English Major Requirements (Proposed Bulletin Copy)


Careers for English Majors
The major in English prepares students for any field of work that requires a broad liberal education with special strength in language, critical analysis and research. English graduates find careers in theatre and film, government, counseling, broadcasting, public policy and administration, banking, retailing and manufacturing as well as writing, editing, publishing, teaching, advertising and public relations. The English major is also excellent preparation for advanced study in such professional graduate programs as law, medicine, librarianship, social welfare and theology, and education.

Curriculum
The curriculum of the Department of English is designed to aid students to write effectively, to read critically, and to acquire a sense of the development of literature written in English and of its relation to society. English majors also have the option of applying for admission to the Honors Program. Students planning to take the GRE for graduate study in English are strongly urged to include course work in pre-1800 British and American literature. All English majors are strongly encouraged to study at least one foreign language. Students may count up to 6 credits from the following list of elective courses offered by other departments toward the English major. toward their English electives from the following list of courses offered by other departments.

Approved Courses for English Electives Listed by Department

Africana Studies
AAS 340 The Black Essay
AAS 345 The Black Novel
AAS 355Z African-American Poetry
AAS 357 Black Popular Culture

Anthropology
ANT 343 Native American Literature
ANT 381 Anthropology of Gender
ANT 360 Social Anthropology
ANT 363 Ethnology of Religion
ANT 390 Ethnological Theory

Classics
CLC 220Z Roman Poets and Playwrights
CLC 223E/L Masterpieces of Greek Tragedy and Comedy
CLC 225 Greek Literature in Translation

College of Arts and Sciences
CAS 220L Literatures of the World I
CAS 221L Literatures of the World II
CAS 360E Passion and Choice

East Asian Studies
EAC 210L Survey of Chinese Literature in Translation 1
EAC 211L Survey of Chinese Literature in Translation 2
EAC 212L Survey of Chinese Literature in Translation 3
EAC390 Classical Chinese Poetry

EAJ 210L Survey of Traditional Japanese Literature
EAJ 212L Modern Japanese Literature in Translation
EAJ 396 Meiji Literature in Translation

EAS 270-WSS 270 Women in East Asian Literature
EAS 392 East Asian Travel Literature

Judaic Studies
JST 248 Women in Jewish Life and Literature
JST272 Modern Hebrew Literature in Translation
JST 273 The Arab in Israeli Literature
JST 274 Love and Sex in Hebrew Literature
JST 280 The Torah
JST 281 The Prophets
JST 282 Late Biblical Literature
JST 285 Hero and Antihero in Scripture
JST 325 Rabbinic Literature
JST 360 Jewish Autobiographies
JST 367 Jewish American Literature

Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Prerequisites appear in parentheses following the title.
An asterisk indicates a class not normally conducted in English.

FRE 202 – French Literature
FRE 208 – Haiti Through Literature and Film
FRE 238 – Great Classics of French Cinema
FRE 281 – French Canada Through Film and Literature
FRE 338 - French Cinema and Society
*FRE 315 Introduction to French Cinema (FRE 241E)
FRE 338 French Cinema and Society (Junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor)
*FRE 415 French Cinema and Society (FRE 341E and 340Z)
*FRE 430 Translation (FRE 341E and 340Z)
*FRE 462 The Novel (FRE 341E and 340Z)
*FRE 463 Poetry (FRE341E and 340Z)
*FRE 481 Francophone Cultures (FRE 341)

*ITA 312 General View of Literature (ITA 223L or permission of instructor)
ITA 315 Italian Civilisation: Etruscans to Galileo
ITA 316 Italian Civilisation: Unification to Present
ITA 318 Italian Cinema and Literature
*ITA 421 Dante (ITA 311 or permission of instructor)
*ITA 441 – The Italian Renaissance (ITA 311 or permission of instructor)
*ITA 471 From Baroque to Romanticism (ITA 311 or permission of instructor)
ITA 481 The Italian Novel and Poetry of the 20th Century (ITA 311 or permission of instructor)

RUS 251L –Masterpieces of Nineteenth Century Literature
RUS 252L – Masterpieces of Twentieth Century Literature
RUS 253 - Contemporary Russian Lit
RUS 261L - Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in English Trans (One course in lit or junior/senior standing)
RUS 266 Gogol in English Translation
RUS 267 Chekhov in English Translation
RUS 270 - Topics in Slavic Literatures and Cultures
RUS 280 - Soviet and Russian Cinema
RUS 354L - Russian Novel in Western Context (One course in lit or junior/senior standing)
RUS 380 - Topics Russian and Soviet Cinema (RUS 280 or permission of instructor)
RUS 421 Introduction to Literary Theory and Analysis (RUS 202L)
RUS426 Russian 19th Century Poetics
RUS 427 Russian 20th Century Poetry

POL 290- Topics in Polish Studies

*SPN 311 Hispanic Literature Through the Golden Age (SPN 223L)
*SPN 316 Representative Spanish-American Authors (SPN 223L)
*SPN 318 Topics in Hispanic Film (SPN 223L or permission of instructor)
*SPN 320 20th Century Spanish Literature (SPN 223L)
*SPN 325 The Hispanic Short Story (SPN 223L)
*SPN 326 Spanish-American Poetry and Theatre (SPN 223L)
SPN 333 Hispanic Literature in Translation (Junior or senior class standing)
*SPN 414 Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean (SPN 223L)
*SPN 418 Hispanic Cinema and Literature (SPN 223L)
*SPN 446 Literature and Human Rights (SPN 312 and 316)
SPN 481 The Generation of ’98 (SPN 312)

