Courses in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies

A LCS 100/100Z Cultures of Latin America (3)
Survey of the diverse pre-Columbian and New World societies and cultures of Spanish and Portuguese America from the pre-conquest period to the present. Broadly interdisciplinary introduction to the historical development of Latin American society, culture, politics, and economics with a special emphasis on elements such as race, gender, and class. Only one version of A LCS 100 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): any course in Latin American Studies and/or Women's Studies and/or History.

A LCS 102 (= A HIS 170) Introduction to Caribbean History (3)
An introduction to the history of culture contact in the Caribbean from the pre-Columbian Arawaks and Caribs, through the infusion of European and African cultures, to the emergence of the leadership of the United States in 1898. Special emphasis on the social and economic development of the plantation system, the intercontinental trade system, slavery, and the struggle for abolition and self-determination. Only one version of A LCS 102 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 103/103W/103Y/103Z Introduction to Afro-Brazilian Culture (3)
An introduction to the processes of formation and transformation of Afro-Brazilian culture and its connections to racial identities, Brazilian national identity, and the black Atlantic world. Only one version of A LCS 103 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 115 (= A POR 115) Portuguese and Brazilian Culture and Society (3)
Survey of culture and society in the Portuguese-speaking world, including Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese Africa. Includes the development of typical customs and institutions with special attention to folklore, music, painting, and architecture. Utilizes visual and recorded materials. Conducted in English. Only one version of A LCS 115 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 125 (formerly A CAS 125) Diversity of Voices in Literature and the Arts: Creating Ourselves and Our Cultures (3)
Examines the emergence of American literary and other creative endeavors from the diverse experiences and heritages of the American peoples. The course focuses on creative works that explore and create representations of the self in relation to individual and group identity, and on the ways that cultural values and ideologies influence creative expression. Only one version of A LCS 125 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 150/150Z (= A ANT 146/146Z) Puerto Rico: People, History, and Culture (3)
Survey of the Puerto Rican people, history, and culture on the island from the pre-Hispanic era to the present. Special emphasis on the change of sovereignty in 1898, the national question, migration, race, class, and culture. Only one version of A LCS 150 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 201/201Z Latino USA (3)
This course is an intensive examination of Latino American society. Major Latino groups (e.g., Puerto Ricans, Mexican-Americans, Cubans, Dominicans, Central Americans, and Colombians) will be studied with emphasis on interaction between these groups and mainstream society, culture and value change in contact situations, and efforts to deal with prejudice and discrimination. The course draws from texts in anthropology, sociology, history, and cultural studies, all of which are augmented with various films.

A LCS 203/203W/203Y/203Z Afro-Latin America (3)
Analysis of blackness in Latin America with a focus on the representations of peoples of African descent in national identities and discourses. The course examines some of the "myths of foundation" of Latin American nations (e.g. The "cosmic race" in Mexico, "racial democracy" in Brazil, etc.), and how these myths bring together ideas of nation, gender, race, blackness, whiteness, and mestizaje (racial and cultural mixture).

A LCS 216/216Z (= A MUS 216/216Z) Music and Society in Latin America: Past and Present (3)
This course will deal with two basic issues: the evolution of musical thought throughout Latin America from pre-Hispanic times to the present, and the relationship between musical manifestations and the prevailing social order in which those activities took place. Only one version of A LCS 216 may be taken for credit.

T LCS 216 (= T MUS 216) Music and Society in Latin America: Past and Present (3)
T LCS 216 is the Honors College version of A LCS 216; only one may be taken for credit.

A LCS 225/225W/225Y/225Z (= A SOC 225/225W/225Y/225Z) Global Migration and Transnationalism (3)
The course is an introduction to global and regional migration patterns since the 16th century with a concentration on post-World War II patterns. It has three modules: (1) Introduces basic concepts and approaches related to migration studies; (2) Examines global and regional historical patterns and major forces shaping them since the 16th century; (3) Emphasizes strategies launched by individuals, households, and enterprises related to the process of international migration. Geographically, the course covers several areas of the world, including the Americas, Western and Eastern Europe, and South East Asia. Only one version of A LCS 225 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 229 Special Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to six credits when content varies.

