Courses in Art History

A ARH 170 Survey of Art in the Western World I (3)
Survey of art from prehistoric times through the 14th century focusing on architecture, sculpture and painting of the ancient Near East, Egypt, and Europe.

A ARH 171 Survey of Art in the Western World II (3)
Survey of art from the 14th century to the present focusing on painting, sculpture and architecture of Europe and the Americas.

A ARH 205 Myths of the Greek and Roman World in Western Art (3)
A survey of the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome as they were appropriated for visual imagery and thematic subject matter of western art. Particular periods of art studied will vary; these will include arts of antiquity and may also include painting and sculpture of the Renaissance, the early modern and modern eras. Texts to be studied will feature major literary writings of Greece and Rome in translation. May not be taken by students with credit for A CLC 105.

A ARH 207 (= A CLA 207) Egyptian Archaeology (3)
A survey of the remains of ancient Egypt from the earliest times to the Roman Empire. The pyramids, temples, tombs, mummies and works of art will be examined in an attempt to understand the unique character of ancient Egypt. Selections from Egyptian religious and historical texts will be read in translation. Only one version of A ARH 207 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 208 (= A CLA 208) Greek Archaeology (3)
Survey of the prehistoric and historical cultures of ancient Greece, as revealed by archaeology, from the Neolithic to the Hellenistic era, with emphasis on the evolution of pottery style, painting, sculpture and architecture. Only one version of A ARH 208 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 209 (= A CLA 209) Roman Archaeology (3)
Survey of the monuments of ancient Rome and her empire in a cultural and evolutionary context, including major works of sculpture, wall painting and architecture. Roman towns and principles of town planning also studied. Translated selections from Roman literary and historical sources.

A ARH 230 The Art of Medieval Knighthood (3)
The art and culture of medieval European knighthood from its beginnings in mounted soldiers of the eleventh century to its role in elaborate tournaments and jousts of the sixteenth. Attention will be given to the social expression of the knightly class through visual and literary means. Objects of study will include architecture, sculpture, manuscript painting and ivory carvings. Literature will include chivalric epics, romances, and manuals of war. Among the topics to be addressed will be arms and armor, castles and manor houses, the arts of courtly love and the visual spectacle of chivalry.

A ARH 238 (= A FRE 238) Great Classics of French Cinema (3)
An introduction with detailed analyses to a dozen of the most well-known French classic films as contributions to the art of cinema and as reflections of French society at various historical moments. Taught in English. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French. Only one of version of A ARH/A FRE 238 and A FRE 315 may be taken for credit. May not be offered 2017-2018.

A ARH 240 (formerly A CAS 240) Images and Issues of Diversity in the Visual Arts (3)
This course will examine the visual and performing arts produced in selected subcultures and will consider the ways in which such social identities as race/ethnic identity, socio-economic class, gender and age are represented. The course focuses on the relationship of artists and their work to cultural and critical history, the impact and relevance for modern society, the social conditions under which these artists create, and the effect of these conditions on the themes, content, forms and shape of the reality in their art.

A ARH 241 Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture (3)
This course focuses on art and architecture made in Italy during the Renaissance (ca. 1250-1600). Each week, lectures explore one or a few major sites, works, or buildings. The class will discuss how artworks fit into their physical contexts, the influence of patrons, and the social, civic, religious, intellectual, and political significance of art. Lectures also examine artistic exchange between Italy and Northern Europe.

A ARH 250 Art in France from Absolutism to Impressionism (3)
Introduction to art of all mediums produced in France from the consolidation of the country under the Valois and Bourbon kings of the Renaissance and Baroque eras, through the origins of Modernism in 19th century art and culture. The course culminates with an examination of the French Impressionists and the many ways in which their radical new painting styles intersected with French social life and concerns of their era.

