College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Senior Vice President & Chief Executive Officer
 Alain E. Kaloyeros, Ph.D.
  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Vice President for Academic Affairs & Chief Academic Officer
 Robert E. Geer, Ph.D.
  University of Minnesota

Vice President for Student Affairs
 Richard L. Collier, M.A.
  University at Albany

Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Professional and Corporate Recruitment and Outreach
 Daniel D. White, Ph.D.
  University at Albany

Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Student Recruitment and Public Outreach
 Diana Martin-Dumesnil, B.S.
  SUNY Fredonia

Assistant Vice President for Student Records
 Rita M. Gaglio, B.S.
  Empire State College

Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Student Recruitment and Admissions
 Krista J. Thompson, B.S.
  Russell Sage College

Associate Vice President & Chief Executive Officer, CNSE-Children’s Museum of Science and Technology (CNSE-CMOST) 
 Deborah Onslow, B.S.  
  University of Maryland

Director of Operations, CNSE-Children’s Museum of Science and Technology (CNSE-CMOST)  
 Laurie Miedema 
  Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Director of Education & Museum Experience, CNSE-Children’s Museum of Science and Technology (CNSE-CMOST) 
 Sarah Fisk, B.S.  
  Paul Smith’s College

Head of Nanosciences Constellation
 Hassaram Bakhru, Ph.D. 
  Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta

Head of Nanoengineering Constellation
 John G. Hartley, Ph.D.
  University of Texas at Austin

Head of Nanoeconomics Constellation
 Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D.
  Northeastern University

Head of Nanobiosciences Constellation
 James Castracane, Ph.D.
  The Johns Hopkins University

Distinguished Service Professor
 Hassaram Bakhru, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
  Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta

Professors
 Robert L. Brainard, Ph.D.
  Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 James Castracane, Ph.D.
  The Johns Hopkins University
 Alain Diebold, Ph.D. (CNSE Faculty Council Chair)
  Purdue University
 Robert E. Geer, Ph.D.
  University of Minnesota
 Timothy Groves, Ph.D.
  The University of Chicago
 Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D.
  Northeastern University
 John G. Hartley, Ph.D.
  University of Texas at Austin
 Makoto Hirayama, Ph.D.
  Sophia University, Japan
 Alain E. Kaloyeros, Ph.D.
  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
 Ernest Levine, Ph.D.
  New York University
 Michael Liehr, Ph.D.
  RWTH Aachen, Germany
 Eric Lifshin, Ph.D.
  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
 James R. Lloyd, Ph.D.
  Stevens Institute of Technology
 Richard J. Matyi, Ph.D.
  Northwestern University
 J. Andres Melendez, Ph.D.
  University at Albany
 Serge R. Oktyabrsky, Ph.D.
  P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow
 Bradley L. Thiel, Ph.D.
  University of Washington
 Bin Yu, Ph.D.
  University of California, Berkeley

Associate Professors
 Thomas Begley, Ph.D.
  University at Albany
 Nathaniel C. Cady, Ph.D. 
  Cornell University 
 Michael A. Carpenter, Ph.D.
  University of Rochester
 Gregory Denbeaux, Ph.D. 
  Duke University 
 Kathleen A. Dunn, Ph.D.
  University of Wisconsin-Madison
 Harry Efstathiadis, Ph.D.
  City University of New York
 Eric Eisenbraun, Ph.D.
  University at Albany
 Michael Fancher, M.A.
  University at Albany
 Mengbing Huang, Ph.D.
  University of Western Ontario, Canada
 Vincent P. LaBella, Ph.D.
  Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
 Ji Ung Lee, Ph.D.
  University of Wisconsin-Madison
 Janet Paluh, Ph.D.
  Stanford University
 Fatemeh Shahedipour-Sandvik, Ph.D.
  University of Missouri-Columbia
 Susan Sharfstein, Ph.D.
  University of California, Berkeley
 Scott Tenenbaum, Ph.D.
  Tulane University
 Mohamed Trebak, Ph.D. 
  Université de Liège, Belgium
 Carl Ventrice, Ph.D.
  Drexel University
 Yubing Xie, Ph.D. 
  Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences  
 Yongqiang Xue, Ph.D. 
  Purdue University

