Go to the NYS Writers Institutes Home Page

"The Writing Semester"
Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the
New York State Writers Institute

In Association with the College of Arts & Sciences
(Cosponsors)

See also the Classic Film Series Schedule
Visiting Writers Series
Spring 2004 Schedule

Michael Ashkin
Paul Auster
Russell Banks
Dave Baron
Dave Barry
10 Brecht Poems
Iris Chang
Chorale Concert
Billy Collins
Crossing the BLVD
Edwidge Danticat
Digital Expression
The Doctor Stories
Janice Galloway
Eugene K. Garber
Nelson George
Ellen Goodman
Eamon Grennan
Mary C. Henderson
Jack Hitt
HumaniTech*
David Ives Sketches
Danielle/Kreg Jones
Ross King
Mark Kurlansky
Marisol
Mohawk
Rick Moody
Musicians of Ma'alwyck
Ruth Ozeki
ZZ Packer
Richard Price
Marion Roach
Jackie Roberts
Elizabeth Rosner
Katy Siegel
Russell Shorto
Barbara Smith
Bonnie Smith
State Author/Poet
Robert Storr
Gary Taubes
Alan Taylor
Words w/out Walls

ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
(Except when cosponsors charge their own fees)
January / February / March / April
Subject to change; please check back for updates.
Richard Price
RICHARD PRICE

Richard Price is the author of seven novels, which convincingly portray the grit and despair of the inner-city. His most recent books include the best-sellers Samaritan (2003), a crime drama about a former TV writer who returns to teach in the inner city neighborhood of his youth, which was chosen for the Read This! Book Club on "Good Morning America," Freedomland (1998), and Clockers (1992), which was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Price has also written numerous screenplays including Sea of Love, Ransom, and The Color of Money, which will be shown on Friday, January 23rd at 7:30 p.m. in Page Hall.

January 27
(Tuesday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Assembly Hall, CC

8:00 p.m. Reading
Recital Hall, PAC
Ross King
ROSS KING

British writer Ross King is the best-selling author of the nonfiction works Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling (2003), the story behind the frescoed ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, and Brunelleschi's Dome (2000), the story of the construction of the enormous dome of Florence's Santa Maria del Fiore cathedral. He has also published two novels, Ex-Libris (1998), and Domino (1996, 2003). Cosponsored by the University Art Museum.

January 29
(Thursday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Standish Room, LE

8:00 pm Reading
Assembly Hall, CC

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JACKIE ROBERTS
Lick o' the Knife
STAGED READING

Jackie Roberts, playwright-in-residence, is the author of Lick o' the Knife, a modern comedy that pays homage to the blood and thunder of Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy. A professor of Drama and Literature at the University of San Diego, Roberts is also an actress who performs regularly with San Diego-area theatre companies. Her television appearances have included The Steve Harvey Show, The West Wing, and ER. Cosponsored by the Departments of Theatre and English, the Futterer-Gould Award, Diversity & Affirmative Action, and the New York State Writers Institute.

Feb 1-8 Residency

February 5 (Thurs)
4pm Seminar
Studio Theatre/PAC
February 7 (Sat)
8pm Reading
Studio Theatre/PAC
The Doctor Stories
STAGED READING

Surgeon-turned-author Richard Selzer and Kathryn G. Maes, Chair of the Department of Theatre, Film, and Video Production at the UColorado at Denver, have adapted some of Selzer's stories for the stage. Troy native Richard Selzer has published several short story and essay collections including Rituals of Surgery (1973), his first collection of short stories, Mortal Lessons: Notes on the Art of Surgery (1976), Confessions of a Knife (1979), a collection of which are surgical memoirs, Letters to a Young Doctor (1982), Taking the World in for Repairs (1986), Imagine a Woman (1990), Down from Troy (1992),and The Doctor Stories (1998). Making use of a vast store of information and experiences from his medical career, Selzer's tales of the sick and diseased, while often startling and shocking, are filled with compassion and a certain awe for the mystery of the human body. Cosponsored by the NYS Writers Institute and Department of Theatre.

February 3
(Tuesday)


7:30 p.m. Reading
Recital Hall, PAC

Art & Culture Talks
MICHAEL ASHKIN

Michael Ashkin is a sculptor living in Brooklyn, New York. Focusing on issues surrounding environmental degradation, Ashkin creates lifelike models of desolated postindustrial landscapes. Built to scale and meticulous in detail, the constructions manage to look vast and unending despite their miniature format. Ashkin's work has been shown at major galleries such as Andre Rosen (New York), Leo Castelli (New York), White Columns (New York) and is currently on view at the Frieze Art Fair (London). Sponsored by the University Art Museum as part of their Art & Culture Talks.

