Program in Religious Studies

Faculty

Director of Religious Studies
 
Charles Koban, Ph.D.
  Department of History

Professors
 Louise M. Burkhart, Ph.D.
  Department of Anthropology
 Rachel Cohon, Ph.D.
  Department of Philosophy
 Susanna Fessler, Ph.D.
  Department of East Asian Studies
 John Monfasani, Ph.D.
  Department of History
 John Schwaller, Ph.D.
  Professor of History

Associate Professors
 Nadieszda Kizenko, Ph.D.
  Department of History
 Patrick Nold, Phil.D.
  Department of History
 Barry Trachtenberg, Ph.D.
  Department of History

Assistant Professor
 Dmitri Korobeynikov, D.Phil., Ph.D.
  Department of History

Adjunct Faculty
 Arthur D. Brenner, Ph.D.
  Department of History
 Joan J. Earley, Ph.D.
  Department of Art and Art History


Religious Studies is an Interdisciplinary Studies major reflecting a wide variety of academic interests and disciplines. Its purpose is to produce a formal structure for the study of the religions of humankind.

“Religion” is that which is to be studied; “religious studies” is the composite program and/or the official title for the formal structure produced for the study of religion. Religious belief will not be necessary in order to take courses or to participate in the program.

Religion, one of the most basic of human concerns, has occupied a leading place in the thought and activities of all peoples from the earliest civilizations (as shown by archaeology), through early literate societies, (as seen in their religious texts), to the present, where religious beliefs and their consequences continue to shape the daily news.

Degree Requirements: Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Religious Studies

General program B.A.: Religious Studies requires a minimum of 36 credits, at least 18 of which must be on the 300 and 400 level, distributed as follows:

1. 15 credits from Breadth Courses, of which the following are required: 

A REL 100 Introduction to the Study of Religion          
A PHI 214 (= A REL 214) World Religions          
A ANT 363 (= A REL 363) Ethnology of Religion

Breadth Courses: 
A AFS 341 African/African-American Religion
A ANT 175 (= A REL 175) Anthropology and Folklore
A CLC 105 Myths of the Greek World
A HIS 235 Early and Medieval Christianity
A HIS 253 (= A JST 253 & A REL 253) Medieval Jews among Muslims and Christians
A HIS 387 (= A REL 387) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture I
A HIS 388 (= A REL 388) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture II
A JST 150 Survey of Jewish Civilization
A PHI 116 (= A REL 116 World Views
A PHI 311 History of Medieval Philosophy
A PHI 322 (= A REL 322) Philosophy of Religion
A REL 200 Introduction to the Bible
A REL 299 (= A JST 299) Topics in Religious Studies
A REL 397 Independent Study of Religious Studies

2. 18 credits from one of the Concentrations: Religious Creative Expressions (Art, Architecture, Music, Literature); Religion and Society; or Critical Issues of Religion.

Courses for the Concentration in Religious Creative Expressions (Art, Architecture, Music, Literature):
A ANT 268 (= A LCS 268) Ethnology of Precolumbian Art
A ARH 170 Survey of Art in the Western World I
A ARH 171 Survey of Art in the Western World II
A ARH 331 Monarchs, Monks, and Medieval Art: Europe 500-1100 C.E.
A ARH 332 Gothic Art and Architecture
A ARH 341 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture: 1250-1450
A ARH 342 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture: 1450-1600
A ARH 402 Roman Sculpture
A ARH 405 Greek Architecture
A ARH 432 Gothic Painting
A ARH 442 Art and Change in Northern Europe, 1300-1500
A CLA 207 (= A ARH 207) Egyptian Archeology
A CLA 208 (= A ARH 208) Greek Archaeology
A ENG 289 Topics in English (as approved, when the topic concerns Religious Studies)
A ENG 336 American Literature to 1800
A ENG 348 Milton
A ENG 421 (= A ENG 330) Literature of the Middle Ages
A MUS 205 History of Music
A MUS 432 Music of the Baroque Period
Courses for the Concentration in Religion and Society:
A ANT 341 (= A LCS 341) Ethnology  of Mesoamerica
A ANT 433 Mesoamerican Archaeology
A HIS 324 Religion in American Life and Thought
A HIS 338 The Italian Renaissance, 1300-1530
A HIS 339 Renaissance and Reformation in 16th Century Europe
A HIS 381 History of the Middle East I
A HIS 383 The Arab-Israeli Conflict in Historical Perspective
A HIS 387 (= A REL 387) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture I
A HIS 388 (= A REL 388) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture II
A HIS 425 American Intellectual History Since 1860
A HIS 463 The Byzantine Empire, 300-1453
A JST 221 The American Jewish Experience
A JST 244 (= A HIS 244) Zionism, Palestine, and Israel in Historical Perspective
A JST 251 (= A HIS 252) Early Israel and Biblical Civilization
A JST 252 (= A REL 252) Jews, Hellenism, and Early Christianity
A JST 254 (= A REL 254 & A HIS 254) The Jews in the Modern World

Courses for the Concentration in Critical Issues in Religion: 
A AFS 213 History of the Civil Rights Movement
A CAS 141 Concepts of Race and Culture in the Modern World
A EAS 266 (= A REL 266) Buddhism in China and Japan
A EAS 345 (= A REL 345) Ethical Issues in East Asian Thought
A HIS 235 Early and Medieval Christianity
A HIS 250 (= A JST 250) The Holocaust in History
A HIS 253 (= A JST 253 & A REL 253) Medieval Jews among Muslims and Christians
A HIS 336 History of the Early Middle Ages
A HIS 338 The Italian Renaissance, 1300-1530
A HIS 381 History of the Middle East I
A HIS 387 (= A REL 387 Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture I
A HIS 388 (= A REL 388) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture II
A PHI 114 Morals and Society
A PHI 115 Moral Choices
A PHI 116 (= A REL 116) World Views
A PHI 212 Introduction to Ethical Theory
A PHI 214 (= A REL 214) World Religions
A REL 100 Introduction to the Study of Religion
A REL 299 (= A JST 299) Topics in Religious Studies
E EST 120 Toleration

3. 3 credits from the senior seminar A REL 499

NOTE: Courses that conform to the intent and content of the concentration but are not listed may be counted towards fulfilling the requirements upon approval of the program director. A rearrangement of courses into new concentrations may be possible upon the approval of the program director.

Students may also complete a minor in religious studies.