Assistant Professors
 Magnus Bergkvist, Ph.D.
  University of Uppsala, Sweden
 Sara Brenner, M.D., University of Iowa and M.P.H.,
  University at Albany
 Nadine Hempel, Ph.D.
  University of Queensland
 Unnikrishnan Pillai, Ph.D.
  University of Minnesota
 
Instructors
 Lawrence P. Clow, Jr., BSET
  Regents College
 Richard L. Moore, II, B.A.
  Trenton State College
 Manisha Rane-Fondacaro, Ph.D.
  Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay
 Miguel Rodriguez, A.S.
  Middlesex County College
 Natalya Tokranov, Ph.D.
  Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences
 Vadim Tokranova, Ph.D.
  Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences



The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) undergraduate curricula in the interdisciplinary fields of nanoscale science and nanoscale engineering are designed to provide UAlbany’s undergraduate students with a well-rounded education of the highest quality. The curriculum provides students with the analytical tools necessary to explore, discover, and innovate, while cementing fundamental knowledge in nanoscience and nanoengineering. The programs impart a broad-based, basic and applied, scientific understanding of atomic scale phenomena, behaviors, and properties of matter in order to achieve deliberate control over nanometer-scale atomic and molecular systems. The programs also enable a quantitative mastery of the fundamental nature of nanoscale interactions that can be effectively used to characterize and measure the behavior and structure of nanometer scale assemblies and systems. These degree programs offer an academically rigorous preparation for students intending to pursue scientific, technical, or professional careers in nanotechnology enabled fields or graduate studies in nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering, biotechnology, biotech-related fields, and other physical sciences such as materials science, physics, and chemistry.

Careers

Graduates will be uniquely qualified for opportunities in the high-tech industries of the 21st century, including nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, health sciences, and sustainable energy, or for competitive graduate degrees in most science and engineering fields. The importance of nanoscale know-how to the U.S. research and pedagogical agendas and to the future career objectives and pathways of students trained in these arenas is best captured in the multi-billion dollar National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), signed into law by the U.S. President in 2004. The law proclaims that nanotechnology is “leading to the next industrial revolution.” The NNI specifically calls for the creation of the “laboratory and human resource infrastructure in universities and in the education of nanotechnology professionals” to prepare future generations of U.S. citizens to compete in the “innovation economy” of the 21st century. These conclusions are echoed by the U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century in its report entitled Roadmap for National Security: Imperative for Change. The report states that: “We also face an unprecedented opportunity. The world is entering an era of dramatic progress in bioscience and materials science as well as information technology and scientific instrumentation. Brought together and accelerated by nanoscience, these rapidly developing research fields will transform our understanding of the world and our capacity to manipulate it.” [1]

Within the applied physics, applied chemistry, nanobioscience, electrical engineering and quantum physics components of CNSE's undergraduate programs, our students acquire skills and practice using state of the art equipment in nanoelectronics, nanolithography, nanodevice fabrication, electron microscopy, and nanophotonics. In materials science and nano manufacturing our students work with polymers, graphene, nanotubes, and other nanoparticle materials related to semiconductors, bioscience, healthcare, renewable energy, clean energy, and other environmental sustainability goals. The curriculum also includes work in nanoeconomics so our graduates will better understand the economic and societal impacts of nanotechnology. These courses prepare them for issues relating to grants and patents, the effective commercialization of their future discoveries, and entrepreneurship.

[1] Nanotechnology Technology Initiative: Leading to the Next Industrial Revolution (National Science and Technology Council, Maryland, first edition published on September 1999, updated yearly); and J. Jasinski and P. Petroff, in Nanotechnology Research Directions: IWGN Workshop Report, eds. M.C. Roco, S. Williams, and P. Alivisatos (National Science and Technology Council, Maryland, February 2000), pp. 77-96; and “Roadmap for National Security: Imperative for Change,” (the U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century, 2001).

