Awards & Honors

Collins Fellows
List of Collins Fellows

Ray Bromley, Geography and Planning — 2019

Jeanette Altarriba, Psychology — 2017

Julie Novkov, Political Science/Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies — 2017

Richard Hamm, History — 2016

Stephen North, English — 2014 (retired)

Kevin Williams, Psychology — 2014

John Delano, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences — 2013 (retired)

Teresa Harrison, Communication — 2013 (retired)

James Acker, School of Criminal Justice — 2010

Iris Berger, History — 2010 (retired)

Lindsay Childs, Mathematics — 2009 (retired)

Hassaram Bakhru, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering — 2008

Daniel Levy, Educational Administration and Policy — 2007

Steven Messner, Sociology — 2007

Richard H. Hall, Sociology — 2006 (deceased)

Leonard A. Slade, Jr., Africana Studies — 2005

Bruce Miroff, Political Science — 2005

David McCaffrey, Public Administration — 2004 

Glenna D. Spitze, Sociology — 2004 (retired)

Paul A. Leonard, Business — 2003 (retired)

Edelgard Wulfert, Psychology — 2003

Peter A. Bloniarz, College of Computing and Information — 2002

Martha T. Rozett, English — 2002 (retired)

Lynn Videka, Social Welfare — 2002 (retired)

John S. Pipkin, Geography and Planning — 2001 (retired)

Allen Ballard, History — 2000 (retired)

Roberta Bernstein, Art — 2000 (retired)

Ronald A. Bosco, English — 1999 (retired)

Shirley J. Jones, School of Social Welfare — 1999 (retired)

Sue R. Faerman, Public Administration and Policy — 1998 (retired)

Vincent J. Aceto, School of Information Science and Policy — 1997 (retired)

Judith E. Barlow, Women's Studies/English — 1997 (retired)

Warren E. Roberts, History — 1997 (deceased)

Carlos Santiago, Latin American and Caribbean Studies — 1996 (retired)

Susan Sherman, Schools of Social Welfare and Public Health — 1996 (deceased)

Judith Baskin, Judaic Studies — 1995 (retired)

Daniel Wulff, Biological Sciences — 1995 (retired)

Martin Edelman, Political Science — 1994 (retired)

James Fleming, Reading — 1994 (retired)

Francine Frank, Linguistics and Cognitive Science — 1993 (retired)

Sung Bok Kim, Undergraduate Studies — 1993 (retired)

Christine E. Bose, Sociology/Women's Studies — 1992 (retired)

Helen Desfosses, Public Administration and Policy/Africana Studies — 1992 (retired)

Donald J. Reeb, Economics — 1992 (retired)

Stephen E. DeLong, Geological Sciences — 1991 (retired)

Joan E. Schulz, English — 1991 (deceased)

M.I. Berger, Educational Administration and Policy — 1990 (retired)

Judith Fetterley, English — 1990 (retired)

Richard Clark, Educational Psychology and Statistics — 1989 (deceased)

Harold Story, Physics — 1989 (deceased)

Edna Acosta-Belen, Latin American and Caribbean Studies/Women's Studies — 1988 (retired)

Eugene McLaren, Chemistry — 1988 (retired)

Shirley Brown, Psychology — 1987 (retired)

R. Findlay Cockrell, Music — 1987 (retired)

Harold Cannon, Accounting — 1986 (deceased)

Margaret A. Farrell, Teacher Education — 1986 (retired)

Kendall A. Birr, History — 1985 (deceased)

Arthur N. Collins, English — 1985 (deceased)

Frank G. Carrino, Hispanic and Italian Studies — 1984 (deceased)

Helen G. Horowitz, Economics — 1984 (deceased)

Overview of the Collins Fellowship

Inaugurated in 1984, the Collins Fellowship award recognizes members of the University at Albany teaching faculty who have exhibited extraordinary devotion to this University and the people in it over a sustained period of time.  The award is unique to the University at Albany and intended to acknowledge the efforts of faculty who are exemplars of the highest levels of institutional commitment and service.  The honor bears the name of Evan Revere Collins, who as President from 1949 to 1969 provided outstanding leadership in Albany’s transition from a college to a university.

Collins Fellows are teaching faculty who have served the University over a sustained period of time and shown extraordinary devotion to the University.

  • A “sustained period of time” means that the nominee has spent a significant portion of his or her professional life in the active service of the University, preparing it for the future at all levels. Eligible nominees must have worked actively within the institution, not necessarily exclusively in a faculty position, for at least 10 years. Time away such as for sabbaticals or leaves are not counted toward the 10 years of service. Nominees may have taken on administrative positions, such as chair, associate dean, vice provost, etc.; such time in administrative service can count toward "sustained service," but it cannot be the exclusive or major service an individual has rendered in order to be a candidate for Collins Fellowship.
     
  • “Extraordinary devotion” includes service at the departmental, the college/school and the University level. Collins Fellows have performed extraordinary service and shown exceptional commitment and dedication to the University by supporting it at all these levels and by concerning themselves with the well-being of the people who work in the institution. While Fellows may have also made contributions outside the University, (such as to their discipline or to the broader academic or local community) they are specifically selected for their dedication to the University at Albany and their sustained acts of citizenship within it. Their contributions demonstrate breadth in the kind of service they have performed, as well as a prolonged loyalty and steadfast focus on the excellence of UAlbany, all without any thought to personal recognition or reward.

The Collins Fellowship is a University at Albany designation separate from the campus President’s Excellence Award for Academic Service, which recognizes an individual’s commitment to service, but falls into a different category: to be considered for the President’s Excellence Award for Academic Service, a faculty member must have performed excellent service in some combination of three areas; service to the institution (departmental, School/College-wide or University-wide); service to his or her discipline or professional organization; and service to the community. The Collins Fellowship is the only award focused solely on service to the University at Albany and requires even more sustained efforts on this front than does the President’s Excellence in Academic Service Award.