T ARH 252 Art of the Enlightenment in France and England (3)
This course examines art produced in Europe during the eighteenth century, a period of rich cultural and intellectual exchange known as the "Enlightenment." We explore the original context, use and significance of the art, as well as the association between artmaking and other forms of cultural inquiry and expression during this era of profound societal change. The art that we examine includes painting, sculpture, graphics and decorative arts, and we address a number of key trends that developed in France and England through a process of influence, exchange and rivalry between these two European powers. These trends include the playful, sensual style known as the Rococo; complex treatments of gender; the fascination with nature and science; and encounters both economic and cultural with people of other parts of the world, notably China, Japan, and Africa. Through the lens of eighteenth-century art students also acquire the fundamental skills of art history research and writing. Open to Honors College students only.

A ARH 260 Introduction to Film Studies (3)
This course offers an introduction to the analysis of cinema as an art form. Students will learn the basic language of film analysis in order to critically understand and interpret the movies as technological, cultural, and artistic products. From mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and film sound to narrative structure, alternatives to mainstream narrative fiction film, and contextual analysis, this introductory course provides the foundation for advanced film studies courses and fulfills the General Education requirement for Arts. The aim of this class is to increase students' visual literacy skills and the ability to recognize film language at work in the creation of meaning on screen.

A ARH 261 Independent and Art House Cinema (3)
This introduction to independent, underground, and art house cinema covers a range of visual and narrative alternatives to the films produced by the studio system. By examining cinema as a mode of visual storytelling and personal expression, these films open up the possibility of an alternative authorship that includes the visions and stories of those operating outside the mainstream or beyond storytelling traditions that are limited by genre conventions and economic expectations. From independent cinema and the avant-garde to underground film movements, midnight movies, cult cinema, and film festival favorites, these films raise questions of what cinema is or can be, highlights cinema's relationship to other art forms, and points to the changing dynamics between the industry and independents in both film history and contemporary filmmaking practices.

A ARH 263 American Film Genres (3)
This course will explore traditional American film genres, centering on the manner in which they were developed, and their evolution across the decades. Such elements as script structure, camera placement and movement, acting and directing styles, and color and widescreen processes will be examined. Genres to be explored include musicals, comedies, horror, science fiction, westerns, and melodrama. Subgenres such as the adult western, the screwball comedy, and the social comment film also will be analyzed.

A ARH 264 New American Cinema (3)
During the late 1960s and early 1970s, great social changes were occurring in the United States. These changes were sparked by the emerging youth culture, the progression of the Civil Rights Movement, opposition to the war in Vietnam, and the advent of the modern-era feminist movement. This course will explore the manner in which these changes impacted on the American cinema. Editing styles, camera placement, and camera movement veered from traditional film language; film content reflected youth alienation, the drug culture, and alternative lifestyles and politics.

A ARH 265 History of Photography (3)
A survey of photography from its invention in 1839 to recent trends. Emphasizes why it was developed, the major 19th century documentary and artistic uses, and the extraordinary range of 20th century explorations. An integrated approach tied to parallel social and artistic events.

A ARH 266 Photography 1970 to the Present (3)
A thorough survey of recent photography. Emphasizes fine art photography and the use of photography by artists working in other media, including documentary and photojournalistic work, photography books, mixed media and digital work. The materials for study are drawn from slide lectures, local exhibitions, contemporary criticism, library materials, and the media. No prior photography or art history required.

A ARH 267 International Film Movements (3)
From the French New Wave, Italian Neorealism, German Expressionism, and Soviet Cinema to Dogma 95, Iranian Cinema, Bollywood, and Bangkok Cinema, this course examines various film movements and tendencies that operate alongside and against Hollywood and other international film industries. Film form, content, style, narrative, and meaning will be understood in the context of cultural, economic, and political climates and in relation to other art forms, genres, and movements. International in scope, this course approaches cinema as both an art form and industry that is technologically and politically determined, artistically motivated, and ultimately transformative of the language of cinema as it is practiced by filmmakers in specific contexts and as understood by viewers nationally, internationally, and transnationally.

