College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity

Dean
Robert Griffin, Ph.D.
Virginia Tech

Vice Dean
Jennifer Goodall, Ph.D.
University at Albany, SUNY

Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration
Matt Roche, M.A.
University at Albany, SUNY

Director of Student Services
Michael Baumgardner, M.A.
Teachers College, Columbia University

Training Coordinator
Nancy Kreis, B.A.
University at Albany, SUNY

Professors
Philip B. Eppard, Ph.D.
Brown University
Joette Stefl-Mabry, Ph.D.
Long Island University
Eric Stern, Ph.D.
Stockholm University

Associate Professors
Gary Ackerman, Ph.D.
King’s College
DeeDee Bennett, Ph.D.
Oklahoma State University
George Berg, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Stephen Coulthart, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh
Alex Greer, Ph.D.
University of Delaware
Hemalata Iyer, Ph.D.
University of Mysore, India
Donghee Sinn, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh
Jeannette Sutton, Ph.D.
University of Colorado Boulder
Xiaojun (Jenny) Yuan Ph.D.
Rutgers University

Assistant Professors
Brandon Behlendorf, Ph.D.
University of Maryland
Sam Jackson, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Brian Nussbaum, Ph.D.
University at Albany, SUNY
Samantha Penta, Ph.D.
University of Delaware
Amber Silver, Ph.D.
University of Waterloo
Unal Tatar, Ph.D.
Old Dominion University
Benjamin Yankson, Ph.D.
University of Ontario Institute of Technology
Michael Young, Ph.D.
Ohio State University

Public Service Professor
James Steiner, Ph.D.
Georgetown University

Professors of Practice
Norman Gervais, Ph.D.
University at Albany, SUNY
Michael Leczinsky, M.S.
University at Albany, SUNY
Shannon Mersand, M.S.
University at Albany, SUNY
David Turetsky, J.D.
University of Chicago School of Law
J. Frank Wiley, B.A.
Sojourner Douglas College

Adjuncts (estimated): 50
Affiliated Faculty (estimated): 45
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 8
                                         


 
We are becoming an increasingly connected society. From smart homes and wearables, to virtual reality headsets, thermostats, pet trackers, heart rate monitors, air quality sensors, and self-driving cars, it’s hard to find a single area of our lives that is not impacted by the “Internet of Things.” The College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity (CEHC) prepares the next generation of leaders to confront these grand challenges of the 21st century through interdisciplinary understandings of information and information technologies in society and in organizations. Data is at the heart of today’s society. CEHC offers programs that specifically explore the creation, dissemination, presentation, and use of data. At UAlbany’s first-in-the-nation College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity (CEHC), better understanding how to manage, and protect, our digital information has become a core priority. CEHC is a designated "iSchool," joining industry thought-leaders worldwide, sharing a fundamental interest in the relationships between information, people, and technology. The College offers degrees in emergency preparedness, homeland security and cybersecurity, information science, and informatics in order to meet the ever growing demand for individuals knowledgeable in these areas. For this reason, the mission of the CEHC is to make a difference by providing high quality academic programs, blending an interdisciplinary and entrepreneurial spirit, fostering enthusiasm for learning and teaching, promoting operational application of knowledge, and leading cutting-edge research initiatives that bring together people, technology, and knowledge to address the challenges of the 21st century.

Experiential Education

A cornerstone of the CEHC’s programming is the emphasis on experiential education. Through work with real-world clients during capstones and internships, authentic simulations, peer education, community service, and applied research in contemporary and highly relevant topics, students take what they have learned in the classroom and apply it in complex and dynamic environments. Through this experience, students internalize and contextualize the theoretical knowledge they have gained, hone their skills and capacities, and gain experience relevant to their future careers. Partnerships with government agencies, private companies, not-for-profit organizations and research centers help to provide internships, applied research and training opportunities for students, academics, and professionals.

