Senate Bill No.: 0304-13

UNIVERSITY SENATE

UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY
STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK


Introduced by: Undergraduate Academic Council

Date: March 1, 2004


ROTC AND APPLIED ELECTIVE CREDIT


IT IS HEREBY PROPOSED THAT THE FOLLOWING BE ADOPTED:


1. That the policies concerning ROTC and applied elective credits be reworded to make clear that “No more than a total of 12 applied elective and/or ROTC credits may be counted toward a student’s graduation.”

2. That this become effective immediately.

3. That this policy be forwarded to the President for approval.

Rationale:

The 1987 University policy on applied elective credit (reproduced on the next page) was modified as in 1991 to allow students to receive some credit for ROTC training.

ROTC CREDIT Students may apply toward their undergraduate degree requirements up to a maximum of twelve applied elective credits for ROTC courses completed successfully from accredited institutions. (US, 4/91)

At that time, ROTC credit was only available through Cross-Registration or brought in as transfer credit. When the UAC approved the ROTC courses R Pad 110, 111, 210 and 211 as Albany offerings, it was understood that these remain part of the maximum 12 credits of applied electives a student may apply toward graduation.

Rewording the policy authorizes the Registrar to apply the 12-credit limit to the total of applied electives (including non-Albany ROTC) and Albany ROTC.

As remains the case, a student with a full 12 credits of ROTC would thus not be able to apply other applied elective credits toward graduation.

3. APPLIED ELECTIVE CREDIT

(a) A maximum of 12 units of transfer credit can be allowed in this category for courses that:

(i) are collegiate in nature;
(ii) lead to a terminal degree in a one or two year program;
(iii) lead to a Baccalaureate program but are practical in nature;
(iv) involve an academic approach and mastery of material.

 

(b) Examples:

Example 1. From Mechanical Technology Program (HVCC #1722 Machine Design 1): "Kinematics and dynamics as related to industrial machinery. Theory will be applied during the laboratory periods. (p. 80, 1970?72 HVCC Catalogue).

Example 2. From Animal Husbandry Program at Cobleskill Ag. and Tech. College (AH 252 ? Animal Health): "A study of diseases and ailments affecting farm animals. Causes, symptoms, control and preventive treatment will be stressed. Sanitation will be emphasized regarding its effect on herd health. Students may select sections based on their interest in horses or cattle." (p. 134, 1971?72 Cobleskill Ag. and Tech. College Catalogue)

Example 3. From Home Economics Program at Syracuse University (NFS 215 ? Food Science): "application of the basic sciences to an understanding of problems in food preparation and preservation. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry." (p. 134, 1970?71 Syracuse University Undergraduate Catalogue)

 

(c) The above are typical of the kinds of courses that satisfy items 3.a., 1), 2), or 3), and 4) above. The course descriptions characterize them as "academic in nature" and include enough content to require a certain amount of mastery of material.

A total of 12 semester hours of this type of coursework would be acceptable as applied elective credit. Where the total exceeds 12 hours, each course will be included in the evaluation. i.e., On the Unofficial Transfer Worksheet each course acceptable in this category will be listed under the column "Previous Courses" with the corresponding entry in the "UA" Courses column to read: Applied elective credit ? 12 semester hours.

(UAC 3/18/87)