A LCS 231 Special Topics in Latino Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to six credits when content varies.

A LCS 233 (= A ANT 233) Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas (3)
Introductory survey of the archaeology and ethnohistory of the three best-known indigenous civilizations of the New World. Each is presented in terms of pre-historic background and evolution, social organization, politics and economics, religion and art. Consideration is given to the Spanish conquest of these groups and to their modern legacies. Only one version of A LCS 233 may be taken for credit.

T LCS 233 (= T ANT 233) Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas (3)
T LCS 233 is the Honors College version of A LCS 233; only one may be taken for credit.

A LCS 240/240V/240X/240Z (= A AFS 240/240V/240X/240Z & A WSS 240/240V/240X/240Z) Classism, Racism, and Sexism: Issues (3)
Analyzes the connections between and among classism, racism and sexism, their mutually reinforcing nature, and the tensions arising from their interrelations. Particular attention will be given to the ideological and personal aspects of these phenomena, as well as to their institutional guises in American society. Only one version of A LCS 240 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 250/250Z (= A GOG 250/250Z) Geography of Latin America (3)
An introduction to the geographical diversity of Latin America, reviewing the Continent’s physical features, natural resources, societies, economies, and politics, and relating them to its history and cultural traditions. Particular attention will be given to rural and urban living conditions, social and regional inequalities, population distribution, internal and international migration, and socioeconomic development issues. Only one version of A LCS 250 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 255 Race and the American Empire (3)

This course will explore the relationship between racism and the formation of the American empire from approximately 1776 through the end of the Progressive Era. By the early 20th century the United States emerged as a world power after a relentless process of continental and overseas territorial expansion. The young nation employed an ideology of racial superiority and predestination to justify its expropriation of the land and natural resources of other peoples and nations, to capture a continuous supply of labor, and to acquire new export. Theories of Manifest Destiny, white man's burden, social Darwinism, and religious doctrines were some of the narratives central to an ideology of racial supremacy in service of empire. Only one version of A LCS 255 may be taken for credit.

T LCS 255 (= T POS 255) Race and the American Empire (3)
T LCS 255 is the Honors College version of A LCS 255; only one may be taken for credit.

A LCS 268 (= A ANT 268) Ethnology of Pre-Columbian Art (3)
Survey of pre-Hispanic Mesoamerican arts and architecture for the reconstruction of pre-Columbian culture, history, religion, symbolism, and ritual. Stresses interrelationships of New World cultures, art styles, and worldview, and on ethnological techniques for iconographic interpretations. Only one version of A LCS 268 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 269 (= A AFS 269 & A ANT 269) The Caribbean: Peoples, History, and Culture (3)
This course introduces students to significant aspects of Anglophone Caribbean culture and history in the context of this region of the globe, the wider Caribbean, functioning as the crossroads of the world. Colonial conquest forced and forged the intersection of Europe, Asia, and Africa in the Caribbean so that while it is not large in terms of geographical area or total population, it resonates with global significance as a crucible of cultural hybridity and as a nurturing space of modernity. Only one version may be taken for credit.

A LCS 282 (= A SOC 282) Race and Ethnicity (3)
Study of religion, race, and nationality conflicts in American society. Reactions of minority to majority; changing patterns of minority relationships; efforts to deal with prejudice and discrimination. Only one version of A LCS 282 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115

