Department of Sociology

Faculty

Distinguished Professors Emeriti
 Richard D. Alba, Ph.D.
  Columbia University
 John R. Logan, Ph.D.
  University of California, Berkeley

Distinguished Service Professors Emeritus/a
 Richard H. Hall, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
  Ohio State University
 Glenna D. Spitze, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
  University of Illinois

Professors Emeriti
 Christine E. Bose, Ph.D.
  Johns Hopkins University
 Donald J. Hernandez, Ph.D.
  University of California, Berkeley
 Marvin D. Krohn, Ph.D.
  Florida State University
 Gwen Moore, Ph.D.
  New York University
 Russell A. Ward, Ph.D.
  University of Wisconsin

Distinguished Teaching Professor
 Steven F. Messner, Ph.D.
  Princeton University

Professors
 Peter D. Brandon, Ph.D.
  University of Chicago
 Glenn D. Deane, Ph.D.
  University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
 Nancy A. Denton, Ph.D. (Chair)
  University of Pennsylvania
 Hayward D. Horton, Ph.D.
  Pennsylvania State University
 Ronald N. Jacobs, Ph.D.
  University of California, Los Angeles
 Richard W. Lachmann, Ph.D.
  Harvard University
 Zai Liang, Ph.D.
  University of Chicago
 Karyn A. Loscocco, Ph.D.
  Indiana University
 Steven Seidman, Ph.D.
  University of Virginia
 Scott J. South, Ph.D.
  University of Texas
 Katherine Trent, Ph.D.
  University of Texas
 David G. Wagner, Ph. D.
  Stanford University

Associate Professors Emeriti
 Albert C. Higgins, Ph.D.
  University of North Carolina
 Lawrence E. Raffalovich, Ph.D.
  Indiana University
 Arthur H. Richardson, Ph.D.
  Purdue University
 Maurice N. Richter Jr., Ph.D.
  University of Chicago

Associate Professors
 Angie Chung, Ph.D.
  University of California, Los Angeles
 Joanna Dreby, Ph.D.
  City University of New York 
 Samantha Friedman, Ph.D.
  Pennsylvania State University
 Joanne M. Kaufman, Ph.D.
  Emory University
 Aaron Major, Ph.D.
  New York University
 Elizabeth Popp-Berman, Ph.D.
  University of California, Berkeley
 Kathleen Strully, Ph.D.
  New York University
 James R. Zetka Jr., Ph.D.
  Northwestern University

Assistant Professors
 Zoya Gubernskaya, Ph.D.
  University of California at Irvine
 Trevor Hoppe, Ph.D.
  University of Michigan
 Tse-Chuan Yang, Ph.D.
  Pennsylvania State University
 
Affiliated Faculty
 Aaron Benavot, Ph. D.
  Stanford University 
 Kathryn S. Schiller, Ph.D.
  School of Education
 Barbara Sutton, Ph.D.
  University of Oregon

Adjuncts (estimated): 5
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 10



Careers
A B.A. degree in sociology prepares people for positions in business, government, and the human services. Fields such as health management, public administration, gerontology, and higher educational administration include people with a sociology B.A. degree. The undergraduate degree in sociology is excellent preparation for advanced degrees and future careers in business administration, criminal justice, social welfare, law, education, and the health professions, as well as graduate study in sociology and related disciplines.

Special Programs or Opportunities
The department provides research opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students, a series of colloquia with locally and nationally known sociologists, and a local chapter of the national sociology honorary society, Alpha Kappa Delta. A joint B.A./M.A. program is available in sociology as well as a joint B.A./M.P.A. in sociology and public administration.

Admission
Application: Students who have completed A SOC 115 (Introduction to Sociology), A SOC 220 (Introduction to Social Research), and A SOC 235 (Sociological Theory) with grades of C or better in the latter two courses may apply for admission to the major in sociology. Upon review of the student’s record, the department will admit all applicants who meet the specified requirements. Students who do not meet the specified criteria for admission may retake either or both courses in order to achieve the minimum grade of C.

