Journalism Program

 

 

Thomas A. Bass, Ph.D.

William Rainbolt, Ph.D.

Director

Nancy Roberts, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

Humanities 312

Albany, New York 12222

 

 

 

Tel. 518-442-4087

Fax 518-442-4599

                                                                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 11, 2005

Dr. Joan Wick-Pelletier

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

University At Albany

Albany, New York 12222

 

Dear Professor Wick-Pelletier.

 

                                    Please find enclosed the Proposal from the Journalism Program for the creation of an undergraduate major, granting a B.A. in Journalism at the University at Albany. The Proposal is the culmination of a process—ongoing for thirty-two years—which has seen the Journalism Program evolve from its founding in 1973 into a well-respected minor in the English Department, with steadily increasing enrollments. In its next expansion, the Program is poised to meet President Kermit Hall’s challenge to “lead this great institution to a new level of excellence and stature.”

 

                                  Given that a University major in journalism represents the final stage in the development of a long-standing and already successful program, we request that this Proposal be given an Expedited Review Process. The Proposal includes a Title Page, Table of Contents, fourteen Sections numbered I-XIV, and four Appendices. Now in its thirty-second year of existence as a minor at the University, the Journalism Program is looking forward with great enthusiasm to adding the responsibilities–and challenges–of becoming one of the University’s distinguished undergraduate majors.

 

                                    We very much appreciate your aid, and the aid of your staff and other officers at the University and of the Journalism Advisory Board, in drafting this Proposal. The document represents our best efforts at estimating the projected growth and curricular requirements of what promises to be a rigorous, yet at the same time highly-attractive, major at the University. 

 

                                    If further documentation or supporting materials are required, we will be pleased to supply them. In the meantime, we would again like to express our sincere thanks for your help in launching this Proposal and bringing it to fruition.

Sincerely,

 

William Rainbolt, Ph.D.

Director of the Journalism Program

       

Nancy Roberts, Ph.D.

Professor of Communication

 

Thomas A. Bass, Ph.D.

 Professor of English

       

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Undergraduate Major Proposal: B.A. in Journalism

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted to

 

 

Dr. Joan Wick-Pelletier

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

 

 

by

 

William Rainbolt, Ph.D, Director, Journalism Program

Nancy Roberts, Ph.D, Communication & Journalism

Thomas Bass, Ph.D, English & Journalism

 

 

 

March 11, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

class=Section2>

UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR PROPOSAL: B.A. IN JOURNALISM

UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

                                                                       

I.                       Introduction

 

II.                     Program Proposal

 

III.                    Program History

 

IV.                    Academic Excellence – Concentrations

 

V.                     Curriculum

                                                                                                                                   

VI.                    Degree Requirements for a Major in Journalism

                                                                                                           

VII.                  Degree Requirements for a Minor in Journalism

 

VIII.                 Honors Program

                                                                                                                       

IX.                    Advising and Professional Development

 

X.                     List of the Four-Year Sequences Required for Completion of the B.A.

 

XI.                   Evaluation of the UAlbany Proposal in Relation to Other Institutions

 

XII.                  Resources and Projected Growth

 

XIII.                Alumni and Professional Networks

 

XIV.                 Faculty

 

Appendix A.    Chart Comparing the UAlbany Proposal to other SUNY Programs

Appendix B.    Bulletin Copy for the Journalism Program

Appendix C.    Course Action Forms for the Journalism Program

Appendix D.    Sources

 

 

 

I.          INTRODUCTION

 

            The Journalism Program has existed at the University at Albany since 1973, when it was inaugurated as a formal curriculum offering a minor in journalism in the English Department. As Professor William E. Rowley, the Program’s founder, wrote of its stated mission: “Our primary task is to provide a liberal education and to preserve and nurture our humanistic culture.” He believed that training in journalism would prove useful for developing “imagination, critical intelligence, and intellectual independence.”

 

            In the thirty-two years since its founding, the Journalism Program has graduated–by conservative estimate–at least eight hundred declared minors, and it has supervised more than five hundred media internships. Since Journalism courses are open to all qualified applicants, the Program has helped many thousands of University students develop both their critical thinking and writing skills. In Spring 2005, more than three hundred students were enrolled in Journalism courses. This is double the number enrolled in Spring 1999.   And in Spring 2005, the Program has a record number students who have declared Journalism as a first or second minor.

 

            As outlined in the following Proposal, the Journalism Program–hoping to fulfill the University’s Academic Mission and to serve as a featured component in the College of Arts and Sciences Strategic Plan–intends to create a B.A. in Journalism to continue this three decades of expansion for the Journalism Program. The program will offer four academic concentrations. The concentrations available to a student working toward a B.A. in Journalism at the University include:

 

                        !           Public Affairs Journalism 

                        !           Science and Technology Journalism

                        !           Visual and Digital Media

                        !           General Journalism

 

“General Journalism” will be a concentration that embraces an array of courses in reporting and writing. It will also include courses aimed at students mastering specific fields, such as Business and Economic Reporting, Arts Reporting, and Literary Journalism. The sequential flow of courses required for successful completion of work in these four concentrations is spelled out in Sections IV-VIII and in Section X of this Proposal.

 

Outlined below are what the Program will be emphasizing as its core values. These draw on the strengths of the University, the talents of its faculty, the School’s privileged position in the State capital, and the Program’s long-standing success in particular domains.  First, the Program will provide a solid foundation in the study of journalism. Journalism is a growing subject of interest in America’s colleges and universities, as evidenced by rising enrollments. Journalism and a free press are also fundamental prerequisites to the well-being of America’s democratic institutions. Along with nurturing these basic values, the Journalism Program will seek to develop nationally recognized strengths in five areas of educational excellence.

           

The areas in which the Journalism Program intends to distinguish itself are:

 

            Public Affairs Journalism. We will take advantage of our location in the State capital to emphasize research and reporting on public affairs and policy, including civic and ethical issues of state, regional, and national import. Courses will be taught in urban and community journalism, opinion writing and investigative reporting, and global perspectives on the news.

 

            Science and Technology Journalism. Given the University's preeminence in researching nanotechnology and other advanced fields in physics, genomics, biotechnology, and atmospheric sciences, the Journalism Program will offer a

concentration in STEM reporting. This is reporting on Science, Technology,  Environmental issues, and Medicine.

 

            New Media Culture. The Journalism Program will capitalize on its current strengths in digital media and visual culture to offer courses in the design, production, and analysis of New Media. Technological advances in media production and delivery continue to affect the form, function, and content of journalism as it evolves in the 21st century. Students preparing themselves for careers in journalism and related fields will receive hands-on experience with these new technologies.

 

            Literary Journalism. Our close links to the New York State Writers Institute, a national treasure in American letters and literary discourse, will be solidified and nurtured. The Writers Institute sponsors on-campus readings, seminars, and workshops with authors, including literary journalists, who address issues of concern to our students, particularly those enrolled in the Program’s Literary Journalism Workshop. 

 

            Information Strategies for Journalists. Numeracy, statistical analysis, information gathering, and the analytical tools required for distinguishing truth from fiction will be placed at the center of the Journalism Program. Journalism ethics and law, including the history and traditions of best journalism practices, will also be emphasized. These subjects will be taught at all levels, in both our introductory and advanced courses.

 

These five areas of academic excellence are key components in defining the mission of the Journalism Program. They will be implemented across the curriculum and inform every aspect of the Program’s course design, advisement, and teaching. Further elaboration of the Program’s mission and its efforts to become a center of excellence at the University–illustrated by concrete examples of how students will progress through a four-year B.A. program in Journalism–are presented in Sections II-XIV of this Proposal.  

 

II.        PROGRAM PROPOSAL

             In the College of Arts and Sciences Strategic Plan for 2003-2008, Dean Joan Wick-Pelletier announced, as the third in an ambitious program of forty-two proposals for enhancing the academic excellence of the University, the mandate to develop a major in Journalism. In his Fall Address to the Faculty in 2004, Interim President John Ryan said that a B.A. in Journalism should be included among the University’s “new or enhanced offerings.”  These statements reaffirm the University’s commitment to developing Journalism as one of the benchmark programs for asserting the School’s academic excellence.  

 

            In spite of its position as a world center for media and culture, New York appears to be one of only two states in the nation whose flagship academic institutions lack a B.A.-granting major in journalism. (The other is Vermont.) Nationally, the annual survey conducted by the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia shows more students are enrolled in journalism, mass media, and mass communication programs than ever before. This enthusiasm from young people for media careers is bolstered by projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (U. S.

Department of Labor), which foresees an average increase of 19% in the number of people who will be employed in media careers between 2002 and 2012.

 

            Paralleling this national trend is a growth in the number of students at the University who are interested in pursuing careers in journalism. Enrollments in Journalism Program courses have more than doubled in the past five years, from 150 seats filled in Spring 1999 to 313 in Spring 2005.  The Program has expanded its course offerings from nine sections a semester to thirteen. It currently has the largest number of declared minors it has ever recorded, 134, with even more minors  likely to be declared before Spring Commencement.

 

            Given a tremendous boost in staffing and intellectual rigor, the Journalism Program added two full-time faculty members in Fall 2004 and Spring 2005. Professor Nancy Roberts, former Director of Undergraduate Studies at the University of Minnesota’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication, shares a joint appointment in the Department of Communication. Professor Thomas Bass, former Director of the Hamilton College Program in New York City on “Media in the Digital Age,” shares a joint appointment in the English Department. Both professors are widely-published authors and highly-respected scholars in their fields.

 

            They join Professor William Rainbolt, Director of the Journalism Program, a former newspaper journalist, freelance writer and editor, and novelist who has been in the Journalism Program for twenty years. The Program also draws vitally from a part-time staff of Professional Media Lecturers, who work in a variety of media careers, including newspapers, magazines, broadcasting, publishing, photojournalism, and freelance writing. These Lecturers’ important contributions are bolstered by their experience and expertise, gained from working on a daily basis in the frontlines of contemporary media.