A LCS 283 Latinization of U.S. Cities (3)
This course examines the historical and contemporary Latino transformation of American cities. We begin with early 20th century Latino migrations to N.Y.C. and L.A., move onto the rise of barrio politics in the 1960s and 70s, recent urban transnational ties in a late 20th century global era, and end with the exponential rise and geographic expansion of Latino populations in various urban and suburban cities across the U.S. A study of these shifts in the Latinization of cities is of particular relevance today as professionals in creative, policy, and academic fields grapple with the fast-growing U.S. Latina/o population. Because of the multi-faceted and urgent nature of this ethnic specific urban process, this course understands that the verb "Latinizing" is enacted by multiple actors with various political and economic interests, and considers the resulting Latinized urban process to be an always contested and evolving intersection of culture, class, gender, sexuality, and race. The course draws from texts in anthropology, sociology, history, cultural studies, and geography, all of which are augmented with various films. By reading multi-disciplinary texts that cover various cities and Latino national groups across the United States, students in this course will gain a rich theoretical and analytical background on the pressing issues and main individuals and communities that have shaped and continue to shape Latina/o urban America.

T LCS 288 Race, Ethnicity, and the Contemporary U.S. City (3)
This course examines the historical and contemporary ethnic and racial transformation of American cities. We begin with early 20th century Latino, Asian, and Black migrations to inner cities, move onto the rise of ethnic urban politics in the 1960s and 70s, new urban transnational ties in a late 20th century global era, and end with the exponential rise and geographic expansion of ethnic and racial minority populations in various urban and suburban cities across the US. A study of the shifts in cities is of particular relevance today as professionals in creative, policy, and academic fields grapple with an increasingly multicultural US city. The course draws from texts in anthropology, sociology, history, cultural studies, and geography, all of which are augmented with various films. By reading multi-disciplinary texts that cover various cities and ethnic and racial groups across the United States, students in this course will gain a rich theoretical and analytical background on the pressing issues and main individuals and communities that have shaped and continue to shape multicultural urban America. Open to Honors College students only.

A LCS 289 (= A SOC 289) Special Topics in Ethnicity (1–3)
Intensive examination of the culture and lifestyle of a single ethnic group within American society. The specific ethnic group varies from term to term and is indicated by course subtitle: e.g., Ethnicity; Italian Americans. A LCS 289 and A SOC 289 can be repeated, but the total credits earned may not exceed 6 credits under different subtitles. Departmental permission required for more than 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A LCS 300 Introduction to Theories and Research Methods in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies (3)
This is a team-taught course designed to introduce students to some of the disciplines within, as well as fields of study that bridge the Social Sciences and Humanities. Guest lecturers with different disciplinary and interdisciplinary trainings will explain the origin, development, and some of the major theories and methods of their respective discipline or field of study. The experts will also discuss the processes of institutionalization of these disciplines and transdisciplines as academic programs in U.S., Latin American, and Caribbean universities, and how they claim to add new knowledge to university curricula. Students will be exposed to the different theories, methods, and epistemologies of both traditional disciplines (e.g. Sociology, Anthropology, Geography, etc.) as well as inter or transdisciplinary fields of study (e.g. Latin America Studies, Latino Studies, Women Studies, Africana Studies, and Judaic Studies, etc.). Students will build Information Literacy skills, learn the difference between quantitative and qualitative research, and study how to write empirical research reports. Offered Fall semester only.

A LCS 302 (= A SPN 322) Latinos(as) en Estados Unidos (3)
Examination of major U.S. Latino groups (Mexican-American, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican) with special emphasis on 20th century literary works. Students will study demographic, socio-economic, historical, and cultural aspects of these groups in the context of their interaction with mainstream society. Course will be given in Spanish. Only one version of A LCS 302 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or 301, or placement.

A LCS 312 (= A POR 312) Introduction to Brazilian Literature (3)
Survey of Brazilian literature from the colonial period to the present. Selected readings, discussions, and reports on collateral study. Only one version of A LCS 312 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A POR 207 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 314 (= A SPN 318) Topics in Hispanic Film (3)
A study of Hispanic film as a medium that offers a unique amalgam of diverse musical, pictorial, and literary art forms within a sociopolitical context. The course will focus on such specific topics as peasant movements, human rights, images of women, race, and ethnicity. Only one of version A LCS 314 may be taken for credit in any semester. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Consult current schedule of classes for topic. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 315 Film in Contemporary Latin America (3)
Study of culture and society in Latin America as revealed through film. Emphasis on the use of film, especially in the “new cinema” movements, as an instrument for social and political change. History and current trends of cinema in selected countries. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 100, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 316 (= A SPN 316) Representative Spanish-American Authors (3)
Survey of literary movements in Spanish America from independence to World War II. Only one version of A LCS 316 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310.

A LCS 317 (= A SPN 317) Latin American Civilization (3)
Study of Spanish-American cultures and institutions from the beginnings of the 20th century. Only one version of A LCS 317 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 207 or equivalent.

A LCS 318 (= A POR 318) Introduction to Brazilian Cinema (3)
Survey of Brazilian cinema, emphasizing the social and cultural dimensions of selected major films, including some which represent the “new cinema” movement. Course includes viewings, discussions, readings, and written work. Only one version of A LCS 318 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 319 (= A SPN 320) 20th Century Spanish American Literature (3)
A study of selected works of Spanish American literature from World War II to the present. Works studied will deal with topics of special interest such as the continuing debate with regard to civilization and barbarism, dictatorship and revolution, social justice, and the search for identity. Only one version of A LCS 319 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310.

A LCS 321Y (= A EAS 321Y & A GOG 321Y) Exploring the Multicultural City (3)
This course will explore the human dimensions and implications of ethnic diversity in the United States, focusing on New York City. The course utilizes a variety of methods to introduce students to the multicultural city, beginning in the classroom but ending with fieldwork in a specific New York neighborhood. Only one version of A LCS 321Y may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one of A GOG 102, 125, 160, 220, or 240. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 326 (= A SPN 326) Spanish-American Poetry and Theatre (3)
Representative Spanish-American plays and selected works in Spanish-American poetry, with emphasis on specific characteristics of the genres. Only one version of A LCS 326 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310.

A LCS 327/327Z Four Caribbean Writers (3–4)
An introduction to the literature of the Caribbean and to the methods of literary analysis. Writers will be grouped around an essential universal theme: for example, Claude McKay, Vidia Naipaul, Derek Walcott, and Jamaica Kincaid around the theme of homelessness. Only one version of A LCS 327 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 329 Special Topics in Puerto Rican Studies (3)
Intensive interdisciplinary examination of a specific aspect on contemporary Puerto Rican Studies. The topic varies from term to term and is indicated every term by the subtitle: e.g. 19th century Agrarian Society or the Political Status Debate or the Migrant Experience. May be repeated for up to 6 credits under different subtitles. Departmental permission required for more than 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 150 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 330 Special Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to six credits under different subtitles.

A LCS 331 Special Topics in Latino Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to six credits under different subtitles.

A LCS 341/341Z (= A ANT 341/341Z) Ethnology of Mesoamerica (3)
Survey of the cultures and history of the native peoples of Mexico and Central America. Beginning with the documents created by and about the native peoples around the time of the Spanish invasion, the course follows the experiences of these societies through the colonial period and up to the present. Only one version of A LCS 341 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 100 or 108.

A LCS 348 Social Change in Latin America (3)
Changing class structure, ethnic composition, and culture of contemporary Latin American nations. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 349 (= R POS 349) Urban Politics in Latin America (3)
This course examines from a theoretical and historical perspective the context and character of politics and political participation in major Latin American urban cities. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 354 (= A GOG 354) Environment & Development (3)
A survey of international development issues, focusing on the impact of economic growth, population growth, and increased consumption of natural resources on global and local environments. This course focuses primarily on the poorer countries of the world, and particularly on tropical environments. It discusses issues of deforestation, desertification, and increased vulnerability to man-made and natural hazards. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101 or 102, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 357 (= R POS 357) Latin American & Caribbean Politics (3)
The course will examine the current process and societies in the hemisphere. Emphasis will be on Latin America and the Caribbean with implications of globalization for all workers and societies of the Americas. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 100 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 358 Globalization and Culture in the Americas (3)
This course examines the trajectories of the processes of globalization since the European colonial expansion in the Americas to the present. An emphasis is placed on the concepts of culture and identity, relations of power and domination in a post-colonial world, racism, international migration, and transnational social movements. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 100 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 359 Globalization in the Americas (3)
The aim of this course is to sharpen every student's ability to evaluate the impact of "globalization" on the societies of the Americas. It relies on concepts from political economy, while mainstreams (or "neoclassical") economics narrowly focuses on prices and markets (supply and demand), political economy examines the broad processes through which power relations existing in society (and conflicts over them) shape economic outcomes. It uses concepts from political economy to examine two specific groups — wage-workers and indigenous peoples — and provides in-depth case studies for examining the multi-dimensional impact of globalization on their livelihoods.      

A LCS 360 Political Economy of the Caribbean (3)
An intensive evaluation of political and economic forces as they have shaped the Caribbean region during the 20th century to the present, particularly the period since World War II. Special attention given to social conflicts and political movements, population growth and migration, urbanization, problems of industry and agriculture, economic planning, education, and superpower confrontations. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 269. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 361 (= A ECO 361) Development of the Latin American Economy (3)
Economic change in Latin American societies. Comparative study of the growth of various Latin American countries emphasizing the variables associated with development: population, technology, capital formation, output, resources, and income distribution. Only one version of A LCS 361 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 369 (= A HIS 369/369Z) Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies since 1810 (3)
The circum-Caribbean lands and islands in the 19th and 20th centuries; independence; independent nations and colonies; foreign intrusions and interventions; social and economic change; revolutions; comparative Caribbean studies. Only one version of A LCS 369 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in history.

A LCS 371/371Z (= A HIS 371/371Z) South America Since 1810 (3)
The political, economic, social, and cultural evolution of the South American nations from the winning of independence to the present, with emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Among topics studied will be dictatorship, democratic government, economic change, modern revolution, and social trends. Only one version of A LCS 371 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in history.

A LCS 373/373Z (= A HIS 373/373Z) History of Modern Mexico (3-4)
An in-depth survey of Mexico since Independence, this course emphasizes agrarian change and peasant rebellion; foreign intervention and U.S.-Mexican relations; indigenous and mestizo identities; gender and culture; political stability and economic development; authoritarianism, democratization, and globalization; and Latinos in the U.S. Writing intensive sections: Only one version of A LCS 373 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits of A HIS or A LCS course work, or junior or senior standing.

A LCS 374 International Migration and Transnationalism (3)
This course discusses basic concepts and theories related to the study of migration and transnationalism. It discusses, among others issues, the following: Why do people move internationally following certain patterns? Why and how do they develop transnational relations? How do migration and transnationalism relate to economic, cultural, political and social processes, and social agency? How do they relate to some gender, class, and ethnic factors? What are some of the global, regional, national, and individual implications of migration and transnationalism? What are the implications for households and enterprises? May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 375 (= R POS 324) Latino Politics in the United States (3)
This course reviews Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban participation, perspectives and issues on American politics. Each Latino sub-group will be analyzed and comparisons will be made between Latino sub-groups and between Latinos and other groups. The following questions will be examined: What is the context of Latino politics? What characterizes Latino political behavior? What is the place of Latinos in the U.S. political system? What are the political perspectives and values? What issues form the basis of their political mobilization and incorporation? What are their political prospects? We will be concerned with relevant historical, interpretive, and theoretical issues raised by the Latino political experience, with an emphasis on electoral representation, issues of gender, race and ethnicity, education, affirmative action, and radical politics. Only one version of A LCS 375 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 400Z Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar in LACS (3)
An in-depth discussion of interdisciplinary research focused on Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino contemporary topics. The course will concentrate on the study of the different stages of the research process (e.g., stating research objectives, review of the pertinent literature, theoretical framework, and methodology). Students will apply these to a required term paper on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. This is the capstone course for LACS majors and is designed as a writing intensive course. Prerequisite(s): LACS major or minor with junior or senior standing.