The Collins Fellowship is a designation separate from the President’s Award for Excellence in Research and the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Collins Fellowship is conferred to those with a sustained and extraordinary record of leadership and service to the institution. While nominees’ research and teaching records are reviewed as part of consideration for Fellowship, greatest emphasis is placed on their record of leadership and service to the University.

The Collins Fellowship is also a designation separate from the rank of Distinguished Service Professor, which is a promotion in rank conferred only at the discretion of the SUNY Board of Trustees. There are statewide guidelines on promotions to Distinguished Service Professor; these guidelines are updated annually by SUNY System Administration.

Each Collins Fellow receives a salary increment and a distinctive medallion. They meet with the University President on an annual or semi-annual basis to discuss important directions taken by the University and to share their thoughts on those directions with the President. Recipients are also included in University-wide convocations and academic ceremonies. Portraits of the Collins Fellows hang in the University Library and recipients are named on the University’s website.

Nomination Guidelines for Collins Fellows

Any member of the University teaching faculty EXCEPT Collins Fellows may nominate a fellow faculty member by submitting, in the following order:

  • a letter of nomination describing the reasons for consideration of the nominee for inclusion in the Collins Fellowship. Such letters should describe the nominee’s overall commitment to the University by a) explaining the extraordinary service and devotion to the University that has inspired the nominator to submit the nomination, b) describing the nominee’s continued research productivity and c) describing the nominee’s commitment to teaching.
     
  • at least three but no more than five supporting letters (in addition to the nominator’s letter), describing the activities that show “extraordinary devotion to UAlbany”
     
    • of the minimum of three letters, only one letter should come from a departmental colleague and two others should come from the campus community
       
    • letters may come from faculty, administrators, staff or, on occasion, students
       
    • since the award is for University citizenship, letters from nominators or supporters outside the University will only be considered if they give evidence of University-related service
       
    • current Collins Fellows should neither nominate nor write supporting letters for a nominee.
       
  • the nominee’s CV (nominees are NOT to know of their nomination; nominations are to be kept confidential)

For additional guidance about nominations, please contact William Hedberg at [email protected].

Please send full nominations electronically to William Hedberg at [email protected].

If electronic submission poses a challenge or hardship, please send paper copies to:

Provost’s Office
Attention: William Hedberg
308 University Hall
1400 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY, 12222

Distinguished Faculty
List of Distinguished Librarians

Rebecca Mugridge, University Libraries — 2020

Trudi Jacobson, University Libraries — 2010

Meredith Butler, University Libraries — 2000 (retired)

List of Distinguished Professors

Laurie Feldman, Psychology — 2020

JoAnne Carson, Art & Art History — 2020

David Holtgrave, School of Public Health — 2019

Lawrence Schell, Anthropology — 2019

William Alex Pridemore, Criminal Justice — 2017

JoEllen Welsh, Environmental Health Sciences — 2017

Alan Lizotte, Criminal Justice — 2016

Scott South, Sociology — 2016

Istvan Kecskes, Educational Theory and Practice — 2015

Colin Loftin, Criminal Justice — 2014

Philip McCallion, School of Social Welfare — 2014 (resigned)

Frank Vellutino, Education Psychology and Methodology — 2012 (retired)

John Monfasani — 2011 (retired)

Ronald W Toseland, School of Social Welfare — 2010

Arthur Applebee, Educational Theory and Practice — 2007 (deceased)

Joachim Frank, Biomedical Science — 2007 (resigned)

Kajal Lahiri, Economics — 2005

Lance F. Bosart, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences — 2004 (retired)

Ronald A. Bosco, English — 2004 (retired)

Edna Acosta-Belen, Latin American and Caribbean Studies/Women's Studies — 2004 (retired)

Marlene Belfort, Biomedical Science — 2003

Edward L. Hannan, Health Policy — 2003 (retired)

Eric Block, Chemistry — 2002 (retired)

Judith Langer, Educational Theory and Practice — 2001 (retired)

Charles Micchelli, Mathematics and Statistics — 2001 (retired)

Terence Thornberry, School of Criminal Justice — 2001 (resigned)

Richard Alba, Sociology — 2000 (retired)

John Logan, Sociology — 2000 (retired)

Daniel C. Levy, Educational Administration and Policy Studies — 1999

James J. Jaccard, Psychology — 1998 (retired)

William J. Reid, Social Welfare — 1998 (deceased)

David H. Bayley, Criminal Justice — 1998 (retired)

John G. Gunnell, Political Science — 1997 (retired)

Richard E. Stearns, Computer Science — 1995 (retired)

Manuel Alvar, Hispanic and Italian Studies — 1991 (deceased)

Donn E. Byrne, Psychology — 1991 (deceased)

Richard Nathan, Rockefeller College — 1990 (retired)

Edward Blanchard, Psychology — 1989 (retired)

David Barlow, Psychology — 1989 (retired)

Hans Toch, Criminal Justice — 1985 (retired)

Bernard Vonnegut — 1983 (deceased)

Harry L. Frisch, Chemistry — 1978 (deceased)

William N. Fenton, Anthropology — 1974 (deceased)

Distinguished Service Professors
List of Distinguished Service Professors

Alan Wagner, Educational Policy & Leadership — 2021

Edelgard Wulfert, Psychology — 2021

Lynn Videka, Social Welfare — 2006 (resigned)

John S. Pipkin, Geography and Planning — 2003 (retired)

Timothy Lance, Mathematics — 2002 (retired)

Glenna D. Spitze, Sociology — 2002 (retired)

David F. Andersen, Public Administration — 2001 (retired)

Sung Bok Kim, History — 2001 (retired)

Vincent J. Aceto, Information Science and Policy — 2000 (retired)

Susan R. Sherman, Social Welfare — 2000 (deceased)

Ernest Scatton, Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures — 1999 (retired)