A ARH 269 The Hollywood Crime Film (3)
Foundational course which explores the particular genre of crime films and its various sub-genres, focusing on films that have been produced by the American motion picture studios from the silent film era through the present. The course provides information about the basics of the Hollywood studio system and spotlights the manner in which this particular genre serves to mirror the changes across the decades in American art, culture, and society. Also discussed are basic film language, narrative conventions, and filmic structure.

A ARH 270 Introduction to Ancient Art: Greek and Roman Mural Painting and Floor Mosaic (3)
A study of two of the primary visual forms, wall paintings and mosaic pavements, which survive from the ancient world will serve to introduce students to the art of the classical civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. The course consists of a historical survey of the wall and floor decorations produced in the Greek and Roman worlds from the palace civilizations of the Aegean Bronze Age through Classical and Hellenistic Greece to the Roman Empire and early Christianity. Parallel developments in Etruscan art are also included. Style, content and technique in both wall paintings and floor mosaics will be studied in the ancient social and cultural contexts in which the art was created. Both pebble and tessellated mosaic pavements and fresco paintings are examined, as well as ancient literary texts which reveal ancient opinion on the visual arts.

A ARH 280 (= A EAC 280) Chinese Painting (3)
Introduces students to the major works of traditional Chinese painting and analyzes those works to arrive at an understanding of life in traditional China. The major class activity will be viewing, discussing and analyzing slides of Chinese paintings. Only one version of A ARH 280 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 285 Contemporary Art: A Global Perspective (3)
This course seeks to introduce first-time students to contemporary art. Major themes, concepts, artists and works of contemporary art will be explored. While emphasis is given to American and European art practices, contemporary art will be looked at from a global perspective which includes recent art from Latin America, South Africa, Middle East, India and China.

A ARH 288 Film History I (1894-1945) (3)
This international-based course provides an introductory survey of film history in its first fifty years, and addresses the history of cinema technologies, movements, and genres as the art form developed. Film History I (1894-1945) provides an important introduction to early film history that covers pre-cinematic and early cinematic technologies, the introduction and growth of narrative fiction film, international and artistic developments surrounding editing and the aesthetics of the image, early studio alliances in the United States and the growth of the Hollywood studio system, and the subsequent transition to film sound. This course sets the stage for the further study of international film history courses such as Film History II and International Film Movements. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 289 Film History II (1945-) (3)
This international-based course addresses the history of cinema technologies, movements, and genres from World War II to the present day. In addition to the Classical Hollywood studio system, Film History II covers major international film movements surrounding and following World War II and the industrial changes in film history that are technologically determined, economically motivated, and socio-politically influenced. This course sets the stage for the further study of contemporary cinema in relation to earlier film histories and advanced Film Studies courses, and is not limited to a Western-centric approach. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 298 Topics in Art History (3)
Introductory study of a special topic in Art History not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

A ARH 301 Aegean Prehistory (3)
Archaeology of the Aegean area from Paleolithic times to the end of the Bronze Age, with emphasis on Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered in 2017-2018.

A ARH 302 (= A CLA 302) Villanovans, Etruscans, and Early Romans (3)
Archaeology of the Etruscans and of early Rome in the context of the Iron Age cultures of the Italian peninsula. Prerequisite(s): A ARH/A CLA 209 and A ARH 270, or junior or senior class standing.

A ARH 303 Artistic Encounters in the Early Medieval World (3)
This course examines the art and architecture serving Christian, Jewish, and Muslim communities in Europe and the Middle East from the second through the tenth century of the Common Era. Particular attention will be paid to those objects and monuments which articulate the common values and areas of tension among the adherents of all three religions. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 329 Archaeological Field Research (2-6)
Supervised participation in the excavation of approved Old World prehistoric, classical or medieval sites. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of the department chair.

