Courses in Chemistry

A CHM 100 Chemical ABCs: Atoms, Bonds, and Citizen Consumers (3)
Introduction to chemistry emphasizing its applications to problems in modern society, consumer goods, and life-related topics. Lecture and demonstration only. Does not yield credit toward the major or minor in chemistry.

A CHM 120 General Chemistry I (3)
Atomic theory, quantitative relationships in chemical change, electronic structure of atoms and chemical periodicity, chemical bonding, and states of matter.

A CHM 121 General Chemistry II (3)
Elementary principles of chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics; electrochemistry; descriptive chemistry of the elements and their compounds. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120 or 130.

A CHM 124 (formerly A CHM 122A) General Chemistry Laboratory I (1)
Introduction to laboratory techniques, experiments demonstrating chemical principles in General Chemistry I, including stoichiometry, calorimetry, and properties of some elements and compounds. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 120 or 130. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 125 (formerly A CHM 122B) General Chemistry Laboratory II (1)
Application of laboratory techniques, experiments demonstrating chemical principles of General Chemistry II, including solution properties, kinetics, equilibrium, and qualitative analysis of some anions and cations. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 124. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 121 or 131. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 126 (formerly A CHM 123A) Problem Solving: General Chemistry I (1)
Applications of the principles and methods studied in General Chemistry I. Assignments selected from the subject matter of General Chemistry I are aimed at aiding the student to develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s): A CHM 120. S/U graded.

A CHM 127 (formerly A CHM 123B) Problem Solving: General Chemistry II  (1)
Applications of the principles and methods studied in General Chemistry II. Assignments selected from the subject matter of General Chemistry II are aimed at aiding the student to develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s): A CHM 121. S/U graded.

A CHM 130 Advanced General Chemistry I (3)
Energy, enthalpy, thermochemistry, quantum mechanics and atomic theory, general concepts of bonding, covalent bonding and orbitals, gases, liquids, and solids. Students will be introduced to faculty research within the Department of Chemistry, as well as interdisciplinary areas. Only one of A CHM 120 and 130 and T CHM 130 may be taken for credit.

T CHM 130 (formerly A CHM 130H) Advanced General Chemistry I (3)
T CHM 130 is the Honors College version of A CHM 130; only one version may be taken for credit.

A CHM 131 Advanced General Chemistry II (3)
Chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, spontaneity, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, transition metals, coordination chemistry, organic and biochemical molecules. Only one of A CHM 121 and 131 and T CHM 130 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 130 or T CHM 130.  

T CHM 131 (formerly A CHM 131H) Advanced General Chemistry II (3)
T CHM 131 is the Honors College version of A CHM 131; only one version may be taken for credit.

A CHM 133 (formerly A CHM 133A) Problem Solving: Chemical Principles I (1)
Discussions and applications of the principles and methods studied in Chemical Principles. Assignments selected from the subject matter of Chemical Principles are aimed at helping the student develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s): A CHM 130. S/U graded.

A CHM 134 (formerly A CHM 133B) Problem Solving: Chemical Principles II (1)
Discussions and applications of the principles and methods studied in Chemical Principles. Assignments selected from the subject matter of Chemical Principles are aimed at helping the student develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s): A CHM 131. S/U graded.

A CHM 143 Pre-Organic Chemistry (1)
The course provides a background and review of those topics necessary for success in organic chemistry. Topics may include bonding, Lewis acid/bases, hybridization, electronegativity, polarizability, 3-D structures, energy profile diagrams, oxidation states, and reaction mechanisms. Carbon containing compounds will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 121.

A CHM 199 Current Topics in Chemistry (1-3)
Selected topics from the current chemical literature in selected areas of chemistry. Particular areas of study to be announced each semester. Intended for students interested in exploring in depth themes and topics covered in larger lecture courses or topics in addition to those that can be treated in such settings. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 220 (formerly A CHM 216A) Organic Chemistry I (3)
Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principal classes of organic compounds, stressing the underlying principles of reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry techniques. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 121 or 131 and 125.

A CHM 221 (formerly A CHM 216B) Organic Chemistry II (3)
Introduction to spectroscopic characteristics or organic compounds; continued classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules; chemistry of carbonyl compounds; aspects of aromatic chemistry, heterocycles, nitrogen compounds, polymers, and biologically important molecules. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 220.