Paul Wallace, Classics — 1996 (retired)

Walter Gibson, James W. Corbett Distinguished Service Professor, Physics — 1995 (deceased)

Edna Acosta-Belen, Latin American and Caribbean Studies/Women's Studies — 1993 (retired)

Shirley Jones, Social Welfare — 1993 (retired)

Ronald A. Bosco, English — 1992 (retired)

William K. Holstein, Business — 1991 (retired)

Douglas M. Windham, Education — 1991 (deceased)

Richard Hall, Sociology — 1989 (deceased)

M.E. Grenander — 1986 (deceased)

Seth W. Spellman — 1984 (deceased)

Mauritz Johnson — 1982 (deceased)

James W. Corbett — 1981 (deceased)

Robert Rienow — 1979 (deceased)

Selection Criteria for Distinguished Service Professors
  • The nominee must be a Full Professor for at least five years, per SUNY guidelines.

  • The nominee must have completed at least 10 years of full-time service within the SUNY system, of which at least three must have been at the University at Albany.

  • A faculty member is expected to serve the University community in the three areas of teaching, research and service. Therefore, when evaluating a nominee for the Distinguished Service Professorship, the Review Committee will be seeking evidence of distinction in service and continuing strong contribution in each of the other two areas.

  • The nominee must have already received the President's Award for Excellence in Academic Service or have been chosen as a Collins Fellow.

Nomination Guidelines for Distinguished Service Professors

The nomination is to be confidential, therefore the nominee is not to know about the nomination and, by definition, cannot participate in the process. Therefore, the nominator must be prepared to serve as the "Case Manager" for the nominee and be willing to supply information on the nominee as described below.

The selection process is in two stages:
 

Stage One

When a nomination is received, preliminary credentials will be requested, including a current curriculum vita of the nominee and a letter of support from the nominator.

Nominators must provide three letters from professional colleagues that "demonstrate substantial distinguished service" on the part of the candidate in accordance with the following SUNY Guidelines: at the local campus and/or community level or regional level, AND at the statewide and/or nationwide and/or international level.
 

Stage Two

The Review Committee then will review all nominations and supporting credentials and, from that review process, identify the strongest candidates for the year.

The nominators of these candidates then will be expected to provide the following:

  • A detailed letter of nomination

  • The full credentials of the nominee, including data that spell out their teaching, service and scholarship in detail, in accordance with the criteria stated in the SUNY Guidelines

  • A file of five to 10 letters from professional colleagues testifying in detail to the service record of the nominee

If the nominator is an Adjunct Professor or a student, the Review Committee expects that they will work in concert with a full-time faculty member who is willing to serve as the Case Manager and prepare the documents on behalf of the nominee. Certainly, a nomination from an Adjunct Professor or a student is as valid as any. However, full-time faculty also have access to more evaluative data about their colleagues than Adjunct Professors or students do, and typically share a larger network of the nominee's peers who can speak to his/her distinction of performance.

From these nominations, the Review Committee will recommend up to two faculty (the maximum allocated to UAlbany each year) to the Provost.
 

Time Table

The process will commence in October, with an invitation to the faculty to submit nominations to the President's Office. Nominations will be due by close of business Friday, November 17. The schedule from then on will be approximately as follows:

  • November 18 to December 1: The Review Committee will review the nominations, identify the strongest and request the complete credentials of those nominees from the respective nominators.

  • December 1 to January 1: The Review Committee will review the nominations and forward its recommendations to the Provost. The Provost then will make her recommendations to the President, who will determine the final nominations to SUNY System Administration.

  • January 1 to January 15: The individual nomination packets will be prepared for submittal in accordance with the System Administration guidelines and will be submitted when called for by System Administration.

Distinguished Teaching Professors
List of Distinguished Teaching Professors

Richard Hamm, History — 2020

David McDowall, Criminal Justice — 2013

Sekharipuram S. Ravi, Computer Science — 2009 (resigned)

Jeffrey Berman, English — 2007

Sue Faerman, Public Administration and Policy — 2007 (retired)

James Acker, Criminal Justice — 2004

Steven Messner, Sociology — 2003

Stephen North, English — 2003 (retired)

Jan L. Hagen, Social Welfare — 2002 (retired)

David P. McCaffrey, Public Administration and Policy — 2002 (retired)

Judith Fetterley, English — 2001 (retired)

Robert A. Rosellini, Psychology — 2001

John W. Delano, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences — 2000 (retired)

Helmut V.B. Hirsch, Biological Sciences — 2000 (retired)

Graeme R. Newman, Criminal Justice — 1999

Gary Gossen, Anthropology — 1996 (retired)

Josiah B. Gould, Philosophy — 1990 (deceased)

Eugene K. Garber, English — 1989 (retired)

Bruce B. Marsh, Physics — 1989 (retired)

Stephen C. Brown, Biological Sciences — 1986 (retired)

Edward Thomas, Mathematics — 1985 (deceased)

Warren E. Roberts, History — 1984 (deceased)

Margaret M. Stewart, Biology — 1977 (deceased)

Charles Luther Andrews — 1976 (deceased)

Hugh N. MacLean — 1974 (deceased)

John Mackiewicz, Biology — 1973 (retired)

Selection Criteria for Distinguished Teaching Professors
  • The nominee must be a Full Professor.

  • The nominee must have completed at least 10 years of full-time service within the SUNY system, of which at least three must have been at the University at Albany.

  • A faculty member is expected to serve the University community in the three areas of teaching, research and service. Therefore, when evaluating a nominee, the Review Committee will be seeking evidence of distinction in teaching and continuing strong contribution in each of the other two areas.

  • The nominee must already have received the Chancellor's or President's Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Nomination Guidelines for Distinguished Teaching Professors

The nomination is to be confidential, therefore the nominee is not to know about the nomination and, by definition, cannot participate in the process. Therefore, the nominator must be prepared to serve as the "Case Manager" for the nominee and be willing to supply information on the nominee as described below.

