FY 2019 Federal Budget

April 2019

FY 2020 Budget Request

Last month, President Trump released his FY 20 budget proposal, which proposes $2.7 trillion in spending cuts over 10 years. Much like previous budget requests, this budget proposes eliminating several higher education and research programs, including the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program, GEAR UP, Title IV International Education, and the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy.

Overall, the President’s budget request would significantly reduce investment in higher education and research. For example, compared to FY 19, the Department of Education would receive a $7.1 billion cut (10 percent), not including a $2 billion rescission to the Pell Grant surplus. Additionally, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation would see a $4.7 billion cut (12.1 percent) and $1 billion cut (12 percent), respectively.

We will continue to monitor the federal budget and keep the campus community informed with updates.

FY 2019 Appropriations

Last February, Congress passed a seven-bill funding package that would avert a second partial government shutdown. The package would fund through September 30 nine departments and many agencies including: NSF, NASA, NEH, NEA and USDA’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative.

As a reminder, FY 2019 funding for the U.S. Departments of Education (ED) and Health and Human Services (HHS) and Energy were finalized earlier in 2018.

The bill provides increases to the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Science Mission Directorate while funding the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Science and Technology at flat levels compared to FY 2018. None of SUNY’s appropriations priorities saw funding decreases relative to FY 2018 in this bill.

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  • Manufacturing Extension Program (MEP) is funded at $140 million, level with FY 18
  • National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) is funded at $15 million, level with FY 18

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – the Office of Science and Technology is funded at $706 million, level with FY 18 enacted

National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is funded at $155 million, a $2 million increase from the FY 18 level

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is funded at $155 million, a $2 million increase from the FY 18 level

National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is funded at $5.425 billion, which is a $485 million decrease from FY 18

  • NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) is funded at $566 million which is a 3 percent increase from FY 18
  • The National Weather Service (NWS) budget remains essentially flat at just under $1.2 billion

National Science Foundation (NSF) is funded at $8.075 billion, which is $308 million more than the FY 18 funding level of $7.767 billion

  • The bill funds Research and Related Activities at $6.520 billion, which is $186 million more than the FY 18 funding level of $6.334 billion
  • For Education and Human Resources, the bill funds the directorate at $910 million, which is $8 million more than the FY 18 funding level of $902 million
  • The bill funds Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction at $295.7 million, which is $113 million more than the FY 18 funding level of $182 million

Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture

  • $415 million for the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, a $15 million increase from FY 18 enacted

NASA’s Science, Aeronautics, and Space Technology Directorates

  • The bill funds the Science Mission Directorate at $6.905 billion, which is $684 million more than the FY 18 funding level of $6.221 billion
  • For the Aeronautics Mission Directorate, the bill funds the directorate at $725 million, which is $40 million more than the FY 18 funding level of $685 million
  • The bill funds the Space Technology Directorate at $926.9 million, which is $167 million more than the FY 18 funding level

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January 2019

The FY 2019 Federal Budget Update and Partial Federal Government Shutdown

In August of 2018, the Congress passed and the President signed into law two appropriations bills for FY 2019. The Senate approved the House vote on a Labor Health and Human Services, Education, and Defense “minibus” appropriations package. As in the past, the spending levels in the “minibus” bill stand in sharp contrast to the Administration’s budget proposals, which called for steep cuts to almost all domestic programs while increasing the Department of Defense budget.

The bill provides many increases for student aid and research grant programs.

Department of Education

  • The bill would provide $22.475 billion for the Pell Grant program which is level with FY 2018 and the President’s request. The bill would increase the maximum Pell Grant award to $6,195.
  • The President would have cut the Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GANN) but the bill funds GANN at $23 million, level with the FY 2018 funding.
  • The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) would be funded at $840 million, which the President had proposed eliminating.
  • The Federal Work Study program would receive $1.130 billion, which is the same level as FY 2018 and $650 million above the President’s request.
  • The TRIO program is funded at $1.010 billion which also is level with FY 2018 funding, whereas the President would have reduced the program to $950 million.
  • The GEAR UP program is funded at $350 million, equal to FY 2018, but the President had proposed to eliminate the program.
  • The Institute of Education Sciences would receive $615 million, which is $2 million above FY 2018 and $93 million more than the President requested.
  • Title VI International Education Programs receives $72 million, level with FY 2018, whereas the President had proposed to eliminate the program.

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

  • The “minibus” funds NIH at $39.084 billion, a $2 billion increase from FY 2018. The President, by contrast, would fund NIH only at $34.757 billion.
  • The NIH funding level is inclusive of full $711 million of Innovation Fund support under the 21st Century Cures Act.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) – Title VII and Title VIII would receive $643 million, which is $3 million less than FY 2018 but $555 million above the President's request.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is level funded at $334 million. The President had recommended consolidation of AHRQ into NIH, but the bill does not support such a move.

Department of Defense (Research)

Science & Technology
The bill includes $16 billion for Defense S&T accounts (6.1-6.3), which is $1.77 billion above the President's budget and an increase of $563 million from FY 2018.
Basic Research
The bill would provides $2.6 billion for Basic Research, which is $529 million more than the President's budget and $455 million above FY 2018.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
The bill includes $3.4 billion for DARPA, a $375 million increase from FY 2018.

Department of Energy (DOE), Energy and Water Development

  • The Office of Science is funded at $6.858 billion, which is $1.186 billion over FY 2018 funding and $2.389 billion over the President’s request.
  • Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy is funded at $366 million, which is $13 million over FY 2018, whereas the President had proposed to eliminate the program.

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Impacts of Partial Federal Government Shutdown

There was considerable impact on some agencies that support science and technology grants. The shutdown has not affected every part of the government’s sprawling science and technology programs because some agencies (as described above), including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health, were entirely or mostly funded through appropriations legislation passed last year. The Department of Energy and Department of Education were similarly unaffected. But many other agencies were closed or slowed down. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which includes the National Weather Service, furloughed many workers. The Fish and Wildlife Service’s offices were mostly empty, the National Park Service had few employees on the job, and almost all employees at the EPA and NASA were furloughed.

The government is currently operating on a continuing resolution allowing the agencies that were part of the shutdown to continue operating at the same levels as appropriated under the FY 2018 funded levels until February 15, 2019.