Courses in Public Health

Health Courses

H SPH 201 Introduction to Public Health (3)
A general introduction to what public health is, its importance for everybody’s health, and how it functions as a combination of science and politics. The role of the public health system will be illustrated by describing issues confronting New York State and what is being done about them.

H SPH 202 From Cholera to Cancer: History, Challenges, and Achievements in Public Health (3)
Public health crosses political, disciplinary, social, and economic borders. Within this context, students will discuss key events in the history of public health and the philosophical basis of studying the health of populations. Readings and outside assignments include popular plays and books, as well as films and various self-teaching streaming videos.

H SPH 203 Integrative Care in Personal and Public Health (3)
This course examines the role of yoga, meditation, and optimal nutrition in managing stress and maintaining a sense of health and wellbeing. Students will guided in personally practicing these lifestyle interventions and examining their emerging role in public health.

H SPH 231 Concepts in Epidemiology (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the science of epidemiology. Specific subjects will include causal thinking, the epidemiologic framework, and study designs utilized in epidemiologic studies and the role of epidemiology in public health. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 108.

H SPH 259 Topics in Public Health (3)
Introductory study of a special topic in Public Health. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

T SPH 272 (= T PAD 272 & T POS 272) Health and Human Rights: an Interdisciplinary Approach (3)
This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to health and human rights and the contemporary challenges and solutions associated with them. The course will be taught with guest lectures from experts in public health, philosophy, social welfare, law, gender studies, public administration the United Nations, among others. Through lectures, discussion and case studies, students will develop a broad theoretical understanding of health as a human right, become familiar with legal and policy frameworks to support public health, and acquire skills in the application of these concepts and the implementation and evaluation of solutions to our modern health challenges. T PAD/T POS/T SPH 272 is the Honors College version of R PAD/R POS/H HPM 486. Only one version may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

H SPH 305 (= H BMS 305) Biological Basis of Personal and Public Health (3)
This course is designed to provide students with a foundation of how biological processes, infectious diseases, pathologies and immunological tools impact personal and public health. This course is designed for students with minimal formal training in the biological sciences. The primary emphasis of this course is to provide the necessary information to students with diverse backgrounds such that they learn both the breadth and depth of how biological processes are important in the health sciences and public health. Prerequisite(s): one semester of college level biology.

H SPH 310 (= H HPM 310) Health Care in the U.S.: Key Policy Issues (3)
This course is an overview of the status, trends, and key issues concerning U.S. health care delivery today. It will include a comparative assessment of health policies by determining which issues in the U.S. health economy have similar causes with those in other nations, and which are specific to domestic circumstances. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 or permission of instructor.

H SPH 321 Global Environmental Issues and Their Effect on Human Health (3)
Globalization has made the earth a much smaller place so that we can no longer focus merely on issues in the United States. This course will address global environmental concerns and their impact on human change, atmospheric pollution, sanitation, etc., within the context of their impacts on populations throughout the world. Faculty and invited lecturers will be guest presenters. Prerequisite(s): one semester of college-level course in biology or chemistry.

H SPH 323 (= H EHS 323) Environmental Laboratory Perspectives in Public Health (3)
The course will define current public health issues in environmental health sciences, highlighting emerging concerns faced by researchers and practitioners. This course will explore environmental agents of disease, including elemental, organic and biological current and emerging contaminants from an environmental laboratory perspective. The course will define characteristics of and describe toxicological and analytical considerations of disease derived from environmental agents. Heavy emphasis will be placed on how laboratory techniques have driven policy and regulation. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one year of college-level biology.

H SPH 332 (= H EPI 332) Introduction to Biostatistics (3)
This course will be a basic introduction to statistics as used in the field of Public Health. Students will learn basic descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic rules of probability spaces, binomial and normal probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing. In addition, students will learn how to use a computer program to analyze data. Prerequisite(s): students must complete A MAT 108 with a grade of B or better to register for H SPH/H EPI 332.

H SPH 341/341Z Promoting Healthy People and Communities (3)
This course focuses on how health promotion strategies influence healthy behaviors, healthy people, and healthy communities. Current public health issues will guide us in examining key health promotion concepts, health concerns at different ages, and the multilevel causes of different health behaviors. Health inequalities will be weaved into most topics. As the first course in the two-course capstone sequence for students completing the Public Health major, this is a writing intensive course that teaches students how to synthesize the literature and write a research paper using a scholarly writing style.

H SPH 342 How U.S. Health Care Works: Myths and Realities (3)
This course will introduce students to everyday realities of the U.S. health care system related to current issues like health care quality, access to care, the uninsured, patient safety, health care inflation, prescription drugs, physician-patient interaction, use of health care technology, and end-of-life care. The course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the various actors, stakeholder interactions, and functions of the U.S. health care system, through a case-based approach interweaving real world events, practice experience, and research about those events.

H SPH 343 Mass Media and Health Behavior (3)
The course will focus on examining how entertainment media, including the Internet, influences health behavior, including topics such as tobacco use, obesity, and violence. The course will also look at the role that advertising has on health, and discuss how the media can be used to educate people about healthy behavior.

H SPH 381 (= H HPM 381 & A ECO 381/W) Economics of Health Care (3)
Economics concepts are used to explain the nature of demand and supply in the health care field. The behavior of consumers and health care providers is examined from an economic perspective. Areas of market failures and the rationale for government intervention are also described. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300 or permission of instructor.

H SPH 389 (= C EHC 389) Introduction to Emergency Health Preparedness and Response (3)
This course provides an introduction to emergency preparedness and response to health threats including natural disasters, infectious diseases, acts of terrorism, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. Federal, state, and local policies underlying emergency management and preparedness are reviewed. The course discusses the distinct contributions of the various sectors of the emergency preparedness and response workforce including public health, healthcare, and emergency management personnel. The importance of community engagement and strong private and public collaborations for effective emergency preparedness and response is discussed. The crucial role of social and cultural factors, including health and healthcare disparities, in emergency preparedness and response are emphasized throughout the course. Current and past catastrophic events in the U.S. and in other countries are examined. Students apply the course content to a simulated catastrophic event of their choice. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

H SPH 397 Independent Study in Public Health (1-3)
Independent study or research on selected topics in public health will be offered under the direction of a faculty member. The student is responsible for locating an appropriate faculty member who is willing to direct the research of independent study. An independent study or research assignment may be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 credits may be earned. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and undergraduate program director, and junior or senior standing. S/U graded.

H SPH 421 Preventing Disease, Disability, & Premature Death (3)
This course discusses the major health behaviors and demographic factors that lead to death, disease & disability throughout the lifespan. It describes policies and programs that address those underlying causes of ill health and provides a framework for developing strategies for promoting health and wellness. Prerequisites: H SPH 201; H SPH 341 preferred.

H SPH 430 (= H HPM 430) Health Literacy (3)
In a society where the health system has grown increasingly complex and difficult to navigate, and where people may have instant access to information from multiple sources, health literacy has become a major issue. This course is designed to introduce students to the concept of health literacy, the significance of health literacy as a determinant of health outcomes, the measures developed to assess health literacy, and best practices for improving health literacy. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

H SPH 435 Social Determinants of Health: Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Applications (3)
This course provides an overview of social determinants of health. Examples of topics include health effects of educational attainment, social integration/networks, racial discrimination, childhood psychosocial environment and job strain. Mixed teaching methods will be used, such as small and large group discussions, debates, student presentations, and lectures. Prerequisite(s): H SPH 201.

H SPH 459 Advanced Topics in Public Health (3)
Advanced study of a special topic in Public Health. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

H SPH 460/460Z Evidence-Based Public Health (3)
Public health programs and policies typically aim to influence, facilitate, or promote healthy behavior change. However, not all programs are equally effective at changing behavior and improving population health. Therefore, a critical skill for public health practitioners is the ability to determine which programs or policies are likely to be the most effective, as well the ability to develop and improve programs in order to maximize their effectiveness. As the second course in the capstone sequence it will provide students with practical guidance on how to identify and implement public health programs that are known to be effective based on rigorous study and testing (i.e., evidence-based programs), how to develop new programs that are based on a strong foundation of existing knowledge, and how to evaluate programs and policies so that they can be improved, retained, or discontinued. Prerequisite(s): H SPH 201, 231, and 341Z.