The selection process is in two stages:
 

Stage One

When a nomination is received, preliminary credentials will be requested, including a current curriculum vita of the nominee and a letter of support from the nominator.

Nominators must provide the Review Committee with the teaching evaluations of all courses taught by the nominee in the past three years.
 

Stage Two

The Review Committee then will review all nominations and supporting credentials and, from that review process, identify the strongest candidates for each of these Distinguished Professor ranks for the year.

The nominators of these candidates then will be expected to provide the following:

  • A detailed letter of nomination,

  • The full credentials of the nominee, including data that spell out their teaching, service and scholarship in detail, in accordance with the criteria stated in the SUNY Guidelines,

  • The nominee's complete teaching evaluations for the previous five years, including comments from students and copies or summaries of grade distributions.

  • If the nominee is primarily a teacher of graduate courses in which SIRF forms typically are not completed, the nominator must provide the Review Committee with detailed testimonials from five to 10 current and former students. Further, as is required by the SUNY guidelines, the nominator must demonstrate that the nominee contributed to curriculum development and the broader educational programs of the university.

From these nominations, the Review Committee will recommend up to two faculty (the maximum allocated to UAlbany each year) to the Provost.
 

Time Table

The process will commence in October, with an invitation to the faculty to submit nominations to the President's Office. Nominations will be due by close of business Friday, November 17. The schedule from then on will be approximately as follows:

  • November 18 to December 1: The Review Committee will review the nominations, identify the strongest and request the complete credentials of those nominees from the respective nominators.

  • December 1 to January 1: The Review Committee will review the nominations and forward its recommendations to the Provost. The Provost then will make her recommendations to the President, who will determine the final nominations to SUNY System Administration.

  • January 1 to January 15: The individual nomination packets will be prepared for submittal in accordance with the System Administration guidelines and will be submitted when called for by System Administration.

O'Leary Professors
List of O'Leary Professors

Edna Acosta-Belen — Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies

Dr. Acosta-Belén is a Distinguished Professor of Latin American, Caribbean Studies, and U.S. Latino Studies, and Women's Studies at the University at Albany, State University of New York (SUNY) where she also serves as Director of the Center for Latino, Latin American, and Caribbean Studies (CELAC). Her areas of research include Puerto Rican, Hispanic Caribbean, and U.S. Latino cultural studies; literary, cultural, and social history; and postcolonial and women's studies.

Jagdish Gangolly — Informatics

Jagdish S. Gangolly was Associate Professor of Informatics and the Director of the PhD Program in Information Science in Department of Informatics, College of Computing & Information. Previously, he was an Associate Professor of Accounting and of Management Science & Information Systems, and Chair of the Department of Accounting & Law during 2005-8 in the School of Business at the State University of New York at Albany. He was also an affiliate and advisor at the Institute for Informatics, Logic & Security Studies at SUNY Albany. He was an Interim Director of the New York State Center for Information Forensics & Assurance (CIFA) during 2003-5.

Akira Inomata — Physics

Born in Japan. PhD: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). UAlbany physics faculty since 1967. Visiting professor: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Munich, and others. Adjunct professor: RPI. Fulbright exchange fellowship. German Academic Exchange fellowship. UAlbany President Award for Excellence in graduate teaching. Supervision of about 20 MS and PhD theses. Co-author of a book, “Path Integrals and Coherent States of SU(2) and S(1,2).” Co-editor of four books including “Fundamental Questions in Quantum Mechanics.” Invited editor for five special issues of two physics journals. 120 scientific publications. A founding member and an advisory committee member of the international conferences on path integrals in physics since 1983. Currently I am studying the origin of physical time.

John Kimball — Physics

My most recent publication is the book "Physics of Sailing" CRC Press Taylor and Francis group, Boca Raton, FL, 2010. In the "old days" I did research on statistical physics, QED and channeling in solids, and condensed matter physics. This work is over. Plans for the future are uncertain. The possibility of a book on basic ideas in physics is under consideration.

Judith Langer — Educational Theory & Practice

Judith A. Langer, internationally known scholar in literacy learning, is founder of the Albany Institute for Research in Education and director of the Center on English Learning and Achievement. Her research focuses on the literate mind: on how people become highly literate, on how they use reading and writing to learn, and on what teachers and schools can do to facilitate effective learning, particularly in urban and low-performing schools. Her major works examine the nature of literate thought - the knowledge students use when they "make sense" and the ways in which their learning is affected by activities and interactions in the classroom. She has studied reading and writing development, ways in which understanding grows over time, how particular literacy contexts affect language and thought, the contribution of literature to literacy, literacy instruction within the core academic disciplines. Her groundbreaking work formed the theoretical framework underlying many national and state as well as international assessments and has been incorporated into many reading and writing standards, curricula and materials. The Annenberg Foundation has developed three separate eight-hour television series based on Langer's research on literature. Langer is the author of numerous research articles, chapters and monographs, and has written 12 books.

Robert McMorris — Educational & Counseling Psychology

Terrence Maxwell — Information Science  

Robert Nakamura — Political Science

Anita Pomerantz — Communication

Anita Pomerantz is an O'Leary Professor in the Department of Communication. Using audio and videotapes of interaction, she analyzes the principles relied upon and the methods used for agreeing and disagreeing, seeking information, and negotiating responsibility for blameworthy and praiseworthy deeds. She studies provider-patient roles, patients= methods for actualizing their agendas, and the work of supervising physicians in ambulatory clinics. She has served as Chair of the Language and Social Interaction Division of the National Communication Association and the International Communication Association and currently serves on a number of editorial boards of language-oriented journals.

William Roth — Social Welfare

William Roth, formerly Associate Professor at the University at Albany School of Social Welfare, is UAlbany's first Vincent O'Leary Professor. He has taught courses in Public and Social Policy and Disability Studies.

Dr. Roth is one of the founders of America's disability rights movement. Roth's work over the years addresses the architectural, transportation, and technological barriers in the United States. He has authored or coauthored several landmark studies including "The Unexpected Minority: Handicapped Children in America" and The Grand Illusion: Stigma, Role Expectations, and Communication." These are widely acknowledged as providing the analytical basis for the disability rights movement as well as fostering a new academic discipline, Disability Studies. Roth's work emphasizes the movement's core vision: the most socially incapacitating aspects of disability are not the inescapable consequence of biology but the result of countless social decisions that do not acknowledge the needs of people with different bodies and, indeed, discriminate against people whose bodies are different.

Dr. Roth pioneered the use of computer technology for people with disabilities and in 1984 founded the Center for Computing and Disability at the University at Albany, one of the first such centers in the nation. His 1992 Personal Computers for People with Disabilities provided a state of the art guide. Roth's recent work has focused on exposing the neo-liberal dismantling of the U.S. welfare state and includes his (2002) The Assault on Social Policy and his co-edited work Globalization, Social Justice and the Helping Profession. He has published his memoirs, Movement: A Memoir of Disability, Cancer, and the Holocaust.

Dr. Roth received his M.A. in Political Science (1965) and his Ph.D. (1970) from the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Roth lives in Albany, New York. He is the author, coauthor, or editor of six books and numerous articles and book chapters. He is married and has one child.

Charles M. Schaninger — Marketing

Charles M. Schaninger, now emeriti, was Vincent O’Leary Professor of and ex-Chair of Marketing at the School of Business, University at Albany, State University of New York. He received his A.B. in economics and in psychology from Cornell University in 1969, and his Ph.D. in Business Administration from the University of Rochester in 1975. He has been at the University of Albany since 1981 after serving on the faculties of the University of Kansas, University of Ottawa, and University of Massachusetts. His first ten years here, he taught exclusively in the MBA program for marketing majors, covering marketing research, marketing strategy, and applied field projects in marketing research. Since then, he primarily taught consumer behavior, and developed and taught integrated marketing communications for our undergraduate marketing majors. He served several years as associate editor of Buyer Behavior for the Journal of Business Research, for which he received the outstanding editor award, and has served on its editorial board for over 20 years, and that of the Journal of Consumer Research for over 15 years. He has also served as an ad-hoc reviewer for over a dozen leading journals as well as national conferences. He is the author of over fifty refereed articles, has won several research awards, and is listed in a number of Marquis Who’s-Who’s. His work has appeared in the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marriage and the Family, Journal of Advertising Research, Journal of Business Research, Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Journal of Macromarketing, California Management Review, Psychology and Marketing, Review of Marketing, Journal of Consumer Behaviour, Advances in Consumer Research, the Academy of Marketing Science Review, Current Issues and Research in Advertising, as well as several book chapters and articles reprinted in readings books. He has had several refereed journal articles since his retirement and two papers at national conferences. He also stepped in again as consulting co-editor of Journal of Business Research in the spring of 2013. His research has focused on the family; changing values and demographics, socio-cultural consumption influences; changing gender role norms, values and demographics; social class; sub-culture; wives’ and dual spouse work involvement; traditional and non-traditional household life cycles; parenting’s influence on negative peer influence and teenage smoking and alcohol use and its public policy and social marketing implications. It has also focused on applied segmentation issues, and on geo-demographics and grocery category management. Recent work also examined how major purchase acquisitions vary interactively and dynamically with life events, social class, and age cohorts. In addition to his academic publications, he has published articles on the history and early breeding of Labrador Retrievers. He is married, and has a daughter who is a biogenetic engineer in a biotech start-up, specializing in Bioinformatics. As hobbies, he trains Labrador Retrievers for fieldwork, has a cabin in the northern Maine wilderness, on the upper Saint John River and Allagash region, where he is well known, and goes white water canoeing, and trout and muskie fishing, and has a cottage on the ocean in Down-East Maine where he partakes of salt-water fishing and island hopping.

David Shub — Biological Sciences

Lawrence Snyder — Chemistry

Ivan Steen — History

Ivan D. Steen joined the faculty of the University at Albany's Department of History in 1965. He has served as Director of the Program in Public History since its inception in 1983. That program is among the oldest and most respected public history programs in the United States. In 1982 he established the Oral History Program, which he continues to direct. He also serves as Co-director of the Center for Applied Historical Research. Dr. Steen's principal scholarly field is American urban history, and he is the author of Urbanizing America: the Development of Cities in the United States, from the first European Settlements to 1920 (Melbourne, FL: Krieger Publishing Co., 2006), as well as twenty-one articles and essays. He has presented research papers and served as a panelist and commentator at numerous scholarly conferences, as well as having delivered public lectures and conducted oral history workshops. A frequent consultant and manuscript reviewer, he also has served as a board member of several local historical organizations. For his service to the public history community of the state, he has received the Hugh Hastings Award of the Association of Public Historians of New York State.

Howard Stratton — Epidemiology & Biostatistics

Jogindar Uppal — Economics

Professor of Economics and Africana Studies. Has been teaching at SUNY Albany for the last 44 years. Has published extensively in the fields of Economic Development in Asia and Africa. He also won the Chancellor's excellence in teaching award.

Donald Wilken — Mathematics & Statistics

Gary Yukl — Management

Professor Yukl received his Ph.D. in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1967. At UAlbany he has been a professor of management, a chairperson of the Management Department, and a director of the Organizational Studies Doctoral Program. His primary research interests include leadership, power and influence, and management development. Dr. Yukl has published many articles in professional journals and has received several awards for his research and two career achievement awards: 2007 Walter Ulmer Applied Research Award from the Center for Creative Leadership; 2011 Eminent Leadership Scholar Award from the Academy of Management. He is the author or co-author of several books, including Leadership in Organizations, 7th edition (Prentice-Hall, 2010), which is widely used around the world and has been translated into seven other languages. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology, and the Academy of Management. Professor Yukl has consulted with a wide variety of business and public-sector organizations. Most of this work involved incentive and motivational issues or training programs in leadership and managerial skills. His leadership development programs were used with thousands of managers in many large and small companies for more than two decades.

Guidelines for O'Leary Professorships

Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

January 20, 2009

I am pleased to announce the establishment of the Vincent O'Leary Professorship — an opportunity that honors selected senior members of the UAlbany teaching faculty. O'Leary Professors hold a special assignment for up to three years post-retirement, allowing the University to retain the important experience and contributions of these valued colleagues while also enabling them to adjust the level of their responsibilities.

O'Leary Professors may contribute to the University's research, teaching and service missions in accordance with an individual agreement negotiated annually with the applicable dean and subject to approval by the Provost. In addition, O'Leary Professors may enjoy:

  • a specially assigned obligation;
     
  • participation in directing master's theses and doctoral dissertations as appropriate;
     
  • eligibility for available travel funds;
     
  • full e-mail, fax and phone services, as well as full parking, library and athletic facilities privileges;
     
  • and office space appropriate to the continuing assignment.

The duration of the appointment (one, two or three years) depends on the post-retirement assignment. O'Leary Professors may be compensated up to 25 percent of the appointee's final academic year salary, not to exceed the maximum permitted by the laws governing retirement earnings.

At the end of the term of appointment, O'Leary Professors continue in emeritus status at the rank of retirement. Emeritus faculty continue to have the opportunity to teach at least one course each year by mutual agreement with the University and to enjoy designated University privileges and space, as available.

Questions about this initiative may be referred to Senior Vice Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs William Hedberg at [email protected]

Individuals interested in exploring the possibility of an O'Leary Professorship should contact their dean.

Honorary Degrees
Doctors of Fine Arts

Philip Morris — 2014

John Mesick — 1986

Doctors of Humane Letters

Barbara Smith — 2015

Hamdi Ulukaya — 2013

Rachael Ray — 2012

Morris Massry — 2007

Seung Park — 2007

Louis Tomson — 2007

Deborah Willen Meier — 1998

Roger Wilkens — 1998

Matilda White Riley — 1997

Miles Lerman — 1994

Jaroslav Pelican — 1993

Catharine R. Stimpson — 1992

Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie — 1991

Robert M. Solow — 1991

Thomas Krens — 1989

Lloyd Edgard Ohlin — 1989

Gerhard L. Weinberg — 1989

Benoit B. Mandelbrot — 1988

Andrew Aikin Rooney — 1988

Alvin F. Poussaint — 1988

Rose Marie Karpinsky — 1987

Danna E. Shalala — 1987

Charles E. Lindblom — 1986

Robert K. Merton — 1986

Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. — 1984

Alice M. Rivlin — 1983

Isaac Bashevis Singer — 1981

Doctors of Laws

Judith Smith Kaye — 2007

Vincent O’Leary — 2006

Richard C. Wesley — 2006

John Lewis — 2001

Richard G. Lugar — 1997

Doctors of Letters

Gregory Maguire — 2011

David McCullough — 1999

Joseph E. Persico — 1996

Nicholasa Mohr — 1989

Alfred Kazin — 1987

Doctors of Science

Larry Gold — 2015

Thomas D’Ambra — 2014

Jack Henion — 2013

Neal F. Lane — 2002

Edward O. Wilson — 1999

Donald N. Landenberg — 1998

Carl Sagan — 1994

Joanne Simpson — 1991

Halfdan Mahler — 1990

James W. Mayer — 1988

Xie Xide — 1987

Marshall W. Nirenberg — 1986

Verner E. Suomi — 1983

Chien-Shiung Wu — 1982

Provost's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising
List of Provost's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising Recipients

Hope-Hildreth Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Monica Hope (2018)
  • Anne Hildreth (2018)

 

2018-2019

  • Stacey Zyskowski
  • Vanessa Borum

 

2017-2018

  • Michael Geroux
  • Karen Williams

 

2016-2017

  • Jason Cotugno
  • Rachel Moody
  • Claudio Gomez
Overview of the Provost’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising

The Provost’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising is presented each year to a University at Albany employee who has demonstrated significant and meritorious achievement in advising undergraduate students. This can be demonstrated by evidence in the following areas:

  • aiding students in achieving their highest academic potential;

  • improving communication and access between students, faculty and staff;

  • developing student decision-making and problem-solving skills;

  • creating or developing advising techniques or policies to better serve our diverse student body (including first-generation students, minority students, students from underserved areas, LGBT students, students with disabilities, etc.);

  • supporting students through difficult personal or academic situations;

  • assisting students with preparation for graduate study or careers after degree completion;

  • helping students evaluate and enhance academic and personal strengths and weaknesses; and/or

  • developing or improving processes and systems to enhance or streamline student advising on the University at Albany campus.

Eligibility Requirements for the Provost’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising

All nominees from the Professional Advising Staff must meet the following requirements:

  • Must not have received either Provost’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Academic Advising Award within the last five full academic years;
     
  • Must have completed a minimum of three years of employment at the University at Albany immediately prior to the semester in which the award is to be given;
     
  • Must have served in an advising role for a minimum four full academic semesters;
     
  • Must not have more than a 50 percent obligation in a teaching faculty line; and
     
  • Must be an active employee of the University at the time of the conferral of the award (fall of the following academic year).

Professional staff and administrators are also eligible for this award if they are involved in undergraduate academic advising, including the administration and policy development of academic advising.

