About

Learn more about Dr. Mary Beth Winn & Dr. Louis-Gabriel Bonicoli

Mary Beth Winn 

Mary Beth Winn

Research Professor emerita, French Studies

Degree/Institution: PhD and M Phil from Yale University
Office: HU 229
Fax: (518) 442-4111
Email: mbwinn@albany.edu

Academic Focus

French literature; Medieval and Renaissance studies; the history of the book; early French printing; manuscript studies; literature through music; interrelationships of literature and the arts; women in Medieval and Renaissance French literature.

Research

Recipient of three fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as numerous other grants for research, including from the Giorgio Cini Foundation, the Herzog August Bibliothek, and the Camargo Foundation, Professor Winn has published widely on 15th and 16th century French literature with articles appearing in Romania, Bibliothèque d’Humanisme et Renaissance, Musica Disciplina, Bulletin du Bibliophile, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, etc. Her book on Anthoine Vérard, Parisian publisher, 1485-1512: Prologues, Poems, and Presentations appeared in 1997, and a website devoted to Vérard editions is in progress. Professor Winn also edited La Chasse d’Amours (1509) attributed to Octovien de Saint-Gelais (Geneva: Droz, 1984) and a collection of articles, Musique naturelle et musique artificielle (Le Moyen Français, V). In collaboration with musicologists Laura Youens and Barton Hudson, she completed the seven-volume critical edition of the chansons of Thomas Crecquillon, for the American Institute of Musicology. In 2012, the edition was honored with the Claude V. Palisca Award by the American Musicological Society. Having collaborated with musicologist Thomas MacCracken on the chansons of Jean Mouton (2014), she is editing with Laura Youens the chansons of Jean Courtois. Other projects include research on Louise de Savoie, mother of King Francis I, a study of patronage and publishing in early Renaissance France,  and critical editions of two works published by Vérard, the Roman de Tristan (1489) and Les Loups ravissans (ca. 1505) by Robert Gobin. In 2003, Professor Winn was honored with a University at Albany Award for Excellence in Research.

Bio

Professor Mary Beth Winn received a PhD and M Phil from Yale University and a B.A. magna cum laude from Vassar College where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Focusing on the late Middle Ages/early Renaissance, with a particular interest in the relations between literature and other arts, her research encompasses the development of printing in Paris from 1470-1530, poetry and patronage, particularly by women, Renaissance chansons, and the texts and illustrations of the medieval “best-seller”, the Book of Hours.

Teaching

Besides enjoying the challenges of language teaching at all levels, Professor Winn developed courses on the Fifteenth Century, Medieval Women, Medievalism, Literature and the Arts, and medieval and Renaissance literature, at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Former Chair of the Department, Professor Winn also directed the D.A. Program in Humanistic Studies.

Service

Member of numerous committees university-wide, she served as both President and Secretary of the campus chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. In recognition of her long-standing commitment to the university, Professor Winn received a 1996 President’s Award for Excellence in Academic Service.

Publications | Honors and Awards | National Musicology Award

 


 

Louis-Gabriel Bonicoli

Louis-Gabriel Bonicoli

Volunteer research staff, French Studies

Degree/Institution: PhD from Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense University
Email: lbonicoli@albany.edu

Academic Focus

Late Medieval and early Modern art and literature; Parisian book production (printers and booksellers) of the 15th and 16th centuries; relations between texts and images in Medieval and Renaissance literature; printed and painted book illustration in France circa 1500; woodcuts and metalcuts in early editions (makers, use, circulation, reception).

Research

Dr. Bonicoli began to study early printed books in 2007 for master degrees at Paris-Nanterre University in both History and Art History. His theses on early modern translations of Julius Caesar’s Commentaries produced in Paris and Venice were completed in 2009 summa cum laude and published as a monograph in 2014. He pursued his interest in book illustration for a doctoral thesis in Art History at the same university, which he defended in 2015 summa cum laude. This work, entitled « La production du libraire-éditeur parisien Antoine Vérard (1485-1512): nature, fonctions et circulation des images dans les premiers livres imprimés illustrés », is currently in preparation for publication. From 2013 to 2016, Dr. Bonicoli was employed as Research assistant at the Bibliothèque nationale de France to contribute to the Arsenal Library incunabula catalogue, under the supervision of Martine Lefèvre. He has participated in numerous international conferences. In 2012, he presented his research on Cesar’s Commentaries at a colloquium held at the École du Louvre in Paris simultaneously with the France 1500 exhibition. For conferences in Manchester and Galway, he explained the different ways woodcuts were reused in Paris ca. 1500 and introduced the concept of intertextual relations established via the illustration in early printed books. He has presented papers on Vérard’s publications of military literature and on Boccaccio’s Des Cleres et nobles femmes, exploring how Vérard’s choice of illustrations influenced the reading of the text. Currently volunteer researcher at the University at Albany-SUNY, he works in collaboration with Mary Beth Winn on a database project related to Antoine Vérard’s editions.

Bio

Louis-Gabriel Bonicoli earned two master degrees in History and Art History and a PhD in Art History at Paris-Nanterre University. While employed by the Bibliothèque nationale de France, he received training in the field of early modern printed books, and he subsequently obtained a diploma equivalent to the third-year degree at the École des Chartes. Based on this multidisciplinary background, he is pursuing research on  illustrated books as cultural objects, in the perspective of visual studies.

Teaching

Dr. Bonicoli has taught Medieval Art history and IT to first year undergraduate, first year postgraduate and high school teachers at Paris-Nanterre University and the Catholic Institute of Paris. He obtained the Associate professor qualification in 2016, delivered by the Conseil national des universités of France. Since 2016, he has participated in research seminars in Saint-Cloud, Oxford and Paris.

Full CV

 

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