 

Its recent expansion, the breadth and quality of its course offerings, and the College’s intent to make Journalism a premier program at the University have generated an outpouring of interest in the Program, both from current and prospective students, alumni, and the media. Articles on the Journalism Program have appeared recently in the  Albany Times Union (August 24, 2004), Metroland (September 23, 2004), and the University at Albany Update (September 10, 2004). To enhance this interest in the Journalism Program, and valorize what promises to be one of the University’s academic areas of excellence, Dean Wick-Pelletier in 2004 appointed a Journalism Advisory Board of distinguished professionals in the field. The Board and the Program’s senior faculty members are currently working with the Assistant Dean for Development on a variety of long-range plans. These include the creation of an endowed professorship; the establishment of visiting professorships for media professionals; the creation of a Center for Public Communication; and other programs, funded from outside sources, which will enhance the University’s core strengths in Journalism, English, Communication, Criminal Justice, the Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy, and other campus units.

 

III.       PROGRAM HISTORY

            The Journalism Program, offering a formal curriculum in journalism studies and a minor in journalism, was founded as part of the English Department in 1973. The Program’s first director was Professor William E. Rowley, former editor of the Knickerbocker Press and a beloved teacher who retired in 1984. He was succeeded by Professor William Rainbolt, who directed the Journalism Program from 1984 to 1988. Professor Carolyn Yalkut served as Director of the Program from 1988 to 1999. Beginning in the Summer of 1999, Professor Rainbolt once again became Director. Another person who has played a key role in shaping the Program is William Kennedy.  Working as a Lecturer in the Program from its founding until 1982, Kennedy taught what a former student describes as an “electrifying” course in Advanced Journalism and Magazine Writing. Although he has moved on to become Executive Director of the New York Writers Institute, Bill Kennedy still involves himself informally in the Program. He played an active role, for example, in helping to choose the new faculty hires.  

 

            From its inception, the Program has strongly believed in maintaining Professor Rowley’s taproot commitment to a liberal arts education for students who want

careers in the media or who plan to attend graduate school. For nearly two decades, the Program concentrated on preparing students to enter the traditional news media, with a heavy emphasis on newspaper and magazine reporting and editing. Student interests and demands have shifted dramatically over the past few years. Now, the Program faces the challenge of instructing students in the digital and electronic formats that are currently revolutionizing journalism. At the same time, the Program is addressing increased student interest in online journalism, public relations, advocacy journalism, book publishing, and broadcasting.

 

            Alumni from the Journalism Program work across the wide spectrum of careers available to students trained in journalism and media studies. The roster includes Nancy Sharkey, assistant managing editor of The New York Times; Mark Memmott, political writer and former deputy managing editor of USA Today; Eric Koli, producer for ABC’s 20/20; Dean Betz, editor of Advance Internet, the Web publishing arm of Newhouse Newspapers; John Fritze, metropolitan desk reporter, Indianapolis Star-Tribune; Loren Ginsberg Edelstein, executive editor of Meetings & Conventions and Travel & Entertainment magazines; Rob Edelstein, TV Guide correspondent and author of two books on NASCAR; Mike Hess, Web news editor, WNBC.com; Keemin Lim, WNYT-TV, Channel 13 reporter; David Goldman, brand marketing division, Burson-Marsteller; Mona Funiciello, Massachusetts Audubon Society; Jessica Valenti, NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund; Ian Leslie, assistant city editor, Beaufort (S.C.) Gazette; Vincent Reda, Chief Writer and Editor in the Office of the Vice President for Outreach, University at Albany; Jan Daniels, environmental writer and founder of Eco Expressions, a creative writing program for youths; Peter Sands, Ph.D., assistant professor of English, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Zachary Church, reporter, Bennington Banner; Jennifer Annello, account executive, Environics Communications; and many more.

 

            The Program is proud of the close relationships it fosters between students and faculty, the collegial atmosphere it maintains among its expanding network of alumni, and its steadfast adherence to keeping journalism an interdisciplinary major–some would say the quintessential interdisciplinary major–in the liberal arts. As one of his former students said of William Kennedy’s course in journalism and magazine writing, “He made it all come to life. Everything in the world was there in the classroom, and we were supposed to write about it.”

 

 

 

IV.       ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE – CONCENTRATIONS

            As previously discussed in the Introduction to this Proposal, the Journalism Program, while providing a solid foundation in the study of journalism, will offer four concentrations. These concentrations are designed to fulfill University at Albany President Kermit Hall’s intention to “lead this great institution to a new level of excellence and stature.” 

 

            The four concentrations available to B.A. candidates in Journalism are:

 

                        !           Public Affairs Journalism

                        !           Science and Technology Journalism

                        !           Visual and Digital Media

                        !           General Journalism

 

            The last of these, while emphasizing training in general reporting and writing, may also focus on mastering a specific field of journalism. A parenthetical notation—denoting specialization within the realm of general purpose reporting—might be awarded, for example, in Business and Economic Reporting, Arts Reporting, or Literary Journalism.

           

            The specific courses to be taken for fulfilling the requirements in these four  concentrations are described below in Section V, which discusses the Program’s Curriculum; in Sections VI through VIII, which describe the Program’s Course Requirements; and in Section X, which specifies the various four-year sequences required for completion of the B.A. in Journalism.                              

 

V.                 CURRICULUM       

            Proposed course numbering system

            With a few exceptions, courses numbered x00–x49 indicate lecture or contextual courses. Courses numbered x50–x99 indicate writing-intensive workshops, independent studies, or internships.

            The prefix for all courses is AJRL.

100      Foundations of Journalism and Media Studies

 

200Z –   Introduction to Reporting and News Writing

220      Visual Culture

270      Information Strategies for Journalists (Workshop)

 

300Z –   Journalism for Non-Majors

308Z –   Narrative and Descriptive Journalism

320      Media Law

325      Media Ethics

330      History of Journalism

340      Global Perspectives on the News

350      Journalistic Interviewing 

355Z –   Public Relations Writing

360Z –   Intermediate Reporting and News Writing

366Z –   Magazine Article Reporting and Writing

370Z –   Reporting on Science and Technology

380 –     Photojournalism

385 –     Broadcast Journalism

390Z –   Digital Media Workshop I: Web Publishing

392Z –   Digital Media Workshop II: Desk-top Publishing

 

410 –     Images of Journalism in Film

420 –     Political Economy of the Mass Media

460Z –   Advanced Reporting and News Writing

465Z –   Opinion Writing

468Z –   Literary Journalism

470Z –   Advanced Reporting on Science and Technology

475      Topics in Journalism

480Z –   Public Affairs Journalism

490Z –   E-zine: Online Magazine Workshop

495 –     Internship in Journalism

497 –     Independent Study in Journalism

499 –     Senior Honors Project in Journalism

 

            Note: AJRL 475, Topics in Journalism, will include courses such as Urban Journalism, Community Journalism, Business and Economic Reporting, Arts Reporting, and other courses which the Program might consider important to add to its regular offerings.

 

 

 

 

 

VI.       DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN JOURNALISM

            Journalism Major

 

            The requirements for a Journalism major will be fulfilled by a minimum of 30

credits in AJRL courses, plus 6 credits in another department or program, as approved by

the Director of the Journalism Program or the student’s Journalism advisor.  Normally, these 6 credits will be in major-oriented courses offered by a program related to the student’s area of concentration.  Beyond this  6-credit requirement, courses in other departments or programs will not be accepted as part of the Journalism Major except as approved by the Director of the Journalism Program or the student’s Journalism advisor.

 

            Of the required 30 credits in AJRL courses: 9 credits are required at the 100-200

level: AJRL 100, AJRL 200Z, and AJRL 270, and 3 credits of electives chosen from

AJRL 220, AENG 202Z, AENG 216, ACOM 238, or ASOC 255. 

 

            At the 300-400 levels, 18 credits are required: 9 credits in a student’s chosen

concentration from the four offered by the Journalism Program, 3 credits in a non-

workshop AJRL course, and 6 credits of AJRL electives.  At least 6 credits must be at the

400 level.

 

            For students in the Public Affairs Journalism concentration, 9 credits are required:

AJRL 480Z; 6 credits from AJRL 350, AJRL 366Z, AJRL 460Z, AJRL 475, or AJRL 465Z; 3 credits in a non-workshop AJRL course at the 300 or 400 levels, and 6 credits of electives in AJRL courses.

            For students in the STEM (Science-Technology-Environment-Medicine)

concentration, 9 credits are required: AJRL 370Z, AJRL 470Z; 3 credits from AJRL 350,

AJRL 366Z, AJRL 465, or AJRL 480Z; 3 credits from a non-workshop AJRL course;

and 6 credits of electives from AJRL courses.

 

            For students in the Visual & Digital Media concentration, 12 credits are required:

AJRL 220, AJRL 390Z or AJRL 392Z, AJRL 380, and AJRL 490Z; 3 credits from non-

workshop AJRL courses; and 3 credits of electives from AJRL courses.

 

            For students in the General Journalism concentration, 9 credits are required:

AJRL 308Z or AJRL 366Z, AJRL 350, and AJRL 460Z; 3 credits from AJRL 355Z,

AJRL 385, or AJRL 490Z; 3 credits from non-workshop AJRL courses; and 3 credits of

electives from AJRL courses.

 

VII.     DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN JOURNALISM

            Journalism Minor

 

            The requirements for a journalism minor will be fulfilled by a minimum of 18

graduation credits, including 9 required credits: AJRL 200Z, AJRL 270Z, and AJRL

308Z. The remaining 9 elective credits can be drawn from AJRL courses at the 200 level

(no more than 3 credits), 300 level and 400 level. Courses from outside the AJRL

curriculum can be counted only with permission of the Director of the Journalism

Program. Minors are not eligible for the Journalism Honors Program.