Latin American and Caribbean Studies
LCS 327/327Z Four Caribbean Writers
LCS 319 Twentieth Century Spanish American Literature (In Spanish)
LCS 326 Spanish-American Poetry and Theatre (In Spanish)
LCS 414 Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean (In Spanish)
LCS 415 US Latino Literature and Culture (In Spanish)

Theatre Studies
THR 310Z Play Analysis
THR 221L Development of Theatre and Drama 1
THR 222L Development of Theatre and Drama 2
THR 224L Contemporary Issues in Modern Drama
THR 225L American Theatre History
THR 228 Voices of Diversity in Contemporary Theatre and Drama
THR 239L Great Drama on Film and Video
THR 322 Development of Theatre and Drama III
THR 350 Directing 1
THR 407 Scriptwriting
THR 430 Contemporary Theatre
THR 456 Seminar in Dramatic Literature

Women’s Studies
WSS 202 Introduction to Lesbian and Gay Studies
WSS 220 Introduction to Feminist Theory
WSS 240 Classism, Racism, Sexism
WSS 218 Constructed Image: Women and the Media
WSS 450 Literature of Feminism
WSS 465 Feminist Theory



Degree Requirements for the Major in English (36 credits)

Twelve credits from required courses: 205Z, 210, 305Z, 310;
an additional nine credits from 200-400 level;
an additional nine credits from 300-400 level; and
six credits from 400 level

Additional Requirements
A grade of C or higher in A Eng 210, or permission of instructor, is required in order to register for A ENG 310 and most 400-level courses in English.


Degree Requirements for the Minor in English (18 credits)

A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in course work at or above the 300 level) from course work with an A ENG prefix.


Honors Program in English
The honors program in English is designed to promote intellectual exchange and community among able English majors and to prepare them to do independent work. Successful completion of the Program earns an Honors Certificate in English and nomination for graduation with "Honors in English" from the University.

Admission to the honors program is through a competitive selection process. Application for the honors program is normally made in the spring semester of the sophomore year to the honors program coordinator. For admission, students should have completed 12 credits in English, including A Eng 210 and one 300-level course. Students should have an overall average of at least 3.25 and 3.50 in English. The honors committee may waive the entry requirements where appropriate. Transfer students may apply upon acceptance to the University.

To remain in the honors program students are required to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.50 in English courses and a minimum 3.25 overall. Any student who leaves the honors program is held responsible for the English major requirements.

The Departmental Honors Committee reviews applications and admissions, monitors the progress of honors students, and evaluates the honors thesis. Upon students' completion of the requirements, the honors committee recommends candidates for the degree with honors in English.

Degree Requirements for Honors in English (37 credits)

Nine credits from major core courses: 205Z, 210, 310
A minimum of Thirteen credits from required courses: 398Z (3) or 305Z, 399Z (4), 498 (3), 499 (3)
Nine credits from 200-400 level
Six credits from 300-400 level


Combined B.A./M.A. Program
The combined B.A./M.A. program in English provides an opportunity for students or recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate's and master's degree programs from the beginning of their junior year.

The combined program requires a minimum of 141 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirement, the minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, the general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 9 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students are considered as undergraduates until completion of 120 graduation credits and satisfactory completion of all B.A. requirements. Upon meeting B.A. requirements, students are automatically considered graduate students.

Students may be admitted to the combined degree program at the beginning of their junior year, or after the successful completion of 56 credits but no later than the accumulation of 100 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration. Students will be admitted upon the recommendation of the Graduate Admissions Committee of the department.

RATIONALE


Summary of Changes to the English Undergraduate Curriculum

The key changes in the proposed new curriculum are summarized below:

1. Core requirements for majors have been changed from 105Z, 121L, 210, and 301Z; to 205Z, 210, 305Z, and 310.

2. Two writing courses have been added, 100Z and 402Z.
3. The Writing Sequence is to be discontinued under the new major. Students are free to pursue a writing track within the major.
4. Students have an option to take up to 6 elective credits toward the major from an approved list of courses in literature and culture outside the department.

Core Requirements
The four-course sequence is intended to establish a coherent basis for the major. 210 and 310 are now survey courses, in the sense that they will cover broad areas important to understanding the discipline and its practices. 210 provides students with the disciplinary understanding enabling them to plan their subsequent course of study. 310 emphasizes current modes of analysis. Normally students are expected to complete the core requirements during their sophomore and junior years.

Writing Courses
205Z and 305Z are intended primarily for English majors; 100Z and 300Z are intended primarily for non-majors. Other courses in writing studies and creative writing (102Z, 202Z, 302Z) are likely to be of interest to all students. 402Z will normally be taken by English majors and minors only.

Scope of English Major
The proposed curriculum recognizes the need to prepare students to be citizens of a global culture conversant with the diversity of cultures English studies engages. New course offerings, in addition to some already in place, address this need, opening up transnational and transcultural dialogues from an Anglophone literary perspective. Students are also given the option to include in their major cross-disciplinary work that enriches their knowledge of writing, literature and culture.

Range of Offerings
Regarding the reduction of course offerings, the English Department currently offers 99 different courses—at least in theory. In practice many of these courses are not scheduled. The current revision proposes reducing that number to 65 and offering larger number of sections in many of these courses.
The “Distribution” and “Course Cycle” numbers demonstrate that the curriculum revision is workable. It does not assume that courses will necessarily be offered with the frequency and in the numbers proposed here. We do think, however, that it is important to offer all courses on a regular basis.