A CHM 222 (formerly A CHM 217A) Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1)
Basic techniques of organic chemistry including extraction, crystallization, distillation, and chromatography; physical properties of compounds. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 220. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 223 (formerly A CHM 217B) Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1)
Application of basic techniques of organic chemistry to the synthesis and qualitative analysis of organic compounds. Applications of IR and NMR spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 222. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 221. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 225 Quantitative Analysis (3)
Theory of quantitative analysis based on modern chemical principles. Practical application to typical gravimetric, volumetric, and colorimetric analysis. Two class periods, one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 121 or 131 and 125. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 250 Introduction to Forensic Chemistry (3)
Descriptive discussion of the role of chemistry in modern forensic science. The main emphasis is in chemical methods and techniques used in criminalistics. Lectures only. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120 and A CHM 121.

A CHM 307/307Z (= A ATM 307/307Z) Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry (3)
Chemical principles and concepts leading to understanding the composition and change in the chemical/atmospheric environment; sources and sinks of chemical constituents; chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere; measurement and theory; greenhouse gases; global pollution and ozone depletion. Only one version of A CHM 307 may be taken for credit. Does not yield credit toward the major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 113 or 119; A PHY 150; and A CHM 121 or 131.

A CHM 320 Introduction to Physical Chemistry (3)
Behavior of gases chemical thermodynamics (including solution equilibria, phase equilibria and electrochemistry), dynamics of chemical reactions (reactions, mechanisms, theory) and fundamentals of quantum chemistry with focus on chemical bonding, molecular structure and spectroscopy. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 121 or 131. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A MAT 113 or 119 and A PHY 108.

A CHM 321 Introduction to Experimental Physical Chemistry (2)
Experimental illustration of physical principles and introduction to instrumentation. Techniques of physical measurements, treatment of experimental data and generalization of results to illustrate the fundamental principles. One class period, one laboratory period each week. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 320.

A CHM 342 Introduction to Biochemistry (3)
A one semester overview of protein and nucleic acid structural biology, synthesis, and function; with a brief introduction to metabolism, signal transduction, and carbohydrate chemistry. This course is suggested for chemistry majors who will not be taking the two semester Comprehensive Biochemistry sequence (A CHM 442 and 443) as part of their degree curriculum. May not be taken by students with credit for A BIO 365. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 220 and 221.

A CHM 343 Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory (1)
Experiments illustrating the fundamentals of biochemistry as discussed in A CHM 342. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 222. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 342. May not be offered in 2014-2015.

A CHM 344 Bioanalytical Chemistry (3)
The objective of this course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of biomolecule analysis. Students will learn how to carry out different types of characterization and quantitative determinations, while becoming familiar with general laboratory practices and the operation of common bioanalytical instrumentation. The Lecture part will introduce the principles of common bioanalytical approaches used in biological and clinical settings, which will enable students to understand, carry out, and troubleshoot typical determinations of biopolymers. The lectures will not cover advanced instrumental techniques that are taught in specialized upper-level courses, but will deal instead with separations, spectroscopy, bioassays, and other common biochemical methods. The lectures will stress the chemical and structural aspects of target analytes as the basis for their identification and quantification. Laboratory experiments will provide the hands-on experience necessary to link personal observations with the sometimes dry and impersonal knowledge provided by textbooks and research articles. The selected experiments are aimed at developing observation and interpretation skills that will be honed by using the actual data obtained by the students. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 342.

A CHM 350 (formerly A CHM 340A) Physical Chemistry I (3)
Mathematical description of physicochemical systems and their interpretation in terms of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, reaction rates and statistical mechanics. Atomic and molecular structure from the viewpoint of quantum theory with special emphasis on bonding and spectra. This is the required physical chemistry course for B.S. Chemistry students with emphases in Chemistry, Forensic Chemistry or Comprehensive Forensics Chemistry. Only one of A CHM 350 or A CHM 444 may be taken for credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry with emphasis in Chemical Biology or B.A. Chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221, A PHY 150, A MAT 214.