All nominees from the Teaching Faculty must meet the following requirements:

  • Must not have received either Provost’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Academic Advising Award within the last five full academic years;
     
  • Must be the instructor of record of undergraduate courses for four full academic semesters;
     
  • Must have completed a minimum of three years of employment at the University at Albany immediately prior to the semester in which the award is to be given;
     
  • Must have served in an advising role for a minimum four full academic semesters;
     
  • Must not have more than a 50 percent obligation in an administrative/professional faculty line; and
     
  • Must be an active employee of the University at the time of the conferral of the award (fall of the following academic year).
Nomination Guidelines for the Provost’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising

Nominations must contain a descriptive narrative to support the evidence included in the file and to explain how the nominee meets the award criteria. A complete nomination file includes the following:

  1. A completed Nomination Form
     

  2. At least four letters of support:
     

    • One letter must be from the nominator (can be student, staff or faculty)
       
    • One letter must be from the nominee’s direct supervisor
       
      • If the nominator is also the nominee’s direct supervisor, the second letter can either come from a colleague or a more senior administrator within the unit or division (for example: Dean, Director, Vice President, etc.)
         
    • Two to four letters must be from current or former advisees
       
  3. The nominee’s résumé or vita (must include advising activities and contributions)
     
  4. The nominee’s statement or philosophy on student advising (one page maximum)
     
  5. The nominee’s statement that describes the activities in advising during the academic year for which the candidate is being nominated, including supporting materials related to the nominee’s advising activities (for example: caseload, training and workshops, office hours, advising syllabi, etc.)

Timeline

The Provost’s Office will send a call for nominations each spring semester for that academic year’s Provost’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Academic Advising. The call for nominations will include specific due dates but the process will generally follow this timeline:

  • Mid-March: Nominations will be due to the Provost's Office.

  • Early April: The review committee will evaluate the nominations and make a recommendation to the Provost.

  • Mid-April: The Provost will review the nominations, consider the committee’s recommendation and select the recipient(s).

  • Late April: Successful awardees will be notified of the outcome.

  • May or Early June: Awards will be given to the recipient(s) at a recognition event.

The full nomination file must be submitted electronically, in PDF format, to the Office of the Provost ([email protected]) to the attention of Dr. Benjamin Weaver, Assistant Vice Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs.

Questions about the Provost’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising can be directed to Kristen Swaney, Interim Director of the Academic Support Center ([email protected]).

President's Excellence Awards
Excellence in Teaching Awards

These awards recognize consistently superior teaching, at the graduate, undergraduate or professional level over a period of several years. The award committees are coordinated in the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and we encourage you to contact that office with any questions about these awards.

There are three categories for Excellence in Teaching.

  • Excellence in Teaching by Full-Time Faculty: This award recognizes superior teaching at the undergraduate, graduate or professional level by members of the full-time teaching faculty. Nominees may be appointed to any academic rank below that of Distinguished Teaching Professor and must be able to offer a record of excellence in teaching as full-time, tenure-track faculty at the University at Albany. Candidates must have completed three academic years of full-time teaching out of the five years on the campus immediately prior to the fall semester of the academic year for which the candidate is being nominated (e.g. Fall 2020 for the 2020-21 award). Letters of intent are due via email on or before December 21, 2020, for the 2020-21 award. Please email Karen McNeill at [email protected] with your letter of intent. Full nominations are due on February 8, 2021.
     

  • Excellence in Teaching by Part-time or Full-Time non-tenure-track Faculty: This award recognizes superior teaching by part-time faculty members, faculty members in non-tenure-track appointments and professional staff who teach. Nominees must be able to document several semesters of excellence in teaching at the University prior to the fall semester of the academic year for which the candidate is being nominated (e.g. Fall 2020 for the 2020-21 award). Letters of intent are due via email on or before December 21, 2020, for the 2020-21 award. Please email Karen McNeill at [email protected] with your letter of intent. Full nominations are due on February 8, 2021.
     

  • Excellence in Teaching by Teaching Assistants: This award recognizes superior teaching at the undergraduate level by Teaching Assistants. Nominees must be able to document several semesters of excellence in teaching at the University prior to the fall semester of the academic year for which the candidate is being nominated (e.g. Fall 2020 for the 2020-21 award). Letters of intent are due via email on or before December 21, 2020, for the 2020-21 award. Please email Karen McNeill at [email protected] with your letter of intent. Full nominations are due on February 8, 2021.

Note: After submission of your letter of lntent, you will receive further information on the necessary contents of the portfolio required for full review of a nomination. Additional guidance regarding successful nomination packets may be obtained from Karen McNeill in the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education ([email protected] or 518-442-3950).

Excellence in Academic Service Award

This award recognizes consistently superior service over multiple years by members of the full-time teaching faculty who are appointed to ranks below Distinguished Professor. They must be able to document achievements from at least three years of full-time service at the University within the five years prior to the fall semester of the academic year for which the candidate is being nominated (e.g. Fall 2020 for the 2020-21 award). Nominees for the award may hold any of the following academic ranks: professor, associate professor or assistant professor.

To be nominated, a faculty member must demonstrate consistently superior service. Eligible service contributions may occur in a variety of areas including service to the campus, the State University, the local community or contributions at the regional, state, national or international levels. Eligible activities may encompass a combination of service contributions to discipline, or disciplinary and professional organizations and societies; and to leadership in local or system-wide faculty governance.

The nature of the service must exceed the work generally considered to be part of a candidate’s basic professional obligation (professional committees, etc.) and must include service that exceeds that for which faculty are normally compensated. There must be positive evidence of outstanding achievement and skill in providing leadership, outreach or other University and/or community service, or extraordinary service and leadership in the nominee’s professional organization.

The scope of the service must extend over multiple years, must be geared toward effecting positive change and must involve the generous giving of personal time in service to areas previously described.

Nominations must include:

  • a current and detailed curriculum vitae
     
  • a summary statement of no more than five pages that addresses the nominee’s service impact. The nature of the service must exceed the work generally considered to be part of a nominee’s basic professional obligation.
     