A LCS 402 Latinos and Health Issues (3)
This course provides an overview of a broad range of issues related to the health status of Latinos in the United States such as the influence of culture, class, and gender on health care, access to health services, patterns of chronic disease, mental health concerns, family and child health. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 201. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 403 Special Topics in Latin American Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to 6 credits under different subtitles. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 400 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 405 Special Topics in Caribbean Studies (3)
An intensive examination of social, economic, political, and cultural issues which affect contemporary Caribbean life and society. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 400 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 406 Leaders and Societies of the English-Speaking Islands (3)
An examination of the emergence from an island society of leaders capable of confronting the British legacy of post-colonial island nations. Designed to sharpen research and writing skills. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 100, 102, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 407 Three Island Revolutions (3)
An in-depth analysis of the revolutions of Haiti (1791), Cuba (1959), and Grenada (1979). Designed to sharpen research and writing skills. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 100, 102, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 408 Latinos and American Political Change (3)
This course examines the impact of changes in the U.S. political institutions on Latino participation and inclusion in the policy process. Particular emphasis will be placed on studying Latino political engagement through collective action and mobilization outside the established political party system.

A LCS 410 Tourism, Culture, and Identities (3)
An in-depth interdisciplinary examination of tourism in relation to culture and its impact on the identities of both hosts and guests. Some of the questions to be explored include the role of tourism in the formation of regional, national, and transnational identities, how tourism reflects global inequities, and the impact it has on local Latin American communities. This course is open only to juniors and seniors.

A LCS 411 Seminar on Latin America (3)
As the world's borders become ever more permeable to the influxes of capital, media, and technology, identity boundaries seem to become increasingly sealed. Despite the phenomena of global impact that have emphasized the commonality of our fragile human condition (e.g. global warming, financial meltdowns, food crises, etc.), identity markers are constantly brought to the fore as reminders of our dissimilarities. Place of birth, language proficiency, attachment to the land, conformity to gender expectations, and even elements that lie on the surface of the body such as skin tone and hair texture have all been used to demarcate who can or cannot belong to identity groups. The main purpose of this course is to understand that are cultural identities, why and how they come about, and what their political consequences are. More specifically, it will discuss contemporary Latin American identities. It will analyze crucial aspects of identity construction, such as sameness, difference, belonging, boundaries, contrasts, and oppositions; the meanings of space and place and the significance of roots for the construction of identities; the importance of diaspora and the challenge it poses to nationalist attachments; the essentialist reactions to the supposed threats to identity exemplified by the rise of anti-immigrant racism and western fundamentalisms; and the centrality of language, media and consumption for the contemporary construction of identities. Adopting theories of identities produced in the fields of anthropology, cultural studies and postcolonial studies, and employing the poststructuralist concepts of subjectivity, positionality, agency, discourse, and representation, the course will prepare students to analyze the construction of identities related to "race," ethnicity, gender, class, nation, and immigration in a context of increasing globalization. Considering that theory should not be understood as "the truth" but a site of contested knowledge, the bibliography will encompass a variety of approaches to, and case studies of identities. Prerequisite(s) A LCS 300.

A LCS 412 Seminar on the Caribbean (3)
Analysis of the colonial establishment of European power and ascendancy in the Caribbean and Latin America, and the numerous and varied forms of resistance to colonialism in the hemisphere. Employing critical strategies associated with the field of post-colonial studies, the course revolves around literature (novels) that provide us with fertile ground for a cultural critique or power and resistance. These novels will be read against the background of the hemisphere's history and cultural legacy of colonialism and anti-colonial resistance in an attempt to better understand the cultural modalities of power and resistance in the Caribbean and Latin America. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 300.

A LCS 413 Seminar on U.S. Latino Studies (3)
This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of dominant approaches to the study of Latinos in the United States. Scholars have employed a variety of theoretical constructs and methodological approaches to explore a wide range of issues of particular significance for Latinos and Latinas. Latino social science research broadly falls into a set of readily defined categories, but shares a distinctive concern with reinterpreting standard narratives that reinforce structures of white privilege. Much of Latino-directed research aims to develop alternative conceptualizations and interpretations of the Latino experience in order to enhance the capacity of Latinos to purposefully engage U.S. society. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 300.