                       

VIII.    HONORS PROGRAM

                        Honors in Journalism

            The Journalism Honors Program supports highly qualified Journalism majors who want to increase their expertise in contemporary journalism practices and analysis.  A student who successfully completes all the Honors Program requirements graduates “with honors in journalism” and is recognized individually at commencement.  Honors students get priority scheduling for Journalism courses and receive master’s degree-level  privileges at the University Library.

            Selection and Evaluation.  In order to be considered for the Journalism Honors Program, a student must: (a) be a declared Journalism major; (b) have completed 12 credits in JRL courses; (c) have a minimum 3.25 overall GPA and a minimum 3.50 journalism GPA; and (d) submit an application essay. Transfers can apply after they have completed one semester at the University. Coursework taken elsewhere can be submitted as part of the application but may not qualify for admission.

            Curriculum. In addition to the required courses for the major and for individual concentrations, honors students must take: one workshop at the 300 or 400 level; one course from AJRL 320 Media Law or AJRL 325 Media Ethics or AJRL 340 Global Perspectives on the News; AJRL 330 History of Journalism in the United States; AJRL 460Z Advanced Reporting; AJRL 420 Political Economy of the Mass Media; and AJRL 499 Senior Honors Project. 

            Graduating with Honors. In order to graduate with honors, a student must maintain a minimum 3.25 overall GPA and a minimum 3.50 journalism GPA in each semester of enrollment. Honors students may be put on a probationary status, and may not be allowed to finish the Honors program, if they fall below either one of the minimum GPAs, or get a C+ or below in any of the required Honors courses, or do not complete the Senior Project by the end of the semester in which they are graduating.

IX.       ADVISING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

            Advising

            During the course of three decades, the Journalism Program has established a solid reputation for giving students individual attention in the areas of curricular advising, placement in internships, and career planning. This strong tradition will continue for the Journalism major. An undergraduate majoring in Journalism will be assigned to a fulltime faculty member in the Program for advisement throughout the student’s career. In addition, faculty members in the Program are available to meet with students intending to declare Journalism as a major, or others interested in learning about the program.

 

 

class=Section3>

X.        LIST OF THE FOUR-YEAR SEQUENCES REQUIRED FOR COMPLETION OF THE B.A.     

            Reproduced below is a sample worksheet for a student enrolled in the Program’s concentration in Public Affairs Journalism. Following this worksheet is a list of required courses for each of the Program’s four concentrations.

 

 

JOURNALISM MAJOR WORKSHEET: PUBLIC AFFAIRS

 

 

Name: ______________________________________ ID: ____________________

First enrolled at UA: ____________________                    

Anticipated graduation: _________________

Major: ________________________________

Minor: ________________________________

                                                                                   

I. MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS – 12 credits

                                                                                        Sem        Grade       Credits

AJRL 100, Foundations of Journalism & Media Studies               ____         ____        ____

AJRL 200Z, Introduction to Reporting & News Writing               ____         ____        ____

AJRL 270, Information Strategies for Journalists                          ____         ____        ____

 

Choose ONE from:

AJRL 220, Visual Culture

AENG 202Z, Introduction to Studies in Rhetoric and Poetics

AENG 216, Traditional Grammar and Usage

ACOM 238, Introduction to Mass Communication

ASOC, Mass Media

 

Selection: ________________________________                   ____          ____        ____

 

 

II. CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS– 12 credits

 

Concentration:  Public Affairs Journalism

AJRL 480Z, Public Affairs Journalism                             ____          ____        ____

Choose TWO from:

AJRL 350, Journalistic Interviewing

AJRL 366Z, Magazine Article Writing

AJRL 460Z, Advanced Reporting and News Writing

AJRL 465Z, Opinion Writing

AJRL 475, Topics in Journalism

 

Selection: ________________________________                   ____          ____        ____

Selection: ________________________________                   ____          ____        ____

 

Choose ONE from:

AJRL 220, Visual Culture

AJRL 320, Media Law

AJRL 325, Media Ethics

AJRL 330, History of Journalism

AJRL 340, Global Perspectives on the News

 

AJRL 410, Images of Journalism in Film

AJRL 420, Political Economy of the Mass Media

AJRL 475Z, Special Topics in Journalism

AJRL 495, Internship in Journalism (3-6 credits)

AJRL 497, Independent Study in Journalism

AJRL 499, Senior Honors Project

Selection: _________________________________                 ____          ____        ____

III. JOURNALISM ELECTIVES: 6 credits

(At least 3 must be from AJRL 220, 320, 325, 330, 340, 410, 420, or 475)

 

Selection: _________________________________                 ____          ____        ____

Selection: _________________________________                 ____          ____        ____

 

 

IV. EXTERNAL CURRICULAR REQUIREMENT: 6 credits

 

Choose 6 credits from another department or program. Your selections must be approved by your Journalism Advisor or the Director of the Journalism Program

Selection: __________________________________               ____          ____        ____

Selection __________________________________                           ____          ____        ____

 

                                                                                                     TOTAL CREDITS: _________

 

 

 

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOURNALISM CONCENTRATION

 

 

12 Credits Required:

AJRL 100, Foundations of Journalism and Media Studies

AJRL 200Z, Introduction to Reporting and News Writing

AJRL 270, Information Strategies for Journalists

AJRL 480Z, Public Affairs Journalism

 

 6 credits from:

AJRL 350, Journalistic Interviewing

AJRL 366Z, Magazine Article Reporting and Writing

AJRL 460Z, Advanced Reporting and News Writing

AJRL 465Z, Opinion Writing

AJRL 475, Topics in Journalism

 

3 credits from:

AJRL 220, Visual Culture

AENG 202Z, Introduction to Studies in Rhetoric and Poetics

AENG 216, Traditional Grammar and Usage

ACOM 238, Introduction to Mass Communication

ASOC 255, Mass Media

 

 3 credits from a non-workshop course at the 300 or 400 levels, and 6 credits of electives from JRL courses.

 

 6 credits from non-JRL courses, as approved by Advisor or Director of Journalism.

 

TOTAL:          36 CREDITS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, MEDICINE (STEM) JOURNALISM CONCENTRATION

 

 

15 credits required:

AJRL 100, Foundations of Journalism and Media Studies

AJRL 200Z, Introduction to Reporting and News Writing

AJRL 270, Information Strategies for Journalists

AJRL 370Z, Reporting on Science and Technology

AJRL 470Z. Advanced Reporting on Science and Technology

 

 3 credits from:

AJRL 350, Journalistic Interviewing

AJRL 366Z, Magazine Article Reporting and Writing

AJRL 465Z, Opinion Writing

AJRL 480Z, Public Affairs Journalism

AJRL 475Z, Topics in Journalism

 

3 credits from:

AJRL 220, Visual Culture

AENG 202Z, Introduction to Studies in Rhetoric and Poetics

AENG 216, Traditional Grammar and Usage

ACOM 238, Introduction to Mass Communication

ASOC 255, Mass Media

 

 3 credits from a non-workshop course at the 300 or 400 levels, and 6 credits of electives from JRL courses.

 

 6 credits from non-JRL courses, as approved by Advisor or Director of Journalism.

 

TOTAL:          36 CREDITS

 

 

 

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR VISUAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA JOURNALISM CONCENTRATION

 

 

9 credits required:

AJRL 100, Foundations of Journalism and Media Studies

AJRL 200Z, Introduction to Reporting and News Writing

AJRL 270, Information Strategies for Journalists

 

 12 credits from:

AJRL 220, Visual Culture

AJRL 390Z, Digital Media Workshop I: Web Publishing

AJRL 392Z, Digital Media Workshop II: Desk-top Publishing

AJRL 380, Photojournalism

AJRL 385, Broadcast Journalism

AJRL 490Z, E-zine: Online Magazine Workshop

 

3 credits from:

AJRL 220, Visual Culture

AENG 202Z, Introduction to Studies in Rhetoric and Poetics

AENG 216, Traditional Grammar and Usage

ACOM 238, Introduction to Mass Communication

ASOC 255, Mass Media

 

 3 credits from a non-workshop course at the 300 or 400 levels, and 3 credits of electives from JRL courses.

 

 6 credits from non-JRL courses, as approved by Advisor or Director of Journalism.

 

TOTAL:          36 CREDITS

 

 

 

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GENERAL JOURNALISM CONCENTRATION

 

 

9 credits required:

AJRL 100, Foundations of Journalism and Media Studies

AJRL 200Z, Introduction to Reporting and News Writing

AJRL 270, Information Strategies for Journalists

 

9 credits from:

AJRL 308Z, Narrative and Descriptive Journalism

AJRL 350, Journalistic Interviewing

AJRL 366Z, Magazine Article Reporting and Writing

AJRL 460Z, Advanced Reporting and News Writing

 

3 credits from:

AJRL 355Z, Public Relations Writing

AJRL 385, Broadcast Journalism

AJRL 490Z, E-zine: Online Magazine Journalism

 

3 credits from:

AJRL 220, Visual Culture

AENG 202Z, Introduction to Studies in Rhetoric and Poetics

AENG 216, Traditional Grammar and Usage

ACOM 238, Introduction to Mass Communication

ASOC 255, Mass Media

 

 3 credits from a non-workshop course at the 300 or 400 levels, and 3 credits of electives from JRL courses.

6 credits from non-JRL courses, as approved by Advisor or Director of Journalism.

 

TOTAL:          36 CREDITS

 

XI.       EVALUATION OF THE PROPOSAL IN RELATION TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS

 

            The University at Albany Journalism major will become the first B.A.-granting journalism program at any of the four University Centers. It will put New York in the ranks of other Eastern and New England states whose flagship public universities offer a B.A. in Journalism. All of the major state universities in the East, from Penn State and Rutgers to UMass and Maine, offer a journalism major. The only exceptions to this practice are New York and Vermont. A world center for media and culture, New York State is long overdue for providing a journalism major at one of its University Centers.

            Stony Brook University offers the closest approximation to the UAlbany Journalism Program, but the SBU 18-credit minor in the English Department presents a more limited range of courses–9 courses at SBU, compared to the current UAlbany Journalism minor’s 25 courses and the proposed major’s 31 courses. SBU students appear to be limited in their course selection to the 18 credits required for the minor, while UAlbany students have a far wider range of courses to choose among. (See Appendix A for a chart showing how the UAlbany Proposal for a B.A. in Journalism compares to other majors, minors, and course offerings at SUNY University Centers and SUNY University Colleges.)

            Neither Binghamton University nor the University at Buffalo offers as many courses as even the limited program at Stony Brook. The English Department at Binghamton includes five courses as part of its concentration in Rhetoric, Expository Writing and Journalism: Introduction to Journalism, Newspaper Editing, Sports Writing, Freelance Magazine Writing, and Topics. UBuffalo’s bachelor’s degree in communication, in its School of Informatics, accepts 4-5 cross-listed sections from the English Department that have Journalism topics, but the B.A. does not provide a specialization in journalism (as it does, for example, with a Certificate in Public Relations/Advertising).

            Six of twelve SUNY University Colleges (excluding Empire State) have outright Journalism majors, and some others provide a limited specialization or a journalism track within an English or Communication department. None of the Colleges provides the concentrations that UAlbany is proposing. These Colleges overlook interdisciplinary study and lack the resources available at a major Ph.D.-granting university located in the State Capital.

            The major public university in almost every state throughout the country offers Journalism as a major–and, quite often, it is a major within a large, respected school that contains departments in all the major media. By creating its own major, UAlbany will be joining what historically has been recognized as not only a benefit but also a necessity for a state’s leading public university. It is time for the State University of New York to rise to the challenge of presenting New Yorkers with a center of excellence devoted to developing qualified journalists and citizens educated in media studies. 

 

XII.           RESOURCES AND PROJECTED GROWTH

      Resources

      The Journalism Program will continue to draw from the good variety of resources that have helped it grow to the point where the University now seeks to develop a major in the field. For example, the Program uses the Science Library’s Digital Media Laboratory at least 12 hours a week in Fall and Spring, and 6 hours in the Summer, for classes such as Introduction to Reporting, Photojournalism, Web Publishing, Desk-top Publishing, and the E-Zine: Online Magazine Workshop. Several of the new courses proposed for the major can be assigned to the media lab. As part of the English Department, Journalism receives priority scheduling for this important space. This will status will continue even as ITS assumes authority for maintaining and upgrading the Lab beginning in Fall 2006.  This Proposal assumes the Program’s use of the Lab will not increase dramatically in the immediate future, but will do so gradually as the major grows.  With limited additions to the software already available to students minoring in Journalism, the media lab could become the functioning testbed for an “electronic” newsroom. This will be particularly useful to students concentrating in Visual and Digital Media. 

            The major will not require new resources for its student publications, since its two major publications now exist online. The E-zine workshop publishes a Web magazine three times during the Spring semester (http://albany.collegepublisher.com). Student writing also appears as part of the Program’s own Webpage (www.albany.edu/journalism). The Journalism faculty has had only brief discussions about expanding the Program’s publishing ventures, and these new initiatives would be developed only as the major establishes itself with a cohort of students, at different levels, who are able to staff these publications. In all likelihood, these new publications would appear online (as a bi-weekly newspaper, for example, or as a regularly-published magazine). This is a great benefit when considering the difficulties, and costs, of publishing in traditional ink-and-paper-based formats.

            The Program has enjoyed close ties with such publicly-recognized University entities as the New York State Writers Institute (in fact, the Program has co-sponsored many speakers with the Institute). Recently, it has developed an active, interdisciplinary programming initiative with the Center for Humanities, Art, and TechnoScience (CHATS). The new major requires no new funds or personnel to continue these relationships. Nor are additional resources required to develop working relationships with the many other University programs that are natural partners for joint events, cross-listing courses, and so on.

            The fulltime teaching faculty is sufficient to begin the major, but only if part-time faculty members (adjuncts, or, as the Program calls them, Professional Media Lecturers) continue to play a vital role in bringing the most up-to-date practices and ideas into the classroom. If the Journalism major proves to be as popular as early signs indicate, then the Program might have to hire 2-3 additional adjuncts per semester.

            Clerical support for the Program has traditionally been drawn from the English Department staff, and while it is impossible to predict enrollments or the numbers of declared majors, at some point the Program may require a part-time clerical worker dedicated to its special needs. It is important to point out that the Journalism Program is playing a significant role in the development efforts of the College of Arts and Sciences.  Members of the faculty, as well as the Assistant Dean for Development, are working to identify potential sources of funding for a wide range of activities. These include endowing one distinguished and several visiting professorships, enhancing technological resources, offering special programs or lecture series, recruiting talented students, and other academic initiatives. Faculty members recognize that these efforts are crucial to the major’s success, and they are committed to aiding this process as fully as possible. They also appreciate how these developmental initiatives are being bolstered by the Dean’s creation of a Journalism Advisory Board (see Section XIII).  In addition, the Program maintains two University of Albany Foundation accounts, one for the Program itself, and one for the Ronald Schafer Memorial Fund Scholarship, which presents a scholarship to the outstanding graduating senior in Journalism each year.

 

XIII.    ALUMNI AND PROFESSIONAL NETWORKS  

            Journalism Advisory Board

            In 2004, Dr. Joan Wick-Pelletier, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, created a Journalism Advisory Board. Meeting occasionally, the Board advises the Dean on strategic planning, fund-raising, and other long-range initiatives. This Board of distinguished media professionals and other senior advisors includes the following members:

Robert J. Bellafiore '82, Partner, Eric Mower Associates

 

Edward Dague (Chair) News Anchor Emeritus, WRGB-TV (Retired)

 

Stewart F. Hancock, III, Publisher, Eagle Newspapers

 

Diane Kennedy, President, New York Newspaper Publishers Association

 

Marc Z. Kramer '77, Senior Vice President for Circulation, The New York Times

 

Susan Pinkus '68 (School of Business), Director of Polling, The Los Angeles Times

 

Michelle Rea, Executive Director, New York Press Association

 

Rex Smith, Vice President and Editor, Albany Times Union

 

Monte Trammer, Publisher, Elmira Star-Gazette

 

            Professional Networks

            In addition to working closely with the Dean’s advisory Board, the Program is increasing its efforts to build a database of alumni, many of whom have expressed their strong support for the plan to create a major at the University. Alumni, and other friends of the Program and supporters of its plans to develop a B.A. in Journalism have demonstrated their support in significant ways--by offering to appear in classes, meeting with students and recent graduates interested in career advice, and by contributing $615 in the past year to the University at Albany Foundation Account for the Journalism Program.

 

XIV.    FACULTY

            Fulltime Faculty                    

 

Thomas Bass, Ph.D., Professor, Journalism and English

            Thomas Bass is a prolific and internationally-recognized author of books and magazine articles. His five books have been widely praised, and his latest, The Predictors (Henry Holt, 1999) was serialized in The New Yorker, translated into a half-dozen foreign languages, and optioned for the movies. His other books are Vietnamerica: The War Comes Home (Soho Press, 1996); Reinventing the Future (Addison-Wesley, 1994), Camping with the Prince and Other Tales of Science in Africa (Houghton Mifflin, 1990), and The Eudaemonic Pie (Houghton Mifflin, 1985). The last of these was designated a “Notable Book of the Year” by The New York Times Book Review. Mr. Bass is currently working on a feature-length article for The New Yorker magazine and a related book project on Vietnam.

            He has written for The New Yorker, Wired, The New York Times, Smithsonian, Audubon, Discover, Pacific News Service, Technology Review, The Times of London, and other publications. His work has been featured on Good Morning America, PBS, CNN, NPR, BBC, Channel 4, and other venues.

            Former Director of the Hamilton College in New York City Program on “Media in the Digital Age,” Mr. Bass teaches advanced journalism and magazine writing, new media culture, science journalism, contemporary issues in journalism, and cultural studies. He joined the Journalism Program in January 2005.

            He holds a Ph.D. in the History of Consciousness from the University of California at Santa Cruz, and an A.B. Honors Degree in the Humanities from the University of Chicago. 

                       

 

William Rainbolt, Ph.D., Director, Journalism Program; Lecturer, English

            William Rainbolt is Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany, where he has taught since 1984. He specializes in various genres of journalistic writing, including news reporting, feature writing, and opinion writing, and he teaches a variety of contextual courses in media and cultural history, images of journalism in film, and media ethics. He has also taught at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Siena College, and Rowan University in New Jersey. 

            Mr. Rainbolt worked on daily newspapers in Texas and New Jersey as a reporter, feature writer, copy editor, sports writer, and sports editor. He is a published novelist (the historical novel Moses Rose, 1996) and freelance writer who has published in The New York Times, The Writer, Editor & Publisher, New York State Bar News, Journalism Educator, and other publications. He has been a writing and media consultant for numerous organizations. His monograph, The History of Underground Communications in Russian Since the Seventeenth Century, was published by R&E Research Associates (1979).

            He holds a Ph.D. in American Cultural History from the University at Albany, an

M.A. in Journalism from the University of North Texas, and a B.A. in Journalism and Russian Studies from the University of Maryland’s University College.            

 

 

Nancy Roberts, Ph.D., Professor, Journalism and Communication

            Formerly the Director of Undergraduate Studies at the University of Minnesota School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Nancy Roberts is a leading national figure in journalism history scholarship. She has written, co-authored, or edited five books in the field, including the principal general-survey textbook used by hundreds of journalism programs around the country, The Press in America: An Interpretive History of the Mass Media, 9th ed. (2000). Her books as author or editor include American Catholic Pacifism: The Influence of Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement (1996); American Peace Writers, Editors, and Periodicals: A Dictionary (1991); “As Ever, Gene”: The Letters of Eugene O’Neill to George Jean Nathan, (1987); and Dorothy Day and the “Catholic Worker” (1984). She is former President of the American Journalism Historians Association and former Head of the History Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

            Ms. Roberts has been a freelance writer and on-assignment writer for publications such as Commonweal, The Christian Science Monitor, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Minneapolis Tribune, The Providence Journal, U.S. Art, and other publications, including trade magazines. Her teaching specialties include magazine writing and editing, literary journalism, arts reporting, and media history and ethics. Lecturing on “Literary Aspects of Journalism” and supervising the Journalism Program’s interns, she joined the faculty in Fall 2004. 

            She holds a Ph.D. in Mass Communication from the University of Minnesota, an M.A. in American Civilization from Brown University, and a B.A. in History from Swarthmore College. 

 

Professional Media Lecturers

 

(Not all Lecturers teach each semester)

 

Sebrina Barrett, Attorney, New York State Court of Appeals

J.D., Southern Illinois University; B.S., University of Missouri

            Experience: Media Law, Farm Journal, Columbia (Mo.) Missourian.

 

Elizabeth Benjamin, Political Reporter, Albany Times Union

M.A., Columbia University, B.A., University of Rochester

            Experience: Albany Times Union, Newsday, Newport (R.I.) This Week.

 

Richard D'Errico, Reporter, The Business Review

M.A., Empire State College, B.S., Northeastern University

            Experience: The Business Review, Associated Press, The Boston Globe, The

            Journal News (White Plains), Middletown (N.Y.) Times Herald-Record, Schenectady Daily Gazette, Amsterdam Recorder.

 

Dennis Gaffney, Freelance Journalist

B.A., Wesleyan University

            Experience: Freelance writer and editor, The New York Times, The Christian

            Science Monitor, Vanguard, The Boston Globe, The Progressive, Boston Phoenix,

            Antiques Roadshow (PBS), American Experience (PBS), Secrets of Lost Empires,

            Nova (PBS), others.                

 

David Guistina, News Producer / Director of Special Projects, WAMC Radio

M.A., University at Albany; B.A., Utica College of Syracuse University

            Experience: WAMC Radio, WNYT-TV news producer, WUUU/WRNY Radio.

 

Mike Hendricks, Editor, The Business Review

B.A., University of Michigan                                                                                        

            Experience: The Business Review, Associated Press, Middletown Times Herald-

            Record, Wayne (Mich.) Daily Eagle.

 

Mike Hill, Reporter, The Associated Press

B.A. SUNY Geneseo

            Experience: The Associated Press, Upstate Bureau and State Capitol Bureau.

 

Ronald Kermani, Vice President for Public Affairs, New York State Higher Education

Services Corp. 

B.S., Syracuse University

            Experience: NYS Higher Education Services Corp., Civil Service Employees Association, NYS Trial Lawyers Association, NYS Public Employees Federation, Albany Times Union.           

 

Stephen Leon, Publisher and Editor, Metroland

M.S.J., Northwestern University, B.A., Princeton

            Experience: Metroland, Young & Rubicam, freelance writing.

 

Claudia Ricci, Educational Opportunities Program Advisor and Faculty Member, University at Albany

Ph.D., University at Albany; M.J., University of California at Berkeley; B.A. Brown

University

Experience: The Wall Street Journal, Chicago Sun-Times, freelance writer and novelist.

 

Katherine Van Acker, Freelance Photographer.

B.S., Montana State University

            Experience: Albany Times Union, The Associated Press, Elizabeth (N.J.) Daily

            Journal, Museum of the Rockies, freelance photographer.

 

Mike Virtanen, Reporter, The Associated Press

M.A., University at Albany; B.A., Colgate University

Experience: The Associated Press, Albany Times Union, Travel Weekly

(Washington, D.C.), Utica Observer-Dispatch/Daily Press, Amsterdam Recorder.

 

David Washburn, Web Operations Manager, Time Warner Cable. 

M.S., Syracuse University, B.S., Lyndon State College.

            Experience: Time Warner Cable, Albany Times Union, The Saratogian (Saratoga       Springs), Bennington (Vt.) Banner.

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX A

 

  CHART COMPARING THE UALBANY PROPOSAL TO OTHER SUNY PROGRAMS

 

SUNY UNIVERSITY CENTERS & UNIVERSITY COLLEGES

 

 

 

THE UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY PROPOSED B.A. IN JOURNALISM

Academic Requirements

Concentrations

 

 

 

36 credits, distributed as:

30 credits in JRL courses

6 credits in non-JRL courses

 

 

 

Public Affairs

Science, Technology, Environment, Medicine

Visual and Digital Media

General Journalism

 

 

 

 

 

See the following pages for a comparison of the UAlbany Journalism Major to other Programs at SUNY University Centers and SUNY University Colleges

 

 

 

CURRENT OFFERINGS IN JOURNALISM AT SUNY UNIVERSITY CENTERS

Univ. Center

College

Department

Major

Minor

Details & Comments

 

ALBANY

 

Arts & Sciences

 

English

 

No

 

Yes

 

18 cr. minimum, but many students take more, with courses in a wide variety of areas; 12-13 sections offered each semester

 

BINGHAMTON

 

Harpur College of Arts & Sciences

 

English, General Literature, & Rhetoric

 

No

 

No

 

5 courses in the “Rhetoric, Expository Writing, & Journalism” area of Eng-Gen Lit-Rhet: courses in Introduction, Special Topics, Newspaper Editing, Freelance Magazine Writing, & Sports Writing

 

BUFFALO

 

Arts & Sciences

 

 

 

 

Informatics

 

 

 

Informatics

 

English

 

 

 

 

 

Communication

 

 

 

Media Study

 

No

 

 

 

 

 

No

 

 

 

No

 

No

 

 

 

 

 

No

 

 

 

No

 

Usually, 4-5 sections a semester offered, with courses in Introduction, Literary Journalism, Feature Writing, Opinion Writing, & Rhetoric & Human Rights (Fall ’04)

 

Eng Dept’s Introduction course cross-listed with Com to satisfy a Com writing requirement

 

Concentrations in Production (digital arts, robotics, virtual reality, film, video, documentary), or Critical Studies

 

STONY BROOK

 

Arts & Sciences

 

English

 

No

 

Yes

 

An 18-credit minimum, but students are limited to that number (unlike UAlbany). Very traditional courses in Intro, Feature Writing, Reporting, Magazine Writing, News Editing, Investigative Reporting, and Computer-Assisted Reporting

CURRENT OFFERINGS IN JOURNALISM AT SUNY UNIVERSITY COLLEGES

Univ. College

College

Department

Major

Minor

Details & Comments

 

BROCKPORT

 

Arts & Performance

 

Communication

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

1 of 3 tracks in Communication, with Broadcasting & Com Studies; 27 credits required in traditional courses, with overlap among Broadcasting & Com Studies; Public Relations and Internet/Web Publishing also offered

 

BUFFALO STATE

 

Arts & Humanities

 

Communication

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Concentrations in Broadcasting (radio or TV production), Journalism (broadcast news, or print and online journalism), Public Communication (PR, advertising, organizational Com), and Com Studies; 39 credits; there is an Electronic Journalism component within the Broadcasting concentration

 

CORTLAND

 

Arts & Sciences

 

Communication Studies

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Concentrations within Com Studies in Journalism, Electronic Communication, Media Production, PR & Adv, Organizational Com, Health Com, Criticism & Culture; 21 credits in “core” courses, 12 in concentration, 3 in electives

 

FREDONIA

Arts & Humanities

 

 

English

 

No

 

Yes

 

21-credit minimum, with 15 required in Journalism

 

GENESEO

 

 

 

Communication

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

1 of 2 tracks for major, along with Interpersonal/Organizational Communication; Intro course can be Print or Radio/TV writing; other selections include International Communication, Media Management, Television News, News & Specialized Writing, Persuasion & Social Influence

 

NEW PALTZ

 

Liberal Arts & Sciences

 

Communication & Media

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

1 of 5 concentrations, along with PR, Media Management, TV/Radio Production, and Communication; 40 credits (but several courses earn 4 credits)

 

OLD WESTBURY

 

Arts & Sciences

 

American Studies

 

No

 

Yes

 

The minor is in the “Media and Communications” component of the AS Department; 24 credits, with some writing but more in media production; the AS and Visual Arts Departments also offer a joint minor in Media Design

 

ONEONTA

 

Fine Arts & Humanities

 

Communication Arts

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Production Track (B.S.) and Critical Analysis Track (B.A.),  oriented toward R/TV/Film

 

OSWEGO

 

Arts & Sciences

 

Journalism

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

36 credits + “Learning Agreement”; 8 courses required, including 5 practica, and several electives offered in R/TV, writing, information science, hypermedia/multimedia design

 

PLATTSBURG

 

Arts & Sciences

 

 

 

 

 

Journalism

 

 

 

 

 

Communication

 

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

41 credits, B.A. or B.S., depending on amount of production coursework; magazine journalism “option”

 

41-46 credits, B.A. or B.S., heavily oriented toward R/TV production, digital media, some Broadcast Journalism

 

POTSDAM

 

 

 

 

Arts & Sciences

 

English & Communication

 

No

 

Yes

 

 

19-21 credits for minor

 

PURCHASE

 

Liberal Arts & Sciences

 

The program appears to be one of several free-standing programs in the School of Humanities, which is apparently part of LAS

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Apparently, 38 credits, 23 drawn from Journalism, and 15 from approved list of selected courses in Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, and Interdisciplinary Studies

 

Prepared August 2004, William Rainbolt, Ph.D., Director, Journalism Program, University at Albany

 

APPENDIX B  -  BULLETIN COPY FOR THE JOURNALISM PROGRAM

 

 

JOURNALISM PROGRAM

 

Faculty

 

Professors

 

   Thomas A. Bass, Ph.D.

      University of California, Santa Cruz

 

   Nancy Roberts, Ph.D.

      University of Minnesota

 

Lecturers

 

   William Rainbolt, Ph.D.

      University at Albany

 

Adjunct Faculty

 

   Sebrina Barrett, J.D.

      Southern Illinois University

 

   Elizabeth Benjamin, M.A.,

      Columbia University

 

   Richard D=Errico, M.A.,

      Empire State College

 

   Dennis Gaffney, B.A.,

      Wesleyan University

 

   David Guistina, M.A.,

      University at Albany

 

   Mike Hendricks, B.A.,

      University of Michigan

 

   Mike Hill, B.A.,

      SUNY Geneseo

 


   Ronald Kermani, B.S.,

      Syracuse University

 

   Stephen Leon, M.S.J.,

      Northwestern University

 

   Claudia Ricci, Ph.D.,

      University at Albany

 

   Katherine Van Acker, B.S.,

      Montana State University

 

   Mike Virtanen, M.A.,

      University at Albany

 

   David Washburn, M.S.,

      Syracuse University           

 

 

The Journalism Program offers a wide array of courses in nonfiction writing, media analysis and production, and the history and global context of journalism in the 21st century. The Program also offers workshops that concentrate on student writing and editing, as well as courses that address the legal and ethical issues confronting journalists today.

 

The Program’s courses and internships prepare students for work as journalists, freelance writers, TV producers, broadcasters, webcasters, editors, magazine and book publishers, copy writers, and public advocates. The Journalism Program also provides excellent preparation for students who wish to pursue careers in related fields, such as law, government, history, educational policy, teaching, and graduate study.

 

While offering survey courses that review the history and development of journalism from its early days in print to its new electronic formats, the Program also gives students hands-on experience with writing newspaper and magazine articles and producing webzines and other electronic forms of journalism. Our internship program encourages students to work at television and radio stations, newspapers and magazines, publishing houses, governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations, and public relations firms.

 

Students may choose Journalism as either a major or minor, and -- space permitting -- our courses are open to undergraduates in all fields. Journalism majors may apply for admission to the Honors Program. Students majoring in Journalism are strongly encouraged to study at least one foreign language.

 


The program offers four concentrations in Journalism. Students studying in the Program will select courses from one or more of these special areas of interest. The four concentrations available to students working toward a B.A. in Journalism include:

 

- Public Affairs Journalism

- Science and Technology Journalism

- Visual and Digital Media

- General Journalism

           

            The last of these is a concentration which might include topics such as Business and Economics Reporting, Arts Reporting, and Literary Journalism.

 

 

Degree Requirements for the Major in Journalism

 

            The requirements for a Journalism major will be fulfilled by a minimum of 30

credits in AJRL courses, plus 6 credits in another department or program, as approved by

the Director of the Journalism Program or the student’s Journalism advisor. Beyond this

6-credit requirement, courses in other departments or programs will not be accepted as

part of the Journalism Major except as approved by the Director of the Journalism

Program or the student’s Journalism advisor.

 

            Of the required 30 credits in AJRL courses: 9 credits are required at the 100-200

level: AJRL 100, AJRL 200Z, and ARL 270Z, and 3 credits of electives chosen from

AJRL 220, AENG 202Z, AENG 216, ACOM 238, or ASOC 255. 

 

            At the 300-400 levels, 18 credits are required: 9 credits in a student’s chosen

concentration from the four offered by the Journalism Program, 3 credits in a non-

workshop AJRL course, and 6 credits of AJRL electives.  At least 6 credits must be at the

400 level.

 

            For students in the Public Affairs Journalism concentration, 9 credits are required:

AJRL 480Z; 6 credits from AJRL 350, AJRL 366Z, AJRL 460Z, AJRL 475, or AJRL 465Z; 3 credits in a non-workshop AJRL course at the 300 or 400 levels, and 6 credits of electives in AJRL courses.

            For students in the STEM (Science-Technology-Environment-Medicine)

concentration, 9 credits are required: AJRL 370Z, AJRL 470Z; 3 credits from AJRL 350,

AJRL 366Z, AJRL 465, or AJRL 480Z; 3 credits from a non-workshop

AJRL course; and 6 credits of electives from AJRL courses.

 

            For students in the Visual & Digital Media concentration, 12 credits are required:

AJRL 220, AJRL 390Z or AJRL 392Z, AJRL 380, and AJRL 490; 3 credits from non-

workshop AJRL courses; and 3 credits of electives from AJRL courses.

 

            For students in the General Journalism concentration, 9 credits are required:

AJRL 308Z or AJRL 366Z, AJRL 350, and AJRL 460Z; 3 credits from AJRL 355Z,

AJRL 385, or AJRL 490Z; 3 credits from non-workshop AJRL courses; and 3 credits of

electives from AJRL courses.

 

 

Honors Program

 

            Outstanding students are encouraged to consider the Journalism Honors Program, which is designed to give them the opportunity to work closely with members of the faculty on research, writing, and other media projects. The Journalism Honors Program supports highly qualified Journalism majors who want to increase their expertise in contemporary journalism practices and analysis.  A student who successfully completes all the Honors Program requirements graduates “with honors in journalism” and is recognized individually at commencement. Honors students get priority scheduling for Journalism courses and receive master’s degree-level privileges at the University Library..

            Selection and Evaluation.  In order to be considered for the Journalism Honors Program, a student must: (a) be a declared Journalism major; (b) have completed 12 credits in JRL courses; (c) have a minimum 3.25 overall GPA and a minimum 3.50 journalism GPA; and (d) submit an application essay. Transfers can apply after they have completed one semester at the University. Coursework taken elsewhere can be submitted as part of the application but may not qualify.

            Curriculum. In addition to the required courses for the major and for individual concentrations, honors students must take: one workshop at the 300 or 400 level; one course from AJRL 320 Media Law or AJRL 325 Media Ethics or AJRL 340 Global Perspectives on the News; AJRL 330 History of Journalism in the United States; AJRL 460Z Advanced Reporting; AJRL 420 Political Economy of the Mass Media; and AJRL 499 Senior Honors Project. 

Graduating with Honors. In order to graduate with honors, a student must maintain a minimum 3.25 overall GPA and a minimum 3.50 journalism GPA in each semester of enrollment. Honors students may be put on a probationary status, and may not be allowed to finish the Honors program, if they fall below either one of the minimum GPAs, or get a C+ or below in any of the required Honors courses, or do not complete the Senior Project by the end of the semester in which they are graduating.

 

 

Courses


 

AJRL 100, Foundations of Journalism

Introduction to journalism and mass media. This course will help students become more informed about media and introduce them to the major issues in journalism and media studies. Topics range from media history and the economic structure of the industry to broad questions about the impact of media on individuals and society. Also addressed will be ethical and legal issues related to media practices in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, the internet, advertising, and public relations.   

 

AJRL 200Z, Introduction to Reporting and News Writing

In this introductory workshop, students develop the skills of practicing reporters and news writers. They acquire the news judgment that allows them to identify what should be reported and written about, and they learn the fundamental forms of journalistic writing. Students familiarize themselves with journalistic sources and evaluate their reliability. They practice editing and revising and learn to use The Associated Press Stylebook.

 

AJRL 220, Visual Culture

The course explores the increasing predominance of visual media in contemporary life. It examines how traditional narrative forms of story-telling are being replaced by visual forms of story-telling in art, photography, film, television, the internet, video games, anime, graphic novels, and advertising. Particular attention will be paid to the global flow of visual culture and the technologies that facilitate these cultural exchanges. Readings include works by Walter Benjamin, Jean Baudrillard, Arjun Appadurai, Laura Mulvey, Susan Sontag, and others.

 

AJRL 240, Information Strategies for Journalists (Workshop)

Students will work to improve their information literacy by learning how to identify and evaluate sources of information, including personal interviews, archival material, public records, and printed and electronic sources. Students will learn how to marshal statistical and numerical evidence while writing about complex issues of public import. While developing their critical and interpretive skills, students will also explore the ethical and legal issues involved in using–or misusing–information.

 

AJRL 300Z, Journalism for Non-Majors

For students interested, but not necessarily planning to major, in journalism, this course offers an introduction to news, feature writing, opinion writing, broadcast journalism, web publishing, and related subjects. Students will write a variety of short assignments, some of them produced under deadline in the media classroom.

 

AJRL 308Z, Narrative and Descriptive Journalism

Students will explore a variety of journalistic styles, with an emphasis on compelling narrative and description, combined with the skillful use of quotes and dialogue. The class features intensive critiques of students’ work. A variety of formats will be studied: newspapers, magazines, non-fiction books, and online publications. Readings for the course include works by Janet Malcolm, Barbara Ehrenreich, Ellen Ullman, Mary Karr, Edward Abbey, Edmund Wilson, Michael Herr, and James Baldwin. Students submit weekly writing assignments and a final portfolio of edited work.  

 

 

 

AJRL 320, Media Law

The First Amendment remains a concept unique in the world. No discussion of media law in America would be complete without understanding our Constitutional guarantees to freedom of speech and of the press. At the same time–given the corporatization of modern media, conflicting regulatory demands, and global constraints on free speech–it is imperative that students understand the case law and legal precedents under which journalism is practiced. Topics include  the historical development of First Amendment rights and of the laws governing libel, privacy, confidentiality, public access to information, fair trials, broadcasting, copyright, anti-trust, pornography, and other pertinent issues.   

 

AJRL 325, Media Ethics

Students will explore the ethical dilemmas encountered by professional journalists. These revolve around conflicts of interest, differing interpretations of community standards, the right to privacy versus the public’s right to know, First Amendment guarantees of free speech, the constraints of corporate ownership, and evolving ideas of what constitutes acceptable journalistic practices. Students are strongly encouraged as a prerequisite to take one of the Philosophy Department courses listed as APHI 114L, APHI 115L, or APHI 212L.   

 

AJRL 330, History of Journalism in the United States

This course examines the development of journalism in the United States, emphasizing the role of the press as a social institution. Subjects covered include the function and purpose of the press, evolving definitions of news, changing interpretations of the First Amendment, and the ethical and legal dimensions of free speech. Also examined will be the social, economic, political, technological, and cultural forces that have shaped the practice of journalism today. 

 

AJRL 340, Global Perspectives on the News

This course provides a global perspective on news production and the distribution of media around the world. After studying the political and legal constraints under which international media operate–including the operating procedures of American journalists working as foreign correspondents–the course will explore topics including censorship, information warfare, internet piracy, the blogosphere, and conflicts between national interests and media technologies that are unconstrained by national borders. Readings include works by Marshall McLuhan, Umberto Eco, Benjamin Barber, Susan George, and others.   

 

AJRL 355Z, Public Relations Writing

Students are introduced to the history of Public Relations, tracing its modern development in the twentieth century and current rise to political prominence. Topics to be discussed include branding, logos, packaging, and other corporate practices. Students will review the legal and ethical rules governing PR. Only after exploring how the goals of PR may be antithetical to those of journalism, will students be asked to produce a variety of writing samples, including advocacy journalism, press releases, speeches, position papers, web content, and other forms of PR. Some of this work, simulating crisis management, will be produced on deadline. 

 

 

AJRL 360Z, Intermediate Reporting and News Writing

Building on the techniques acquired in AJRL 200Z, students will develop their news instincts and hone their reporting and writing skills. Much of the class will be spent developing “live” stories–covering events, interviewing subjects, scrutinizing news sources, or handling a “beat.” Students will produce news articles and feature stories like those expected of professional reporters with a modicum of experience in the field.  

 

AJRL 366Z, Magazine Writing

This course gives students experience in conceptualizing, researching, writing, rewriting, and submitting for publication different types of articles that are found in magazines, webzines, and the features section of newspapers. Ethical issues and writer-editor relationships are also examined. Students write several articles of varying length and complete other assignments, such as writing query letters and analyzing magazine content.

 

AJRL 370Z, Reporting on Science and Technology

A foundations course in writing about science and technology–two forces that play an increasingly dominant role in modern life. Students will learn how to evaluate scientific claims and distinguish the relative importance of technological advances in fields ranging from computers and telecommunications to biotechnology, nano-scale research, and environmental studies. Ethical issues surrounding military research, patents, copyrights, and intellectual property will also be explored. Weekly reading and writing assignments.

 

AJRL 380, Photojournalism

Students develop the critical skills for evaluating and the technical skills for producing, editing, and publishing digital photographs in a variety of formats, including traditional newspapers, satellite transmissions from the field, and internet web sites. Students should have prior photographic experience and be able to demonstrate, through a portfolio of work, their readiness for the course. While developing their aesthetic and technical skills, students will critique each others’ photos in a workshop format. 

 

AJRL 385, Broadcast Journalism

Students will report, write, produce, air, and record a variety of television and radio news stories with a degree of professionalism resembling what might be found in local newscasts, whether they be short reports or longer, feature-length stories. Working individually or in groups, students will use analog and digital video technologies and recording devices to produce their stories.

 

AJRL 390Z, Digital Media Workshop I: Web Publishing

This workshop teaches the editing and design skills required to produce literary websites, webcasts, blogs, and other forms of online digital journalism. The class is taught as a hands-on workshop in a digital classroom. Students, working on individual and team projects, will produce digital media using a variety of tools, ranging from Photoshop and Flash to Dreamweaver and HTML.                               

 

AJRL 392Z, Digital Media Workshop II: Desk-top Publishing

This course develops the skills required for writing, editing, designing, and publishing on the web, primarily webzines and internet news sites. This hands-on workshop is taught in a digital media lab. Working individually and in teams, students will produce and publish three major media projects.

 

AJRL 410, Images of Journalism in Film

This course explores the depiction of American journalism and journalists in a variety of fictional films and selected works of prose. Students study the history of filmed representations of journalists; they also study the images that journalists have presented of themselves and their profession. The course does not involve journalistic reporting and writing, but it does require close analysis of films, attentive reading, participation in class discussion, and a willingness to explore.

 

AJRL 420, Political Economy of the Mass Media

The course examines the production, distribution, and consumption of media and how these social constraints shape the news, images, and cultural artifacts that surround us. Proceeding by case-study analyses of various cultural industries, including publishing, broadcasting, and other mass media, the course will examine topics including global marketing and branding, media corporatization, and other links between our cultural experience and the modern political economy. Readings of works by Herbert Schiller, Stuart and Elizabeth Ewen, Robert McChesney, Joseph Stiglitz, Katha Pollitt and others.

 

AJRL 460Z, Advanced Reporting and News Writing

After prior work in lower-level courses, students in this advanced workshop will develop their skills as investigative reporters and writers of news stories and articles that are thoroughly researched and compellingly written. Students may choose to write and rewrite one article throughout the semester or a cluster of articles on related subjects. Students are expected to develop a sense of journalistic tenacity and appreciation for applied research. They will learn how to develop a story through multiple drafts and how to produce articles that are noteworthy for their journalistic flair, emotional impact, or informative power. 

                       

AJRL 465Z, Opinion Writing

This workshop gives students experience in writing a variety of journalistic pieces normally found in the opinion sections of newspapers, magazines, and online sites. Among the types of articles students will produce are personal columns, movie and music reviews, and editorials. Students will also read widely among the best practitioners of opinion writing, from H.L. Mencken and Hunter Thompson to Maureen Dowd and Molly Ivins.

 

AJRL 468Z, Literary Journalism

This course requires students to read literary journalism and to write their own. Readings include works by Daniel Defoe, Charles Dickens, Samuel Clemens, Stephen Crane, Janet Flanner, Lillian Ross, Rebecca West, John Hersey, James Agee, Dorothy Day, Meridel LeSueur, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Tracy Kidder, and others. While reflecting on the relationship between journalism and literary fiction and nonfiction, students will complete bi-weekly writing assignments.

 

AJRL 470Z, Advanced Reporting on Science and Technology

The successor to 370Z, the introductory course on science writing and technology. Students will be expected to produce a sustained, well-researched and argued body of work on a scientific domain or domains of their choosing. Acceptable topics include computers and information, public health, medicine, biotechnology, nano-scale research, and environmental studies. Weekly reading and writing assignments, the latter sometimes consisting of outlines or drafts of longer work-in-progress. 

 

AJRL 475, Topics in Journalism

This course may be either an intensive skills-oriented workshop or a conceptual course on a topic in journalism that bears serious study. More than one section of the course may be offered in a semester.

 

AJRL 480Z, Public Affairs Journalism

The Capital District offers a unique laboratory for reporting on public affairs at all levels, from the local to the national. These include governmental affairs, but also judicial matters, relations between New York State and the State’s indigenous Indian tribes, and policy issues concerning medicine, technology, business, and education. Public affairs journalism is now part of a larger debate about the lengths to which journalists should go in hosting community events and creating an informed citizenry. Along with numerous writing assignments, students will engage in wide reading of journalists who have staked out positions in this debate and operated effectively as reporters or advocates in the public arena.                                 

 

AJRL 490Z, E-zine: Online Magazine Workshop

E-zines, defined here as magazines published on the World Wide Web, are flourishing in the rapidly expanding domain of electronic journalism. This now includes blogs, webcasts, internet news services, and other specialized sites. The workshop is devoted to publishing several issues of an online magazine, which will include articles, images, graphics, and other interactive features. Students will work in teams to do the reporting, writing, editing, layout, design, coding, and publishing of these web-based e-zines. 

 

AJRL 495, Internship in Journalism

The course is limited to Journalism majors and minors. Internships in a variety of media are offered for variable credit. The internship requires that students work on-site in a professional media organization, under the direct supervision of a qualified supervisor. A faculty supervisor will also design an academic component for the internship, based on readings, daily journals, and the writing of papers that analyze and reflect on the work experience. The faculty supervisor will meet regularly with interns, both individually and as a group. The Journalism Program Director will establish the specific requirements that must be fulfilled to receive credit for this course.

 

AJRL 497, Independent Study in Journalism

For variable credit (1-3), students in Journalism pursue an independent project under the supervision of a fulltime faculty member. A student might use this course to enhance a portfolio, gain expertise in journalistic practices, research a special topic, or complete work on a major assignment. An application to a faculty member is required. A written agreement outlining the goals and work to be completed during the independent study is also required. The course is limited to seniors with prior journalism experience, although they do not have to be a Journalism major or minor.

 

AJRL 499, Senior Honors Project in Journalism

Students will define, develop, research, and write or produce in electronic or visual form an individual project of serious merit. The project is intended to demonstrate the range of skills acquired during the student’s training in Journalism. The project should also demonstrate a nuanced understanding of the ethical and legal issues of the profession. Work on the project will be supervised by advanced arrangement with a faculty member. The decision on whether a student’s final project merits receiving Honors in Journalism will be made by the faculty of the Journalism Program.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX C  -  COURSE ACTION FORMS FOR THE JOURNALISM PROGRAM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 300Z

New:

AJRL 100

Credits:

   3

 

Course Title:

Foundations of Journalism and Media Studies

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Introduction to journalism and mass media. This course will help students become more informed about media and introduce them to the major issues in journalism and media studies. Topics range from media history and the economic structure of the industry to broad questions about the impact of media on individuals and society. Also addressed will be ethical and legal issues related to media practices in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, the internet, advertising, and public relations.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course, formerly taught at the 300 level, will now be redesigned and taught at the 100 level. 

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

William Rainbolt, Director/Journalism                                                                                          Michael K. Hill, Chair, English

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

X

New Course

Revision of:

 

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

 

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

 JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

 

New:

AJRL 200Z

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Introduction to Reporting and News Writing

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

In this introductory workshop, students develop the skills of practicing reporters and news writers. They acquire the news judgment that allows them to identify what should be reported and written about, and they learn the fundamental forms of journalistic writing. Students familiarize themselves with journalistic sources and evaluate their reliability. They practice editing and revising and learn to use The Associated Press Stylebook.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course is being offered as part of a new major in Journalism.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

 JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 364 / 365

New:

AJRL 220

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Visual Culture

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

The course explores the increasing predominance of visual media in contemporary life. It examines how traditional narrative forms of story-telling are being replaced by visual forms of story-telling in art, photography, film, television, the internet, video games, anime, graphic novels, and advertising. Particular attention will be paid to the global flow of visual culture and the technologies that facilitate these cultural exchanges. Readings include works by Walter Benjamin, Jean Baudrillard, Arjun Appadurai, Laura Mulvey, Susan Sontag, and others.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course was formerly offered under the Topics rubric AJRL 364 & 365.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

X

New Course

Revision of:

 

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

 

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

 JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

 

New:

AJRL 270

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Information Strategies for Journalists (Workshop)

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Students will work to improve their information literacy by learning how to identify and evaluate sources of information, including personal interviews, archival material, public records, and printed and electronic sources. Students will learn how to marshal statistical and numerical evidence while writing about complex issues of public import. While developing their critical and interpretive skills, students will also explore the ethical and legal issues involved in using—or misusing—information.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course is being offered as part of a new major in Journalism.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

 

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

X

Other:

  See below

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

 

New:

AJRL 300Z

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Journalism for Non-Majors

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

For students interested, but not necessarily planning to major, in journalism, this course offers an introduction to news, feature writing, opinion writing, broadcast journalism, web publishing, and related subjects. Students will write a variety of short assignments, some of them produced under deadline in the media classroom.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

Formerly taught as an introductory course for students intending to minor in Journalism, this course is now being offered to the general student body.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

 

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

 

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

X

Other:

  See below

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

 

New:

AJRL 308Z

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Narrative and Descriptive Journalism

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Students will explore a variety of journalistic styles, with an emphasis on compelling narrative and description, combined with the skillful use of quotes and dialogue. The class features intensive critiques of students’ work. A variety of formats will be studied: newspapers, magazines, non-fiction books, and online publications. Readings for the course include works by Janet Malcolm, Barbara Ehrenreich, Ellen Ullman, Mary Karr, Edward Abbey, Edmund Wilson, Michael Herr, and James Baldwin. Students submit weekly writing assignments and a final portfolio of edited work.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course is currently being taught in the Journalism curriculum.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 364/365

New:

AJRL 320

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Media Law

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

The First Amendment remains a concept unique in the world. No discussion of media law in America would be complete without understanding our Constitutional guarantees to freedom of speech and of the press. At the same time—given the corporatization of modern media, conflicting regulatory demands, and global constraints on free speech—it is imperative that students understand the case law and legal precedents under which journalism is practiced. Topics include the historical development of First Amendment rights and of the laws governing libel, privacy, confidentiality, public access to information, fair trials, broadcasting, copyright, anti-trust, pornography, and other pertinent issues.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course was formerly offered under the Topics rubric AJRL 364 & 365.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL364/365

New:

AJRL 325

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Media Ethics

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Students will explore the ethical dilemmas encountered by professional journalists. These revolve around conflicts of interest, differing interpretations of community standards, the right to privacy versus the public’s right to know, First Amendment guarantees of free speech, the constraints of corporate ownership, and evolving ideas of what constitutes acceptable journalistic practices. Students are strongly encouraged as a prerequisite to take one of the Philosophy Department courses listed as APHI 114L, APHI 115L, or APHI 212L.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course was formerly offered under the Topics rubric AJRL 364 & 365.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 365

New:

AJRL 330

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

History of Journalism in the United States

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

This course examines the development of journalism in the United States, emphasizing the role of the press as a social institution. Subjects covered include the function and purpose of the press, evolving definitions of news, changing interpretations of the First Amendment, and the ethical and legal dimensions of free speech. Also examined will be the social, economic, political, technological, and cultural forces that have shaped the practices of journalism today.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course is currently being taught in the Journalism curriculum under the Topics rubric AJRL 365.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 364 / 365

New:

AJRL 340

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Global Perspectives on the News

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

This course provides a global perspective on news production and the distribution of media around the world. After studying the political and legal constraints under which international media operate—including the operating procedures of American journalists working as foreign correspondents—the course will explore topics including censorship, information warfare, internet piracy, the blogsphere, and conflicts between national interests and the media technologies that are unconstrained by national borders. Readings include works by Marshall McLuhan, Umberto Eco, Benjamin Barber, Susan George, and others.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course was formerly offered under the topics rubric AJRL 364 & 365.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

 

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

 

Title

X

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

X

Other:

  See below

 

Department:

JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 350

New:

 

Credits:

3

 

Course Title:

Journalistic Interviewing

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Students in this course will gain experience in journalistic interviewing.  They will work on assignment in a variety of situations, including personal interviews, background interviews, cold calls, solicitations for comment, and repeat interviews to press for clarification or new information. Also discussed in the course are the ethics of journalistic interviewing and editing, as well as the legal issues involved in prior consent, release forms, taped interviews, and other journalistic practices. The course satisfies the Oral Discourse general education requirement.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

Prerequisites: a grade of B or higher in any AJRL course at the 100-, 200-, or 300-level, or permission of instructor. 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course is currently being taught in the Journalism curriculum.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 364Z / 365Z

New:

AJRL 355Z

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Public Relations Writing

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Students are introduced to the history of Public Relations, tracing its modern development in the twentieth century and current rise to political prominence. Topics to be discussed include branding, logos, packaging, and other corporate practices. Students will review the legal and ethical rules of governing PR. Only after exploring how the goals of PR may be antithetical to those of journalism, will students be asked to produce a variety of writing samples, including advocacy journalism, press releases, speeches, position papers, web content, and other forms of PR. Some of this work, simulating crisis management, will be produced on deadline.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course was formerly offered under the Topics rubric AJRL 364Z & 365Z.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

X

New Course

Revision of:

 

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

 

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

 

New:

AJRL 360Z

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Intermediate Reporting and News Writing

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Building on the techniques acquired in AJRL 200Z, students will develop their news instincts and hone their reporting and writing skills. Much of the class will be spent developing “live” stories—covering events, interviewing subjects, scrutinizing news sources, or handling a “beat.” Students will produce news articles and feature stories like those expected of professional reporters with a modicum of experience in the field.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course is being offered as part of a new major in Journalism.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

X

New Course

Revision of:

 

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

 

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

 

New:

AJRL 366Z

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Magazine Writing

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

This course gives students experience in conceptualizing, researching, writing, rewriting, and submitting for publication different types of articles that are found in magazines, webzines, and the features section of newspapers. Ethical issues and writer-editor relationships are also examined. Students write several articles of varying length and complete other assignments, such as writing query letters and analyzing magazine content.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course is being offered as part of a new major in Journalism.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

X

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 364Z / 365Z

New:

AJRL 370Z

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Reporting on Science and Technology

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

A foundations course in writing about science and technology—two forces that play an increasingly dominant role in modern life. Students will learn how to evaluate scientific claims and distinguish the relative importance of technological advances in fields ranging from computers and telecommunications to biotechnology, nano-scale research, and environmental studies. Ethical issues surrounding military research, patents, copyrights, and intellectual property will also be explored. Weekly reading and writing assignments.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course was formerly offered under the Topics rubric AJRL 364Z & 365Z.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

 

New Course

Revision of:

X

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

 

Title

X

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

AJRL 364Z / 365Z

New:

AJRL 380

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Photojournalism

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Students develop the critical skills for evaluating and the technical skills for producing, editing, and publishing digital photographs in a variety of formats, including traditional newspapers, satellite transmissions from the field, and internet web sites. While developing their aesthetic and technical skills, students will critique each others’ photos in a workshop format.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

Students should have prior photographic experience and be able to demonstrate, through a portfolio of work, their readiness for the course.

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course was formerly offered under the Topics rubric AJRL 364Z & 365Z.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

Approved by Chair(s) of Departments having cross-listed course(s) (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of College (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

Chair of Academic Programs Committee (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

Dean of Graduate (Undergraduate) Studies (PRINT NAME/SIGN)

Date

 

 

 

 

 

University at Albany – State University of New York

 

College of Arts and Sciences

Course Action Form

Proposal No.

 

 

 

 

Please mark all that apply:

 

X

New Course

Revision of:

 

Number

X

Description

 

 

Cross-Listing

 

Title

 

Prerequisites

 

 

Shared-Resources Course

 

Credits

 

 

Deactivate / Activate Course

 

Other:

 

 

Department:

  JOURNALISM PROGRAM

To be effective (semester/year):

  FALL 2006

 

 

 

Course Number

Current:

 

New:

AJRL 385

Credits:

  3

 

Course Title:

Broadcast Journalism

 

Course Description to appear in Bulletin:

 

 

Students will report, write, produce, air, and record a variety of television and radio news stories with a degree of professionalism resembling what might be found in local newscasts, whether they be short reports or longer, feature-length stories. Working individually or in groups, students will use analog and digital video technologies and recording devices to produce their stories.

Prerequisites statement to be appended to description in Bulletin:

 

If S/U is to be designated as the only grading system in the course, check here:

 

 

This course is (will be) cross listed with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

This course is (will be) a shared-resources course with (i.e., CAS ###):

 

 

Explanation of proposal:

 

 

This course is being offered as part of a new major in Journalism.

Other departments or schools which offer similar or related courses and which have certified that this proposal does not overlap their offering:

 

 

Chair of Proposing Department (TYPE NAME/SIGN)

Date