A CHM 351 (formerly A CHM 340B) Physical Chemistry II (3)
A continuation of A CHM 350. The course contains the principles of chemical kinetics, quantum theory and spectroscopy. Topics include the rate laws, systems displaying complex kinetics, enzyme catalysis, atomic structure, molecular structure, microwave, Raman, infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and statistical mechanics. This is the required physical chemistry course for B.S. Chemistry students with emphases in Chemistry, Forensic Chemistry or Comprehensive Forensics Chemistry. Only one of A CHM 351 or A CHM 445 may be taken for credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry with emphasis in Chemical Biology or B.A. Chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 350.

A CHM 352Z (formerly A CHM 341Z) Physical Chemistry Lab (3)
The experimental understanding of the basic principles of physical chemistry and development of familiarity with instrumentation. Includes experiments on the electrical properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, microcalorimetry and computer experiments in molecular orbital theory. The course also includes instruction on searching the chemical literature, data processing, and writing laboratory reports. One lecture and two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 225. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 350. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 354 Mathematical Methods in Chemistry (3)
The purpose of this course is to clarify and to review the required, practical mathematical underpinnings for upper level chemistry courses that contain elements of thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics and data analysis. Corequisite(s): A CHM 350. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 214.

A CHM 390 Chemistry Internship (1-4)
Students will have the opportunity to acquire practical, "hands-on" experience in chemistry by participating as an intern in the work of an agency, institution, or corporation other than the University. The student's work will be supervised and evaluated by a designated individual at the internship site. This supervisor will provide an evaluation of the student's work to the University at Albany Department of Chemistry faculty member who is the instructor of record for final assessment and grading. Students majoring in Chemistry may apply to the Department of Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course. Admission to ACHM 390 will be dependent upon the acceptability of the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and to the host institution or agency. Enrollment in the course is limited in number in order to provide substantial individual hands-on training, and therefore, is determined on a competitive basis. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. S/U graded.

A CHM 401 Current Topics in Advanced Chemistry (1-3)
Intensive examination of emerging trends in chemistry from the chemical literature. New information emerging from recent studies will be stressed. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 411 Computational Chemistry I (3)
Practical applications of quantum chemical calculations for chemical research. Overview of different levels of molecular orbital theory with case studies highlighting selected applications to organic, inorganic, and biophysical chemistry. Evaluation of each technique's strengths and limitations. Prior programming experience is not required. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 351 or A PHY 440, or permission of instructor.

A CHM 412 Computational Chemistry II (3) 
Molecular mechanics as a tool in biochemical and biophysical research. Statistical mechanics of equilibrium systems and enhanced sampling techniques in different thermodynamic ensembles will be reviewed. Strengths and limitations of commonly used methods will be explored. Prior programming experience is not required, but prior exposure to Linux will be helpful. Note that this course may be taken independently of A CHM 411. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 351 or A PHY 440, or A PHY 460, or permission of instructor.

A CHM 417 Advanced Synthesis Laboratory (3)
Experimental investigation of advanced syntheses of organic and inorganic compounds including their separation and analysis. The development of skills and understanding for the application of complex procedures and methods common in current practice. One class period, two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 223. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 420 (formerly A CHM 420A) Inorganic Chemistry I (3)
Bonding and reactivity in inorganic systems, including metal complexes and covalent molecules. Applications of crystal field theory and introductory molecular orbital theory to coordination compounds, including group theory and symmetry, the spectrochemical series, and substitution mechanisms. Metal carbonyl complexes and an introduction to organometallic compounds and their reactions. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 320 or 351.

A CHM 421 (formerly A CHM 420B) Inorganic Chemistry II (3)
Topics in advanced inorganic chemistry, including organometallic chemistry, catalysis, and bioorganic chemistry. Other selected topics may include solid-state chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, electron-transfer, applications of vibrational and electronic spectroscopies, and the chemistry of the main-group elements. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 420. 

A CHM 422 Organometallic Chemistry (3)
A systematic study of the compounds containing a carbon-metal or carbon-metalloid bond. Emphasis will be placed upon the interaction of metal fragments with organic ligands, the structural types, and chemical reactivity of this class of compounds. Topics will also include the role of organometallic compounds in synthesis, their catalytic behavior, and models of bioinorganic systems. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 and A CHM351 or 445.

A CHM 424 Retrieval and Presentation of Chemical Information (1)
Instruction and practice in modern methods of searching the chemical literature. Students are required to develop their skills in preparing written presentations and speeches. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing. S/U graded.

A CHM 425 Introduction to Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (2)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits of A CHM 425 and/or 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 424. S/U graded. 

A CHM 426 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (3)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. May be repeated for credit but not more than 3 credits of A CHM 425 and/or 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 424. S/U  graded.

A CHM 427 (formerly A CHM 426T) Honors Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (4)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems in chemistry with the results reported in a written Honors Thesis, as well as a public Department Seminar. S/U graded.

A CHM 428 Forensic Chemistry Rearch (3)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. May be repeated for credit but not more than 6 credits total may be applied toward the advanced elective course requirement of the comprehensive forensics chemistry or honors forensics chemistry emphases. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U  graded.

A CHM 430 Instrumental Analysis (3)
Theoretical principles and chemical applications of selected methods of instrumental analysis. Main emphasis is on electroanalytical methods including polarography, conductance, potentiometry, and coulometric methods, and on trace methods of analysis such as spectrograph emission, flame emission, atomic absorption, and fluorometric analysis. Two class periods, one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 225. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 320 or 351 or permission of instructor. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 432 Mass Spectrometry at the Chemistry-Biology Interface (3)
The goal of this course is to provide the students not only with basic knowledge of ionization techniques and mass analysis, but also with an understanding of the biochemical tools necessary for sample processing and preparation. Many examples of biomedical applications will be discussed in class to illustrate strategies and experimental design. These examples will also provide an overview of what has been done using mass spectrometry in the life sciences and will offer possible indications of which problems may be within reach. Spectra interpretation skills will be developed through discussion of examples in class and through solution of take home problems. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 433 Electronics for Scientific Instrumentation (3)
The objective of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge and a fundamental understanding of electronics as applied to modern research laboratory. Students will learn the basic principles of key electronic components and circuits, with special emphasis on circuit analysis and design. The properties and applications of major components and modules will be studied, including transducers, amplifier, and digitizers. The fundamental elements of TTL and serial interfacing will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 435 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3)
This course will develop classical and statistical thermodynamics for solving chemical and molecular problems important in modern chemistry research. The specific topics will be: the mathematical and physical underpinnings of the theory, the models to approximate reality, the discussion of the weaknesses of those approximations, and the application of classical and statistical thermodynamics to modern research problems in all flavors of physical chemistry. Prerequisite(s): two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry (A CHM 350 and 351) and at least three semesters of calculus (through A MAT 214), or permission of instructor.

A CHM 436 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)
Organic chemistry at an advanced level, including introduction of theoretical background and application in synthesis. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 320 or 351.

A CHM 437 Organic Synthesis (3)
The course will focus on the total synthesis of complex organic molecules, such as natural products. Synthetic strategies as well as reaction mechanisms of every step will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221.

A CHM 442 (formerly A CHM 440A) Comprehensive Biochemistry I (3)
Chemical characteristics of living matter, amino acids, polypeptides and proteins, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics; bioenergetics and chemistry of metabolism. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 or permission of instructor.

A CHM 443 (formerly A CHM 440B) Comprehensive Biochemistry II (3)
Biosynthesis, storage, and expression of genetic information; electron transport and other transports across membranes, membrane protein structure and function. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 or permission of instructor.

A CHM 444 (formerly A CHM 441A) Biophysical Chemistry I (3)
Foundations of the physical principles and their applications to biochemical systems. Topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics, applications of these to chemical reactions and equilibria, and molecular motion and transport phenomena. Does not yield credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry students with emphases in Chemistry, Forensic Chemistry or Comprehensive Forensics Chemistry. Only one of A CHM 350 or A CHM 444 may be taken for credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry with emphasis in Chemical Biology or B.A. Chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221, A PHY 150, A MAT 113 or 119.

A CHM 445 (formerly A CHM 441B) Biophysical Chemistry II (3)
Foundations of the physical principles and their applications to biochemical systems. Topics include transport phenomena and sedimentation and electrophoresis, chemical and biochemical kinetics, chemical quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Does not yield credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry students with emphases in Chemistry, Forensic Chemistry or Comprehensive Forensics Chemistry. Only one of A CHM 351 or A CHM 445 may be taken for credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry with emphasis in Chemical Biology or B.A. Chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 444.