Academic Programs

Graduate
CEHC offers a Master of Science in Information Science (M.S.I.S.) and a Master of Science in Information Science, School Library (M.S.S.L.), accredited by the American Library Association (ALA), as well as a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Information Science. The College also offers a Certificate of Graduate Study in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity, and is associated with a Certificate in Public Health Surveillance and Preparedness; a Certificate in Information Security; and a Certificate of Advanced Study in Library and Information Science. A combined B.A./M.S.I.S. or B.S./M.S.I.S. permits highly qualified students to begin work on the master’s degree while still an undergraduate.

Undergraduate
The College offers undergraduate degrees in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity and in Informatics. In each major, students do core coursework, experiential learning and a concentration.

Minors in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity and in Informatics are available. The Informatics minor has an option that combines with any major or a set of cognates coupled with a specific major to enhance the informatics perspective within that discipline. Currently, the cognates linked to a major are Art, Communication, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Economics, Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity, Geography, Journalism, Physics, and Sociology. See the “Minors” section of this bulletin for details.       

Requirements for the Major in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity

The major in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity is designed to provide students with a broad overview of these three critical fields. The major program provides both four-year and transfer students with a solid liberal arts education that emphasizes critical thinking, oral and written communication, creativity and innovation, problem solving skills, cultural literacy, and interpersonal and teamwork skills. In addition to these general skills, the major emphasizes leadership, public administration, management, risk analysis, ethics, policy making, planning, strategic communication, and systemic thinking. One of the unique and central elements of this major is the focus on experiential education. The courses in this major are designed to be an ideal setting for intellectual growth as students take what they have learned in the classroom and apply it to solve complex social problems in the real world.

Students with a concentration in Emergency Preparedness or Homeland Security will be awarded a B.A. degree; students with a concentration in Cybersecurity will be awarded a B.S. degree. Only one concentration may be declared. B.A. students are required to take 90 liberal arts and science credits out of the total 120 credits. B.S. students are required to take 60 liberal arts and science credits out of the total 120 credits.

General Program B.S. and General Program B.A. The major in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity requires a minimum of 39 credits distributed as follows:

Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity Core (18 credits):
C EHC/R PAD 101 Introduction to Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
C EHC 210 Critical Inquiry and Communication in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
C EHC 242 Cybersecurity or C INF 124X Cybersecurity Basics
C EHC/R PAD/R POS 343 Homeland Security
C EHC/R PAD 344 Emergency Preparedness
C EHC 345 Leadership and Ethics in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity

Experiential Learning (9 credits):
Students must take:
C EHC 310 Research Seminar in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity

AND 6 credits from the following list:
C EHC 340 Contemporary Issues in Security and Preparedness
C EHC 341 Washington in Perspective
C EHC 342 Washington Internship
C EHC 350 Cybersecurity Case Analysis - The Threat Within
C EHC 390 External Internship Experience in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity (repeatable)
C EHC 391 Research Internship Experience in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
C EHC 393 Simulation: Building Security and Preparedness
C EHC 394 Exercise Design and Implementation
C EHC 398 Experiential and Service Learning in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
C EHC 410 Capstone Project in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
C EHC/C I NF 495 Special Topics in Research, Applied and Experiential Learning
C INF 466 Independent Research (repeatable)
E EPL 456 Introduction to Peer Education or E EPL 457 Advanced Peer Education or E EPL 487 Institute in Education (as appropriate)

Over the course of the 6 credits, the experiences must meet the following criteria:
a) Knowledge Synthesis: Students must perform tasks that allow for the synthesis of prior knowledge gained throughout the EHC major.
b) Application: Students must be provided with the opportunity to apply their knowledge in a "real-world" context (i.e., they must help solve a real-world problem).
c) Professionalism: Students must be exposed to the requirements of operating in a professional environment (suitable to their intended concentration) and must demonstrate a minimal level of professionalism in order to earn their credits.

Vetting of experiential learning opportunities will be conducted by CEHC.

Concentrations (at least 12 credits):
Select one concentration.

Emergency Preparedness Concentration (General Program B.A.)

C EHC 400 Preparedness and Response
C EHC 401 Mitigation and Recovery

Select two courses from:
A ATM 100 The Atmosphere
A ATM 103 Introduction to Climate Change
A ATM 107 The Oceans
A ATM 200 Natural Disasters
A ENV/A GEO 105 Introduction to Environmental Science
A HIS 158 The World in the 20th Century: Carbon Empires and Their Discontents
A HIS 220 Public Policy in Modern America
A HIS 311 History of American Foreign Policy I                                                                                    
A HIS 312 History of American Foreign Policy II
A HIS 313 Constitutional History of the United States
A HIS 329 Environmental History
A GOG 290 Introduction to Cartography
A GOG 484 Remote Sensing I
A USP 201 Introductory Urban Planning
A USP 315 State and Regional Planning
A USP/A GOG 430 Environmental Planning
A USP 456/A GOG 496 Geographic Information Systems
A USP 474 Site Planning
A USP 475 Urban Design
C EHC 360 The Legal, Ethical, and Operational Impacts of Unmanned Systems
C EHC 402 Risk, Planning, and Continuity                                                                                        
C EHC 403 Governance and Stakeholders in Emergency Management and Homeland Security        
C EHC 405 Crises and Vulnerable Populations                                                                              
C EHC 442  Advanced Threat and Hazard Assessment
C EHC/R PAD 455 Disaster, Crisis and Emergency Management and Policy
C EHC/R PAD 471 Military Forces in Support of Civil Authorities
C EHC/R PAD 472 Disasters and Crisis Management in the Public, Private, and Nonprofit Sectors
H SPH 201 Introduction Public Health
H SPH 231 Concepts in Epidemiology
H SPH 321 Global Environmental Issues and Their Effect on Human Health
H SPH/H EHS 323 Environmental Laboratory Perspectives in Public Health
H SPH 341 Promoting Healthy People and Communities
R PAD/R POS 140 Introduction to Public Policy
R POS/R PAD 321 State and Local Government
R POS 336 Civil Liberties
T SPH/R POS/R PAD 272 Health and Human Rights: an Interdisciplinary Approach

Homeland Security Concentration (General Program B.A.)

C EHC 460 Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism
C EHC 461 Homeland Security Risk

Select two courses from:
 A BIO 175 Forensic Science Investigation
A HIS 158 The World in the 20th Century: Carbon Empires and Their Discontents
A HIS 220 Public Policy in Modern America                                                                                    
A HIS/A JST 275 Antisemitism: Historical Exploration & Contemporary Challenges
A HIS 289/A LCS 271 Latin American Drug
A HIS 290 War on Terror as History                                                                                                  
A HIS 311 History of American Foreign Policy I
A HIS 312 History of American Foreign Policy II
A HIS 313 Constitutional History of the United States
A HIS 366 War, Society, and Culture since 1789
A HIS/A REL 387 Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture I
A HIS 456 The Diplomacy of the Nuclear Age
C EHC 221 Introduction to Intelligence
C EHC 320 Psychology of Terrorism
C EHC 321 Human Trafficking
C EHC 324 Civil Liberties in Context: Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
C EHC 325 Critical Infrastructure
C EHC 355 Comparative Homeland Security
C EHC 356 Transnational Crime
C EHC 360 The Legal, Ethical, and Operational Impacts of Unmanned Systems
C EHC 393 Simulation: Building Security and Preparedness
C EHC 402 Risk, Planning, and Continuity
C EHC 403 Governance and Stakeholders in Emergency Management and Homeland Security
C EHC 405 Crises and Vulnerable Populations
C EHC 442  Advanced Threat and Hazard Assessment
C EHC/R PAD 456 Homeland Security Intelligence
C EHC/R PAD 457 Intelligence Analysis for Homeland Security
C EHC/R PAD 459 Homeland Security: Building Preparedness Capabilities
R CRJ 201 Introduction to the Criminal Justice Process
R CRJ 202 Introduction to Law and Criminal Justice
R CRJ/A SOC 203 Criminology
R CRJ 281 Introduction to Statistics in Criminal Justice
R CRJ 351 Policing in a Free Society
R CRJ 353/R POS 363 American Criminal Courts
R CRJ 401 Crime Deviation and Conformity
R CRJ 417 Cross-National Crime
R CRJ 418 Information Use and Misuse in Criminal Justice
R POS/R PAD 140 Introduction to Public Policy
R POS/R PAD 316 Methodological Tools for Public Policy
R POS 320 American Federalism
R POS 360 Violent Political Conflict
T POS 260 Political Violence
T POS 261Y/R POS 361 Comparative Ethnicity

Cybersecurity Risk Management Concentration (General Program B.S.)

C INF 124X Cybersecurity Basics 
One of: 
C INF 306 Information Security and Assurance, or
C EHC/R PAD 445 Principles and Practices of Cybersecurity

Any two courses:
C EHC/R PAD 449 Cybersecurity: Long Term Planning and Risk Management
C EHC 450 Cybersecurity Policy, Law & Institutions
C EHC/R PAD 469 Cyber Threats and Intelligence
C INF 403 Advanced Networking and Security
C INF 452 Computer and Network Security
C INF 453 Information Security and Privacy
C INF 454 Human Aspects of Cybersecurity
C INF 455 Prevention and Protection Strategies in Cybersecurity

Non-credit training in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
Students must complete 100 hours selected from a list of approved trainings. Students must complete the minimum number of hours required in each training tier as follows: Foundational; Professional Development; Community Engagement; Concentration Specific.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Informatics

The B.S in Informatics is a unique opportunity for students to study the creation, presentation, and use of data and technology across disciplines. The degree is a combined major and minor, requiring a total of 54 credits. This includes 42 credits of required core courses that focus on the relationship between technology and society, the use of various technologies across platforms, and programming fundamentals. Emphasis is also placed on providing students with various opportunities to gain real-world experience. As part of the 54 credits, students are required to complete 12 credits in a concentration. Students electing the IT concentration or the IUE concentration can complete the entire degree online.

The concentrations are:
• Interactive User Experience (offered fully online)
• Cybersecurity
• Social Media
• Data Analytics
• Software Development
• Information Technology (offered fully online)
• Game Design and Development
• Self-Designed

General Program B.S. (combined major and minor sequence) A minimum of 54 credits as follows:

Core courses (42 credits)

Information and Society (9 credits)
C INF 100X Information in the 21st Century
C INF 301 Emerging Trends in Information and Technology
C INF 499 Senior Seminar in Informatics

Practical Applications (15 credits)
C INF 108 Programming for Problem Solving (or substitute I CSI 201 Introduction to Computer Science)
C INF 201 Introduction to Web Technologies
C INF 202 Introduction to Data and Databases
C INF 203 Introduction to Networks and Systems
C INF 305 Digital Project Management

Math (3 credits)
Any A MAT course between 100 - 299 (except A MAT 108 Elementary Statistics)

Research (6 credits)
C INF 200 Research Methods for Informatics (or substitute A SOC 220 Introduction to Social Research)
A MAT 108 Elementary Statistics (or substitute A SOC 221 Statistics for Sociologists)

Experiential Learning (9 credits)
Students will be advised into course-related experiences that complement their chosen concentration. Some classes may be repeated to count for a total of 6 credits toward this requirement. At least two different experiences are required to complete this requirement. Fully-online students are an exception to this, and only they may complete C INF 469 (9 credits) to fulfill this requirement.

C INF 398 Field Experience in Informatics
C INF 465 Senior Capstone in Informatics (repeatable)
C INF 466 Independent Research (repeatable)
C INF 467 Technology-Based Community Support (repeatable)
C INF 468 Undergraduate Internship (repeatable)
C INF 469 Undergraduate Internship for Fully Online Students
C EHC 350 Cybersecurity Case Analysis - The Threat Within
C EHC 390 Internship Experience in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
C EHC 410 Capstone Project in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity
E APS/E EPL 390 Internship in Higher Education (as appropriate)
E APS/E EPL 487 or E APS/E EPL 456, E APS/E EPL 457 Peer Education (as appropriate)
R SSW 390 Community and Public Service Program II (as appropriate)
U UNI 390 Internships for Juniors and Seniors (as appropriate)

Concentrations (at least 12 credits)
Select one concentration.

Interactive User Experience (offered fully online)
C INF 302 Human-Computer Interactive Design
C INF 362 Intermediate Interactive Design
Select two courses from:
A DOC/A JRL 324 Introduction to Documentary Photography
A DOC/A HIS 330 Foundations of Documentary Web/Hypermedia Production
A DOC/A HIS 406 Practicum in Historical Documentary Filmmaking
A DOC/A HIS 407 Readings and Practicum in Digital History and Hypermedia
C INF 124X Cybersecurity Basics
C INF 308 Programming for Informatics
C INF 363 Digital Design
C INF 401 Case Studies in Digital Citizenship
C INF 462 Current Technologies in Interactive Design
C INF 496 Intermediate Special Topics in Informatics (as appropriate, repeatable)     

Cybersecurity
C INF 124X Cybersecurity Basics
C INF 306 Information Security and Assurance 

Select any two courses from:
C EHC 399 Selected Topics in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity (as appropriate, repeatable)
C EHC 449 Cybersecurity: Long Term Planning and Risk Management
C EHC 450 Cybersecurity Policy, Law & Institutions
C EHC 455 Principle and Practice of Cybersecurity
C EHC 469 Cyber Threats and Intelligence
C INF 401 Case Studies in Digital Citizenship
C INF 452 Computer and Network Security
C INF 453 Information Security and Privacy
C INF 454 Human Aspects of Cybersecurity
C INF 455 Prevention and Protection Strategies in Cybersecurity
C INF 496 Intermediate Special Topics in Informatics (as appropriate, repeatable)
I CSI 300Z Social, Security, and Privacy Implications of Computing
I CSI 424 Information Security
I CSI 426 Cryptography

Social Media
C INF 131 Introduction to Data Analytics: Seeking Information in Data with Computation
C INF 307 Current Topics in Social Media
Select two courses from:
A DOC/A HIS 224 Nonfiction Media Storytelling
A SOC 210 Sociology of Culture
A SOC 255 Mass Media
A SOC 270 Social and Demographic
C EHC 399 Selected Topics in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity (as appropriate, repeatable)
C INF 308 Programming for Informatics
C INF 363 Digital Design
C INF 401 Case Studies in Digital Citizenship
C INF 496 Intermediate Special Topics in Informatics (as appropriate, repeatable)
I CSI 432 Network Science

Data Analytics
C INF 131 Introduction to Data Analytics: Seeking Information in Data with Computation
C INF 300 Probability and Statistics for Data Analytics
Select two courses from:
C EHC 399 Selected Topics in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity (as appropriate, repeatable)
C INF 407 Modern Issues in Databases
C INF 428 Analysis, Visualization, and Prediction in Analytics
C INF 451 Bayesian Data Analysis and Signal Processing
C INF 496 Intermediate Special Topics in Informatics (as appropriate, repeatable)
I CSI 431 Data Mining
I CSI 432 Network Science
I CSI 436 Machine Learning
I IST 433 Information Storage and Retrieval

Software Development
C INF 308 Programming for Informatics
C INF 405 Advanced Concepts and Practices in Software Development
I CSI 201/I ECE 201 Introduction to Computer Science
I CSI 213/I ECE 213 Data Structures

Information Technology (online only)
C INF 302 Human-Computer Interactive Design
C INF 303 Intermediate Networking
C INF 306 Information Security and Assurance
C INF 308 Programming for Informatics

Game Design and Development
C INF 171 eSports and the Digital Gaming Ecosystem
C INF 363  Digital Design
C INF 371 Digital Game Design and Development l

Choose one course from:
C INF 471  Digital Game Design and Development ll
C INF 496 Intermediate Special Topics in Informatics (as appropriate, repeatable)
E TAP 534 Introduction to Games for Learning: Theory and Practice
E TAP 535 Introduction to Game Design for Educators
E TAP 540 Learning and Teaching Computer Science Principles

Self-Designed (with Departmental Approval only)
Student must provide a proposal of courses to take to support the proposed self-designed concentration that includes at least four courses. At least 9 credits of a self-designed concentration should be taken while enrolled in the Informatics B.S. program. A proposal must be approved by CEHC faculty before the student can declare it.

Combined BA-BS Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity or BS Informatics with MS Information Science

The 4+1 combined degree program of a Bachelor’s in Informatics or Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity with a Master of Science in Information Science is designed to provide CEHC undergraduate students with an opportunity to receive a graduate degree at an accelerated pace.

One of the unique and central elements of the combined program is the ability to substitute four of the required undergraduate courses with four of the core graduate courses. During the senior year, the student will begin their graduate coursework while still paying undergraduate tuition rates, saving both time and money towards the completion of the Master’s degree.

Students must have a 3.2 minimum GPA, and have completed at least 56 credits at the undergraduate level to apply for admission into the combined program. Applications should be submitted in the first semester of the junior year. Required elements include three letters of recommendation, and a statement of goals. The GRE is waived for applicants to the combined program.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to meet with a financial aid counselor to ensure that acceptance into the program will not affect their financial aid.

Core Requirements for all students (15 credits)

C IST 601: The Information Environment; replaces C INF 499 or 1 C EHC elective
C IST 602: Information & Knowledge Organization
C IST 614: Management of Information Agencies; replaces 1 C INF/C EHC elective
C IST 608: Research Methods; replaces C INF 466 or C EHC 410
C IST 678: Internship Experience; replaces C INF 468 or C EHC 390*

*It is recommended that the internship take place during the second semester of the senior year, after the student has completed coursework and instruction in the overview and best practices of the information science field.

Concentrations

At the graduate level, students take 6-12 credits in a concentration, supplemented by 9-15 credits of electives with the consultation of their advisor.

• Archives & Records Management
• Data Analytics
• Information Management & Technology
• Intelligence Analysis
• Library & Information Services

More information, including the curriculum for the MS Information Science, can be found in the Graduate Bulletin. Apply online at https://www.albany.edu/graduate/apply-now.

Combined B.A./M.S.I.S. or B.S./M.S.I.S. Program

The combined B.A./M.S.I.S. or B.S./M.S.I.S. program in Information Science provides a unique opportunity for capable, highly motivated students to pursue any undergraduate liberal arts major while at the same time beginning their professional preparation for a career in the rapidly expanding fields of information management and curation. A distinctive feature of the curriculum is the stress placed upon user and human as well as technological factors. Toward the end of their program of study, students will be expected to combine academic study with internship experience in locations such as corporations; New York State government agencies; archives; or academic, public or special libraries.

Graduates will be prepared for employment in a wide variety of public and private sector settings within business, industry, law, humanities, health and human services, and education where they will function as librarians, archivists, records managers, information systems specialists, information analysts, or information officers and managers.

The program is especially strong in: (1) data analytics, (2) intelligence analysis, (3) library and information science, (4) archives/records administration, and (5) information management and technology. 

Students may be admitted to the combined program at the beginning of their junior year or after successful completion of 56 credits. A carefully designed program can enable the student to earn the B.A. or B.S. and M.S.I.S. within 10 semesters. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation are required. The Graduate Record Exam is not required for admission. In qualifying for the baccalaureate, students will meet all University and school requirements, including existing major and minor requirements, general education requirements, minimum liberal arts and sciences requirements, and residency requirements.

Additionally, students will complete a minor in Information Science including, as a minimum, the following courses: C INF 108; C INF 202; C IST 601; C IST 602; C IST 614, and C IST 506 or C IST 533 or C IST 546 or C EHC 557 or C IST 603.

In qualifying for the master’s degree, students will meet all University and school requirements, including completing a minimum of 42 graduate credits, and any conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, or other professional experience, and residency requirements. The combined program allows students to complete 12 graduate credits as an undergraduate that are applied to both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.