Special Programs

In addition to its undergraduate majors, CNSE sponsors a ten-week, full-time summer internship program for eligible undergraduates with majors in science or engineering. Applications are available on the CNSE website (http://cnse.albany.edu/) as well as a full description of the program. Admission is by competitive application. Questions should be directed to the Assistant Vice President Diana L. Dumesnil.

The CNSE program also provides a wide range of community engagement opportunities where students have the opportunity to use their knowledge to teach and inform the general public about nanoscale science and engineering. Students are encouraged to volunteer for outreach events at CNSE and at the CNSE-Children’s Museum of Science and Technology (http://www.cmost.org/).

Advising

A comprehensive and proactive advisement program, coupled to a flexible assessment system, is essential to ensuring top academic quality and scholarly excellence of the CNSE undergraduate programs while best serving the educational and career interests of its student participants. Upon enrollment into the CNSE nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering programs, students will be assigned an academic advisor for consultation and scheduling of coursework.

Periodic communication and evaluation of progress will be implemented for each admitted student and will center on individual advisor/student interactions to ensure timely completion of the program of study. Students will meet with their academic advisors regularly to review progress, solicit guidance, and identify opportunities for advancement. Upon completion of the equivalent of four semesters of residency within the nanoscale science program, each student will be guided to select a research advisor for coordination of research involvement leading to the Capstone Undergraduate Research/Design Project (see Program Requirements section below). As part of this research training, undergraduate students will be required to participate in and contribute to, as early as possible, scientific papers, technical reports, and presentations at national and international conferences, seminars, and symposia. Furthermore, undergraduate students enrolled in the nanoscale science and nanoscale engineering programs will be strongly encouraged to participate in onsite and offsite private sector and government laboratory fellowship and internship programs to develop their technical expertise, team participation skills, and professional networking abilities.

Application and Admission

The process for admission to the undergraduate programs in nanoscale science and nanoscale engineering for both freshmen and transfer applicants follows the standard UAlbany application procedures for restricted undergraduate applicants. Applicable admission requirements are outlined below for the three categories of restricted applications: Freshman, Transfer, and Advanced Standing. It should be noted that only undergraduate students formally admitted to the program in nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering are eligible to enroll in Foundational Principles Courses, Core Competency Courses, Technical Concentration Courses or Capstone Research/Design Courses in nanoscale science and nanoscale engineering in the absence of special permission from CNSE (see Program Requirements below).

1. Admission with Freshman Status

Eligibility: It is expected that to meet minimum eligibility criteria each applicant to the CNSE nanoscale science and nanoscale engineering programs will be completing or have completed the following courses and curricula with superior performance by the time the student enters the program: four years of high school mathematics through pre-calculus, four years of high school science to include a minimum of one course each in: biology, chemistry, and physics; and the standard high school curriculum in English, social science, humanities, and foreign languages. All admitted applicants must possess a valid NYS high school diploma or recognized equivalent by the U.S. Department of Education at the time they enroll.

The standard eligibility for consideration will be a minimum HSGPA of 87.5% and a minimum SAT of 1,320 (1600 scale) and/or a minimum ACT of 25. Exceptions to the standard eligibility may be made based on individual achievement and/or unique skills or experience.

Students applying to the nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering programs who are enrolled in high schools where English is not the primary language of instruction must present a minimum TOEFL IBT score of 100, or IELTS score of 7.6 in addition to the criteria above. A student applying as an international student may access application information at http://www.albany.edu/admissions/step_international.php.

Application and Admission: Students applying to the University at Albany in the freshman category who demonstrate documented scholarly excellence and academic interest in nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering could be offered an opportunity for direct freshman admission to the CNSE undergraduate programs. Applicants file the standard SUNY application available at http://www.albany.edu/admissions/step_apply.php. In addition, each applicant must submit a brief, personally written statement of purpose that addresses the reasons the student wishes to enter the CNSE nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering program. A thorough review will be undertaken of the student’s secondary school performance as reflected in high school grade point average (HSGPA), school-based tests such as Regents exams, scores on the SAT or ACT national exams, overall graduating class rank, letters of recommendation, the statement of purpose, and potentially, a personal interview.

Decisions regarding direct freshman admission to the nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering majors will be made by the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE). Offers of admission to nanoscale science and nanoscale engineering majors will be made directly from the CNSE to the applicant. Students selected for Direct Freshmen Admission will be required to document their intent to declare their major to one of the two majors accordingly. [Note: Students who are uncertain which of the two programs to declare need to choose one upon admission but can change to the other program at a later time--students in both programs take the same requirements during their first three semesters.] Students must meet University at Albany requirements for good academic standing to retain their enrollment in the CNSE undergraduate program.

It is strongly recommended that a completed application and all supporting credentials for the CNSE nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering programs be submitted no later than January 15th for Fall, and by October 1st for Spring admission.

Provisional Admission to CNSE Courses: Freshman applicants who are not granted Direct Freshman Admission to the CNSE undergraduate programs but whose achievements or experience seem particularly promising may be extended an offer to enroll in nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering courses at CNSE during their freshman year. If this offer is accepted, the student though not admitted to nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering majors is given permission to enroll in the same CNSE courses as the students who have been admitted. During the freshman year, the student remains an “open” major and the student’s academic adviser is in the Advisement Services Center, but the student is also assigned a CNSE faculty member as a mentor and is encouraged to meet with CNSE’s Director of Academic Advisement. Each student is given a specific contract for the freshman year which, once met, will result in the student’s full admission to CNSE after two semesters.

2. Restricted Admission with Advanced Standing Status

Eligibility: Undergraduate students at UAlbany who are not formally enrolled in the CNSE nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering programs are offered an opportunity for direct admission to the program after completing 24 credits of qualified science or engineering coursework at UAlbany.

The standard eligibility for consideration will include a minimum UAlbany GPA of 3.50 in relevant coursework. Exceptions to standard eligibility may be made based on individual achievement, unique skills, or experience. Due to the specialized nature of the training that takes place in the first four semesters of the CNSE undergraduate program, students who have earned more than 64 credits at the time of application are generally advised to complete an alternate science, mathematics or engineering major and apply for the CNSE graduate program.

Application and Admission Decision: Application materials will be available on the CNSE website http://cnse.albany.edu/; it is the applicant’s responsibility to provide all required application documents, which include: completed application form, a brief, personally written statement of purpose that addresses the reasons the student wishes to enter the CNSE nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering programs, a UAlbany transcript, relevant technical or research performance, and secondary school performance (using the criteria described above in “Restricted Admission with Freshman Status”).

A thorough review will be undertaken of the student’s UAlbany performance in science and/or engineering, relevant technical or research performance, secondary school performance as reflected in high school grade point average (HSGPA), school-based tests such as Regents exams, scores on the SAT or ACT national exams, overall graduating class rank, letters of recommendation, the statement of purpose, and potentially a personal interview.

The goal of Admission with Advanced Standing is the identification of outstanding students who have demonstrated the ability to excel at the university level and a scholarly aptitude for the field of nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering. Although all applications will be considered, completion of the program within a four-year residency at the University at Albany will remain a top priority. Advanced Standing students who do not satisfy standard eligibility for admission with advanced standing to the CNSE undergraduate program may contact CNSE for individual consideration. Some students may be granted conditional status, with admission to the program contingent upon satisfactory completion of a specific academic contract.

Decisions regarding direct Admission with Advanced Standing will be made by the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE). Offers of admission to CNSE will be made directly from the CNSE to the applicant. Students selected for Admission with Advanced Standing will be required to document their intent to declare their major accordingly. Students must meet University at Albany requirements for good academic standing to retain their enrollment in the CNSE undergraduate program.