A CHM 446 Chemical Biology Laboratory (3)
The lab will provide the basics for protein purification, protein characterization, and DNA manipulation through the use of chromatographic, electrophoretic, and spectroscopic tools of biochemistry and biophysics. One class period, two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 and 223. Corequisite(s): A CHM 350, 442, 443. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 450 (formerly A CHM 450A) Forensic Chemistry I (3)
This introductory course combines a series of seminars, lectures, and laboratories which focus on current topics and analytical methods utilized in today’s modern forensic laboratories. Seminars in Forensic Chemistry will include topics such as: Introduction to Criminalistics, Ethical Dilemmas, and Computer-Assisted Data Analysis. Lecture and laboratory courses will include: Microscopy, Drug Chemistry, Questioned Documents, Toxicology, Latent Prints, Trace- and Firearms/Tool-marks. Various analytical methods currently being used in modern forensic laboratories will be performed utilizing chromatography (TLC, GC, CG/MSD, etc.) and liquid/liquid extractions. One lecture and two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 225 and 430 or permission of instructor. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 451 (formerly A CHM 450B) Forensic Chemistry II (3)
Continuation of A CHM 450. This course combines a series of advanced seminars, lectures and laboratories in Forensic Chemistry. Topics such as: public speaking on technical and non-technical subjects, as well as courtroom testimony, will be covered. Lecture and laboratory topics will include: DNA, Quantitative Methodologies in Drug Chemistry and Toxicology, as well as Advanced Statistical Methods such as: chi-square tests, multiple regression and correlation, nonparametric statistics and analytical variances. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 450 or permission of instructor. Effective Fall 2013 and beyond, course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 455 Forensic Chemistry Internship (1-4)
Students will have the opportunity to acquire practical “hands-on” experience in forensic chemistry by participating as an intern in the work of an agency, institution, or corporation other than the University. The student’s work will be supervised and evaluated by a designated individual at the internship site. This supervisor will provide an evaluation of the student’s work to the University at Albany faculty member who is the instructor of record for final assessment and grading. Students majoring in chemistry with a forensic chemistry emphasis may apply to the Department of Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course. Admission to the Forensic Chemistry Internship course will be dependent upon the acceptability of the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and the host institution or agency. Among the criteria used by these agencies will be completion of A CHM 450 and a possible background check of the applicant. Enrollment in the course is limited in number in order to provide substantial individual hands-on training, and therefore is determined on a competitive basis. Application to the program must be made six months in advance of the beginning of the proposed internship. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. S/U graded.

A CHM 458 Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry/Pharmacology (3)
Medicinal chemistry is an interdisciplinary course at the interface of chemistry and pharmacy and is involved with designing, synthesizing and developing pharmaceutical drugs. It will include the following topics: molecular modeling, rational drug design, combinatorial chemistry, QSAR, and cheminformatics. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221, 442.

A CHM 470 Crystallography (3)
The geometry and structure of crystalline solids and methods of importance in their investigation. Internal and external symmetry properties as a consequence of atomic types and bonding possibilities: lattice types and space groups, x-ray diffraction, and optical techniques. This course will include real-time demonstrations and practical crystallographic work, including the opportunity to work on a provided structural experiment or a crystal from an undergraduate research project. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 471 Theory and Techniques of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry (3)
Introduction to basic theory and general applications of spectroscopic methods in biophysics and biochemistry. Discussion will be based on classical and quantum mechanical approach. Topics include: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and vibrational spectroscopy; determination of structure by diffraction and scattering techniques. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 350 and 351 or A PHY 450, and permission of instructor.

A CHM 472 Experimental Methods of Organic Structure Determination (2)
Discussion of modern methods of organic structure determination such as multinuclear NMR and 2D-NMR techniques, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Interpretation and correlation of spectral results in order to assign structures of organic, biological, and related molecules. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 and 223 and permission of instructor.

A CHM 473 Chemical and Enzymatic Kinetics (3)
Empirical and theoretical treatment of reaction rates and reaction mechanisms; experimental techniques. Emphasis on reactions in solutions, complex reactions, enzyme kinetics, homogeneous catalysis (enzymatic and nonenzymatic), and transition state theory. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 351, A MAT 214, A PHY 240, and permission of instructor.

A CHM 495 Materials Independent Study (3)
Individually selected topic of independent study in materials science (chemistry) culminating in a comprehensive written report. The material covered is to be beyond that offered in any other formal undergraduate course. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A CHM 497 Independent Study (3)
Individual, independent study of selected topics above or beyond those offered in formal undergraduate courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded.