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All Events for Spring 2009 / View as Calendar
January
Course and Syllabus Design for Significant Learning
Wednesday, January 14, 2009 2:00 - 3:30 pm
Easy Classroom Activities to Increase Student Engagement
 

Tuesday January 20 3:00 – 4:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
Teaching Portfolios for Faculty
Wednesday, January 28 3:00 – 4:30pm Assembly Hall (Campus Center)
Thursday, January 29 2:30 – 4:00pm Levitt Room (Downtown Campus)
Getting Them to Do the Reading

Thursday, January 29 2:30 – 4:00pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
February
Why Do Students Struggle With Abstraction and What Can You Do About It?
Monday, February 2 3:00 – 4:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
Thursday, February 5 2:30 – 4:00pm Levitt Room (Downtown Campus)
What Is Streaming Media, and How Can You Teach With It?
Tuesday, February 10 3:00 – 4:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
How to Find the Right Faculty Job for You
Thursday, February 12 2:30 – 4:00pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
Faculty Showcase: Team-Based Learning

Thursday, February 26 4:00 – 5:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
March
Designing Activities that Explore Cultural Values
Wednesday, March 4 3:00 – 4:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
Excel Gradebook Consultations

Wednesday, March 11 12:00 – 3:00pm Library B15
ITLAL Special Event: Guest presenter Maryellen Weimer

Friday, March 20 11:00am – 2:30pm Alumni House
SKILL Conference for Graduate Students
Saturday, March 21, 2009 University Hall - Atrium
April
 
Other Workshops
Workshops Conducted by Information Technology Services Training (ITS)
Workshops Conducted by the Interactive Media Center

Course and Syllabus Design for Significant Learning (Return to top)
Wednesday, January 14 2:00 – 3:30pm Standish Room, 3rd floor of the Science Library
How do you want students to be different at the end of the semester from how they were at the beginning? What kinds of learning experiences in your course are likely to induce those changes? In this session participants will zero in on factors that contribute to development of student thinking, knowledge, and know-how. Participants will develop a plan that allows them to revise an existing course in ways that promote stronger student engagement with the materials, as well as greater student mastery of disciplinary thinking.
Easy Classroom Activities to Increase Student Engagement (Return to top)
Tuesday January 20 3:00 – 4:30pm Terrace Lounge
Active learning strategies are an engaging way to foster meaningful retention of course material, promote critical thinking and group collaboration, build class community in the beginning of the semester, and break up lectures along the way. In this workshop participants will participate in three engaging activities that are quick to prepare and flexible enough to be used in any discipline or class size. We will also discuss solutions to some common barriers to implementing active learning. Participants in this workshop will start to develop activities for their individual courses.
Teaching Portfolios for Faculty (Return to top)
Wednesday, January 28 3:00 – 4:30pm Assembly Hall (Campus Center)
Wednesday, January 29 2:30 – 4:00pm Levitt Room (Downtown Campus)
Showing that you are an effective teacher is crucial to your success as a faculty member, especially if you are preparing for tenure review. A teaching portfolio gives you the chance to showcase your teaching, to explain why you do what you do in the classroom, and to demonstrate why your methods work. This workshop will give you tips for collecting and displaying materials that will help you articulate your philosophy of teaching and demonstrate your strengths as a teacher.
Getting Them to Do the Reading (Return to top)
Thursday, January 29 2:30 - 4:00 PM Terrace Lounge
The semester has begun and you suspect that you’re working far harder than your students. Or even worse, they aren’t even coming to class prepared at all. This workshop will discuss some strategies for getting your students see the value of their assigned readings and holding them accountable for preparing for class. We will also discuss what to do when you face a class full of unprepared students.
Why Do Students Struggle With Abstraction and What Can You Do About It? (Return to top)
Monday, February 2 3:00 – 4:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
Thursday, February 5 2:30 – 4:00pm Levitt Room (Downtown Campus)
Where’s the concept in all those examples? What’s the purpose of all that data? Learning to tell the forest from the trees is THE most important skill students need in order to become mature disciplinary thinkers. We can accelerate their progress by effectively structuring their encounters with information. The key lies in asking students to make active “test judgments” that help them assess and sort new information before they absorb it into existing patterns of belief and use. Reflecting on judgments and their consequences is how students improve their thinking. This workshop will stage and model the “judgment and reflection” process that is the foundation of the critical thinking classroom.
What Is Streaming Media, and How Can You Teach With It? (Return to top)
Tuesday, February 10 3:00 – 4:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
An increasing number of UAlbany faculty members are giving students access to media by digitizing and streaming their audio-visual files. In this workshop you will learn about the types of media that can be digitized and streamed and the most effective ways to use them to teach.
How to Find the Right Faculty Job for You (Return to top)
Thursday, February 12 2:30 - 4:00 PM Terrace Lounge
You know you want an academic job, but where? Most students assume they would be happiest at a research university (like the University at Albany), but 80% of PhD graduates don’t end up working at research universities, and many who do aren’t happy in that environment. Join us for a panel discussion with faculty members from local non-research institutions (including liberal arts and community colleges) to learn what their faculty life is like so that you can target your job search to the type of institution that will best fit your career interests. We will also discuss how to tailor your application package so that it will be attractive to a search committee at a non-research institution.
Faculty Showcase: Team-Based Learning (Return to top)
Thursday, February 26 4:00 – 5:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
Come and learn about the experiences of a cohort of UAlbany faculty who have chosen to incorporate Team-Based Learning (TBL) into their classrooms. TBL is a method of teaching that holds student teams accountable for their learning while also ensuring that individuals pull their weight. Various faculty members will share their personal experiences and anecdotes in adopting this method of teaching as well as some challenges and rewards they have experienced in the classroom. Click here to read about one professor's experience.
Designing Activities that Explore Cultural Values (Return to top)
Wednesday, March 4 3:00 – 4:30pm Terrace Lounge (Campus Center)
The University at Albany has a widely diverse population both in its student body and faculty. This workshop is designed to provide tools for exploring those differences in a productive way. In this workshop we will first participate in a variety of easily adaptable activities for exploring diversity in cultural values and then discuss their applications in the classroom.
Excel Gradebook Consultations (Return to top)
Wednesday, March 11 12:00 – 3:00pm Library B15
You will learn how to use Excel for basic grade book management and new strategies for using your Excel grade book more effectively. Just bring in any relevant grading information (your syllabus, written grade book, etc.) and an ITLAL staff member will work with you on an individual basis to create a grade book for your class. Setting up your Excel grade book before mid-term will save you time and allow you to keep up with students’ progress so as to avoid surprises at the end of the semester.
ITLAL Special Event: Guest presenter Maryellen Weimer (Return to top)
Friday, March 20 11:00– 2:30pm Alumni House
Session 1: Teaching that Promotes Learning (11:00am – 12:30pm)
If a professor aspires to teach in ways that promote learning, what does that teacher do about the nuts and bolts of instructional practice?  Based on the presenter’s book, Learner-Centered Teaching, this workshop will link the research on learning to five areas of instructional practice that directly influence how much and how well students learn.
Session 2: Successfully Implementing Change (1:00 – 2:30pm) This workshop will identify a series of steps that help ensure that change positively impacts learning outcomes. It will outline strategies for adapting and implementing changes to particular instructional situations and assessing their impact to determine if the strategy needs further adaptations, should be used again or even used more widely. 
SKILL Conference for Graduate Students (Return to top)
Saturday, March 21   University Hall - Atrium
ITLAL is pleased to announce the 5th annual SKILL Conference for graduate students in teaching roles. This conference provides aspiring faculty members the opportunity to obtain valuable information about improving teaching, to share teaching experiences with other graduate students, and to gain professional experience presenting at a conference. This year’s theme is “Teaching for Professional Success.” We invite proposals for presentations that address excellence and growth in teaching.
Conference Website: http://skill.itlal.org
Contact: Billie Bennett (bbennett@uamail.albany.edu)
Proposal deadline: February 27, 2009
* There is no fee to participate or attend this conference. Please RSVP.
Keynote Speaker: Maryellen Weimer
Assumptions that Grow Teachers
Good teaching requires a lot from teachers: It requires emotional energy, intellectual stamina, creative approaches, vigilance, faith in the power of feedback to prompt learning, and perseverance to find the way back from failure. This session will explore what it takes to sustain teaching excellence across a career, not in the how-to-do-excellent-teaching sense but how growth and change can be approached so that they make improvement a positive and productive process. We will propose ways of thinking about instructional growth and ways of implementing change that can increase both the motivation to change and effectiveness in the classroom.