En EspaņolEn Español
LI B-69
1400 Washington Ave
Albany, NY 12222

Summer Hours: M-F, 8am - 4pm

Support ITLAL
ITLAL NewslettersITLAL Newsletters
ITLAL's Home Page University at Albany's Home page banner image
ITLAL Library
ITLAL is continuing to build a library of titles of interest to be used by faculty members, graduate students, and administrators. While the books are not currently available for check-out, we will be happy to make single chapter copies available on request. All are also invited to make use of any of the books listed on these pages in the library space in the ITLAL office, Social Science 251. If you have any suggestions for additions to our library, please feel free to contact us at teachingandlearning@albany.edu. Click on any title to see that book's Table of Contents.
Issues in Higher Education
These readings consider higher education issues from an institutional perspective.
Diversity and Internationalization
Institutional Reform
Leadership and Management in Academe
Resources for Faculty Evaluation
These titles provide information about faculty evaluation processes for both faculty members and administrators.
For Faculty
For Administrators
Teaching Resources
These titles are designed to help with a broad range of classroom issues, from day-to-day management to overall course design.
Active Learning Strategies
Assessment of Student Learning
Classroom Strategies and Management
Collaborative Learning
Designing Learning Experiences
General Books on Teaching
Large Classes
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Student Perspectives and Development
Teaching in the Sciences
Teaching with Technology
Teaching Writing
Topics for Specific Users
These titles address issues of interest to specific populations.
Adjunct Faculty
Resources for and about Graduate Students and Teaching Assistants
Resources for and about New Faculty
Strategies for Faculty Success
These resources provide information to help faculty members manage all aspects of their academic careers.
Strategies for Faculty Success

 

 

 

 

 

Issues in Higher Education
Diversity and Internationalization (Return to Top)

Barbara R. Bergmann, In Defense of Affirmative Action
A distinguished economist cuts through the incendiary rhetoric to present a clear-eyed defense of affirmative action as a just and indispensable solution to the persistent race and sex discrimination that splinters our society.

Jerome Branche, John Mullennix, and Ellen R. Cohn, Diversity Across the Curriculum: A Guide for Faculty in Higher Education
In a collection of more than 50 vignettes, exceptional teachers from a wide range of academic disciplines—health sciences, humanities, sciences, and social sciences—describe how they actively incorporate diversity into their teaching. Different strategies discussed include a role-model approach, creating a safe space in the classroom, and the cultural competency model.

Joe R. Feagin, Vera Hernan, and Nikitah Imani. The Agony of Education: Black Students at White Colleges and Universities
This book probes the choices and trade-offs facing African-American students attending an historically white university; psychologically (un)supportive classroom and campus settings, administrative barriers, recruitment and retention, white faculty and white students.

Temple Grandin, Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism
What emerges in Thinking in Pictures is the document of an extraordinary human being, one who, in gracefully and lucidly bridging the gulf between her condition and our own, sheds light on the riddle of our common identity.

Frances A. Maher and Mary Kay Thompson Tetrault, The Feminist Classroom: An Inside Look At How Professors And Students Are Transforming Higher Education For A Diverse Society
This book provides an intimate view of how feminist teachers are revolutionizing higher education.

Sue V. Rosser, Re-Engineering Female Friendly Science
In Re-Engineering Female Friendly Science, Rosser revisits the feminist origins of curriculum transformation and puts the gender back in gender equity.
Institutional Reform (Return to Top)

Trudy W. Banta, Elizabeth A. Jones, and Karen E. Black, Designing Effective Assessment: Principles and Profiles of Good Practice
Banta, Jones, and Black offer 49 detailed current examples of good practice in planning, implementing, and sustaining assessment that are practical and ready to apply in new settings. This important resource can help educators put in place an effective process for determining what works and which improvements will have the most impact in improving curriculum, methods of instruction, and students services on college and university campuses.

Ernest L. Boyer, Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate
In this groundbreaking study, Ernest L. Boyer offers a new paradigm that recognizes the full range of scholarly activity by college and university faculty. He suggests that four general areas of endeavor be viewed as scholarship: discovery, integration of knowledge, teaching, and service. Boyer questions the existence of a reward system that pushes faculty toward research and publication and away from teaching and proposes reconsidering the priorities of the professoriate.

Eileen Carnell, Jacqui MacDonald and Susan Askew, Coaching and Mentoring in Higher Education: A Learning-Centred Approach
This handbook sets out a clear organizational rationale of coaching and/or mentoring and provides structured activities for self-reflection or groups. In addition to offering a number of definitions of coaching and mentoring, this handbook examines how these practices have explicit links with models of learning. A case study of a successfully piloted learning-centered model illustrates these links in practice.

Robert M. Diamond, Aligning Faculty Rewards with Institutional Mission: Statements, Policies, and Guidelines
This book provides guidelines for developing a coherent faculty rewards system, starting with the articulation of institutional priorities and following the process through the development of department guidelines and union contracts.

Lion F. Gardiner, Redesigning Higher Education: Producing Dramatic Gains in Student Learning
This study focuses on the theoretically grounded links between critique and prescription. Within the context of contemporary theory on student development, Gardner examines the growing body of knowledge about student learning, college outcomes and the effectiveness of various options for instruction and assessment as the basis for identifying an empirically grounded set of practices that lead to better learning for students.

Charles E. Glassick, Mary Taylor Huber, and Gene Maeroff. Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate
Scholarship Assessed begins where Ernest L. Boyer’s Scholarship Reconsidered left off. Begun under the oversight of Boyer and completed by authors Glassick, Huber, and Maeroff, Scholarship Assessed examines the changing nature of scholarship in today’s colleges and universities.

John Tagg, The Learning Paradigm College
Tagg offers a radically fresh perspective which examines existing functional frameworks and offers a way to reenvisions and recast many familiar aspects of college work and college life.

Jennifer Washburn, University Inc.: The Corporate Corruption of Higher Education University Inc. exposes for the first time the toxic mix of science and profit that is destroying the historic independence of American universities and reveals how commercial conflicts have led to compromised research, a loss of scholarly independence, the downsizing of teaching, and the erosion of the humanities.

Leadership and Management in Academe (Return to Top)

Estela Mara Bensimon, Kelly Ward, and Karla Sanders, The Department Chair's Role in Developing New Faculty Into Teachers and Scholars
This book is designed to help chairs with three important stages of junior faculty socialization: 1) recruitment and hiring; 2) the critical first year; and 3) evaluating the performance of new faculty.

Robert Birnbaum, How Colleges Work: The Cybernetics of Academic Organization and Leadership
In this publication of the National Center for Postsecondary Governance and Finance, Robert Birnbaum provides a new way of thinking about the leadership of colleges and universities.

Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman, First, Break All The Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently
Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman of the Gallup Organization present the remarkable findings of their massive in-depth study of great managers across a wide variety of situations.

Walter H. Gmelch and Val D. Miskin, Chairing an Academic Department, 2nd ed.
Although chairs come to leadership positions for varied reasons, few come with any specific leadership training. Once in the position, they are critiqued, judged, and evaluated by both their faculty and administrators, groups which frequently have conflicting criteria. Based upon their extensive study of the demands on and needs of department chairs, the authors have distilled their findings into a practical and accessible volume to guide chairs in their growth.