Conclusion
This proposal emphasizes planning a sound English major, following the shape of the discipline, the goals of the University as expressed in its mission statement, and those of the College of Arts and Sciences as outlined in the new Strategic Plan. It also takes into account the needs of
non-majors and other programs, such as General Education.


THE ENGLISH MAJOR

I. GOALS

English Studies is a rapidly changing discipline that embraces a number of related fields, from national and post-colonial literatures, to literary theory, cultural studies, cinema, journalism, and electronic texts/media. While its focus is increasingly interdisciplinary, English Studies takes as its particular pursuit textual analysis. Particular and sustained attention is paid to language, literature, and culture in their historical, as well as theoretical, contexts; in their aesthetic, as well as practical, dimensions; and in their social, as well as political, significances.

The general goal of the English major is to foster two fundamental abilities: the first is critical thought and interpretation; the second is thoughtful expression. Students are encouraged to become critical readers, which is to say, they are taught to understand the effects that texts have on them and the techniques employed to accomplish those effects. Students who can make active critical interpretations are likely to be self-conscious and effective writers. Understanding how meaning is generated, English majors will be capable and confident in expressing themselves and in adapting their communication to the demands, rhetorical and practical, of different situations. All coursework in English features textual analysis, whether the works under consideration are conventionally literary (such as novels and poems) or not (such as films and hypertexts). Every course in English emphasizes writing and expression, whether in the form of critical essays, creative writing, or performance.

In addition to these general goals, the specific objectives of the curriculum include:

--development of a conceptual frame for understanding the presuppositions, assumptions, histories, and ways of understanding the processes that reading and writing literary and cultural texts entails. In setting this priority for the English major, we assume that is it this conceptual orientation that majors will carry with them as readers of culture throughout their lives, regardless of their individual pursuits after college.

-- attainment of disciplinary self-consciousness. In a changing field and world, it is important that English majors recognize the components of their area of study, from literary history to critical theory to cultural studies. The goal in this regard is not to establish mastery of each of the sub-disciplines of English studies, but to develop the ability to think critically, to conceptualize, and to inquire into meanings that shape the practices of reading and writing.

-- focused study in a particular topic area or set of related issues within English studies. Recognizing the scope and complexity of the discipline, students will pursue a sustained inquiry into a particular area, sub- or cross-discipline. They must gain knowledge of that area’s organizing categories, such as history, theory, discipline, genre, and so on.

II. STRUCTURE

The English major is consistently focused on critical reading and writing. Within this focus, the curriculum recognizes the diversity and the breadth of the discipline. It requires that students encounter fundamental issues concerning interpretation and expression in English studies through a series of four core courses. These courses foster disciplinary awareness, historical understanding, theoretical sophistication, and interpretive ability. They stress critical expression and writing skills.

The core courses prepare students for a sustained work within particular aspects of the discipline. In conjunction with the Advisement Office and a faculty mentor, students design a course of study that articulates an individualized focus or concentration: an area of historical or generic interest, a set of related concerns, or a particular axis of inquiry. The curriculum enables students to include in their course of study historical, authorial, genre-focused, theoretical, and cultural frames for completing the major, but it does not require a particular number or distribution of these areas. The major does enable students to progress logically from core courses to focused work at more advanced levels.


III. PLANNING AND COMPLETING THE ENGLISH MAJOR

English Studies is a diverse field, encompassing many different areas in the study of literature, writing, and culture. English majors have a wide variety of interests, and the major is designed to provide a solid basis for careers in numerous fields. In addition to the required courses outlined below, we recommend that students acquire a broad foundation for the major by taking several survey courses at the 200 level: 222L World Literature, 260 American Literary Tradition, 291 British Literary Tradition, and 295 Classics of Western Literature.

The required courses should be taken as early as possible in the major. The four courses provide a conceptual framework and develop the interpretive and expressive abilities required for successful completion of the upper-level courses. 205Z and 210 can be taken as early as the freshman or sophomore year, and 305Z and 310 should be completed no later than the junior year. The topics courses at the 400 level assume that students possess the critical sophistication, the expressive ability, and the knowledge of the discipline and its practices that are the objectives of the four courses required for the major.

Based upon the foundation provided by the required courses, students pursue a course of study in the major based on their individual intellectual and vocational interests. They will be assisted in planning their course of study by both the English Department Advisement Office and the faculty mentor assigned to them.

It is generally recommended that students considering secondary school teaching as a career take courses in the areas in which they are most likely to teach, often British and American literature, and especially in the content areas required for teacher certification by New York State. Among the courses recommended for these students are: 216, 222L, 226L, 240, 260, 291, and 295; 311-346 (literary history and author courses), 351-359 (genre courses); and 411, 413, and 449. This is not to discourage prospective teachers from taking other courses offered by the English Department; on the contrary, we feel that the best teachers will be those who have studied all aspects of their discipline.

It is generally recommended that students preparing for graduate study in English, the Humanities, or the Social Sciences take courses that prepare them for the critical and theoretical sophistication demanded by the profession of teaching and writing at advanced levels. Among the courses recommended for these students are: 222L, 260, 291, and 295; a range of courses in literary history, authors, genres, and cultural studies (311-373). Specialized courses at the advanced level should be taken in the areas of possible specialization in graduate school. This might include, for example, cultural and Post-Colonial studies (366, 367, 372, 373, 410, 449, 460, 465, 485); media and film (351, 355, 412, 419, 485); or gender studies (362, 368, 410, 416); among others.