Appeals: Students denied admission to the major may appeal the decision by petition to the department chair. The deadline for appeals is the end of the fifth day of classes each semester. Appeals will be evaluated prior to the final date for adding or dropping semester length courses each semester. The department chair and the director of the undergraduate committee will make the decision on the appeal.

Transfer Students: Transfer students who plan to major in sociology but have not completed A SOC 220 or A SOC 235 or their equivalents with grades of C or better may declare their intention to major in sociology but will not be formally admitted to the major when they enter the University. Students who declare their intention to major in sociology will be advised by the Sociology Department. Upon successful completion of the two courses with a grade of C or better in each, students will be admitted to the major. Most entering transfer students have completed A SOC 115 (Introduction to Sociology). Those who have not taken A SOC 115 must take it their first semester. Students to whom this applies may take A SOC 115, A SOC 220, and A SOC 235 concurrently during their first semester.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Sociology

General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36 credits in sociology, including: A SOC 115, 220 (with a grade of C or better), 221, 235 (with a grade of C or better), one 400 level seminar, and 21 additional credits of sociology as advised. Of the required 36 credits in sociology, a minimum of 12 credits must be at the 300 level or above.

Note: the 400 level seminar counts toward the 12 credit minimum.

Sociology majors are restricted to A–E grading after matriculation at Albany when taking courses to fulfill the requirements in Research Methods (A SOC 220), Statistics (A SOC 221), and Theory (A SOC 235).

The A SOC 221 requirement can be fulfilled by satisfactorily completing A MAT 108, A PSY 210, or R CRJ 281.

Honors Program

The honors program in sociology combines recognition of general academic excellence with demonstrated achievement in sociology. The program is structured to provide exposure to the breadth of sociological modes of inquiry, while also stimulating and supporting original, student-initiated exploration of sociological issues.

Selection and Evaluation
The student must have declared sociology as a major and have completed at least 12 credits of course work in sociology. The student must have an overall grade point average no lower than 3.25 and a 3.50 in sociology is required for admission to the honors program. Upon satisfactory completion of the honors curriculum and of courses required of all majors, students will be recommended by the Director of the Honors Program to graduate with honors in sociology.

The student must maintain the same grade point average overall and the same average in the major as were required for admission to the honors program.

Curriculum
A total of 36 credits in sociology, including A SOC 115, 220, 221, 235, two substantive courses (300 level or higher) directly related to the topic of the honors thesis. Research Proposal Seminar (A SOC 488Z) and a Senior Honors Thesis (A SOC 498).

Administration
The undergraduate honors director administers the program, advises students, and helps students in selecting thesis advisers. The thesis is discussed in a forum involving the adviser, the honors director, and other faculty members selected by the student and the adviser upon its completion in the senior year.

Combined B.A./M.A. and B.A./M.P.A. Programs

Sociology/Sociology: The combined B.A./M.A. program in sociology/sociology provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of their junior year. The program provides an integrated and focused curriculum in sociology that allows the upper level student exposure to advanced knowledge in theory and substantive areas and opportunities for participation in research. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirement, the minimum 90 credit liberal arts and science requirement, general education requirements, and residency requirements. During their junior and senior years students take A SOC 509, 510, 511, and 522. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students may apply to the Graduate Committee for admission to the combined degree program in sociology at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration. The Graduate Committee will thoroughly review the progress and academic standing of students admitted to the program at the end of the junior year.

Sociology/Public Administration: The combined B.A./M.P.A. program in sociology/public administration provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of their junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.P.A. degrees in one less semester than is normally required.

The combined program requires a minimum of 154 credits, of which at least 46 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and school requirements, including the requirements of the major described previously, the minor requirement, the minimum 90 credit liberal arts and science requirement, general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.P.A., students must meet all University and school requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 46 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.P.A. programs.

Students may apply to the combined degree program in sociology/public administration at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration.