Institute for Mesoamerican Studies

IMS functions
 

The Institute for Mesoamerican Studies (IMS) is a non-profit educational research institute dedicated to the study and dissemination of knowledge concerning the peoples and cultures of Mesoamerica (Mexico and northern Central America). IMS serves to organize and coordinate the work of the Mesoamericanist faculty at the State University of New York at Albany. We have the largest number of full-time Mesoamericanists of any institution north of Mexico, and our members are among the most active and prominent scholars in the field of Mesoamerican anthropology. The primary activities of IMS are research and publication. Read more about our history and how to contact us on our About Us page.

 

Spotlight:

Congratulations Graduates!

Ben Leeming with Advisor Louise Burkhart Rebecca Mendelsohn Graduates with her advisor, Robert Rosenswig

The Institute for Mesoamerican Studies congratulates our 2017 graduates.This spring, Ben Leeming, Rebecca Mendelsohn, and Sarah Heins Ledogar completed their Ph.D. degrees, while Kyle Lockhart completed his M.A degree. Felicidades!

 

IMS Student Associate Receives a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship

Sheddy

The Institute for Mesoamerican Studies congratulates Crystal Sheedy, an IMS student associate, on her recent Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship. Sheedy's project is entitled "Mayas in the Global Economy: Gender, Work, and Household Change and Continuity."

 

IMS Associates Receive 3 New National Science Foundation Grants

Masson on Survey in MexicoRosenswig in ArizonaAntonelli with soil samples

The Institute for Mesoamerican Studies congratulates Marilyn Masson and Robert Rosenswig and IMS faculty associates, and Caroline Antonelli, an IMS student associate, on their recent National Science Foundation grants. Rosenswig's project is entitled "The Role Of Competition In The Development Of Societal Complexity." Read more about the project here. Masson's project is about "Changing Agrarian Foundations Of Urban Life: A Long-Term Perspective." Read more about the project here. Antonelli's project focuses on "Subsistence Organization In A Traditional Society." Read more about the project here. All three projects will be used for archaeological investigation in Mexico.