Mary Lou Higgerson, Communication Skills for Department Chairs
Developed from the author’s extensive background in administration, organization communication, and conducting training sessions, this book presents communication strategies tailored to the specific responsibilities and contexts of the department chair’s position.

Mary Lou Higgerson and Susan S. Rehwaldt, Complexities of Higher Education Administration: Case Studies & Issues
Based on extensive experience in administration, in teaching, and in running workshops for administrators, the authors have assembled a collection of cases focused on topics common to academic administrators.

Susan A. Holton, Mending the Cracks in the Ivory Tower: Strategies for Conflict Management in Higher Education
With a particular focus on department chairs and deans, this book helps analyze the many kinds of personal and institutional conflicts most commonly faced in higher education and provides the necessary tools and methods for conflict management and resolution.

Sherry L. Hoppe and Bruce W. Speck, Identifying and Preparing Academic Leaders This book provides a source for doctoral students who want to know about the nature of higher education administration, for professors who seek insight into the roles and functions administrators fulfill, and for administrators who want to learn more about how to be effective in their jobs.

Deryl R. Leaming, Academic Leadership: A Practical Guide to Chairing the Department, 2 nd ed.
Organized into six parts, this second edition contains best practices and ideas from some of today’s leading scholars as well as information on some of the newer challenges and responsibilities for department chairpersons, including: developing a departmental vision, working with constituents, retaining students, conflict management, mentoring faculty, and post-tenure review.

N. Douglas Lees, Chairing Academic Departments: Traditional and Emerging Expectations
This book provides new, existing, and potential department chairs with some historical perspectives and practical suggestions as they face a higher education enterprise that is undergoing significant changes from past practice.

Steven B. Sample, The Contrarian's Guide to Leadership
In this offbeat approach to leadership, college president Sample--the man who turned the University of Southern California into one of the most respected universities in the country--challenges many conventional teachings on the subject.

Robert I. Sutton, The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t
This groundbreaking book sheds light on how social friction among colleagues ruing morale, lowers productivity, and can truly devastate a company’s (or, by extension, a university’s) culture. Sutton not only confronts this issue directly, but also provides extensive strategies and insights into how you can pinpoint and eliminate this problem.

Peter B. Vaill, Learning as a Way of Being: Strategies for Survival in a World of Permanent White Water
In Learning as a Way of Being, Vaill offers a thoughtful critique of the roots of management education and argues that, if managers are to navigate the waters skillfully, institutions of “higher learning” must, above all, teach managers how to integrate the discipline of learning into their very being.

Resources for Faculty Evaluation
For Faculty (Return to Top)

Nancy Van Note Chism, Peer Review of Teaching: A Sourcebook. 2nd ed.
The new edition of this bestselling book builds on the author’s extensive administrative and consulting experience as well as scholarship on faculty reward. It includes additional discussion of important foundational issues as well as practical forms and ideas gleaned from disciplinary groups and campuses throughout the nation.

Larry Keig and Michael D. Waggoner. Collaborative Peer Review: The Role of Faculty in Improving College Teaching
This report examines ways in which institutions are affecting their teaching climate. Through the use of peer review of teaching, faculty involuntarily are seeking to improve their instructional skills. This report provides a foundation for those institutions that see peer evaluation of faculty as faculty as one process that can help to make the culture more responsive to the evaluation and improvement of teaching.

Peter Seldin, The Teaching Portfolio: A Practical Guide to Improved Performance and Promotion/Tenure Decisions (3 rd ed.)
This edition focuses on self-reflection and documenting teaching performance. “Its straightforward approach, practical suggestions, step-by-step instructions, and field-tested recommendations will prove invaluable to those involved in evaluating and improving teaching.”

For Administrators (Return to Top)

Raoul A. Arreola, Developing a Comprehensive Faculty Evaluation System: A Guide to Designing, Building, and Operating Large-Scale Faculty Evaluation Systems
Based on 36 years of research and experience building and operating large-scale faculty evaluation systems, as well as consulting experience to thousands of administrators and faculty from hundreds of college and universities of all types, this new edition includes more detailed information about the process of building and operating a comprehensive faculty evaluation system and a new model for conceptualizing the full complexity of faculty performance itself.

John A. Centra, Reflective Faculty Evaluation: Enhancing Teaching and Determining Faculty Effectiveness
In this book, John A. Centra provides faculty members, administrators, and faculty development specialists with the up-to-date approaches they need to evaluate and improve teaching. Greatly expanding his earlier bestseller, Determining Faculty Effectiveness, Centra underscores the importance of active methods of teaching and the need to evaluate those methods in less traditional ways.

Robert M. Diamond, Aligning Faculty Rewards with Institutional Mission: Statements, Policies, and Guidelines
This book provides guidelines for developing a coherent faculty rewards system, starting with the articulation of institutional priorities and following the process through the development of department guidelines and union contracts.

Peter Seldin & Associates. Changing Practices in Evaluating Teaching
Changing Practices in Evaluating Teaching is a complete guidebook, with a wide array of forms, case studies, web sites, tables, and example. It is written for presidents, provosts, academic vice presidents, deans, department chairs, instructional development specialists, and faculty—the essential partners in improving teaching evaluation systems.

Peter Seldin & Associates. Evaluating Faculty Performance: A Practical Guide to Assessing Teaching, Research, and Service
This book contains a wealth of material on current evaluation practices and realistic suggestions for upgrading methods and procedures. Seldin and his associates cover every aspect of the evaluation of teaching, research, and service—from gaining genuine faculty support to collecting and assessing various kinds of data—revealing what works and what does not.

Teaching Resources
Active Learning Strategies (Return to Top)

John C. Bean, Engaging Ideas: The Professor's Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom
A practical nuts and bolts guide for teachers from any discipline who want to design interest-provoking writing and critical thinking activities.

Charles C. Bonwell and James A. Edison, Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom
This slim guide outlines activities to make the college classroom more engaging for students. It includes the basics, such as how to modify lectures and using in-class writing, as well as advanced techniques like roll-playing, debates, and peer teaching.

Derek Bruff, Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments The use of classroom response systems, or "clickers," which enable instructors to rapidly collect and analyze student responses to questions during class, has proven to both engage students in course material and provide valuable feedback on students learning and perspectives for instructors. Bruff includes illustrative examples of the range of questions that can be used effectively with clickers.

Donald A. Schön, Educating the Reflective Practitioner
The reflective practitioner is one who participates in a practicum in the professional school which will help him or her "acquire the kinds of artistry essential to competence in the indeterminate zones of practice." Schon argues that professional schools (from engineering to public administration to teaching) rely too heavily on scientific knowledge and technical rationality while giving little attention to "reflection-in-action." Schon now details a program of reflective practicum education in the professional schools.

Donna M. Stringer and Patricia A. Cassiday, 52 Activities for Exploring Values Differences
This book features sound, ready-to-use activities for settings where the exploration of values differences is beneficial, including the classroom. The activities cover a broad spectrum for the varied needs of trainers and teachers: those who like hands-on, practical but low-risk activities; those who prefer experiential activities; and those who learn best if they can reflect on ideas.