A ARH 331 Monks, Monarchs, and Medieval Art: Europe 500-1100 C.E. (3)
An examination of European architecture, painting, sculpture and portable arts from the 6th to the 12th century. Course covers early Germanic and Celtic art, Carolingian and Ottonian periods. French, English, German, Italian Romanesque architecture and sculpture of the pilgrimage route of Santiago, monastic manuscript illumination, mural painting, objects in bronze and precious metals. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 332 Gothic Art and Architecture (3)
Examines Gothic Art of the 13th and 14th centuries in France and its spread throughout Europe. Includes a study of religious and lay architecture (cathedrals, castles, town halls); cathedral sculpture; stained glass, murals and mosaics; manuscript illumination, painted altarpieces and art of precious metals. Only one version of A ARH 332 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 341 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture: 1250-1450 (3)
This course will focus on paintings, sculptures, and architectural structures produced in Italy between 1250 and 1450. We will focus on works produced in major centers like Florence and Milan, as well as those made in smaller cities like Siena and Padua. The course will stress the effects of historical, social, and political contexts on the production of images and structures. Topics to be covered include the influence of the mendicant orders, the effects of the Black Death, patronage, urbanism, the construction and decoration of churches and palaces, the influence of antiquity, courtly art and architecture, the role of gender in art, and the social status of the artist. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 342 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture: 1450-1600 (3)
This course will focus on artistic and architectural monuments created in Italy between 1450 and 1600, a period that saw the development of the High Renaissance and the eventual emergence of the Mannerist style. We will focus on paintings, sculptures, architectural structures, and graphic work produced in major centers, including Florence, Venice, Rome, and Milan. Topics to be covered include the role of the patron, politics and art, the continuing influence of antiquity, sexuality and gender in imagery, and the evolving social position of the artist. Special attention will be paid to papal patronage and, naturally, the influence of the Protestant Reformation and the Counter-Reformation on art in Italy. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 343 Northern European Art: 1350-1600 (3)
This course will focus on art created in northern Europe between 1350 and 1600. We will focus on paintings, sculptures, and graphic work produced in France, the Netherlands, and Germany. Topics to be covered include the meaning of realism, symbolism and the use of iconographic analysis, the development of the art market, artistic specialization, the function of images in religious and domestic contexts, the emergence of the self-conscious artist, and sexuality and gender in imagery. Attention will be paid to the influence of antiquity and the Italian Renaissance in the north. We will also examine the influence of the Protestant Reformation on images produced after 1517. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 350 Art in the Courts of 17th Century Europe (3)
A study of the painting, sculpture and architecture produced in Italy, France and Spain during the 17th century. Attention will focus on the religious, political and ceremonial demands of the Catholic Church and the royal courts, as well as on the careers of individual artists such as Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio, Poussin and Velasquez. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 351 Netherlandish Painting in the Age of Rembrandt and Rubens (3)
An examination of the painting and graphic art produced in the Netherlands during the 17th century. In addition to studying artistic trends and individual artists such as Rembrandt and Rubens, students will explore the ways in which the art addressed the social needs and concerns of Dutch and Flemish audiences. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 352 Art of the Enlightenment (3)
This course examines art produced in Europe during the 18th century, a period of rich cultural and intellectual exchange known as the "Enlightenment." It explores the original context, use and significance of the art, as well as the association between artmaking and other forms of cultural inquiry and expression during this era of profound societal change. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 361 Understanding Screen Studies: Acting, Apparatus, and Audiences (3)
This course explores the history of screen studies in relation to changing technology and the cinematic apparatus, audience and reception studies, the art of acting and directing, and the understanding of cinema as an art form that is culturally located. Students will learn to recognize the semiotics of cinema in the context of film history, theory, criticism, and practice, and to become critical viewers of the art. This course also grapples with screen studies as it is changing in the new digital age, and raises epistemological questions regarding the nature of representation and reception studies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 362 Topics in Film: Significant Cinema Directors (3)
This course offers an in-depth look at the work and influences of selected individual directors or groups of filmmakers in the context of auteur theory, film and art history, and cultural studies. Students will exercise formal and contextual analysis in order to better understand the director-as-auteur trope and will also be asked to deconstruct these theories and traditions in order to create new narratives surrounding authorship, genre, and intertextuality in cinema. On the one hand, this course honors the work of particular filmmakers that are undeniably accomplished, while on the other hand also taking into account issues of privilege, collaboration, technological developments, and economic support from the film industry that makes such authorship possible. Directors will thus be celebrated and critiqued with these issues in mind. This course may be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 363 Art of American Silent Films (3)
Examination of the silent film in America, with an emphasis upon Hollywood. Topics to be addressed include: the studio and star systems; significant personalities; the writing of silent film; technological developments; and the various film genres, such as epics, comedies, and melodramas. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260. May not be offered in 2017-2018.