H SPH 469 (= H HPM 469) Topics in Health Policy, Management, and Behavior (3)
Advanced course on selected topics in Health Policy, Management, and Behavior. Topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): senior standing and permission of instructor.

H SPH 490 Field Placement in Public Health (3)
Supervised placement in a public health agency or organization. Provides practical experiences to engage students in the application of public health principles and practices to complement knowledge gained in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): open only to public health seniors; at least 9 credits of public health major core coursework, including H SPH 201 and H SPH 231, which must be completed prior to enrolling in H SPH 490; G.P.A. of 3.00 or above; permission of instructor. S/U graded.

H SPH 499 Research Placement in Public Health (1-3)
Research Placement in Public Health will provide a supervised research experience with a School of Public Health faculty member. The goal of the placement is to provide an opportunity for students to integrate and apply the knowledge learned in the public health major courses while learning about public health research. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): H SPH 201 or permission of instructor. S/U graded.

Health Policy and Management Courses

T HPM 203 Social Media and Public Health (3)
As a frequently used communication tool, social media has been increasingly utilized by public health professionals and organizations. This course will teach students how social media can be used to disseminate public health knowledge and promote healthy lifestyles. Open to Honors College students only.

T HPM 250 Introduction to Maternal and Child Health from a Public Health Perspective (3)
This course is an introduction to the maternal and child health (MCH) field. A knowledge base of MCH within a public health context, focusing on MCH life course issues and public health approaches to address these issues, will be provided. Professional and educational opportunities within MCH will be described. Open to Honors College students only.

H HPM 310 (= H SPH 310) Health Care in the U.S.: Key Policy Issues (3)
This course is an overview of the status, trends, and key issues concerning U.S. health care delivery today. It will include a comparative assessment of health policies by determining which issues in the U.S. health economy have similar causes with those in other nations, and which are specific to domestic circumstances. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 or permission of instructor.

H HPM 381 (= H SPH 381 & A ECO 381/W) Economics of Health Care (3)
Economics concepts are used to explain the nature of demand and supply in the health care field. The behavior of consumers and health care providers is examined from an economic perspective. Areas of market failures and the rationale for government intervention are also described. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300 or permission of instructor.

H HPM 430 (= H SPH 430) Health Literacy (3)
In a society where the health system has grown increasingly complex and difficult to navigate, and where people may have instant access to information from multiple sources, health literacy has become a major issue. This course is designed to introduce students to the concept of health literacy, the significance of health literacy as a determinant of health outcomes, the measures developed to assess health literacy, and best practices for improving health literacy. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

H HPM 469 (= H SPH 469) Topics in Health Policy, Management, and Behavior (3)
Advanced course on selected topics in Health Policy, Management, and Behavior. Topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): senior standing and permission of instructor.

H HPM 486 (= R PAD 486 & R POS 486) International Health and Human Rights: an Interdisciplinary Approach (3)
This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to health and human rights and the contemporary challenges and solutions associated with them. The course will be taught with guest lectures from experts in public health, philosophy, social welfare, law, gender studies, public administration the United Nations, among others. Through lectures, discussion and case studies, students will develop a broad theoretical understanding of health as a human right, become familiar with legal and policy frameworks to support public health, and acquire skills in the application of these concepts and the implementation and evaluation of solutions to our modern health challenges. T PAD/T POS/T SPH 272 is the Honors College version of R PAD/R POS/H HPM 486. Only one version may be taken for credit.

Biomedical Sciences Courses

H BMS 305 (= H SPH 305) Biological Basis of Personal and Public Health (3)
This course is designed to provide students with a foundation of how biological processes, infectious diseases, pathologies and immunological tools impact personal and public health. This course is designed for students with minimal formal training in the biological sciences. The primary emphasis of this course is to provide the necessary information to students with diverse backgrounds such that they learn both the breadth and depth of how biological processes are important in the health sciences and public health. Prerequisite(s): one semester of college level biology.

H BMS 310 Molecular and Genomic Approaches in Biotechnology I (4)
This course is the first of a two-part sequence. Basic molecular biology techniques will be reviewed, such as the purification, enzymatic manipulation, and separation of nucleic acids, PCR, and hybridization. Subsequently the course will consider such technologies as DNA sequencing and quantitative PCR with a focus on both the instrumentation required to perform these technologies their research applications. Lecture topics will be partnered with laboratory exercises that provide hands-on experience so that students develop a more full understanding of these technologies, again focusing on the instrumentation required to perform them. While instrument operation and data analysis will be highlighted, there will be significant coverage of other key issues such as instrument design, maintenance, quality control calibrations, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212 and 217.

H BMS 311 Molecular and Genomic Approaches in Biotechnology II (4)
This course is the second of a two-part sequence. Next Generation Sequencing and microarray analysis will be covered with a focus on the instrumentation required to perform these technologies. Research applications of the technologies will be highlighted. Lecture topics will be partnered with laboratory exercises that provide hands-on experience so that students develop a more full understanding of these technologies, again focusing on the instrumentation required to perform them. While instrument operation and data analysis will be highlighted, there will be significant coverage of other key issues such as instrument design, maintenance, quality control calibrations, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 310.

H BMS 312 Proteomic Methodologies in Biotechnology (4)
The course will begin with a brief review of basic analytical techniques such as SDS-PAGE, chromatography and mass spectrometry. The main focus of the course will be on such technologies as 2D gel electrophoresis, high pressure liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and the instrumentation required to perform these technologies. Applications of the technologies will be highlighted, including small molecular analysis, peptide and protein sequencing, protein expression analysis, and protein post-translational modifications. The lecture topics will be partnered with laboratory exercises that provide hands-on experience so that students develop a more full understanding of these technologies, again with a focus on the instrumentation required to perform them. While instrument operation and data analysis will be highlighted, there will be significant coverage of other key issues such as instrument design, maintenance, quality control calibrations, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120 and A BIO 217.

H BMS 314 Animal and Cell Culture Model Systems (4)
The course will begin with a brief review of the most commonly used animal model systems. Techniques used to generate and analyze these models will be discussed in detail. The use of cell culture and in vitro differentiation systems as alternatives to animal models will be considered. Applications of the technologies will include nucleic acid extraction from cells and tissues, histological examination of tissues, laser capture microdissection, flow cytometry, and in vitro cell differentiation assays. Lecture topics will be partnered with laboratory exercises that provide hands-on experience so that students develop a more complete understanding of these technologies, with a focus on the instrumentation required to perform them. While instrument operation and data analysis will be highlighted, there will be significant coverage of other key issues such as experimental design and troubleshooting. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212 and 217.

H BMS 410 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Molecular Core Lab (3)
Students will acquire practical, hands-on experience with the use of instrumentation in molecular biology/genomics research in a core laboratory environment. Projects may include the usage of instrumentation for nucleic acid extraction, PCR, quantitative PCR, and DNA sequencing. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 310.

H BMS 411 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Genomics Core Lab (3)
Students will acquire practical, hands-on experience with the use of instrumentation in genomics/microarray research in a core laboratory environment. Projects may include the usage of instrumentation for nucleic acid extraction, microarray analysis, and Next Generation DNA sequencing. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 311. 

H BMS 412 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Proteomics Core Lab (3)
Students will acquire practical, hands-on experience with the use of instrumentation in proteomics research in a core laboratory environment. Projects may include the usage of instrumentation for 2D gel electrophoresis, high pressure liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 312.

H BMS 414 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Cell Analysis Core Lab (3)
Students will acquire practical, hands-on experience with the use of instrumentation in cell analysis research in a core laboratory environment. Projects may include the usage of instrumentation for histological examination of cells and tissues, laser capture microdissection, and flow cytometry. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 314.

H BMS 415 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Academic Lab (3)
Students will acquire practical, hands-on experience with the use of instrumentation in an academic laboratory environment. Projects will include the use of instrumentation relevant to the research activities of the particular academic laboratory. Permission of the Principle Investigator of the laboratory is required. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 310.

H BMS 420 Bio-Instrumentation Cooperative Training Internship (3)
Students will perform a research internship with a local biotechnology company or academic laboratory. Students will gain a more full understanding of how instrumentation is used in biotechnology to address complex research questions, as well as the expectations that come with a professional career in laboratory research. Prerequisite(s): any two courses from H BMS 410, 411, 412, 414, 415.