It is strongly recommended that applications for the Fall semester be received no later than May 15th of the preceding Spring semester; applications for Spring semester should be received no later than December 15th of the preceding Fall semester.

3. Restricted Admission of Transfers with Advanced Standing

Eligibility: UAlbany students who are admitted as transfer students are offered an opportunity for direct admission to the CNSE nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering programs if they have completed 24 credits of qualified science or engineering coursework at their former institution(s). Decisions regarding Transfer with Advanced Standing admission will be made by the CNSE following a review of the student’s college or university transcript, relevant technical or research performance, and secondary school performance. The standard eligibility for consideration will include a minimum college or university GPA of 3.50 in relevant coursework. Exceptions to the standard eligibility may be made based on individual achievement and/or unique skills or experience. Due to the specialized nature of the training that takes place in the first four semesters of the CNSE undergraduate program, students who have earned more than 64 credits at the time of application are generally advised to complete an alternate science, mathematics or engineering major and apply for the CNSE graduate program.

Application and Admission Decision:
an applicant files the standard SUNY Application available at http://www.albany.edu/admissions/step_transfer.php. In addition, each applicant must submit a brief, personally written statement of purpose that addresses the reasons the student wishes to enter the CNSE nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering program. The goal of Restricted Admission of Transfers with Advanced Standing to the CNSE undergraduate program is the identification of outstanding transfer students who have demonstrated the ability to excel at the university level and an aptitude for the fields of nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering. Although all applications will be considered, completion of the program within a time period that does not exceed the four-year residency at UAlbany will remain a top priority. Transfers with Advanced Standing who do not satisfy standard eligibility for admission with advanced standing to the CNSE undergraduate program may contact CNSE for individual consideration. Some students may be granted conditional status, with admission to the program contingent upon satisfactory completion of a specific academic contract.

Decisions regarding admission as a transfer with advanced standing will be made by the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE). Offers of admission to the nanoscale science and nanoscale engineering majors will be made directly from the CNSE to the applicant. Students selected for Admission with Advanced Standing will be required to document their intent to declare their major accordingly. Students must meet University at Albany requirements for good academic standing to retain their enrollment in the CNSE undergraduate program.

It is strongly recommended that students applying as transfers submit their complete application materials to the Undergraduate Admissions office no later than March 15th for Fall consideration and by October 15th for Spring consideration.

Removal from and reinstatement to CNSE Majors: The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering follows the University Policy on academic dismissal. Any CNSE student who is dismissed from the University should follow the University’s procedure for appealing academic dismissal. The student should also file an appeal with the CNSE’s Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing. The review of this appeal includes, but is not limited to, the student’s written appeal and documentation, consultations with the student’s instructors and advisor, and the CNSE Vice President for Academic Affairs, as appropriate. The committee reviews the appeal and makes a recommendation to the Senior Vice President of CNSE. The Senior Vice President makes the final decision, which will be communicated to the student via the Office of Student Affairs. The process and deliberations will follow established University policies and protocols for due process.

Requirements for the B.S. in Nanoscale Science

The B.S. program in Nanoscale Science requires the completion of the following:

  • Foundational Principles courses: 20 credits of N SCI/N ENG 114 (or T SCI/T ENH 114), 115, 116, 117, 126, 127, 128, 129, and 140 (or T SCI/T ENH 140), 141. N SCI 128/129 and 140/141 may be replaced by N SCI 133/134 and 135/136 for students pursuing a Nanobioscience concentration.
  • Core Competencies courses: 21 credits of N SCI 220 (or T SCI 220), 230 (or T SCI 230), 300, 305, 350, 360, and 410.
  • Concentrations courses: 12 credits of Nanoscale Science courses from 1 of the following concentration areas:

Nanoelectronics: N SCI 310, 320, and 420-424
Nanostructured Materials: N SCI 310, 320, and 430-434
Nanobioscience: N SCI 240, 330, and 440-443

  • Capstone Undergraduate Research/Design courses: 9 credits of N SCI 390X, 490, 492W.
  • 9 credits of 400-level Nanoscale Engineering or Science topical elective courses.
  • 6 credits of Nanotechnology survey courses from N ENG/N SCI 101-104.
  • 6 credits of 200-level Nanoscale Science and Technology Skills electives.
  • 1 credit of a senior seminar courses (N SCI 498 or equivalent).
  • 18 credits of Mathematics: A MAT 112, 113, 214, 220, and 314. Students may also substitute the appropriate honors calculus courses offered by the Department of Mathematics that meet the requirements of their major.

The total credit for the major is 102 credits. With the remaining General Education requirements not already completed within the major, the total for the degree program could total 132 credit hours, but by careful choice of General Education requirements, the program can be completed within the 120 credits required for graduation from the University.

Requirements for the B.S. in Nanoscale Engineering

The B.S. program in Nanoscale Engineering requires the completion of the following:

  • Foundational Principles courses: 20 credits of N ENG/N SCI 114 (or T ENH/T SCI 114), 115, 116, 117, 126, 127, 128, 129, and 140 (or T ENH/T SCI 140), 141 or 133/134.
  • Core Competencies courses: 27 credits of N ENG 301, 302, 303, 304, 405, 406, 407, 408.
  • Concentrations courses: 9 credits of Nanoscale Engineering courses from 1 of the following concentration areas:
Nanoelectronics (N ENG 411-415)
Nanoscale Engineering for Energy & Environment Applications (N ENG 421-424)
NanoSystems Engineering (N ENG 431-435)
Nanoscale Lithography (N ENG 441-444)
Emerging Materials and Device Engineering (N ENG 451-457)
  • Capstone Undergraduate Research/Design courses: 9 credits of N ENG 390X, 490, 492W.
  • 6 credits of 400-level Nanoscale Engineering or Science topical elective courses.
  • 6 credits of Nanotechnology survey courses from N ENG/N SCI 101-104.
  • 9 credits of 200-level Nanoscale Engineering Design and Skills electives from N ENG 201, 202, and 203 or the corresponding Honors College numbers T ENH 201, 202, and 203.
  • 1 credit of a senior seminar courses (N ENG 498 or equivalent).
  • 15 credits of Mathematics: A MAT 112, 113, 214, and 311. Students may also substitute the appropriate honors calculus courses offered by the Department of Mathematics that meet the requirements of their major.

The total credit for the major is 102 credits. With the remaining General Education requirements not already completed within the major, the total for the degree program could total 132 credit hours, but by careful choice of General Education requirements, the program can be completed within the 120 credits required for graduation from the University.

Honors Programs in Nanoscale Science and Nanoscale Engineering

Admission: students may apply in the spring of the sophomore year to the honors program in either nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering. Applications will be available from the CNSE Office of Student Services. The student must have an earned overall GPA of 3.25, and a 3.50 for all courses attempted in the major, at time of admission to the honors program. In addition, all applicants to the honors program must provide as part of the completed application a written statement of purpose which explains the reasons and motivation for wanting to undertake the honors program.

Progress and review: Honors students’ progress in the program will be reviewed every semester by the CNSE Office of Student Services in consultation with the Honors Program Director and the CNSE Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students falling below 3.25 overall, and/or 3.50 in the major will be given a written warning. The warned student will have one semester in which to raise the GPA to the standard. If the student falls below the standard a second time, the student will be removed from the honors program pending an appeal. The appellate procedure for a student who believes they should remain in the program is to submit a written appeal to the Honors Program Director, who will review the appeal with the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The student’s instructors and advisor may be consulted as part of the appeal process. A recommendation to continue or remove the student from the honors program will be made to the Senior Vice President of CNSE by the Honors Director. The student will be informed of the decision within ten days of submitting the appeal.

If the appeal is granted, the student must meet the standard the next semester in either full-time or part-time study or the student will be dropped from the program with no further appeal. If the appeal is denied, the student is removed from the honors program, and is returned to their original nanoscale science or nanoscale engineering program.

Graduating with Honors in Nanoscale Science or Nanoscale Engineering: When a student who is admitted to the honors program completes all requirements listed below, earns an overall GPA of 3.25 and a major GPA of 3.50, presents an acceptable honors project or thesis (N SCI 493W or N ENG 493W) then, upon recommendation of the project advisor and honors director to the Senior Vice President, the Senior Vice President will direct that the student graduate with “Honors in Nanoscale Science” or “Honors in Nanoscale Engineering” and that the appropriate designation be placed on the student’s transcript.

Requirements for the Honors B.S. in Nanoscale Science

The Honors B.S. in Nanoscale Science requires the completion of the following:

  • Foundational Principles courses: 20 credits of N SCI/N ENG 114 (or T SCI/T ENH 114), 115, 116, 117, 126, 127, 128, 129, and 140 (or T SCI/T ENH 140), 141. N SCI 128/129 and 140/141 may be replaced by N SCI 133/134 and 135/136 for students pursuing a Nanobioscience concentration.
  • Core Competencies courses: 21 credits of N SCI 220 (or T SCI 220), 230 (or T SCI 230), 300, 305, 350, 360, and 410.
  • Concentrations courses: 12 credits of Nanoscale Science courses from 1 of the following concentration areas:

Nanoelectronics: N SCI 310, 320, and 420-424
Nanostructured Materials: N SCI 310, 320, and 430-434
Nanobioscience: N SCI 240, 330, and 440-443

  • Capstone Undergraduate Research/Design courses: 9 credits of N SCI 390X, 491, 493W.
  • 9 credits of 400-level Nanoscale Engineering or Science topical elective courses.
  • 6 credits of Nanotechnology survey courses from N ENG/N SCI 101-104.
  • 6 credits of 200-level Nanoscale Science and Technology Skills electives.
  • 1 credit of a senior seminar courses (N SCI 498 or equivalent).
  • 18 credits of Mathematics: A MAT 112, 113, 214, 220, and 314. Students may also substitute the appropriate honors calculus courses offered by the Department of Mathematics that meet the requirements of their major.

Requirements for the Honors B.S. in Nanoscale Engineering

The Honors B.S. in Nanoscale Engineering requires the completion of the following:

  • Foundational Principles courses: 20 credits of N ENG/N SCI 114 (or T ENH/T SCI 114), 115, 116, 117, 126, 127, 128, 129, and 140 (or T ENH/T SCI 140), 141 or 133/134.
  • Core Competencies courses: 27 credits of N ENG 301, 302, 303, 304, 405, 406, 407, 408.
  • Concentrations courses: 9 credits of Nanoscale Engineering courses from 1 of the following concentration areas:
Nanoelectronics (N ENG 411-415)
Nanoscale Engineering for Energy & Environment Applications (N ENG 421-424)
NanoSystems Engineering (N ENG 431-435)
Nanoscale Lithography (N ENG 441-444)
Emerging Materials and Device Engineering (N ENG 451-457)
  • Capstone Undergraduate Research/Design courses: 9 credits of N ENG 390X, 491, 493W.
  • 6 credits of 400-level Nanoscale Engineering or Science topical elective courses.
  • 6 credits of Nanotechnology survey courses from N ENG/N SCI 101-104.
  • 9 credits of 200-level Nanoscale Engineering Design and Skills electives from N ENG 201, 202, and 203 or the corresponding Honors College numbers T ENH 201, 202, and 203.
  • 1 credit of a senior seminar courses (N ENG 498 or equivalent).
  • 15 credits of Mathematics: A MAT 112, 113, 214, and 311. Students may also substitute the appropriate honors calculus courses offered by the Department of Mathematics that meet the requirements of their major.