It is generally recommended that students preparing for professional schools (law, foreign service, etc.) and careers (business, publishing, etc.) take courses that will strengthen analytical, critical, and expressive abilities. Graduate schools and prospective employers alike count on English majors to possess a degree of cultural literacy but especially to be capable of analytical and critical thought, and the power to express themselves clearly and articulately. Students interested in using the English major to prepare for careers in fields other than English might take writing courses (200Z, 300Z, 450); general literature courses (121L, 144L, 216, 222L, 226L, 240, 260, 291); and courses in criticism, theory, and cultural studies (362, 366, 372, 373, 310, 416, 460, 465, 485).

It is generally recommended that students whose primary interest is in writing complement their study of writing practices with courses in literary history and other media. For instance, in addition to lower level writing courses (100Z, 102Z, 202Z, 205Z) and to upper level writing courses (300Z, 302Z, 402Z; 350 and 450), students might take courses in genres and media studies (351-359) and special topics courses in related areas (412, 419, 485).

Two comments or qualifications on these recommendations are necessary. First, these are only recommendations; they are not requirements. Students and advisors may find courses in other categories will be more appropriate than these suggestions. Second, the content of “Studies” courses (300 level) and “Topics” courses (400 level) will vary considerably from semester to semester. This, too, means that a particular section of a course not listed as generally recommended for one of the various emphases within the major might well be appropriate for students with that interest. Both qualifications speak to the same point: students and advisors will have to examine carefully the course descriptions for each semester in order to determine the courses best suited to students’ interests and needs.

IV. THE UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY ENGLISH MAJOR AND . . .

A. OTHER UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY MAJORS

The English major and minor are designed to be consistent with other large programs in the College of Art Sciences.

· Prerequisites (a grade of C or higher in English 210) are designed to ensure competency at a foundational level before progressing to advanced core and senior-level courses . This practice is less restrictive than other departments, which require demonstrated proficiency before admission to the major (compare, e.g., Sociology, which requires three courses and grades of C or higher in two of them, and Communication, which requires two courses with grades of C- or higher).

· The total number of credits (36) is standard, while the number of credits at upper levels (21) is higher than most (History requires 18, while Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology require only 12). The difference reflects those majors which have a significant number of general requirements at the 100 and 200 level (Anthropology, e.g., allows 12 credits from the 100 level to count toward the major), from those like English and History that offer varied concentrations to their students, enabling them to take courses in these areas at the upper level.

B. ENGLISH PROGRAMS AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS

The English program at Albany is comparable to that available at other progressive research universities in New York and across the country. These programs offer flexible and diverse curricula, designed to provide the foundation upon which students build particular concentrations. To cite three examples:

SUNY BINGHAMTON, DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH, GENERAL LITERATURE AND RHETORIC

Binghamton requires “a core of five courses in literary history and theory.” Students may then opt for “the basic major in English” or concentrations in rhetoric or creative writing. The basic major, “with its six intradepartmental electives, allows students the flexibility to design their majors around their own interests (literature of past or present, language, folklore, American culture or cultural studies, to name just a few possibilities).”

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE, DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

Irvine requires four specific courses, distributing the remaining credits in various categories (seminars, lectures, and electives). The goal of the program is “students’ skills as critics and writers . . . and to train students in criticism by sharpening their awareness of how one reads, analyzes, and performs critiques of literary writing . . . in canonical and non-canonical literatures.” The Department advises students: “Most of the responsibility for the shape of the major is yours; the department’s requirements are deliberately not very restrictive. You and your faculty advisor will put together a program of study that best fits your interests.”

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

The Department of English requires six credits at the lower level to enter the major, after which students take ten courses at the upper levels. Those courses are chosen in conjunction with advisors: “Majors in English may follow courses of study called ‘models.’ . . . Models provide a modest amount of course concentration, and thus a certain focus and coherence to each student’s coursework, while encouraging diversity and or breadth of learning in the student’s chosen discipline [12 models are specified]. . . . A student may also frame for him- or herself an individualized model not shown in this list, or one which spans several tracks.”

V. GENERAL EDUCATION

The revised curriculum demonstrates the Department’s continuing commitment to the General Education program. There will be no reduction in seats offered in general education sections, and we have both increased the number of writing courses (as well as opened existing courses such as 202Z to non-majors) and strengthened the literature offerings at the 200 level, providing students with a number of options to satisfy Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Diversity requirements. While the addition of 100Z to the English Department curriculum (and of 102Z specifically to satisfy the Fine Arts requirement) acknowledges that the English Department by training and experience is particularly well-suited to conduct writing instruction, we note that the Writing Across the Curriculum Program mandates that each department on campus play an active role in that process.


VI. ASSESSMENT

The English Department at the University at Albany is committed to assessment of student learning as a means for improving the quality of teaching and learning. The Department's Undergraduate Advisory Committee is charged with conducting assessment of the English major. Their efforts are guided by an assessment plan , which continually and systematically examines the extent to which students are meeting the two fundamental abilities, critical thought and interpretation, and thoughtful expression, as well as the specific curricular objectives defined under the goals of the English major. The assessment plan involves both direct and indirect assessment of student learning. Direct assessment of student learning will be conducted via an analysis of a sample of student portfolios in upper-level classes. Indirect assessment of student learning and program effectiveness will be examined through student surveys and focus groups with graduating seniors. The Undergraduate Advisory Committee will oversee the procedure for analyzing the portfolios and the Advisement Office will be responsible for collecting survey data from student concerning their overall experiences, satisfaction with the major, and an assessment of the faculty mentoring program. Additionally, the English major will collect information about our graduates, such as graduate school, law school, teacher education program attendance, current occupation, and alumni satisfaction survey as ways of examining relative program effectiveness over time.

Information gathered from the assessments will be disseminated to students and faculty. Modifications based on feedback from assessment results and faculty-student discussions may be necessary. The feedback loop is essential for continued improvement of the quality of teaching and learning in the English major. Our commitment to involving students in the assessment process is evidenced in this proposal. Current English majors and recent graduates of the program participated in a focus group, providing valuable insight into the shortcomings of the current curriculum, recommendations for improvement, and a perspective on how the current proposal might impact undergraduate majors and non-majors.

1. The English Department will undergo a departmental program review in the 2005-2006 academic year. The Undergraduate Advisory Committee will develop the assessment instruments and procedures with the Director of Assessment, in accordance with the Program Review Procedures developed by the University at Albany


English Courses Descriptions

NOTE: Students who matriculated before Fall 2004 must complete the English major requirements as described in the Bulletin under which they entered.


A Eng 100Z Introduction to Analytical Writing
Introduction to the skills necessary for clear, effective communication of ideas through careful attention to the writing process, critical analysis, and argumentation. The course emphasizes a variety of rhetorical practices. Designed for non-English majors.

A Eng 102Z Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
Introductory course in creative writing. Practice in the writing of poetry, fiction, autobiography, and other literary forms. May be taken only by freshmen and sophomores.

A Eng 121L Reading Literature
Introduction to reading literature, with emphasis on developing critical skills and reading strategies through the study of a variety of genres, themes, historical periods, and national literatures. Recommended for first- and second-year students.

A Eng 144L Reading Shakespeare
Introduction to Shakespeare, with emphasis on developing critical skills and reading strategies through detailed study of the plays, from early comedies to later tragedies and romances. Recommended for first-year students and non-English majors. No prior knowledge of Shakespeare is required.

A Eng 202Z Introduction to Studies in Rhetoric and Poetics
An introduction to writing as it is informed by rhetoric and poetics. Features extensive student writing. Emphasis on key concepts and basic terminology, analysis of both literary and student texts, and workshop pedagogy.

A Eng 205Z Introduction to Writing in English Studies
(formerly A ENG 105Z; not to be repeated for credit)
Introduction to the forms and strategies of writing in English studies. The course emphasizes the relationship between writing and disciplinary context, and such concepts as genre, audience, and evidence. Required of all English majors.

A Eng 210 Introduction to English Studies
A survey of key texts (literary, philosophical, historical) within the discipline of English studies, specifically those that trace its history and signal its changing place in the Humanities. The course introduces the nature and scope of English studies. Required of all English majors.

A Eng 216 Traditional Grammar and Usage
Thorough coverage of traditional grammar and usage with an introduction to the principles of structural and transformational grammar. Brief exploration into recent advances in linguistic thought. Practice in stylistic analysis using such grammatical elements as syntax, voice, subordination and sentence structure.

A Eng 221 The Bible as Literature (= A Jst 242 and A Rel 221)
Literary genres of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the cultures from which they emerged. Attention to parallel developments in other literatures and to the influence of the Hebrew Bible on Western life and letters. Only one of Eng 221, Jst 242, and Rel 221 may be taken for credit.


A Eng 222L World Literature
Introduction to classics of world literature exploring national, historical and linguistic boundaries. Texts chosen will introduce students to literary traditions and provide a foundation for English literary studies.

A Eng 226L Focus on a Literary Theme, Form or Mode
Exploration of a single common theme, form or mode using varied texts to promote fresh inquiry by unexpected juxtapositions of subject matter and ways of treating it. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 240 Growing Up in America
Introduction to problems of social significance related to growing up in a multi-ethnic society through the study of American literature and culture.

A Eng 261L American Literary Traditions
Introduction to representative works in the American literary tradition, emphasizing major developments in American literature.

A Eng 291L British Literary Traditions

Introduction to representative works of British literary tradition, emphasizing major developments in British literature.

A Eng 295L Classics of Western Literature
Introduction to classics of western literature, emphasizing foundational works for literary study by tracing the evolution of Anglophone modern literary genres from Homeric epics.

A Eng 300Z Expository Writing
For experienced writers who wish to work on such skills as style, organization, logic and tone. Practice in a variety of forms: editorials, letters, travel accounts, film reviews, position papers and autobiographical narrative. Classes devoted to discussions of the composing process and to critiques of student essays. Intended primarily for junior and senior English minors and nonmajors.

A Eng 302Z Creative Writing
For the student who wishes to experiment with a variety of kinds of writing. Admission is by permission, and those seeking to enroll should submit a sample of their work to the instructor. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A Eng 305Z Studies in Writing about Texts
Intensive study of the forms and strategies of writing in English studies. Students will engage with a variety of literary, critical, and theoretical texts. The course emphasizes students’ own analytical writing. Required of all English majors. Pre-requisite: 205Z.

A Eng 310 Reading and Interpretation in English Studies

A survey of contemporary theories of interpretation and criticism. The course emphasizes current modes of analysis within the discipline and includes both literary and cultural texts. Required of all English majors. Pre-requisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 311L History of the English Language
A broad tracing of the history, development and structure of the language from the beginnings to modern English, including foreign influences on English, basic tendencies of the language, grammatical constructs, and regional usages, especially American. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.

A Eng 330 Literature of the Middle Ages (formerly A Eng 421)
Students will examine a number of representative medieval English texts. Additional readings in related areas, such as ancient and continental literatures (in translation), as well as relevant cultural and historical texts, will help to situate the English literary tradition as it developed through the millennium known as the Middle Ages. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 421.

A Eng 331 Literature of the Early Renaissance (formerly A Eng 422)
Examination of the various forms that developed and flourished in England during the 16th century: prose, narrative and lyric poetry, and drama (exclusive of Shakespeare.) Attention to classical and continental influences, the historical background, the legitimation of English, and the power of individual texts. Major figures may include More, Wyatt and Surrey, Sidney, Marlowe, Spenser and Jonson. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 422.

A Eng 332 Literature of the Later Renaissance (formerly A Eng 423)
Examination of the poetry, prose and drama of England from 1600 to 1660 (exclusive of Milton). Major figures may include Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Herbert, Marvell and Webster. Attention to political issues intellectual issues and religion as they bear upon the poetry of wit, the prose of conviction, and the drama of power and intrigue. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 423.

A Eng 333 Literature of the Restoration and the 18th-Century Enlightenment (formerly A Eng 425)
Examination of the literature and culture of the English Restoration, including drama, prose and poetry, and eighteenth century texts by such writers as Pope, Swift, Johnson. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 425.

A Eng 334 Nineteenth-Century British Literature
Examination of the texts in the British literary tradition, read in their relations to literary movements and broader cultural issues and movements, possibly in conjunction with non-canonical texts of the time period. Topics to be discussed may include: the literature of the earlier nineteenth and late eighteenth centuries in relation to a continuing culture of Romanticism; the literature of the mid and later nineteenth century in relation to cultures of Modernism; the literature of Empire. (Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 426 or A Eng 427).

A Eng 335 Literature in English after 1900
Examination of British Literature in the twentieth century. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the development of literary genres and themes; modernism and post-modernism; colonial and post-colonial literature. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 371 or 428.

A Eng 336 American Literature to 1800
Examination of American literature of the colonial and federal periods. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the development of literary genres and themes; formations of national identity; theological and political contexts. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 432.

A Eng 337 Nineteenth-Century American Literature
Examination of American literature of the nineteenth century. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the development of literary genres and themes; romanticism, realism, regionalism, and naturalism; literature in relation to historical and political contexts. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 433 or A Eng 434.

A Eng 338 American Literature after 1900
Examination of American literature of the twentieth century. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the development of literary genres and themes; modernism and post-modernism; literature and identity formation in American culture; American literature in relation to transnational contexts. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A Eng 434 or 435.

A Eng 342 Study of an Author or Authors before mid-18th century
Examination of a single major author in depth (e.g., Chaucer or Milton), or of two or more authors whose works illuminate each other in terms of style, theme, and/or relationship to a particular historical era. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.


A Eng 343 Study of an Author or Authors after mid-18th century

Examination of a single major author in depth, or of two or more authors whose works illuminate each other in terms of style, theme, and/or relationship to a particular historical era. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 346 Studies in Shakespeare (formerly A Eng 344 and A Eng 345)
Examination of Shakespeare’s plays, with emphasis on character, language, theme, form and structure. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the early or later works; theatrical modes (e.g., comedy, romance, tragedy, history); performance (e.g., Shakespeare on film or stage); Shakespeare in relation to his contemporaries; Shakespeare's dramatic and non-dramatic poetry. Designed for English and theatre majors and minors. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 350 Contemporary Writers at Work
Rhetoric and poetics as practiced by contemporary writers across a range of genres and media. Particular attention to social, intellectual, and aesthetic contexts out of which such work emerges.

A Eng 351 Studies in Technology, Media, or Performance
Examination of technological, media, or staged phenomena, as well as readings related to these forms. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: place of technology, media or performance in English studies; forms and/or theories of technology, media, or performance; materiality and meaning; cultural texts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 355 Studies in Film
Examination of themes and issues in the history and/or interpretation of American and British film. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the themes, structures, and/or style of a director or directors; genres of film; theories of film; film and other arts, including literature.
May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 356 Studies in Non-fiction Prose
Examination of nonfiction prose as a medium of discourse, ranging from literary criticism, biography, and autobiography to journalism, science, philosophy, history. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: forms of nonfiction; theories of nonfiction prose; historical development; cultural texts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 357 Studies in Drama
Examination of drama, with an emphasis on critical reading of dramatic literature. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: forms of drama; theories of drama; theatrical traditions; problems of production and dramatic interpretation. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 358 Studies in Poetry
Examination of poetry, with an emphasis on study of poetic forms and modes. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: major developments in themes, language, forms and modes of poetry; poetics; poetry in the arts, including theatre and song. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 359 Studies in Narrative
Examination of narrative forms with an emphasis upon prose fiction. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: forms of fiction, theories of narrative; narrative in the fine arts, including film; cultural narratives. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 362 Critical Approaches to Gender and Sexuality in Literature
Examination of the role of Anglophone literary texts from any period(s) in the construction of gender and sexuality, with an emphasis on study of interpretive strategies provided by various critical discourses. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: aesthetic movements; historical problems; cultural texts; political questions.

A Eng 366 Critical Approaches to Ethnicity in Literature
Examination of constructions of "race" and/or "ethnicity" as presented in Anglophone literature. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: how markers of nationality are related to issues of sexuality, class, and other cultural-historical ways of accounting for the complex questions that surround identity. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 367 Jewish-American Literature
Literature written by American Jews of the 20th century. Among the topics offered are Jewish fiction writers, Jewish-American Drama, Jewish-American Women Writers, Jewish Humor, and Jewish-American Literature and Film. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 368 Women Writers (= A WSS 368L)
Selected works of English and/or American women writers in the context of the literary and cultural conditions confronting them. The course focuses on the development of a female tradition in literature and on the narrative, poetic, and/or dramatic styles of expression, voice and values of women writers. Only one of A Eng 368L & A Wss 368L may be taken for credit. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 369 African American Literature
Selected works of African American writers in their cultural, literary and historical contexts. The course focuses on the development of an African American tradition and on the artistic forms essential to it. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 372 Transnational Literature
Examination of aesthetic movements, cultural texts, political questions, and historical problems of postcolonial nations and subjects in their transnational contexts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 373 Literature of the Americas
Examination of the literatures of the Americas, North and South, including the Caribbean. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: aesthetic movements; local cultural practice; history; identity formation; and politics. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 374 Cultural Studies
A study of cultural forms and practices in relation to the historical conditions in which they are shaped. The course considers theoretical and the practical dimensions of meaning in a wide range of cultural texts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A Eng 398Z Honors Seminar
First course in the English Honors sequence of four seminars offered over a two-year period. Topics vary with each sequence. The seminars explore special topics in literary history, literary theory and critical methodology. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): admission to Honors Program.

A Eng 399Z Honors Seminar
Second course in the English Honors sequence of four seminars offered over a two-year period. Topics vary with each sequence. The seminars explore special topics in literary history, literary theory and critical methodology. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A Eng 398Z.

A Eng 402Z Advanced Writing Workshop
Workshop for experienced writers in various genres and media. Permission of Instructor required.

A Eng 410 Topics in Contemporary Literary and Critical Theory.

Focused examination of the theoretical questions, presuppositions, and debates pertinent to a specific perspective or issue in contemporary thought and theory. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: a particular discourse (e.g., ecocriticism, ideology critique, queer theory, language theory, psychoanalysis), or cultural problem. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 411 Topics in British Literature and Culture
Focused examination of selected topics in the literature and culture of England, including nations formerly under British rule or influence. Individual semesters may focus on, among others: a historical period, genre, or theme; the literature and culture of a particular place or country (such as India, Ireland, the Caribbean); a specific aspect of cultural study. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 412 Topics in Film or Drama
Focused examination of specific theme or issue in the history and/or interpretation of Anglophone film and/or drama from any period(s). Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: the work of a particular author and/or director; historical period, genre, or theme; a particular discourse in film or drama studies (e.g., ideological, aesthetic); relations between film and/or drama and literary and other texts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 413 Topics in American Literature and Culture
Focused examination of selected topics in the literature and culture of the Americas. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: a particular historical period, genre, or theme; literature of a region or group (e.g., African American, Caribbean, or Latino); interpretive or other theoretical problems in American literary and cultural study. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 416 Topics in Gender, Sexuality, Race, or Class
Focused examination of topics in the study of gender, sexuality, race and/or class, as they are positioned and defined in Anglophone literary or other texts from any period(s). Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: a particular historical period, genre, or theme; theories of gender, sexuality, race, and/or class as related to literary or other forms of representation; a particular cultural problem. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 419 Topics in Technology, Media and Performance
Focused examination of a specific theme or issue in the study of technological, media, or staged phenomena, as well as readings related to these forms. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: the machine in culture; artificial intelligence; notions of nature and the body; environmental issues; print media; television; the Internet; popular arts; performance art; ritual; social practices. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 449 Topics in Comparative Literatures and Cultures
Focused examination of selected topics in the study of comparative Anglophone literatures and cultures from any periods. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: comparative study of particular aesthetic movements, cultural texts, political questions, or historical problems. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 450 Topics in Writing Studies
Carefully focused study in the history, theory, or practice of rhetoric and/or poetics (e.g., narrative theory; poetic movements; twentieth-century rhetorical theory). May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 460 Topics in Transnational Studies
Focused examination of transnational literature and cultures. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: particular aesthetic movement(s), cultural text(s), political question(s), or historical problem(s) of postcolonial nations and subjects in their transnational contexts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 465 Topics in Ethnic Literatures in Cultural Contexts
Focused examination of a particular topic on constructions of "race" and/or "ethnicity" as related to Anglophone literature or other forms of representation from any period(s). Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: neglected literary forms and cultural traditions; relations between writing and political struggles; identity studies and developments within interpretive or other theories. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 485 Topics in Cultural Studies
Focused examination of particular topic in the study of culture, broadly defined. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: postcolonial studies; history of social institutions and knowledge production; study of identity formations; cultural forms; technology and science studies. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 488 Special Topics (1-6 credits) Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 488Z Special Topics (1-6 cr.)
Note: all 400-level writing workshops may be taught under this rubric. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 490 Internship in English
Supervised practical apprenticeship of 10-15 hours of work per week in a position requiring the use of skills pertaining to the discipline of English, such as reading and critical analysis, writing, research, tutoring, etc., with an academic component consisting of the internship colloquium. Written work and report required. Selection is competitive and based on early application, recommendations, interviews and placement with an appropriate internship sponsor. Open only to junior or senior English majors with a minimum overall grade point average of 2.50 and a minimum of 3.00 average in English. S/U graded.

A Eng 497 Independent Study and Research in English (1-4 cr.)
May be taken for a maximum of 8 credits. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Prerequisite(s): permission of a faculty member in the department and of the appropriate departmental committee. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 498 Honors Seminar III
Independent honors thesis individually formulated and written under the direction of the coordinator. Students writing theses will meet occasionally in colloquia to become acquainted with each other's work in progress. Prerequisite(s): A Eng 399. S/U graded. Prerequisite: C or better in A Eng 210, or permission of the instructor.

A Eng 499 Honors Seminar IV
Continuation and completion of thesis begun in A Eng 498. The thesis will be reviewed and evaluated by an honors committee. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A Eng 210 and A Eng 498.

DISTRIBUTION

(number of semesters offered, excluding summers, over two-year period)


Required

205Z (4)
210 (4)
305Z (4)
310 (4)

Foundational

100Z (4)
102Z (4)
121L (4)
144L (4)

Introductory

216 (2)
222L (2)
226L (4)
240 (4)
261 (4)
291 (4)
295 (4)

Writing Studies

202Z (4)
300Z (4)
302Z (4)
402Z (4)

Period

311 (2)
330 (2)
331 (2)
332 (2)
333 (2)
334 (2)
335 (2)
336 (4)
337 (4)
338 (4)

Author

342 (4)
343 (4)
346 (4)
350 (4)

Genre/Media

351 (2)
355 (2)
356 (2)
357 (2)
358 (2)
359 (2)

P-C/Cult/Gen

362 (2)
366 (2)
367 (2)
368 (2)
369 (2)
372 (2)
373 (2)
374 (2)

Advanced

410 (2)
411 (2)
412 (2)
413 (2)
416 (2)
419 (2)
449 (2)
450 (2)
460 (2)
465 (2)
485 (2)
488/Z

Ind/Int

490 (4)
497 (4)

Honors

398Z (2)
399Z (2)
498 (2)
499 (2)




TWO YEAR COURSE CYCLE (courses and number of sections)

Year One—Fall

100Z (3)
102Z (2)
121 (8)
144 (2)

202Z (1)
205Z (6)
210 (7)
216 (1)
222 (1)
226 (1)
240 (5)
261 (2)
291 (1)
295 (1)

300Z (2)
302Z (2)
305Z (5)
310 (5)
330 (1)
331 (1)
333 (1)
336 (1)
337 (1)
338 (1)
342 (1)
343 (1)
346 (2)
350 (1)
351 (1)
355 (1)
359 (2)
362 (1)
368 (1)
372 (1)
398Z (1)
402Z (2)
410 (1)
412 (1)
416 (1)
449 (2)
485 (2)
498 (1)


100-200 Courses

12 x 20 = 240
6 x 60 = 360
23 x 40 = 920

41 sections; 1520 seats offered

300-400 Courses

13 x 20 = 261
30 x 40 = 1200

43 sections; 1460 seats offered

Proposed Total

84 sections; 2980 seats offered

Total in Fall ’01

80 sections; 2950 seats offered
2587 seats used


Year One—Spring


100Z (2)
102Z (3)
121 (8)
144 (2)

202Z (1)
205Z (7)
210 (5)
226 (2)
240 (5)
261 (2)
291 (1)
295 (1)

300Z (2)
302Z (2)
305Z (5)
310 (5)
311 (1)
332 (1)
334 (1)
335 (1)
336 (1)
337 (1)
338 (1)
342 (1)
343 (1)
346 (2)
350 (1)
356 (1)
357 (1)
358 (1)
366 (1)
367 (1)
369 (1)
373 (1)
374 (1)
399Z (1)

402Z (2)
411 (1)
413 (1)
419 (1)
450 (1)
460 (1)
465 (1)
499* (1)

100-200 Courses

13 x 20 = 261
6 x 60 = 360
20 x 40 = 800

39 sections; 1420 seats offered

300-400 Courses

12 x 20 = 261*
30 x 40 = 1200

42 sections; 1460 seats offered
*499 adds to seat but not section total

Proposed Total

82 sections; 2920 seats offered

Total in Spring ’02

79 sections; 2900 seats offered
2576 seats used

Year Two—Fall

100Z (3)
102Z (2)
121 (8)
144 (2)

202Z (1)
205Z (6)
210 (7)
216 (1)
222 (1)
226 (1)
240 (5)
261 (2)
291 (1)
295 (1)

300Z (2)
302Z (2)
305Z (5)
310 (5)
330 (1)
331 (1)
333 (1)
336 (1)
337 (1)
338 (1)
342 (1)
343 (1)
346 (2)
350 (1)
351 (1)
355 (1)
359 (1)
362 (1)
368 (1)
372 (1)
398Z (1)

402Z (2)
410 (1)
412 (1)
416 (1)
460 (1)
485 (1)
498 (1)

100-200 Courses

12 x 20 = 240
6 x 60 = 360
23 x 40 = 920

41 sections; 1520 seats offered

300-400 Courses

13 x 20 = 261
27 x 40 = 1080

40 sections; 1340 seats offered

Proposed Total

81 sections; 2860 seats offered

Total in Fall ’01

80 sections; 2950 seats offered
2587 seats used


Year Two—Spring

100Z (2)
102Z (3)
121 (8)
144 (2)

202Z (1)
205Z (7)
210 (5)
226 (2)
240 (5)
261 (2)
291 (1)
295 (1)

300Z (2)
302Z (2)
305Z (5)
310 (5)
311 (1)
332 (1)
334 (1)
335 (1)
336 (1)
337 (1)
338 (1)
342 (1)
343 (1)
346 (2)
350 (1)
356 (1)
357 (1)
358 (1)
366 (1)
368 (1)
369 (1)
373 (1)
374 (1)
399Z (1)

402Z (2)
411 (1)
413 (1)
419 (1)
449 (1)
450 (1)
465 (1)
499 (1)