The New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Computer Arts, The New Media Fellowship from the Colbert Foundation, and The Emerging Artist/Emergent Media Grant from the Jerome Foundation. Jennifer and Kevin McCoy’s exhibition, The Allure of the Literal, is on view at the University Art Museum February 5 through April 6, 2008.


          Thursday, March 20
          6:30 p.m. (note early start time)
          “Doing Criticism: A Life Sentence” Lecture, by art critic Roberta Smith
          University Art Museum

          Roberta Smith is the senior art critic for the New York Times. Widely acclaimed as a rigorous writer with the keen ability to express complex visual ideas, Smith’s work stands out for its integrity and independence of mind. She began working as a professional art critic in the 1970s, writing for journals such as Arts, Artforum, and Art in America; her work has also appeared in popular publicationssuch as Newsweek and Vogue. In 1981 she became art critic for the Village Voice, andin 1986 began writing for the New York Times, where her reviews now appear weekly. She has contributed essays to exhibition catalogues on Donald Judd, Alex Katz, Elizabeth Murray, and Cy Twombly. She received art criticism grants from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1975 and 1980. In 2003, Smith won the College Art Association's prestigious Frank Jewett Mather Award for art criticism. Co-sponsored by the Department of Fine Arts, UAlbany. Supported by University Auxiliary Services.


          Thursday, March 13
          7:00 p.m.
          Reading and lecture by novelist Gregory Maguire
          Recital Hall, Performing Arts Center Book signing immediately following at University Art Museum

          Gregory Maguire is a novelist and children’s literature scholar. His adult novels include Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West (1995) praised by John Updike in The New Yorker as “an amazing novel”, Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister (1999), Lost (2001), and Mirror, Mirror (2003). Wicked was developed into an award winning Broadway musical in 2003. Though best known for his revisionist retellings of classic folktales, Maguire is the author of more than a dozen books for children including What-the-Dickens:The Story of a Rogue Tooth Fairy (2007). Born in Albany, New York, Maguire received his B.A. (’76) from UAlbany and his Ph.D. in English and American Literature from Tufts University. He was a professor and co-director at Simmons College's Center for the Study of Children's Literature from 1979-1985. Since 1986 he has been co-director and founding board member of Children's Literature New England Inc., a nonprofit group that focuses attention on the significance of literature in the lives of children. Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute. Supported by the University at Albany Alumni Association.


          Monday, March 3
          7:00 p.m.
          Lecture by artist David Opdyke
          University Art Museum

          David Opdyke is a rising star in contemporary art. A former architectural model-maker, Opdyke uses his finely honed skills as a starting point for sculptures, drawings, and installations that combine obsessive detail with a sardonic view on the complexities of globalization, consumerism, and military escalation. Born in Niskayuna, NewYork, Opdyke lives and works in Brooklyn. His work has been exhibited at Ronald Feldman Gallery, Roebling Hall, Bravin Lee Programs in New York City, the Corcoran Museum of Art in Washington, D.C., and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. He is the recipient of the Aldrich EmergingArtist Award from the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Sculpture. David Opdyke’s exhibition, Plan C, is on view at the University Art Museum February 5 through April 6, 2008.

           

           


          2007


          Tuesday, February 13
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture by painter Peter Saul.

          Peter Saul is one of the most influential artists of the last forty years. His visceral, acid colored canvases are inspired equally by Pop art, Cubism, Surrealism, and Mad Magazine. Coming of age in the ‘50s and ‘60s, Saul has remained an unrelenting critic of the economic and moral forces that move our society. He continues to influence new generations of contemporary artists who share the long-standing artistic tradition of social criticism and satire. Saul has exhibited worldwide in numerous galleries, museums, and institutions. Most recently he has had solo exhibitions at Musée Paul Valéry in Sète, France, and Musée d’art moderne et contemporain in Geneva, Switzerland. His work was recently included in Disparities and Deformities: Our Grotesque, Site Santa Fe, and Splat, Boom, Pow at the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston and the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston. Supported by a grant from University Auxiliary Services.


          Tuesday, February 27
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Reading and discussion by cultural historian Michael Kammen.

          Michael Kammen's most recent book, Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture (2006), examines the key debates about aesthetics and morality that have shaped a distinctively American view of art’s role in a democratic society. The author and editor of more than thirty books, Kammen received the Pulitzer Prize for People of Paradox: An Inquiry Concerning the Origins of American Culture (1972). Kammen is the Newton C. Farr Professor of American History and Culture at Cornell University, where he has been on the faculty since 1965. His other books include A Time to Every Purpose:The Four Seasons in American Culture (2004); Robert Gwathmey: The Life and Art of a Passionate Observer (1999); American Culture, American Tastes: Social Change and theTwentieth Century (1999); In the Past Lane: Historical Perspectives on American Culture (1997); and A Machine That Would Go of Itself: The Constitution in American Culture (1986). Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute.


          Tuesday, March 13
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture by Sina Najafi, creator and editor-in-chief of Cabinet Magazine.

          Sina Najafi, creator and editor-in chief of Cabinet Magazine will talk about the magazine’s new book, Presidential Doodles:Two Centuries of Scribbles, Scratches, Squiggles and Scrawls from the Oval Office (2006). Featuring drawings by U.S. presidents of nearly every era, the book provides a rare glimpse into the private personalities of America's most famous men. Highlights include a diagram of the Pythagorean theorem by a young John Adams and numerous cowboy cartoons drawn by Ronald Reagan on White House stationery. Najafi has taught at the Rhode Island School of Design, New York University, and Stockholm University. He has also been a visiting lecturer at Columbia University, the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, Tyler School of Art, Hampshire College, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Tate Modern in London. He holds degrees in comparative literature from Princeton University and Columbia University and is currently completing a dissertation in comparative literature at New York University. Cabinet Magazine is a quarterly not-for-profit publication, now in its seventh year. Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute.


          Wednesday, March 28
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Reading by novelist Lynne Tillman

          Lynne Tillman is a fiction writer, essayist, art critic, and educator. Her latest novel, American Genius, A Comedy (2006), dismantles American myths, past and present, through the obsessions, fears, and doubts of an unnamed woman. Tillman is also the author of This Is Not It (2002), a series of short stories written in collaboration with visual artists; No Lease on Life (a NewYork Times Notable Book of 1998 and a finalist for the National Book Critics CircleAward); Cast in Doubt (1992); The Madame Realism Complex (1992); Motion Sickness (1991); and Haunted Houses (1987). She is also the author of two collections of essays, The Broad Picture (1997) and Absence Makes the Heart (1990), as well as The Velvet Years: Warhol’s Factory 1965–1967 (1994), with photographs by Stephen Shore. Tillman is Professor/Writer in Residence at the University at Albany, and in 2006 was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. She has taught writing and visual art at Yale University, Bard College, and elsewhere. Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute and held in conjunction with the University Art Museum exhibition Mr. President, for which Tillman is the catalogue essayist.


          Wednesday, September 5
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          In Conversation: Geoffrey Young and James Siena

          Geoffrey Youngand James Siena will discuss their collaboration on a new edition of Pockets of Wheat, first published in 1996 featuring poems by Young and drawings by Siena, many of which are featured in the museum’s current exhibition. The rapport between Siena and Young is akin to musicians communicating through their instruments. They bring to the reader not something better than they could solo, but something different. Gary Counsil, The Brooklyn Rail Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute. Supported by a grant from University Auxiliary Services.


          Wednesday, September 26
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture by Judith Linhares

          Judith Linhares’ luminous oil paintings and works on paper have inspired a generation of younger figurative painters. Known for bright color and confident narrative visions, she is on familiar terms with animals, flowers, invented structures, fairy tales, and dream logic. Linhares’s paintings have the vivid instantaneousness of dreams, in which you see everything in a split-second, more clearly and starkly than in waking life. David Pagel Supported by a grant from University Auxiliary Services. Both programs are held in conjunction with the exhibitions Judith Linhares: New Works and BIG FAST INK: James Siena Drawings, 1996-2007 (through September 30, 2007) Curated by Geoffrey Young, poet, critic, and founder of Geoffrey Young Gallery, Great Barrington, Massachusetts.


          Friday, November 9
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Tiger Tales performed by Chinese Theatre Works

          Tiger Tales blends ancient and contemporary techniques in a comical story of survival in the modern jungle. Tiger Tales is performed in English accompanied by traditional Chinese music, and is suitable for all ages.


          Saturday, November 10
          noon and 2:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum

          Overhead Projector Shadow Puppetry Workshops conducted by Chinese Theatre Works

          These workshops will guide participants through the entire process of planning, designing, building and performing a 2-5 minute shadow figure production. Participants will create brief shadow performances using a range of materials (cardstock, acetate, wire, fabric scraps, gel, found objects, kitchen utensils, toys, and more). The Chinese Theatre Works is the only professional Chinese shadow theater company in the United States. Held in conjunction with the exhibition Chinese Shadow Figures from the Collection of Dr. Fan Pen Chen (November 2, 2007 – January 6, 2008)


          Saturday, December 8
          2:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Puppet Theatre in Folk Ritual Activities in Fujian, lecture by Mingsheng Ye

          A foremost authority on Chinese puppetry, particularly on popular religion, culture and puppetry in Fujian, Mingsheng Ye has published eleven books and more than eighty articles in top academic journals. One of his more recent works is a momentous, two-volume book titled, History of Puppetry in Fujian on the shadow theatre, marionette theatre, and glove puppetry of Fujian. Supported by the China Center Initiative through the Department of East Asian Studies.

           


          2006


          Tuesday, January 31
          8:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Reading, by Susan Vreeland, novelist, from her newest book, Life Studies (2005).

          Susan Vreeland, novelist, takes her inspiration from the worlds of Renaissance and modern art. Her newest book is Life Studies (2005), which features tales based on incidents in the lives of notable Impressionist and post-Impressionist painters. A teacher of high school English for thirty years, Vreeland became a writer relatively late in life. A passion for the portraits of Jan Vermeer, resulted in The New York Times bestseller, Girl in Hyacinth Blue (1999), the story of a fictional painting by the Dutch master. Vreeland’s other books include The Passion of Artemisia (2002), based on the life of female Italian Renaissance painter Artemesia Gentileschi; and The Forest Lover (2004), based on the life of pioneering modernist painter Emily Carr. Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute.


          Tuesday, February 7
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture, “Forever Jung: Reflections on Art, Criticism and Psychology” by Ken Johnson, art critic for The New York Times.

          Ken Johnson is an art critic at The New York Times and a contributing editor for Art in America magazine. He writes on a diverse range of artists and issues in contemporary art. He began his career in 1984, by writing art reviews for the Albany Times Union, and 1987 contributed articles on contemporary artists to Arts Magazine. Johnson received an M.A. degree from the University at Albany in 1977. Supported by the University at Albany Alumni Association. Co-sponsored by the UAlbany Art Department.


          Tuesday, March 21
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture by Vito Acconci, pioneer performance, video, and installation artist.

          Vito Acconci is a pioneer in performance, video, and installation art and in the exploration of architectural space. Initially a poet, Acconci began making conceptual art in the late 1960s. Since then, his work has expanded art’s boundaries beyond the gallery or museum into shared public spaces. In 1988, he started Acconci Studios and began his current practice of collaborating with architects to create projects integrated into public buildings, gardens, plazas, playgrounds, and transportation centers. Co-sponsored by the Center for Humanities, Arts, and TechnoSciences (CHATS) and the New York State Writers Institute. Held in conjunction with Architecture at Albany: the year long exploration of the built environment at the University at Albany and its surrounding community.


          Tuesday, May 4
          7:00 p.m.
          Performing Arts Center
          Performance by Everton Sylvester and Searching for Banjo, spoken word poet and musical trio

          Everton Sylvester is a poet and musician who blends urban story-poems with reed, bass, and percussion, creating "get-in-your-bones" jazz. He is lead poet with bands Searching for Banjo and Brooklyn Funk Essentials. His first book of poetry, Backyard in Bed-Stuy (2002), draws from his experiences as a former Brooklyn High School teacher, optician, and New York City cab driver. Sylvester is a 1993 James Michener fellow as well as 1997 and 1998 Sundance Screenwriters fellow. Everton is featured in the PBS-Syndicated series United States of Poetry and the movies Slamming and Prince of Central Park. He teaches writing and Caribbean literature at the City University of New York. Supported by the University Commission for Diversity and Affirmative Action and Spread the Word, UAlbany's student poetry group.


          Tuesday, October 10, 2006
          8:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture by Julie Heffernan

          Julie Heffernan was born in Peoria, Illinois in 1956. She received her MFA in 1985 from Yale University. In 1996 she received a New York Foundation for the Arts award, in 1995 a National Endowment for the Arts grant, and in 1986 a Fulbright-Hayes Grant. She has shown in numerous one-person and group exhibitions nationally since 1985. Heffernan lives in Brooklyn, New York. Supported by University Auxiliary Services.


          Tuesday, November 7, 2006
          7:15 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture, “Deep Decoration: New Expressive Structures in Architecture” by Nina Rappaport

          Nina Rappaport is an architectural writer, curator, educator and Editor of Publications for the Yale School of Architecture, including the bi-annual magazine Construct. She has published widely as a freelance architectural critic in the United States and Europe, and has edited and written for numerous books and catalogs. Nina has curated several exhibitions and is Lead Design Trust Fellow for a project on the arts in Long Island City, N.Y. She is an adjunct professor at City College School of Architecture, where among her courses is the seminar "The Post-Industrial Factory." Co-sponsored by the Center for Humanities, Arts and TechnoSciences (CHATS), the Journalism Program, and the University Art Museum, and made possible by a grant from the University Auxiliary Services.

           

           


          2005


          Tuesday, February 8
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture, “Artificial Strife: Differentiation and Otherness in Robotic Entities,” by Adrianne Wortzel, new media artist working with robotic and telerobotic theatrical scenarios in both physical and virtual networked environments. Held in conjunction with the University at Albany Libraries Frankenstein Semester.

          Adrianne Wortzel is an artist creating fictive web works, robotic and telerobotic installations and performance productions. Her telerobotic installation, Camouflage Town, was featured in the exhibition Data Dynamics at The Whitney Museum of American Art (2001). She has produced international performative webcasts, and was co-host and content provider for "Art Dirt" a weekly live video-streamed interview format internet show originating from Pseudo TV in New York from 1996-1998. Her Globe Theater Repertory Company of Robots was featured in New York as part of Cooper Union's Technoseduction (1997); in Creative Time's Art in the Anchorage (1997); and abroad in Ars Electronica 97: FleshFactor (Linz, Austria); and Kunstfluge's Aerale 99 (Baitz, Germany). She is a recipient of a 2000-2001 National Science Foundation grant awarded for creating a robotic theater at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art where she is currently working on her project ELIZA REDUX, a series of webcast and videotaped psychoanalytic sessions between a human and a robot. Wortzel is Associate Professor of Advertising Design and Graphic Arts at New York City College of Technology, CUNY, and an Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, where she is Director of the Cooper Union Tele/Robotic Theater.


          Tuesday, March 1
          4:15 p.m.
          Standish Room
          Science Library
          Seminar with Shelley Jackson, author of the "classic" Patchwork Girl, a hypertext novel that combines original fiction and artwork to tell the story of a female Frankenstein monster.


          Tuesday, March 1
          8:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture by Shelley Jackson
          Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute, the Institute for Research on Women (IROW) and the Center for Humanities, Arts, and TechnoSciences (CHATS). Held in conjunction with the University at Albany Libraries Frankenstein Semester.

          Shelley Jackson is a writer and artist. Her critically acclaimed hypertext novel, Patchwork Girl, combines original fiction and artwork to tell the post-feminist story of a female Frankenstein monster. Skin, Jackson’s latest project is, a short story to be tattooed one word at a time, one to a person, on 2095 volunteers who will not read or see the story until they have received their tattoos. The project has been written up in Newsweek, The New York Post, The Village Voice, The London Observer, and People among other publications in the US and abroad. Jackson’s short fiction has appeared in Fence, Conjunctions, Crowd, Grand Street, and Kenyon Review. She is the author of The Anatomy of Melancholy (2002), her first fiction collection and is the author and illustrator of two children's books, The Old Woman and the Wave (1998) and Sophia: The Alchemist’s Dog (2001).


          Thursday, March 17
          8:00 p.m.
          Performing Arts Center Musical performance by One Ring Musical performance by One Ring Zero, who use odd-ball instruments to perform songs with lyrics written by contemporary authors.
          Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute.

          Using odd-ball instruments like the claviola, toy piano, theremin, and glockenspiel; One Ring Zero creates a musical landscape that is part cartoon, part klezmer, and part circus. This performance will feature songs from their most recent album As Smart As We Are--with lyrics written for the band by Paul Auster, Rick Moody, Margaret Atwood, Denis Johnson, Jonathan Lethem, AM Homes, Neil Gaiman, Dave Eggers and many more. One Ring Zero has performed at music venues and cultural institutions in the U.S. and Canada including MassMoCA, the Whitney Museum of Art, Lincoln Center's Damrosch Park, Central Park Summer Stage with George Plimpton and Paul Auster, Book Expo America in Chicago, the Calgary Folk Festival, and Toronto’s Harbourfront Centre.


          Wednesday, May 11
          6:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture, “The Good, the Bad, and the Very Bad: A Year in the Life of an Art Critic.” by Jerry Saltz, writer, editor, and the Senior Art Critic for The Village Voice.
          Co-sponsored by the University at Albany Fine Arts Department.

          Jerry Saltz is a writer, editor, and the Senior Art Critic for The Village Voice. He was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Criticism in 2001, and a compilation of his reviews, Seeing Out Loud: The Village Voice Art Columns, 1998-2003 , was published by The Figures Press. Saltz has lectured widely and has written for many periodicals including Frieze, Parkett, Art in America, Flash Art, and Time Out New York. He currently teaches at Columbia University, the School of Visual Arts (in New York), and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.


          Wednesday, November 2
          8:00 PM
          University Art Museum
          Reading/Discussion by Jed Perl, art critic for the New Republic Co-sponsored by New York State Writers Institute.

          Jed Perl has been the art critic covering the contemporary art scene for The New Republic since 1994. His commentary has also appeared in The New Criterion, Partisan Review, and The New York Times Book Review, and he has appeared on CNN, NPR and "The MacNeill/Lehrer Report." Perl's newest book is New Art City (2005), an exploration of the New York City cultural milieu of the mid-20th century, and the remarkable range of artists and artistic movements it produced. Other books include Eyewitness: Reports from an Art World in Crisis (2000), Gallery Going: Four Seasons in the Art World (1991), and Paris Without End: On French Art Since World War I (1988).

           

           


          2004


          Thursday, January 22
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Home Extension walk-through with artists and the curator Gregory Volk will be joined by Home Extension artists for an informal tour and discussion of the exhibition.

          Gregory Volk is a Brooklyn-based art critic and independent curator. He writes for Art in America and is a visiting professor at the University at Albany, SUNY. Home Extension, curated by Gregory Volk and Sabine Russ, is on view at the University Art Museum from January 21 through April 10, 2004 and features work by Sebastiaan Bremer, Beth Campbell, Fred Holland, Kimsooja, Joachim Koester, Odili Donald Odita, Ragna Róbertsdóttir, Karin Sander, Ward Shelley, and Roman Signer.


          Thursday, January 29
          4:15 p.m.
          Standish Room, New Library Uptown Campus
          Seminar with Ross King
          Thursday, January 29,
          8:00 p.m.
          Assembly Hall, Campus Center Uptown Campus
          Reading, "Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling" Ross King's presentation will detail the story behind the famous mural on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel inside Vatican City; how Pope Julius commissioned Michelangelo to fresco the chapel's ceiling; and their often strained relationship. Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute.

          British writer Ross King is the best-selling author of the non-fiction works Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling (2003), the story behind the frescoed ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, and Brunelleschi's Dome: How a Renaissance Genius Reinvented Architecture (2000), the story of the construction of the enormous dome of Florence's Santa Maria del Fiore cathedral. He has also published two novels, Ex-Libris (1998) and Domino (1996, 2003).


          Wednesday, February 4
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture by Michael Ashkin

          Michael Ashkin is a sculptor living in Brooklyn, New York. Focusing on issues surrounding environmental degradation, Ashkin creates lifelike models of desolated post-industrial landscapes. Built to scale and meticulous in detail, the constructions manage to look vast and unending despite their miniature format. Ashkin's work has been shown at Andre Rosen (New York), Leo Castelli (New York), White Columns (New York), and the 2003 Frieze Art Fair (London).


          Tuesday, February 24
          4:15 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Informal conversation with Rick Moody
          Tuesday, February 24,
          8:00 p.m.
          Recital Hall, Performing Arts Center Uptown Campus
          Rick Moody reads from his work. Co-sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute.

          Rick Moody , fiction writer and editor, is the author of three novels, two story collections, and a memoir. His first novel, Garden State (1991), won the Pushcart Press Editors Choice Award. He gained national recognition with the publication of his second novel, The Ice Storm (1994), which was adapted into a movie in 1997. His most recent works include the memoir The Black Veil (2002) and the story collection Demonology (2000). Moody has also written essays for two books, Twilight (2002) and Hover (1998), which feature the photography of Gregory Crewdson. He has also written on contemporary artists Roy Lichtenstein and Fred Tomaselli.


          Monday, March 8
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture by Katy Siegel

          Katy Siegel is a contributing editor of Artforum and teaches contemporary art history and criticism at Hunter College, CUNY. She is the co-author of Art & Money , forthcoming from Thames & Hudson, as well as an edited volume of Sidney Tillim's critical writings on art, forthcoming from Routledge. Siegel is also the author of numerous articles and catalogue essays on contemporary art.


          Wednesday, March 24
          7:00 p.m.
          University Art Museum
          Lecture, "Facts and Fictions: Stories and Histories in Recent Art" Robert Storr will discuss the return of narrative to the visual arts and why, after many years of formalist suppression, it is now everywhere.

          Robert Storr is the Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. As a curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art from 1990 until 2002, Storr organized numerous shows, including retrospectives of Gerhard Richter, Chuck Close, Tony Smith, and Bruce Nauman. He is the co-curator of the recent exhibition Max Beckmann at the Museum of Modern Art.

           


          2003


          Thursday, March 20
          4:15 p.m.
          Informal seminar, "Navigating the Documentary" with David Shapiro , visual artist and director, writer, and producer of the award-winning documentary film Keep the River on Your Right: A Modern Cannibal Tale


          Friday, March 21
          7:00 p.m.
          Screening of and director's commentary on Keep the River on Your Right: A Modern Cannibal Tale (American, 2000, 93 minutes, color, 35 mm) by David Shapiro , director


          Tuesday, March 25
          7:00 p.m.
          Lecture, "Redefining Identity: Art, Genetics, and the New Nature of Portraiture" by Gary Schneider , photographer, and Dorothy Warburton , geneticist


          Thursday, April 10
          3:00 p.m.
          Informal public conversation, "The Politics of Media: Culture Jammers, Hackers, Hacktivists, and Other Encounters between Art, Media, and Technology" with Mark Dery , cultural critic, and McKenzie Wark , media theorist


          Thursday, April 10
          7:00 p.m.
          Lecture, "Collapsing New Buildings: The Trade Towers, Terror Art, and the Excesses of Aesthetic Philosophy" by Mark Dery , cultural critic


          Wednesday, September 24
          7:00 p.m.
          Lecture, "What Art Is For Now" by Peter Schjeldahl , art critic for The New Yorker


          October 20
          7:00 p.m.
          Lecture, "My Art Practice and Welcome To It: Tradition, Family, and Peanut Butter" by William Pope.L , visual and performance-theater artist and educator


          Thursday, October 30
          4:00 p.m.
          Informal public conversation, "A Moving Picture Show" with Allen Yates , artist, and Daniel Goodwin , head of the Combined Media Program in the Art Department at UAlbany


          Wednesday, November 12
          7:00 p.m.
          Boor Sculpture Studio Panel discussion: "Working in Arcadia: The Role of the Artist in Art Communities Today" Artists and directors from Art Omi Artist Colony, The Millay Colony for the Arts, and Yaddo will discuss the artist community experience