A ARH 365 Modern Art I (3)
Survey of the first phase of Modernism, focusing on painting and sculpture in Europe and the USA from circa 1780–1880. Movements covered include Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism; artists include David, Goya, Manet, Cassatt. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 366 Modern Art II (3)
Survey of Modern art from circa 1880–1945, focusing on painting and sculpture of Europe and the Americas. Movements covered include Post-impressionism, Cubism, German Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism; artists include Van Gogh, Picasso, Kollwitz, Duchamp, O’Keeffe, Douglas, Kahlo. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course or permission of instructor.

A ARH 368 Documentary Cinema: History, Theory, Criticism (3)
This course provides a historical and theoretical introduction to documentary film history and criticism, from early cinema to contemporary documentary filmmaking practices. Students will examine the aesthetics and ethics of representation with a keen attention to issues of visibility, consent, and the power dynamics of authorship, identity politics, and access to the modes of representation. Canonical moments of documentary film history will be explored alongside lesser known examples of documentary works in order to address complex issues of subjectivity, objectivity, and truth as implicated or compromised by the film camera, filmmaker, and film audiences. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 or permission of the instructor.

A ARH 369 (= A ART 382) Experimental Film and Video (3)
This course is an introduction to the elements, structure, and history of experimental film and video art. Experimental film and video art share similarities in their fundamental historical development but adopt very different approaches in style, form, and media. This course will follow each development through screenings and discussions relating to film and video beginning in the 1920s to the present. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 or 267 or A ART 280.

A ARH 380 Poetry and Cinema (3)
This course examines the relationship between the visual and the verbal both on screen and on the page, and will ask students to investigate how film and poetry have influenced and responded to one another over time and in the context of their respective literary and cinematic transformations. The aim of this course is to outline the possibilities of lyrical cinema within experimental, animation, documentary, and narrative film, and to point toward the similarities of rhythm, structure, and image that are frequently shared by poetry and cinema. Films, filmmakers, and poets will be studied alongside one another; a significant amount of time will be spent reading and discussing the original poems. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 and junior or senior standing.

A ARH 383 (formerly A ARH 283; = A ART 383) History and Practice of Video Art I (3)
In this course students will be seeing and making video art. Post production techniques in Apple Final Cut Pro and a variety of audio software are covered. Regular screenings and discussions are held to understand the lineage of the media and provide feedback on each other's work. Class time is spent working on assignments, screenings, lectures and discussion. A significant amount of out of class time will be needed to complete projects. May not be taken by students with credit for A ARH 283 or A ART 280. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 244, 250 or A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 384 (formerly A ARH 268; = A ART 384) History and Practice of Video Art II (3)
Follow-up to History and Practice of Video Art I, this course more thoroughly engages the technical and theoretical issues of the computer in the visual arts with a focus on digital video. Digital video post-production is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students' aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Topics covered include basic non-linear editing with Apple Final Cut Pro, and various image and sound editing software/hardware. May not be taken by students with credit for A ART 281 or A ARH 268. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 383, A ARH 383 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 401 Greek Sculpture (3)
Study of selected sculptural monuments from the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic eras, considered in relation to their historical, intellectual and religious context. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered 2017-2018.

A ARH 402 Roman Sculpture (3)
Selected monuments representing the historical development of Roman sculpture in its social and religious context from the early Republic to the time of the emperor Constantine. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 209 or A ARH 270 or A ARH 302 or junior or senior class standing.

