Reading Courses

Rdg 500 Classroom Literacy Instruction (3)

This class introduces instruction and development in literacy including research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with state and national standards. The focus is on intentional, critical literacy teaching with topics including; children's learning and thinking, instructional planning, tools and formats for balanced literacy instruction, text complexity, leveled texts, dialogic instruction, engaging families, running records and reading inventories, vocabulary-, syntax- and knowledge building.

Rdg 504 Children's Literature (3)

Students read and respond to multiple genres of children's literature, including nonfiction texts, across both print and electronic platforms. Topics include: supporting and appreciating students' complex responses to literature; analyzing the symbiotic relationship of words and pictures in visual texts; using technology to promote literary understanding; and meeting the standards by designing literature instruction informed by critical literacy perspectives.

Rdg 505 Practicum: Academic Literacy Across Instructional Contexts, 5-12 (3)

This course is intended for prospective and practicing consultant teachers and literacy specialists whose job is to support secondary students' subject area knowledge-building in three contexts: the general classroom, academic support classes, and small group or one-to-one tutoring. The course is designed around reading and writing argumentative and explanatory texts. Students will learn knowledge-building literacy practices; assess whole class and individual literacy practices and events; and plan units of study for academic support classes.

Rdg 506 Practicum: Young Adult Literature (3)

Students read and respond to multiple genres of literature for young adults, including nonfiction texts. Topics include: understanding how adolescents build identities and worldviews through engagements with literature; supporting and extending students¿ responses to literature through dialogic teaching; designing literature instruction to support close readings of complex texts informed by literary theory and disciplinary knowledge; using technology to promote literary understanding; analyzing the symbiotic relationship between words and pictures in visual, digital, and multigenre texts. The course has a 5 hour practicum requirement.

Rdg 526 (Ant 526, Lin 526) Language Acquisition, B-2 (3-4)

Examines theoretical and empirical aspects of first language acquisition and its development in speech and writing, including phonology, syntax, vocabulary, and pragmatics. It views acquisition across languages and (sub)cultures from linguistic, psychological, and social perspectives.  

Rdg 530 Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum (3)

Address the theory and practice of literacy learning and instruction within and across the disciplines. Focuses on disciplinary and interdisciplinary uses of and purposes for oral and written texts. Includes developing research-based models for integrating reading and writing into content study and for communicating beyond the school setting.

Rdg 580 Response to Intervention: The Interactive Strategies Approach (3)

Most reading difficulties can be prevented through the implementation of appropriately targeted and intensive instructional interventions. In this course, participants will learn about the Interactive Strategies Approach (ISA) - a well-researched, responsive and comprehensive approach to early literacy instruction and intervention. This course is intended for primary grade teachers and others involved in instruction and decision making related to Response to Intervention. The focus of the course is on helping teachers to develop greater expertise in identifying and responding to the needs of early literacy learners with the goal of accelerating the progress of children who struggle at the early stages of literacy acquisition.

Rdg 600 Strategic Intervention to Prevent Literacy Difficulties (3)

Teachers will learn about the Interactive Strategies Approach to early literacy instruction and intervention and how the approach can contribute to RTI processes in the primary grades. The topics include: the development of strategic, self-regulated early literacy learners who view reading and writing as meaning making activities, providing differentiated instruction in an RTI context, promoting motivation to read and write, and the development of phonological skills, a strategic word approach to word learning, oral language skills, and the knowledge base upon which comprehension depends. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Rdg 500.

Rdg 601 Practicum: Instruction to Prevent Literacy Difficulties (3)

Most early literacy difficulties can be prevented through early, responsive, comprehensive, and coherent literacy instruction.  This course focuses on helping teachers to develop greater expertise in identifying and effectively responding to learners who struggle at the early stages of literacy acquisition.   Topics include differentiated instruction in an RTI context, promoting motivation to read and write, the development of phonological skills, a strategic word approach to word learning, and oral language skills and the knowledge base upon which comprehension depends. Graduate students provide one-to-one intervention for a young literacy learner and engage small groups of students in interactive read alouds.  Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Rdg 655.

Rdg 605 Practicum: Adolescent Literacies and Multimodalities, 5-12 (3)

Exploration of adolescent literacies across contexts and modes. Students conduct inquiries with adolescents to develop and assess educational contexts for multimodal literacy learning. Topics include: youth creative practices; using new technologies to enhance literacy learning; teachers as researchers. Prerequisites: Rdg 610.

Rdg 609 Adult Literacy (3)

Social and psychological perspectives on current research, programs, methods, materials, and evaluation in adult literacy. Teachers will consider contrasting conceptions of literacy and learning and adult development; participatory literacy programs; instruction and curriculum for adults of diverse backgrounds; alternative/performance-based assessment.

Rdg 610 Literacy in Society (3)

Framed by sociocultural perspectives, this course examines literacy in the social context and the changing nature of literacy in the 21st century. Areas of inquiry include how students' cultural backgrounds and identities can serve as resources for literacy learning; linguistic diversity; media literacies; multimodal literacies; and critical literacies.

Rdg 615 Teaching Writing, B-6 (3)

This course provides an overview of writing instruction in elementary schools, drawing on research to inform instructional practice. Areas of emphasis include the history of writing instruction, the process of writing, writing development, assessing writing, mentor texts, writing conventions, disciplinary writing, and organizing writing classrooms. Graduate students will learn how to confer with writers, examine language choices, analyze how students develop as writers, and converse with professional communities about writing instruction.

Rdg 616 Teaching Writing, Grades 5-12 (3)

Teachers will critically examine major instructional strategies and theories for teaching writing. Covers these topics: the intertwining roles of talk and reading in writing development, writing within and across disciplines, using portfolios for tracking student learning and for assessing teachers' growth, and uses of technology in writing English/Language Arts classroom.

Rdg 617 Teaching Social Studies, B-6 (3)

This course focuses on history, culture, economics, government, and geography, for teachers to learn the theoretical and practical applications of historical and current concepts. Drawing on national and state standards, the course will emphasize materials, instruction, and assessment to promote conceptual understandings, including a diverse range of perspectives on social studies content.

Rdg 618 Teaching Math and Science, B-6 (3)

This course focuses on New York State Standards and Assessment in teaching mathematics and science. Teachers will learn theoretical and practical applications of historical and literary concepts. Examines productive ways to integrate across the subject areas. Emphasizes material selection, instruction, and assessment to promote conceptual understandings for all students.

Rdg 619 Practicum: Writing in the Classroom, 1-6 (3)

This course involves small group writing instruction with students in grades 1 - 6.  Graduate students teach a small group of children, document and assess students' writing, and analyze instructional interactions drawing on theories of literacy development. Areas of emphasis include creating contexts for writing, mentor text selection, responsive writing instruction, writing conventions, disciplinary writing, and engaging with families.  Graduate students develop communities of professional practice as they engage as responsive writing teachers, analyzing teaching interactions, and offering reflections and possibilities for future instruction.

Rdg 620 Practicum: Differentiated Instruction and Coaching, B–6 (3-6)

Involves an intense small group inquiry with youth through grade 6. Graduate students teach a small group, document and assess students¿ literacy learning, and analyze instructional interactions drawing on theories of literacy development. Emphasis includes creating contexts for inquiry, text selection, responsive reading and writing instruction, and engaging with families. Graduate students develop communities of professional practice as they engage as responsive literacy coaches, analyzing teaching interactions, and offering reflections and possibilities for future instruction. Prerequisite: Rdg 601.

Rdg 623 Practicum: Differentiated Instruction and Coaching, 5-12 (3-6)

Involves an intense small group inquiry with youth. Graduate students teach a small group, document and assess students¿ literacy learning, and analyze instructional interactions drawing on theories of literacy development. Emphasis includes creating contexts for inquiry, text selection, responsive reading and writing instruction, and engaging with families. Graduate students develop communities of professional practice as they engage as responsive literacy coaches, analyzing teaching interactions, and offering reflections and possibilities for future instruction. Prerequisite: Rdg 600 or 601.

Rdg 625 Integrated Literacy Instruction, B-6 (3)

Theory and practice of integrated literacy instruction. Topics include: historical perspectives on integrated language arts, different kinds of integration (within language arts, between language arts and subject areas, within and across grade levels, etc.) developing integrated units of instruction, teaching skills within themes, and assessing children's literacy progress.

Rdg 630 (Tap 630) The Development of Literate Thought: Social and Historical Roots (3)

General foundation for understanding the conceptions, uses and changing demands of literacy as they interact with conditions within society and schools. Exploration of the uses of literacy within the home and community in terms of their contribution to the academic context that an individual encounters as well as the perceptions and learnings that ensue.

Rdg 632 (Tap 632) Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Literacy (3)

Critical examination of social and linguistic perspectives on literacy. Relation among schooling, literacy, and forms of social and cultural life. Focuses on the sources of sociocultural and linguistic diversity, its relation to the origins and development of schooling, and the implications of such diversity for contemporary literacy instruction and evaluation.

Rdg 633 (Tap 633) Cultural Diversity in Education (3)

An exploration of culture in formal and informal educational settings.  An introduction to perspectives on race, ethnicity and cultural diversity as related to teaching and learning.

Rdg 638 Media Literacy (3)

This course focuses on how popular culture and visual media have changed how we think about English language arts. One component of the course focuses on major theories of popular culture and visual media. Another component involves exploring how popular culture and visual media can be integrated into classroom practice.

Rdg 648 Discourse and Language in the Classroom (3)

Explores discourse analysis as relevant to understanding teaching and learning in classroom settings. Major themes include the nature of classrooms as a communicative environment; influences of social and linguistic diversity in classrooms on teaching and learning processes; alternatives approaches to analysis of classroom communication and their contribution to understanding major themes.

Rdg 655 Early Literacy Development, B-2 (3)

This class examines literacy development in very young children in school, preschool and home. Literacy development is addressed as acquiring situated, changing, social practices. Topics include: conditions and materials for literacy learning, developing responsive literate relationships with and among young children, observing and documenting growth in early literacy, the reciprocal relationships among early writing, reading and speaking, the relational and emotional dimensions of early literacy, intentionality, play, drama, identity, and picture books and their use. The course addresses effective teaching practices for both preschool and kindergarten classrooms. This course has a 5-hour required practicum component.

Rdg 656 Language and Learning to Read (3)

Explores topics on the nature of language, especially English, in relation to literacy teaching and learning. Examines the organization of language, its acquisition from birth through adolescence, its use in communicative settings, linguistic awareness, language as tool for learning, differences between spoken and written language, dialect and sociocultural variations and attitudes.

Rdg 657 (Tap 657) Reading in a Second Language (3)

Provides an overview of issues in teaching and learning to read and write a second language by young children, adolescents, and adults. Considers the differences across languages in spoken and written form, the nature of second language acquisition, the range of programs in place to foster second language literacy, and perspectives on optimal instruction.

Rdg 658 MS Research Project (3)

Preparation and presentation of an inquiry project.  Students work independently, with guidance from an advisor or other faculty member. Prerequisite: 21 credits in Reading Department Masters degree program.

Rdg 677 Data-Based Decision Making in Literacy Assessment, Policy and Practice (3)

This class is intended to enable teachers to effectively analyze and draw conclusions from classroom-, school- and system-level literacy assessment data and to develop a critical understanding of the use and implications of data in literacy research.  Areas of emphasis include assessment functions (screening, monitoring, etc.), basic concepts of measurement, statistical inference, and research designs.  The course uses data sets as the basis for discussions about evaluation systems, instructional improvement (Common Core, APPR), data-driven decision making, proactive participation in literacy initiatives, and principles for linking research and practice in literacy instruction. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Rdg 600 or 601.

Rdg 680 Series: Seminars (3)

Individual and group study of problems related to specific areas of literacy. Prerequisites: Consent of department and 12 hours of graduate credit.

Rdg 685 (E Spe 685) Reading and the Exceptional Child (3)

Theories and practices of reading as related to the education of students with special needs and handicapping conditions. Specific topics include assessment, individualized educational plans, instructional delivery, and inclusive reading programs for exceptional children.

Rdg 687 Institute in Education (1-9)

Selected courses and workshops in literacy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rdg 695 Supervised Fieldwork (3)

Exploring theory and research through fieldwork experience. Open to graduate students who have been admitted to the Reading Department. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

Rdg 697 Independent Study in Reading (1-6)

Projects designed to meet the needs of students in master's level programs. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

Rdg 710 Literacy as Social Practice (3)

This course will introduce you to an array of theoretical frameworks within which contemporary scholars define, study, and explain literate actions as simultaneously individual and collective. These traditions include but are not limited to: critical literacy; sociocultural theories; activity theory; ethnography of communication; technologically mediated literacies; narrative theories.

Rdg 711 Literacy as Social Reproduction and Transformation (3)

Students will explore theoretical explanations of the relations between literacy practices and social reproduction and transformation. Key elements of critical cultural studies (including the Frankfurt School, British cultural studies, and 20th Century French sociology) will be introduced and related to literacy studies, dating from Paulo Freire to the present.

Rdg 715 Analysis of Written Discourse (3)

Focuses on contributions of different traditions in discourse analysis to social and educational research. Topics include conversational analysis, narrative analysis, analysis of multi-modal texts, and analysis of institutional settings. Particular attention to the study of language use in home and community settings, and the characterization of authoritative discourse about knowledge.

Rdg 731 (Tap 731) Theory and Research in Teaching Writing (3)

Examination of current research in the field of writing. Readings include class papers as well as significant recent research in the various domains of research in writing. Examination of studies from various fields including psychology, linguistics, anthropology, and education.

Rdg 732 (Tap 732) Theory and Research in Teaching of Literature (3)

Presentation of a theoretical overview concerning the teaching of literature K-12 together with a review of the latest research in the reading of literature. Emphasis on crucial issues that need to be researched and on the various methodologies that might be used in research.

Rdg 734 (Tap 734) Oral and Written Language (3)

Overview of the social and psychological factors that underlie patterns of oral and written discourse in classroom settings as they support or impede literacy learning. Basis of the belief that literacy learning is socially based and that this foundation affects cognitive behavior and communicative interactions during instructional events.

Rdg 742 Teacher Leadership in Literacy (3)

Involves mentoring in association with the clinical practicum course. Mentors will be required to work with teachers in the master's program and school personnel associated with children being tutored. Includes detailed examination of teaching and mentoring interactions, facilitative structures in schools, and communication with other personnel and parents.

Rdg 743 Researching Classroom Literacy (3)

Intended to help teachers formulate research problems and be competent with the logic of classroom action research. Course involves readings on classroom research, analysis of examples of classroom research, and formulating individual research projects.

Rdg 756 Texts and Teaching in Literacy Learning (3)

Examines research on the classroom instruction associated with literacy, teaching, includes readings about: (a) historical and theoretical review of classroom instruction and materials, (b) analysis of current research on literacy instructional settings and processes, and (c) teacher knowledge and professional growth. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

Rdg 757 Research on Preparing Literacy Teachers (3)

The focus of this course is the examination of historical and current research on literacy teacher preparation and continued development, including teacher change, teacher beliefs, and institutional constraints and affordances related to literacy instruction in schools.

Rdg 758 CAS Research Project (3-9)

Preparation and presentation of an inquiry project.  Students work independently, with guidance from an advisor or other faculty member.

Rdg 762 Current Research in Literacy (3)

Analyses of research in literacy, and the implications of these studies for the teaching of reading and writing. Selection of appropriate research methodology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rdg 770 Diagnostic Reports and Case Studies in Reading (3)

Preparation and discussion of diagnostic reports and case studies. Students diagnose and report a number of cases. Prerequisite: Rdg 666.

Rdg 771 Clinical Experience (3)

Designed for students not intending to work in a clinical setting but who would like exposure to more severe cases than encountered in Rdg 667. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rdg 772 Advanced Clinical Practices (3)

Designed for students desiring to increase their clinical skills. Fall semester devoted primarily to diagnosing, treating, and evaluating the needs of a severely disabled reader who may have multiple handicaps. Spring semester involves continued casework, plus mainstreaming the reader. Seminars and other course requirements tailored to student's interests and needs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rdg 773 Seminar in Reading Disability and Related Disorders (3)

Examination of classical and current issues in the causation, diagnosis, and treatment of reading disability. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rdg 779 Quantitative Methods in Literacy Research (3)

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to quantitative methodology as applied to literacy research. A primary objective of the course is to help advanced students, who have fairly sophisticated understanding of literacy and literacy development, to become more sophisticated consumers of quantitatively based literacy research. Prerequisite: Advanced Standing in Reading/Literacy Program and/or Permission of the Instructor.

Rdg 781 Literacy Learning and Development Across the Lifespan (3)

Seminar explores literacy learning and development in adolescence and adulthood. Course examines theories of adolescent and adult learning and development; literacy theory; policy influencing literacy instruction; research on literacy learning and development in sites such as families, peer groups, communities, workplaces, K-12 schools, and various adult education settings, including prisons.

Rdg 782 Psycholinguistics and the Reading Process (3)

Examines the linguistic, perceptual, and cognitive dimensions of the reading process, and explores its empirical basis in studies of reading acquisition and skilled fluent reading. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rdg 887 Institute in Education (1-9)

A Special course, not part of the pattern of regular offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs.

Rdg 889 Readings in Literacy (3-6)

For students in the Reading PhD/CAS programs who are preparing for comprehensive and specialization exams.

Rdg 890 Research and Independent Study in Reading (2-6)

Projects designed to meet needs of students in advanced programs. Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

Rdg 891 Research Practicum (3)

Designing, conducting, interpreting, and reporting research studies. Students work directly with faculty in an on-going project. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rdg 892 Practicum in College Teaching (3)

Preparation and presentation of course content, and evaluation of student achievement. Student works directly with the faculty member who is teaching a 500-level or 600-level course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rdg 893 Advanced Studies Research Project (3-9)

Individualized research project for student completing an Advanced Studies certificate in the Reading Department. Project may involve conducting and writing a research report, literature review, or position paper. Students may take this course for up to 9 credits. Prerequisite: Methodology coursework and consent of department.

Rdg 895 Internship in Reading (4-8)

Planned experiences which emphasize the students' professional objectives. Includes a seminar. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

Rdg 897 Proseminar: Dissertation Preparation (3-12)

Development of the Specialization exam and/or dissertation proposal. Prerequisite: completion of comprehensive examination and approval of major advisor.

Rdg 899 Doctoral Dissertation (1)

Required each semester of all candidates working on their doctoral dissertations. Prerequisite: Consent of the department.