A LCS 414 (= A SPN 414) Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean (3)
Study of selected major writers of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico of the 19th and 20th centuries. Special consideration of literature as a reflection of situations and problems peculiar to the Hispanic Caribbean. Conducted in Spanish. Only one version of A LCS 414 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310.

A LCS 415 Los Latinos en EE.UU.: Historia, Cultura, y Literatura (3)
A study of the historical, cultural, and socioeconomic development of U.S. Latino groups. Emphasis on the experiences of Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, and Mexicans. Particular attention will be given to how gender, race, ethnicity, and class shape the U.S. Latino experience. Prerequisite(s): knowledge of Spanish at the 300 level or above is required. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 430Z (=A WSS 430Z) Environmental Justice: Racism, Classism, Sexism (3)
In Environmental Justice: Racism, Classism, and Sexism, we will explore how racism, classism, and sexism impact current environmental “events,” including environmental policy-making, public health outcomes, and the rhetoric and politics of environmentalism. Surveying the development of environmental awareness among the public philosophies behind such awarenesses, and resulting shifts in policy, we will focus on the growth of the environmental justice movement, and will consider how various groups have addressed environmental degradation and injustice. Also under consideration will be a set of related issues: how globalization has impacted these events, the feminist critique of science and its impact, relationships between grass-roots activism (for example, native American activists and other Environmental Justice groups) and between these groups and more scholarly approaches, and contributions by artists, labor-rights groups, religious leaders, animal rights activists, and deep ecologists. Prerequisite(s): Students, at whatever level, are welcome. The requirements will differ for graduate and undergraduate students. For example, graduate students will be reading more theoretical articles, and will be responsible for explaining these to the undergraduate students. In addition, graduate students will be required to submit a final research paper that is much longer (12-20 pages) than that required for undergraduate students. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 450 Legislative Internship (3-6)
Internships involving off-campus participation in the NYS Legislature, with collateral academic study. Contingent on the approval of a faculty member of the Department of Latin American and Caribbean Studies willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student's progress. Students must apply two weeks prior to the start of the academic term, and are subject to an interview and selection process. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): Open to students of any major. Bilingual and multicultural skills will prove particularly useful since students will be working with legislative members of the NYS Assembly Puerto Rican/Hispanic Task Force. S/U graded.

A LCS 451 (= A HIS 451 & A WSS 451) Gender & Class in Latin American Development (3)
The study of the historical interplay of cultural, ideological, and structural factors affecting women’s lives during the course of Latin America’s experience with modernization and industrialization during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics covered may include: household work, paid work, migration, growth of female-headed households, women’s political participation, and women’s participation in social movements. Only one version of A LCS 451 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): any course in Latin American Studies and/or Women’s Studies and/or History.

A LCS 465 (= R POS 447) Latino/as and Inequality in America (3)
This course is about the political engagement of Latinas and Latinos and the political and economic forces that historically have impeded their full incorporation in U.S. society. Only one version of A LCS 465 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): open to seniors and graduate students.

A LCS 475 Caribbean Migration (3)
The focus of the course is post-World War II migration between the Caribbean and the United States—in particular migration from Cuba, the West Indies, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. The material is interdisciplinary in nature, though highlighting approaches from the fields of economics, sociology, political science, and history. The major topics include: (1) Migration theory; (2) U.S. migration policy—its impact on receiving and sending populations; (3) a socio-historical background to post-war Caribbean Migration; and (4) specific migrations from Cuba, the West Indies, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

A LCS 491 (= A ANT 481) Research Projects (3–6)
Introduction to basic research skills required to answer questions on human behavior, with special emphasis on cross-cultural interaction. Specific research projects provide students with the basic research methods, including data collection, processing, and analysis. Only one version of A LCS 491 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 497 Independent Study (3-6)
Independent study in an area of special interest to the student under the supervision of the sponsoring faculty member. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.