A ARH 403 Greek Painting (3)
A survey of ancient Greek painting from the beginnings about 1000 B.C. through the Hellenistic age; primarily painted vases, but also including the limited evidence that exists for wall painting and other forms. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered 2017-2018.

A ARH 405 Greek Architecture (3)
The development of Greek monumental architecture from the earliest temples through the Hellenistic Age. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered 2017-2018.

A ARH 406 Roman Architecture and Town Planning (3)
The development of Roman public and private architecture, with emphasis on its urban setting and function, and the evolution of Roman towns in Italy and the Empire from the early Republic to the time of the emperor Constantine. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 209 or A ARH 270 or A ARH 302 or junior or senior class standing.

A ARH 432 Gothic Painting (3)
Study of the style and technique of stained glass, manuscript illumination, wall and panel painting in the 13th and 14th centuries, with emphasis on France and Italy. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 442 Art and Change in Northern Europe, 1300-1500 (3)
Research seminar examining selected topics in the art produced in northern Europe from 1300-1500. Special emphasis upon the cultural significance of art in an era that saw dramatic changes in social structures and religious beliefs. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and at least nine credits of upper-level coursework in Art History or Medieval and Renaissance Studies, or permission of instructor

A ARH 450 (= A FRE 460) Art and Society in Early Modern France (3)
Seminar examining selected topics in art and architecture produced in France from the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. Special emphasis upon the cultural significance of art in an era that saw the rise and fall of monarchical power as well as dramatic changes in understandings of social hierarchy, gender, the natural world, and philosophy. Only one version of A ARH 450 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and at least nine credits of upper-level coursework in Art History or French Studies.

A ARH 460 Special Topics in Cinema (3)
In-depth study of selected topics in film not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260, junior or senior standing, and two upper level film studies courses.

A ARH 461 (= A WSS 461) Women in Cinema (3)
This course provides an introduction to women in cinema with an emphasis on images of women in film and films directed by women. Drawing upon film history and feminist film theory, this course takes on the construction of femininity and embodiment on screen as well as the role of the camera, the anticipated or implied spectator, and the film industry at large in those representations. Students will also examine alternatives to the traditional visual relationships and gender dynamics emphasized by Hollywood and other film industries, and will become familiar with experimental, animated, and feminist counter-cinema as important instances of visual culture that either transgress or work through issues of gender and the gaze differently. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior status and either A ARH 260 or six credits of A WSS coursework.       

A ARH 462 Research Seminar in Film Studies (3)
Seminar for advanced art history or film studies students on selected topics in film history, criticism, theory, and practice. Topics may range in subject, from experimental and digital cinema to the international film festival. Coursework involves extensive discussion and readings as well as a substantial written or creative project in relation to the specific seminar topic. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260, junior or senior standing, two upper level film studies courses, and Art History major/minor or Film Studies minor, or permission of instructor.       

A ARH 463 Cinematic Space: Art, Architecture, and Landscape in Film (3)
Seminar on landscape in cinema examining the role of setting, set design, art, architecture, and the environment in the creation of cinematic space on screen for both characters and viewers. Examines a wide range of films that feature landscape as a protagonist and undeniable presence within the world of the film, and approaches cinema as a mode of visual storytelling. Incorporates a study of other, closely related art forms such as photography, sculpture, architecture, and dance in order to better understand cinematic space and how film operates to create mood and meaning. Students will apply this approach to their own experiences of spatial mediation and the nature of representation in our lives and in the arts. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260, junior or senior standing, and 2 upper division film studies courses.

A ARH 464 Advanced Analysis of Film Form, Story, and Style (3)
Advanced film studies seminar on the artistry of film form, story, and style that aims to provide students with the advanced analytical skills and increased visual literacy to identify film language at work (textual analysis), film as a cultural artifact (contextual analysis), and film in relation to other art forms (intertextual analysis). This study of cinema includes its stories, characters, settings, and narrative devices as well as its non-narrative, experimental, or expressive possibilities. The course situates trends in contemporary cinema and its current sensibilities and styles in the context of film history, auteur theory, genre studies, and technological advancements as they effect the industry, aesthetics, and audience expectations. Prerequisites(s): A ARH 260, junior or senior standing, two upper division film studies courses.

A ARH 466 Art Criticism of the Modern Period (3)
A study of the major European and American critics of 20th century art up to circa 1970. Student essays in criticism of actual artworks will emphasize understanding of historically significant critical perspectives, as well as the development of personal approaches to criticism. Prerequisite(s): One 100 or 200 level Art History course, junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor.

A ARH 467 Art Criticism of the Post-Modern Period (3)
Investigation of practice and theory of contemporary art criticism. Readings will concentrate on critics and writers from the 1970s to the present. In writing about works of art, students will practice basic critical skills of description, formal analysis, interpretation, and articulation of personal responses. Prerequisite(s): One 100 or 200 level Art History course, junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor.

A ARH 468 Art Since 1945 (3)
Survey and critical analysis of art from circa 1945 to the present. The course will cover directions in late Modernism and Post-modernism, including Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Feminist Art, Graffiti Art and Political Art. Prerequisite(s): one 100 or 200 level Art History course and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 475 (= A WSS 475) Women in Art from the Renaissance to Impressionism (3)
Examines representations of women in European and North American art from the Renaissance through Impressionism. Special attention is given to works made by women, and to the problem of how women artists negotiated their position as both subjects and objects of artistic depiction. While women artists faced challenges to their authority on every level - material, theoretical, and ideological - the course explores the inventive ways they reconfigured, or even challenged, traditional expectations. Only one version of A ARH 475 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing plus either one 100 or 200 level Art History course or 6 credits of Women's Gender, and Sexuality Studies courses; or permission of instructor.

A ARH 476 (= A WSS 476) Women in Art from the New Woman to Now (3)
This course examines the ways in which women artists living within diverse historical and cultural contexts gained social agency through visual imagery and material construction. Beginning with the "New Woman" movement around the turn of the 20th century, it examines women's contribution to avant-garde movements in Europe and North America; the feminist art movement of the 1960s and 70s; "post-modern" feminist art which critiqued the very notion of social identity; and women artists' continuing efforts to enrich, question, and challenge the global art world of the 21st century. May not be taken by students with credit for A ARH/A WSS 475 prior to Fall 2014. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing plus either one 100 or 200 level Art History course or 6 credits of Women's Gender, and Sexuality Studies courses; or permission of instructor.

A ARH 490 Internship in Art History (3)
Supervised placement in an institution devoted to the collection, exhibition and/or conservation of works of art, such as the Albany Institute of History and Art or the State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical experience in working with original works of art and includes research and writing projects. Art History majors may use 3 credits toward course requirements above the 300 level. May be repeated for credit, with permission of supervising instructor. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): at least 6 credits in Art History and junior or senior standing. S/U graded.

A ARH 491 Internship in Film Studies (3)
Internship in the study of film or in film production. Students are responsible for finding and securing the internship with an organization or individual, subject to approval by the director of the Film Studies minor. May be repeated for credit. Three credits may be applied to upper level coursework in the Film Studies minor or the Art History major. Prerequisite(s): open only to juniors or seniors with a Film Studies minor or with at least six credits of film studies coursework, and an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. S/U graded.

A ARH 497 Independent Study (1–4)
Directed studio project in a selected art area. May be repeated with approval of department chair. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and department chair.

A ARH 498 Topics in Art History (3)
In-depth study of selected topics in art history not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 499Y Research Seminar in Art History (3)
Seminar focusing upon selected topics in art historical research. Students will study all aspects of research in art history, including the formulation of a topic; establishing the state of research on the topic; preparing an annotated bibliography and scholarly notes; and using library and web-based catalogues, databases, museum archives, image banks, and other research tools. The main focus of the coursework will be an individual research project. The course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and Art History major or minor, or permission of instructor.