  • confidential letters from peers and others in a position to comment on the nominee’s contributions are encouraged
     
  • recommendations from the nominee's Chair and Dean

Additional guidance regarding successful nomination packets may be obtained from Dr. William Hedberg (518-956-8037 or [email protected]).

For the 2020-21 awards, nominations are due via email to [email protected] by February 8, 2021. The subject line should be "President's Excellence Award Nomination; Last Name, First Name."

Excellence in Librarianship Award

This award recognizes consistently superior professional achievement in the field of librarianship. Nominees must hold a full-time appointment as a professional librarian and possess an M.L.S. degree or equivalent. They must be able to document at least three academic years of service at the University within the five years prior to the fall semester of the academic year for which the candidate is being nominated (e.g. Fall 2020 for the 2020-21 award).

The nomination must present positive evidence that the candidate performs superbly in fulfilling his or her librarianship duties. Consideration should be given to the candidate's ability to perform this function in a creative and innovative fashion that is of outstanding quality. In providing librarianship services, the candidate must be generous with personal time and easily accessible. The individual must be flexible and adapt readily to the needs of the library, the institution and the constituents served. The candidate must also keep abreast of developments in the field and use relevant contemporary data in relation to that person’s work situation. Evidence in this category should include references to publications, membership and work in professional organizations, attendance at meetings, seminars, etc.

Nominations must include:

  • a current and detailed curriculum vitae
     
  • a summary statement of no more than five pages that addresses the nominee’s skill in librarianship, service to the University and to the profession, and scholarship and continuing professional growth
     
  • confidential letters from peers and others in a position to comment on the nominee’s professional impact and contributions are also encouraged
     
  • recommendations from the nominee's supervisor and Dean

Guidance regarding the requirements for nominations is available from Ms. Ann Gunning, University Libraries ([email protected] or 518-442-3520).

For the 2020-21 awards, nominations are due via email to [email protected] by February 8, 2021. The subject line should be "President's Excellence Award Nomination; Last Name, First Name."

Excellence in Professional Service Awards

This award recognizes consistently superior professional achievement within and beyond the position.

There are two categories of Excellence in Professional Service:

  • Excellence in Professional Service by Full-Time Professional StaffNominees must be members of the full-time professional staff or the State University of New York Research Foundation, and have completed at least three years of continuous service in the position for which they are being nominated prior to the fall semester (e.g. Fall 2020 for the 2020-21 award).
     
  • Excellence in Professional Service by Part-Time Professional Staff: Nominees must be members of the part-time professional staff or the State University of New York Research Foundation, and must have completed three academic years of part-time professional service out of the five years immediately prior to prior to the fall semester of the academic year for which the candidate is being nominated (e.g. Fall 2020 for the 2020-21 award).

Nominees for the award must be individuals who have repeatedly sought improvement of themselves, their campuses and, by extension or through direct service, the State University and, in doing so, have transcended the normal definitions of excellence. At all position levels, nominees shall be those individuals who can serve as professional role models for a University in the pursuit of excellence.

The candidate must perform superbly in fulfilling the job description for the position held; and should also demonstrate excellence in professional activities beyond the parameters of the job description. The ideal candidate will satisfy the standards in a creative and innovative fashion while demonstrating flexibility and adapt-ability to institutional needs. Consideration should be given to capabilities and accomplishments in the areas of leadership, decision making and problem solving. Evidence in this category includes, but is not limited to, professional recognitions, initiation of ideas, development of proposals and committee activities.

Nominations must include:

  • a current and detailed curriculum vitae
     
  • a summary statement of no more than five pages that addresses the nominee’s performance in fulfilling the job description for the position held as well as excellence in professional activities beyond the parameters of the job description
     
  • confidential letters from peers and others in a position to comment on the nominee’s professional impact and contributions are also encouraged
     
  • a recommendation from the nominee's supervisor

Additional guidance regarding successful nomination packets may be obtained from Dr. William Hedberg (518-956-8037 or [email protected]). 

For the 2020-21 awards, nominations are due via email to [email protected] by February 8, 2021. The subject line should be "President's Excellence Award Nomination; Last Name, First Name."

Excellence in Support Service Award

This award recognizes individuals who have given consistent and superior performance and service in a classified position or a non-exempt position not covered by the other Excellence Awards. Nominees must have been in their positions for a minimum of two years of continuous full-time or part-time service prior to prior to the fall semester of the academic year for which the candidate is being nominated (e.g. Fall 2020 for the 2020-21 award).

The nomination must provide evidence that the candidate has performed superbly in fulfilling the job description for the position held, and should give examples of how he or she has exceeded the requirements of the position through superior service to the university, students, faculty and staff. Evidence of service to the community is also encouraged.

Nominations must include:

  • a current and detailed resume
     
  • a summary statement of no more than five pages that addresses the nominee’s skills and service contributions to the University’s program and operation
     
  • confidential letters from peers and others in a position to comment on the nominee’s job-related impact are also encouraged
     
  • a recommendation from the nominee's supervisor

Additional guidance regarding successful nomination packets may be obtained from Dr. William Hedberg (518-956-8037 or [email protected]).

For the 2020-21 awards, nominations are due via email to [email protected] by February 8, 2021. The subject line should be "President's Excellence Award Nomination; Last Name, First Name."

Excellence in Research and Creative Activities

The Excellence in Research and Creative Activities Award is designed to acknowledge and recognize consistently outstanding accomplishments in research and creative activities conducted by the University at Albany faculty. Faculty members are nominated by their colleagues for this award. Candidates must have completed at least three continuous academic years of full-time employment out of the past five years at the University at Albany at the time of nomination. Candidates must hold full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty positions or be research associates with full-time, permanent appointments.

Nominations should be submitted electronically to Elisa López in the Office of the Vice President for Research at [email protected] by February 8, 2021.

Read further information about the eligibility requirements and guidelines for submissions here.