Sivasailam “Thiagi” Thiagarajan with Raja Thiagarajan, BARNGA: A Simulation Game on Cultural Clashes
BARNGA is the classic simulation game for exploring communication challenges across cultures. While playing the game, participants experience the shock of realizing that despite good intentions, people interpret things differently, one from one another, in profound ways. Players learn that they must understand and reconcile these differences in order to become a functioning group.

Sivasailam “Thiagi” Thiagarajan, Thiagi’s 100 Favorite Games
Thiagi’s 100 Favorite Games
is a new resource from one of the world’s foremost authorities on interactive learning. This collection represents game-play at its very best. Thiagi offers the “how-to” for his all-time favorite games.

Maryellen Weimer, Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice Learner-Centered Teaching shows how to tie teaching and curriculum to the process and objectives of learning rather than to content delivery alone.

Edward Zlotkowski, Successful Service-Learning Programs: New Models of Excellence in Higher Education
In this book, leaders of service-learning programs share how they have championed successful programs that have enriched their campuses and renewed their communities.
Assessment of Student Learning (Return to Top)

Thomas A. Angelo and K. Patricia Cross. Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers
In this book Thomas A. Angelo and K. Patricia Cross provide a practical handbook to help college faculty—and teachers in other settings—develop a better understanding of the learning process in their own classrooms and assess the impact of their teaching upon it.

Trudy W. Banta, Elizabeth A. Jones, and Karen E. Black, Designing Effective Assessment: Principles and Profiles of Good Practice
Banta, Jones, and Black offer 49 detailed current examples of good practice in planning, implementing, and sustaining assessment that are practical and ready to apply in new settings. This important resource can help educators put in place an effective process for determining what works and which improvements will have the most impact in improving curriculum, methods of instruction, and students services on college and university campuses.

Richard E. Lyons, Meggin McIntosh, and Marcella L. Kysilka, Teaching College in an Age of Accountability
This book provides professors with the insights and tools necessary to achieve higher levels on accountability assessment outcomes while preparing students for enhancing their own career success in a more complex future. Accountability proponents generally call for increased access to higher education for all citizens, improved retention of students once they are enrolled, and graduation and placement rates that recognize the investment of tax and institutional funds in students’ success. This book equips professors to address each of these outcome goals in a proactive manner.

Barbara E Walvoord and Virginia Johnson Anderson. Effective Grading: A Tool for Learning and Assessment
The authors view grading as a complex process that serves multiple roles: evaluation, motivation, communication, and organization.

Barbara E. Walvoord, Assessment Clear and Simple: A Practical Guide for Institutions, Departments, and General Education
Assessment Clear and Simple
is “Assessment 101” in a book—a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process.

Grant Wiggins, Educative Assessment: Designing Assessment to Inform and Improve Student Performance
In this book, Grant Wiggins outlines design standards for performance-based assessments that promise students—no matter what their ability—clear and worthy performance targets, useful feedback, coaching, and the opportunity to progress toward excellence.

John Zubizarreta, The Learning Portfolio: Reflective Practice for Improving Student Learning
This book offers readers both an academic understanding of and rationale for learning portfolios and practical information that can be custom tailored to suit many disciplinary, pedagogical, programmatic, and institutional needs.
Classroom Strategies and Management (Return to Top)

Ronald A. Berk, Professors Are From Mars, Students Are From Snickers
Professors and students seem to come from different planets (or candy bars). Barriers naturally exist that impede their communication, such as title, age, income, and cholesterol level. Humor can break down these barriers so that professors can better connect with their students and other audiences. It can be used as a teaching tool to facilitate learning. A variety of techniques that can be integrated systematically into instruction and professional presentations are described and illustrated.

Stephen D. Brookfield and Stephen Preskill, Discussion as a Way of Teaching: Tools and Techniques for Democratic Classrooms
Stephen D. Brookfield and Stephen Preskill suggest exercises for starting discussions, strategies for maintaining their momentum, and ways to elicit diverse views and voices.

Barbara Gross Davis, Tools for Teaching
Forty-nine teaching tools organized into twelve sections, cover both traditional tasks—writing a course syllabus, delivering an effective lecture—and newer, broader, concerns, a set of general strategies, such as responding to diversity and using technology.

Peter Filene, The Joy of Teaching
Gathering concepts and techniques borrowed from outstanding college professors, The Joy of Teaching provides helpful guidance for new instructors developing and teaching their first college courses.

Wilbert J. McKeachie and Graham Gibbs. Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research and Theory for College and University Teachers
McKeachie's Teaching Tips is a handbook designed to provide helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday problems of teaching at the university level, and those that pop up in trying to maximize learning for every student.

Wilbert McKeachie, Marilla Svinicki et al, McKeachie’s Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers, 12th ed.
McKeachie's Teaching Tips is a handbook designed to provide helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday problems of teaching at the university level, and those that pop up in trying to maximize learning for every student. The newest edition includes new chapters on diversity, high- and low-stakes writing, and experiential learning.

Robert Rotenberg, The Art & Craft of College Teaching: A Guide for New Professors and Graduate Students
This book provides a hands-on, quick-start guide to the complexities of the classroom for graduate teaching assistants and new instructors in their first five years of college teaching.
Collaborative Learning (Return to Top)

James. L. Cooper, Pamela Robinson, and David Ball, Small Group Instruction in Higher Education
This volume presents a look at the history of small group instruction research, theory and practice and offers a glimpse at the future of this powerful instructional strategy.

Larry K. Michaelsen, Arletta Bauman Knight, and L. Dee Fink, Team-Based Learning: A Transformative Use of Small Groups in College Teaching
This book describes team-based learning (TBL), an unusually powerful and versatile teaching strategy that enables teachers to take small-group learning to a new level of effectiveness. It is the only pedagogical use of small groups that is based on a recognition of the critical difference between “groups” and “teams,” and intentionally employs specific procedures to transform newly formed groups into high-performance learning teams.

Designing Learning Experiences (Return to Top)

John Biggs and Catherine Tang, Teaching for Quality Learning at University, 3rd ed.
This book’s “how to” approach addresses several important issues: designing high level outcomes, the learning activities most likely to achieve them in small and large classes, and appropriate assessment and grading procedures. It is an accessible, jargon-free guide for all university teachers interested in enhancing their teaching and their students’ learning, and for administrators and teaching developers who are involved in teaching-related decisions on an institution-wide basis.

L. Dee Fink, Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses
Fink takes important existing ideas in the literature on college teaching (active learning, educative assessment), adds some new ideas (a taxonomy of significant learning, the concept of a teaching strategy), and shows how to systematically combine these in a way that results in powerful learning experiences for students.

Judith Grunert, The Course Syllabus: A Learning-Centered Approach
This practical manual presents why and how to construct a syllabus that shifts from what you will cover (the traditional syllabus) to one that reflects what tools and information you can provide students to help them learn (the learning-centered syllabus).

Laurie Richlin, Blueprint for Learning: Constructing College Courses to Facilitate, Assess, and Document Learning
This book familiarizes readers with course design elements; enables them to understand themselves as individuals and teachers; know their students; adapt to the learning environment; design courses that promote deep learning; and assess the impact of the teaching practices and design choices they have made. She provides tools to create a full syllabus, offers guidance on such issues as framing questions that encourage discussion, developing assignments with rubrics, and creating tests. What Laurie Richlin offers is a intellectual framework, set of tools and best practices to enable readers to design and continually reassess their courses to better meet their teaching goals and the learning needs of their students.

Peter B. Vaill, Learning as a Way of Being: Strategies for Survival in a World of Permanent White Water
In Learning as a Way of Being, Vaill offers a thoughtful critique of the roots of management education and argues that, if managers are to navigate the waters skillfully, institutions of “higher learning” must, above all, teach managers how to integrate the discipline of learning into their very being.

Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, Understanding by Design
This book is about good design—of curriculum, assessment, and instruction—focused on developing and deepening understanding of important ideas. Posed as a question, considered throughout the book and from many perspectives, the essence of this book is this: How do we make it more likely—by our design—that more students really understand what they are asked to learn?
General Books on Teaching (Return to Top)

Ken Bain, What The Best College Teachers Do
In stories both humorous and touching, Ken Bain describes examples of ingenuity and compassion, of students’ discoveries of new ideas and the depth of their own potential.

John Biggs and Catherine Tang, Teaching for Quality Learning at University, 3rd ed.
This book’s “how to” approach addresses several important issues: designing high level outcomes, the learning activities most likely to achieve them in small and large classes, and appropriate assessment and grading procedures. It is an accessible, jargon-free guide for all university teachers interested in enhancing their teaching and their students’ learning, and for administrators and teaching developers who are involved in teaching-related decisions on an institution-wide basis.

Stephen D. Brookfield, Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher
Building on the insights of his highly acclaimed earlier work, The Skillful Teacher, and applying the principles of adult learning, Brookfield thoughtfully guides teachers through the processes of becoming critically reflective about teaching, confronting the contradictions involved in creating democratic classrooms, and using critical reflection as a tool for ongoing personal and professional development.

Stephen D. Brookfield, The Skillful Teacher: On Technique, Trust, and Responsiveness in the Classroom, 2nd ed.
The Skillful Teacher is a comprehensive guide that shows how to thrive on the unpredictability and diversity of classroom life and includes insights developed from the hundreds of workshops conducted by the author. Broookfield explores the assumption that skillful teaching is grounded in constant research into how students experience learning. The book explores the three R’s of skillful teaching: respect, research, and responsiveness.

Stephen D. Brookfield, Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning
Stephen D. Brookfield analyzes current approaches to adult learning, presents a comprehensive review of the research on how adults learn, and proposes ways to develop more innovative adult learning programs.

William E. Campbell and Karl A. Smith (Eds.), New Paradigms for College Teaching
New Paradigms was written for faculty searching for new ways to help students learn. Chapters provide a variety of methodologies including cooperative learning, writing-across-the-curriculum, active learning, and learning communities.

Kenneth E. Eble, The Craft of Teaching, 2nd ed.
Kenneth Eble’s 1976 classic on college teaching was hailed as one of the best books ever published on the topic. Updated and revised in 1988, this book offers fresh insights on issues of enduring importance—from how to help students learn and how to make the best use of the classroom to the nuts and bolts of assignments, tests, grades, and textbooks.

Kenneth A. Feldman and Michael B. Paulsen, Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom, 2nd ed.
This is a broad-based reader designed to increase the awareness and understanding of the most important issues, practices and research associated with the principles of effective teaching and learning in the college classroom. This book should serve as a resource for graduate students, faculty members, administrators, and any others with an interest in higher education.

Donelson R. Forsyth, The Professor’s Guide to Teaching: Psychological Principles and Practices
This book explores what research has revealed about effective teaching and mines this resource to offer useful suggestions and practical recommendations for new and seasoned instructors. Emphasizing current research, Forsyth communicates the elements of effective teaching in the language of scientific psychology.

Heather Fry, Steve Ketteridge, and Stephanie Marshall (eds.), A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice, 3rd ed.
This book focuses on developing professional academic skills for teaching. Dealing with the rapid expansion of the use of technology in higher education and widening student diversity, this fully updated and expanded edition includes new material on, the example, e-learning, lecturing to large groups, formative and summative assessment, and supervising research students.

Anthony E. Grasha, Teaching with Style: A Practical Guide to Enhancing Learning by Understanding Teaching & Learning Styles
The book takes the reader on a journey that includes an understanding of the elements of teaching and learning styles; the need for discovering Who am I as a teacher? And What do I want to become?; personal change processes in teaching; exploring one’s philosophy of teaching; and an integrative model for selecting instructional processes that are keyed to different blends of the Expert, Formal Authority, Personal Model, Facilitator, and Delegator styles of teaching and the Independent, Avoidant, Collaborative, Dependent, Competitive, and Participant learning styles.

Diane F. Halpern & Associates, Changing College Classrooms: New Teaching and Learning Strategies for an Increasingly Complex World
This book combines a range of promising instructional strategies with helpful guidelines for assessing the effectiveness of instruction. It will help faculty and administrators equip students with the creative, critical, technological, and problem-solving skills—as well as a coherent sense of multicultural awareness—necessary to thrive in a rapidly changing society.

Nira Hativa, Teaching for Effective Learning in Higher Education
This book identifies the strategies that are consistently associated with good teaching and explains how they promote students’ active and meaningful learning. By presenting teaching as a logical structure of interconnected behaviors whose contribution to student learning is based on theory and research, the book promotes teachers’ pedagogical knowledge and their perception of teaching as scholarly intellectual work.

Marilyn Kallett and April Morgan (Eds.), The Art of College Teaching: 28 Takes
This volume provides a collection of 28 essays about teaching, including 11 written by Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Professor of the Year awardees.

James M. Lang, On Course: A Week-by-Week Guide to Your First Semester of College Teaching
This book is full of experience-tested, research-based advice for graduate students and new faculty clutching the podium for the first time. Divided into fifteen chapters to match the weeks of the semester, On Course provides a wide range of innovative and traditional teaching strategies. They work—and they won’t overwhelm you with extensive preparation or grading time when you’re also trying to do your research, meet service requirements, learn your way around a new campus, and remember your children’s names.

Robert Leamnson, Thinking about Teaching and Learning: Developing Habits of Learning with First Year College and University Students
Building on the insights offered by recent discoveries about the biological basis of learning, and on his own thought-provoking definitions of teaching, learning and education, Robert Leamnson proceeds to the practical details of instruction that teachers are most interested in—the things that make or break teaching. The author provides teachers with a map to develop their own teaching philosophy, and effective nuts-and-bolts advice.

Joseph Lowman, Mastering the Techniques of Teaching
Drawing on direct observation of teaching, the useful literature on college instruction, and student accounts of outstanding professors, Lowman examines what constitutes good teaching and shows how to master effective teaching techniques.

Linda B. Nilson, Teaching at Its Best: A Research-Based Resource for College Instructors, 2nd ed.
This best-selling handbook is an essential toolbox—a compilation of hundreds of practical teaching techniques, formats, classroom activities, and exercises. This revised and expanded edition covers topics relevant to today’s classroom such as technology and the Internet, problem-based learning, diversity, service learning, and faculty evaluation systems.-

Parker J. Palmer, The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life
In The Courage to Teach, Parker Palmer takes teachers on an inner journey toward reconnecting with their vocation and their students—and recovering their passion for one of the most difficult and important of human endeavours.

Keith W. Prichard and R. MacLaran Sawyer, Handbook of College Teaching: Theory and Applications
This book provides solid theoretical information on educational psychology and presents practical information on teaching particular disciplines. The volume also overviews different instructional techniques and settings, and discusses general concerns likely to face college faculty.

Paul Ramsden, Learning to Teach in Higher Education
This classic text combines practical advice with sound theory to provide a uniquely stimulating introduction to the practice of university teaching. The book has a simple message: to become a good teacher, first you must understand your students’ experiences of learning. Out of this grows a set of principles for teaching in higher education.

Laurie Richlin, Blueprint for Learning: Constructing College Courses to Facilitate, Assess, and Document Learning
This book familiarizes readers with course design elements; enables them to understand themselves as individuals and teachers; know their students; adapt to the learning environment; design courses that promote deep learning; and assess the impact of the teaching practices and design choices they have made. She provides tools to create a full syllabus, offers guidance on such issues as framing questions that encourage discussion, developing assignments with rubrics, and creating tests. What Laurie Richlin offers is a intellectual framework, set of tools and best practices to enable readers to design and continually reassess their courses to better meet their teaching goals and the learning needs of their students.

John K. Roth (ed.), Inspiring Teaching: Carnegie Professors of the Year Speak
Inspiring Teaching is a fascinating and often profound collection of essays written by 19 Carnegie Professors of the Year from a variety of colleges and universities across the U. S. and Canada.

Jane Vella, Learning To Listen, Learning To Teach: The Power Of Dialogue in Educating Adults
Vella draws on her rich personal experiences as an adult educator to reveal twelve basic principles of adult learning that transcend cultural differences. The principles include seeing the learner as decision maker in the learning process, building relationships for open communication, inviting participation by learners in goal setting through needs assessment, honoring cultural perspectives, and realizing the accountability of the teacher to the learners.
Large Classes (Return to Top)

Frank Heppner, Teaching the Large College Class: A Guidebook for Instructors with Multitudes
A distillation of years of experience by the author—who started his college teaching career in 1969—in teaching large classes and in coaching other professors to do the same, this guide is concise and user-friendly.

Christine A. Stanley and Erin M. Porter (Eds.), Engaging Large Classes: Strategies and Techniques for College Faculty
Experienced teachers of large classes across a wide range of disciplines and institutions offer instructional strategies and advice for both new and experienced faculty members. What many of the contributors have learned is that large classes can be just as stimulating and rewarding as small ones, and that the large size can yield surprisingly positive opportunities.

James Surowiecki, The Wisdom of Crowds
New Yorker business columnist James Surowiecki explores a deceptively simple idea: Large groups of people are smarter than an elite few, no matter how brilliant—better at solving problems, fostering innovation, coming to wise decisions, even predicting the future.
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (Return to Top)

Rae Andre and Peter J. Frost, Researchers Hooked on Teaching: Noted Scholars Discuss the Synergies of Teaching and Research
This insightful new book suggests that if scholars are to be teachers, then their ability to integrate teaching and research is basic to their well-being over the course of their career, and is probably a predictor of classroom effectiveness as well.

Regan A. R. Gurung, Nancy L. Chick, and Aeron Haynie: Exploring Signature Pedagogies Approaches to Teaching Disciplinary Habits of Mind. This book asks the question: How does each discipline foster deep learning and help students think like disciplinary experts? With contributions from the sciences, humanities, and the arts, this book offers a critical evaluation of how to best foster student learning across the disciplines.

Devorah Lieberman and Catherine Wehlburg (eds.), To Improve The Academy: Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development, Vol. 19
An annual publication of the Professional and Organizational Development (POD) Network in Higher Education, To Improve the Academy offers a resource for improvement in higher education to faculty and instructional development staff, department chairs, faculty, deans, student services staff, chief academic officers, and educational consultants.

Robert J. Menges, Maryellen Weimer and Associates, Teaching on Solid Ground: Using Scholarship to Improve Practice
This book helps define and illustrate the concept of scholarship of teaching. For faculty who regard teaching as more than a series of techniques, the authors included in this collection develop ideas that will offer intellectual substance, stimulate reflection, and lead to greater enjoyment from teaching.

Paul Savory, Amy Nelson Burnett, and Amy Goodburn, Inquiry into The College Classroom: A Journey Toward Scholarly Teaching
An essential companion for university faculty interested in conducting scholarly inquiry into their classroom teaching, this practical guide presents a formal model for making visible the careful, difficult, and intentional scholarly work entailed in exploring a teaching question.

James E. Zull, The Art of Changing The Brain
James Zull invites teachers in higher education or any other setting to accompany him in his exploration of what scientists can tell us about the brain and to discover how this knowledge can influence the practice of teaching. He describes the brain’s functions in clear non-technical language and an engaging conversational tone, always relating them to the real world of the classroom and his own evolution as a teacher.
Student Perspectives and Development (Return to Top)

Alexander W. Astin, What Matters in College? Four Critical Years Revisited
Based on a study of more than 20,000 students, 25,000 faculty members, and 200 institutions, the book shows how academic programs, faculty, student peer groups, and other variables affect students’ college experiences, and how these factors can shape students’ personalities and behavior; values and beliefs; and academic, cognitive, and career development.

Neil Howe and William Strauss, Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation
Having taken their own polls, weighed all the data, talked with hundreds of kids, parents, and teachers, and reflected on the rhythms of history, Howe and Strauss offer this powerful conclusion: Before the decade is over, Millennials will reject the Gen X pop culture, rebel against Boomer politics, dramatically redefine what it means to be young, and, in time, become America’s next great generation.

Richard J. Light, Making the Most of College
Richard Light interviewed 1600 Harvard students over a ten-year period to discover how to make the most of the college experience. Examining issues including collaborative selection of classes, talking productively with advisers, improving writing and study skills, maximizing the value of research assignments, and connecting learning inside the classroom with the rest of life, this book is a blueprint for academic success.

Michael Moffatt, Coming of Age in New Jersey: College and American Culture
This book is an anthropological study of students at Rutgers University (then Rutgers College) from 1977 to 1987. More broadly, however, Moffatt offers an analysis of college, late-adolescence, and certain general American cultural notions-individualism, friendship, community, bureaucracy, diversity, race, sex, intellect, work, and play-in the thought and experience of undergraduates.

Rebekah Nathan, My Freshman Year: What A Professor Learned By Becoming A Student
This book shares the experiences of an anthropologist who enrolled as a freshman, moved into the dorm, ate in the dining hall, and took a full load of courses. And she came to understand that being a student is a pretty difficult job, too.

William Strauss and Neil Howe, Generations: The History of America's Future, 1584 to 2069
William Strauss and Neil Howe posit the history of America as a succession of generational biographies, beginning in 1584 and encompassing everyone through the children of today. Their bold theory is that each generation belongs to one of four types, and that these types repeat sequentially in a fixed pattern.
Teaching in the Sciences (Return to Top)

Jerome Groopman, How Doctors Think
This book examines the kind of (often flawed) thinking that leads doctors to make decisions about patients' diagnoses and treatment. More broadly, however, it examines the role that preconceptions, prejudgments, and personal biases can play in rational thought processes.

Calvin S. Kalman, Successful Science and Engineering Teaching in Colleges and Universities
Based on the author’s work in science and engineering educational research, this book offers broad, practical strategies for teaching science and engineering courses and describes how faculty can provide a learning environment that helps students comprehend the nature of science, understand science concepts, and solve problems in science courses.

National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, Science, Evolution, and Creationism
In this book, a group of experts assembled by the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of medicine explain the fundamental methods of science, document the overwhelming evidence in support of biological evolution, and evaluate the alternative perspectives offered by advocates of various kinds of creationism, including “intelligent design.”

Shelia Tobias, They’re Not Dumb, They’re Different
In an effort to disentangle the many variables that account for failure and/or unwillingness of large numbers of college students to pursue mathematics and science, Sheila Tobias has engaged otherwise successful outsiders in a series of experiments across disciplinary boundaries. Her findings -- that barriers to learning are the result of "disciplinary cultures" -- puts students' "failure to thrive" in mathematics and science in an entirely new and different light.

Teaching with Technology (Return to Top)

The Alliance for Technology Access, Computer & Web Resources for People with Disabilities
In this book, The Alliance for Technology Access brings together the most up-to-date information on a wide range of topics, including making use of conventional, assistive and information technologies; personal stories of people using technology in their daily lives at school, at work and at home; details about state-of-the-art computer technology—including screen enhancements, speech synthesizers and customized keyboards—in a completely revised “toolbox” section; and brand-new and extensively updated listings of Web resources, publications, support organizations and vendors to contact for more information.

David G. Brown, Interactive Learning: Vignettes from America's Most Wired Campuses
In 93 brief, informal, and practical vignettes, professors show how they transformed courses with technology, discuss how the technology affected teaching and learning, and distill important lessons learned.

Derek Bruff, Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments The use of classroom response systems, or "clickers," which enable instructors to rapidly collect and analyze student responses to questions during class, has proven to both engage students in course material and provide valuable feedback on students learning and perspectives for instructors. Bruff includes illustrative examples of the range of questions that can be used effectively with clickers.

Carmela Cunningham and Norman Coombs, Information Access and Adaptive Technology
This practical new guide is designed to help school officials put students and staff with disabilities on a “level playing field” with everyone else, in computer labs, in libraries, and in classrooms. Rather than merely focusing on specific types of hardware and software, the authors discuss how to set up the infrastructure necessary to provide technology and support.

Dennis R. Falk and Helen L. Carlson, Multimedia in Higher Education: A Practical Guide to New Tools for Interaction and Learning
This book is designed to offer an overall paradigm for design of instruction related to multimedia, and to explore each step of the paradigm with reviews of the literature, lists of pertinent questions, case studies, guidelines, and resource suggestions.

Randy Garrison and Norman D. Vaughan. Blended Learning in Higher Education: Framework, Principles, and Guidelines
This groundbreaking book offers a down-to-earth resource for the practical application of blended learning in higher education as well as a comprehensive examination of the topic. Well-grounded in research, Blended Learning in Higher Education demonstrates how the blended learning approach embraces the traditional values of face-to-face teaching and integrates the best practices of online learning.

Kay Herr Gillespie, The Impact of Technology on Faculty Development, Life, and Work
This sourcebook treats issues of technology’s impact on faculty development, life, and work within the context of our changing epistemologies and a conception of faculty development as adult learning.

Richard N. Katz and Julia A. Rudy, Information Technology in Higher Education: Assessing its Impact and Planning for the Future
This book provides guidance to campus leaders, information technologists, and institutional researchers as they carry on essential collective discussions regarding the role of information systems, information services, and information itself. The authors provide us with a foundation to understanding how IT investments should be made, measured, and assessed, along with many practical suggestions and examples.

Timothy J. Newby and Judith Oates Lewandowski, Teaching and Learning with Microsoft Office 2007 and Expression Web
Teaching and Learning with Microsoft Office 2007 and Expression Web is designed to give busy and often overwhelmed teachers and students a quick way to see and grasp the basics of key software applications. Readers who use this book will obtain a foundation of the basics of common application software, learn how to integrate and utilize the software within classroom settings, and learn how to create a learning environment that is engaging, interesting, and effective.

Diana G. Oblinger and Sean C. Rush, The Future Compatible Campus: Planning, Designing, and Implementing Information Technology in the Academy
In The Future Compatible Campus, educational leaders explain how redesign and new uses of technology lead to greater institutional effectiveness. While the plan for creating a future compatible campus is unique to each institution, this book will assist in the development of a framework that focuses information technology planning on supporting an institution’s vision and goals, as well as how to translate that plan into action.

Diana G. Oblinger and Sean C. Rush, The Learning Revolution: The Challenge of Information Technology in the Academy
In The Learning Revolution, prominent educational leaders offer accounts of current experiments and innovations using technology, as well as predictions of how technology will profoundly shape the future of higher education. The fifteen essays in this book provide the reader with a full spectrum of ideas about technology’s role in higher education, both in and beyond the classroom.
Teaching Writing (Return to Top)
Jay Heinrichs. Thank You For Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can Teach us about the Art of Persuasion
Heinrichs is a clever, passionate and erudite advocate for rhetoric, the 3,000-year-old art of persuasion, and his user-friendly primer brims with anecdotes, historical and popular-culture references, sidebars, tips and definitions. For teachers who want to help students learn to make arguments, either orally or in writing, this book provides useful examples from traditional historical sources and popular culture.

Rebecca Moore Howard, Standing in the Shadow of Giants: Plagiarists, Authors, Collaborators
This book argues that through binary privileging of the "real" author (the inspired, autonomous genius) over the transgressive writer (the collaborator or the plagiarist), composition pedagogy deprives students of important opportunities to join in scholarly discourse and assume authorial roles.

Mike Rose, Lives on the Boundary
With rich detail, Rose demonstrates innovative methods to initiate “problem” students into the world of language, literature, and written expression. This book challenges educators, policymakers, and parents to reexamine their assumptions about the capacities of a wide range of students.
Topics for Specific Users
Adjunct Faculty (Return to Top)

Donald. A. Greive, A Handbook for Adjunct/Part-Time Faculty and Teachers of Adults
This books is designed to help adjuncts tackle the day-to-day problems associated with teaching part-time. From course planning to teaching adult students, this book offers practical suggestions, strategies and advice.

Richard E. Lyons, Best Practices for Supporting Adjunct Faculty
Best Practices for Supporting Adjunct Faculty showcases proven initiatives at a variety of institutional types—two- and four-year, public and private—that help achieve the needs of adjunct instructors, while increasing their effectiveness within institutions’ existing delivery systems.

Richard E. Lyons, Marcella L. Kysilka, and George E. Pawlas. The Adjunct Professor’s Guide to Success: Surviving and Thriving in the College Classroom
The Adjunct Professor’s Guide to Success begins by providing guidance to those seeking an initial teaching assignment. In then addresses the issues that will be faced—becoming oriented to the institution, planning the course, conducting an effective first class meeting, etc. The book concludes with chapters on self-evaluation techniques for building a part-time career in academe.
Resources for and about Graduate Students and Teaching Assistants (Return to Top)

R. R. Allen and Theodore Roeter, Teaching Assistant Strategies: An Introduction to College Teaching
This guide shows you how to find a comfortable and effective teaching style; how to relate to students, course directors, and support staff; how to plan creative and effective instructional units; how to create a positive atmosphere in the classroom; how to make lectures and class presentations interesting and relevant; how to conduct productive class discussions; how to conduct skill development courses effectively; and how to measure and evaluate student progress.

Sandra L. Barnes, On The Market: Strategies for a Successful Academic Job Search
This book examines professional and personal issues every candidate should think about before entering or re-entering the job market, or when considering, accepting, or rejecting a position. Included are suggestions, practical strategies, “quick lists,” publishing strategies, and advice from faculty, as well as observations and ideas developed during the author’s employment search process.

Kenneth A. Feldman and Michael B. Paulsen, Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom, 2nd ed.
This is a broad-based reader designed to increase the awareness and understanding of the most important issues, practices and research associated with the principles of effective teaching and learning in the college classroom. This book should serve as a resource for graduate students, faculty members, administrators, and any others with an interest in higher education.

Heather Fry, Steve Ketteridge, and Stephanie Marshall (eds.), A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice, 3rd ed.
This book focuses on developing professional academic skills for teaching. Dealing with the rapid expansion of the use of technology in higher education and widening student diversity, this fully updated and expanded edition includes new material on, the example, e-learning, lecturing to large groups, formative and summative assessment, and supervising research students.

John A. Goldsmith, John Komlos, and Penny Schine Gold, The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career: A Portable Mentor for Scholars from Graduate School through Tenure
In this guide, three distinguished scholars—with more than 75 years of combined teaching experience—talk openly about what’s good and what’s not so good about academic, as a place to work, and as a way of life. Written as an informal conversation among colleagues, the book is packed with inside information—about finding a mentor, making it through the dissertation, getting a job, obtaining tenure, and lots more useful advice.

Paul Gray and David E. Drew, What They Didn’t Teach You in Graduate School: 199 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career
What is academic life like? How do you discover its tacit rules? Develop the habits and networks needed for success? What issues will you encounter if you’re a person of color, or a woman? How is higher education changing? In 199 succinct, and often humorous but seriously practical hints, Gray and Drew share their combined experience of many years as faculty and (recovering) administrators to offer insider advice—the kind that’s rarely taught or even talked about in graduate school.

Kathryn Hume, Surviving Your Academic Job Hunt: Advice for Humanities PhDs
This book shows job hunters how to train themselves to succeed in the humanities job market. They can study examples of the documents and work up answers to the questions posed in phone, conference, and campus interviews. They will also learn about bargaining for items such as subsidies, databases, and start-up packages.

Julia Miller Vick and Jennifer S. Furlong, The Academic Job Search Handbook, 4th ed.
This book provides an overview of the hiring process and a timetable for applying for academic positions. It also gives detailed information on application materials, interviewing, negotiating job offers, and starting the new job. This new edition addresses hot topic in the competitive job market of today, including the challenges faced by dual-career couples, job search issues for pregnant candidates, advice on how to deal with gaps in a CV, and advice on seeking postdoctoral opportunities.

Catherine Ross and Jane Dunphy, Strategies for Teaching Assistant and International Teaching Assistant Development: Beyond Micro Teaching
Written for anyone who works with graduate students to support their teaching efforts in American research universities, this book draws on the extensive experience of professional educators who represent a variety of programs throughout the United States. They understand the common constraints of many TA development classes, workshops, and programs, as well as the need for motivating and sophisticated techniques that are, at the same time, practical and focused.

Robert Rotenberg, The Art & Craft of College Teaching: A Guide for New Professors & Graduate Students
This book provides a hands-on, quick-start guide to the complexities of the college classroom for instructors in their first five years of teaching independently. The chapters survey the existing literature on how to effectively teach young adults, offering specific solutions to the most commonly faced classroom dilemmas.

Emily Toth, Ms. Mentor’s Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia
Ms. Mentor’s readers will find answers to the secret queries they were afraid to ask anyone else. They’ll discover what it really takes to get tenure; what to wear to academic occasions; when to snicker, when to hide, what to eat, and when to sue. They’ll find out how to get firmly planted in the rich red earth of tenure.

Emily Toth, Mr. Mentor’s new and ever more Impeccable Advice for Women and men in Academia
From the ivory tower that affords her an unparalleled view of the academic landscape, Ms. Mentor dispenses her perfect wisdom to the huddled masses of professorial newbies, hardbitten oldies, and anxious midcareerists. She gives etiquette lessons to academic couples and the tough-talking low-down on adjunct positions. She tells you what to wear, how to make yourself popular, and how to decode academic language.

Resources for and about New Faculty (Return to Top)

Robert Boice, The New Faculty Member
Boice provides tested solutions for helping new faculty cope with common challenges, outlines a structured mentoring program to build collegiality through social support networks, and presents specific techniques for helping new faculty find time, fluency, and balance as writers, including advice on dealing with editorial evaluations or rejections.

Robert Boice, Advice for New Faculty Members: Nihil Nimus
This book is a unique and essential guide to the start of a successful academic career. By following its practical, easy-to-use rules, new faculty can learn to teach with the highest levels of student approval, involvement, and comprehension, to write with ease, and to socialize more successfully.

Kenneth A. Feldman and Michael B. Paulsen, Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom, 2nd ed.
This is a broad-based reader designed to increase the awareness and understanding of the most important issues, practices and research associated with the principles of effective teaching and learning in the college classroom. This book should serve as a resource for graduate students, faculty members, administrators, and any others with an interest in higher education.

Heather Fry, Steve Ketteridge, and Stephanie Marshall (eds.), A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice, 3rd ed.
This book focuses on developing professional academic skills for teaching. Dealing with the rapid expansion of the use of technology in higher education and widening student diversity, this fully updated and expanded edition includes new material on, the example, e-learning, lecturing to large groups, formative and summative assessment, and supervising research students.

William Germano, From Dissertation to Book
This book is the essential guide for academic writers who want to revise a doctoral thesis for publication. The author draws upon his extensive experience in academic publishing to provide writers with a state-of-the-art view of how to turn a dissertation into a manuscript that publishers will notice. Building on the idea that revising the dissertation is a process of adapting from one genre to another, Germano offers advice on such topics as rethinking the table of contents, taming runaway footnotes, shaping chapter length, and confronting the limitations of jargon. He also offers timetables to help writers plan their revision schedules.

Paul Gray and David E. Drew, What They Didn’t Teach You in Graduate School: 199 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career
What is academic life like? How do you discover its tacit rules? Develop the habits and networks needed for success? What issues will you encounter if you’re a person of color, or a woman? How is higher education changing? In 199 succinct, and often humorous but seriously practical hints, Gray and Drew share their combined experience of many years as faculty and (recovering) administrators to offer insider advice—the kind that’s rarely taught or even talked about in graduate school.

Christopher J Lucas and John W. Murray, Jr., New Faculty: A Practical Guide for Academic Beginners (2 nd ed.)
This fully revised edition of New Faculty offers a useful compendium of “survival” advice for the faculty newcomer on a variety of subjects: practical tips on classroom teaching, student performance evaluation, detailed advice on grant-writing, student advising, professional service, and publishing.

Robert J. Menges and Associates, Faculty in New Jobs: A Guide to Settling In, Becoming Established, and Building Institutional Support
Drawing on a study conducted by researchers at the National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, Faculty in New Jobs offers practical, real-world advice covering all phases of the faculty career—from the difficult early process of settling in, to becoming socially and academically established, to ultimately building the institutional supports necessary for a successful career.

Robert Rotenberg, The Art & Craft of College Teaching: A Guide for New Professors & Graduate Students
This book provides a hands-on, quick-start guide to the complexities of the college classroom for instructors in their first five years of teaching independently. The chapters survey the existing literature on how to effectively teach young adults, offering specific solutions to the most commonly faced classroom dilemmas.

A. Clay Schoenfeld and Robert Magnan, Mentor in a Manual: Climbing the Academic Ladder to Tenure, 3rd ed.
This professional handbook is designed to help pre-tenure faculty successfully navigate their way up the academic ladder. The authors provide practical advice about broader issues like acquiring an academic frame of mind as well as more specific issues like learning how to assimilate yourself into individual department cultures.

Franklin Silverman, Collegiality and Service for Tenure and Beyond: Acquiring a Reputation as a Team Player
This book is the third in a series of candid handbooks intended to provide assistant professors and graduate students contemplating a career in academia much of the practical information they’ll need to maximize the likelihood of being tenured and promoted to associate professor. This book deals with collegiality and service.

Strategies for Faculty Success
Strategies for Faculty Success (Return to Top)

Mim Carlson, Winning Grants Step by Step
Winning Grants Step by Step is the definitive guide to writing persuasive and successful proposals. In easy-to-understand terms, Mim Carlson leads you through creating a proposal—from start to finish—that fulfills the three most important criteria grantmakers demand from a competitive proposal: a clearly state purpose describing what your organization is trying to achieve, compelling evidence that demonstrates the importance of this goal, and a well-reasoned plan that outlines how your organization will meet the goal in a cost-effective manner.

A. Leigh Deneef and Crauford D. Goodwin (Eds.), The Academic's Handbook (3 rd ed.)
Faculty members, administrators, and professionals with experience at all levels of higher education offer candid, practical advice to help beginning academics understand matters including: the different kinds of institutions of higher learning and expectations of faculty at each; the ins and outs of the job market; the tenure system; the challenges of faculty mentoring; the modern research library; the structure of university governance; and the role of departments within the university.

Robert M. Diamond, Preparing For Promotion and Tenure Review: A Faculty Guide This practical book will help everyone preparing for promotion and tenure review to develop a solid foundation for the process. A guidebook that prepares the candidate and ensures a fair review process, it enumerates important questions to ask, lists factors to consider, and offers suggestions concerning materials to submit.

William Germano, From Dissertation to Book
This book is the essential guide for academic writers who want to revise a doctoral thesis for publication. The author draws upon his extensive experience in academic publishing to provide writers with a state-of-the-art view of how to turn a dissertation into a manuscript that publishers will notice. Building on the idea that revising the dissertation is a process of adapting from one genre to another, Germano offers advice on such topics as rethinking the table of contents, taming runaway footnotes, shaping chapter length, and confronting the limitations of jargon. He also offers timetables to help writers plan their revision schedules.

Paul Gray and David E. Drew, What They Didn’t Teach You in Graduate School: 199 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career
What is academic life like? How do you discover its tacit rules? Develop the habits and networks needed for success? What issues will you encounter if you’re a person of color, or a woman? How is higher education changing? In 199 succinct, and often humorous but seriously practical hints, Gray and Drew share their combined experience of many years as faculty and (recovering) administrators to offer insider advice—the kind that’s rarely taught or even talked about in graduate school.

Donald E. Hall, The Academic Self: An Owner's Manual
Donald E. Hall offers a self-help book designed for academics, from graduate students to tenured faculty. He helps readers engage in an active process of career management, goal setting, prioritization, and reflection on the norms that constitute what he calls “academic selfhood.”

Michele Lamont, How Professors Think: Inside the Curious World of Academic Judgment
In the academic evaluation system known as peer review, highly respected professors pass judgment, usually confidentially, on the work of others. But only those present in the deliberative chambers know exactly what is said. Michele Lamont observed deliberations for fellowships and research grants, and interviewed panel members at length. In How Professors Think, she reveals what she discovered about this secretive powerful, and peculiar world.

A. Clay Schoenfeld and Robert Magnan, Mentor in a Manual: Climbing the Academic Ladder to Tenure, 3rd ed.
This professional handbook is designed to help pre-tenure faculty successfully navigate their way up the academic ladder. The authors provide practical advice about broader issues like acquiring an academic frame of mind as well as more specific issues like learning how to assimilate yourself into individual department cultures.

Franklin Silverman, Collegiality and Service for Tenure and Beyond: Acquiring a Reputation as a Team Player
This book is the third in a series of candid handbooks intended to provide assistant professors and graduate students contemplating a career in academia much of the practical information they’ll need to maximize the likelihood of being tenured and promoted to associate professor. This book deals with collegiality and service.

Emily Toth, Ms. Mentor’s Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia
Ms. Mentor’s readers will find answers to the secret queries they were afraid to ask anyone else. They’ll discover what it really takes to get tenure; what to wear to academic occasions; when to snicker, when to hide, what to eat, and when to sue. They’ll find out how to get firmly planted in the rich red earth of tenure.

Emily Toth, Mr. Mentor’s new and ever more Impeccable Advice for Women and men in Academia
From the ivory tower that affords her an unparalleled view of the academic landscape, Ms. Mentor dispenses her perfect wisdom to the huddled masses of professorial newbies, hardbitten oldies, and anxious midcareerists. She gives etiquette lessons to academic couples and the tough-talking low-down on adjunct positions. She tells you what to wear, how to make yourself popular, and how to decode academic language.

Kenneth J. Zahorski, The Sabbatical Mentor: A Practical Guide to Successful Sabbaticals
The Sabbatical Mentor makes concrete the planning, execution, and follow-up necessary for successful sabbaticals. By breaking the process into logical and manageable segments, the author demystifies it and thereby encourages individuals to participate in this unique, enjoyable and professional rewarding benefit of academic life.