February 4
(Wednesday)

7:00 p.m. Reading
Art Museum
Fine Arts Bldg


THE MUSICIANS
OF MA'ALWYCK

with guest reader
LEONARD SLADE Jr

The Musicians of Ma'alwyck celebrate Black History Month with guest reader Leonard Slade, Jr. Under the direction of Ann-Marie Barker Schwartz, violinist Ann-Marie Barker Schwartz, guitarist Sten Isachsen and cellist Petia Kassarova present a tribute to black composers with selections by Ulysses Kay, Harry Burleight, Adolphus Hailstork, Leo Brouwer and others. The program includes African, Cuban, and European black composers, as well as African-American composers. Poet Leonard Slade will read his own works and selections by other black poets. Slade is Chair of the Africana Studies Department and author of eleven poetry volumes including For the Love of Freedom (2001), Neglecting the Flowers (1997), and Pure Light (1996). Cosponsored by the Musicians of Ma'alwyck and the Departments of Music and Africana Studies.

February 5
(Thursday)

$7/$3 for students
For Tickets
Call 518-442-3997


8:00 p.m. Performance
Recital Hall, PAC

Nelson George NELSON GEORGE

Nelson George, considered one of the foremost commentators on black culture of his generation, is an accomplished screenwriter, documentarian, critic, and author of seven award-winning nonfiction books, most recently Post-Soul Nation (2004), an examination of the splintering of African-American culture in the 1980s, Hip-Hop America (1998), Blackface: Reflections on African-Americans and the Movies (1994), Elevating the Game: Black Men and Basketball (1992), and the Death of Rhythm and Blues (1988). Nelson's published novels are: Show & Tell, Seduced, and the Blackboard bestsellers Urban Romance and One Woman Short. George served as black music editor for Billboard and wrote the "Native Son" column for The Village Voice.

February 10
(Tuesday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Assembly Hall, CC

8:00 p.m. Reading
Recital Hall, PAC

Mark Kurlansky MARK
KURLANSKY

Mark Kurlansky, journalist and popular historian, is known for his bestselling "niche histories," including his most recent work 1968 (2004), a look at the cultural and political history of that world-changing year, Salt: A World History (2002), and Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World (1997). Other books include The Basque History of the World (1999), and A Chosen Few: The Resurrection of European Jewry (1994). Kurlansky recently published his first fiction collection, The White Man in the Tree (2000), and edited Choice Cuts (2002), an anthology of great food writing.

February 12
(Thursday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Standish Room, LE

8:00 p.m. Reading
Assembly Hall, CC

Jack Hitt
JACK HITT
Marion Roach MARION ROACH
Gary Taubes
GARY TAUBES

Discussion on the art of journalism and current issues within the field.
Jack Hitt is a contributing writer for Harper's, GQ and Lingua Franca. He also writes for The New York Times Magazine, Outside and Mother Jones. In 1990, he received the Livingston Award for national coverage. His books include Off the Road: A Modern-Day Walk Down the Pilgrimís Route into Spain(1994, Simon & Schuster, ISBN 0-671-75818-7) and In a Word: Dictionary (1992). He contributes frequently to NPR's "This American Life."
Marion Roach is a science journalist, former New York Times staff writer, and contributor to NPR's "All Things Considered." Her 1983 article about her mother's struggle with Alzheimer's disease remains one of the most reprinted articles in the New York Times Magazine's history. She is co-author (with Dr. Michael Baden) of the book, Dead Reckoning: The New Science of Catching Killers (2001), an entertaining and informative examination of the latest breakthroughs in forensic pathology, and the author of Another Name for Madness (1985). Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Newsday, American Health, and Prevention. A resident of Troy, she served as host of the 1996 WMHT/PBS documentary, Historic Views of the Collar City.
Gary Taubes writes about science, medicine and health for The Atlantic Monthly, New York Times Magazine, Discover, Esquire, GQ and Technology Review. A three-time winner of the National Association of Science Writers award, Taubes currently serves as contributing correspondent for Science. His books include Bad Science: The Short Life and Hard Times of Cold Fusion (1992) and Nobel Dreams: Power, Deceit and the Ultimate Experiment (1988).


JOURNALISM: THE STATE OF THE ART

February 19
(Thursday)

8:00 p.m. Panel
Recital Hall, PAC

Rick Moody
RICK MOODY

Rick Moody, fiction writer and editor, is the author of three novels, two story collections and a memoir. His first novel, Garden State (1991) won the Pushcart Press Editors Choice Award. He gained national recognition with the publication of his second novel, The Ice Storm (1994), which was adapted into a movie in 1997. His most recent works include the memoir The Black Veil (2002) and the story collection Demonology (2000). Moody has also written essays for two books featuring the photography of Gregory Crewdson, Twilight (2002), and Hover (1998) and on contemporary artists Roy Lichtenstein and Fred Tomaselli. Cosponsored with the University Art Museum.

February 24
(Tuesday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Art Museum, FA

8:00 p.m. Reading
Recital Hall, PAC

Ellen Goodman ELLEN GOODMAN

Ellen Goodman is a Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated columnist whose articles on contemporary American life have appeared in more than 400 newspapers for over 25 years. Her columns appear weekly in the Albany Times Union and the Schenectady Daily Gazette. She is also the author of six collections of her essays, the most recent of which is Paper Trail (February 2004), the nonfiction book Turning Points (1979, Doubleday) which detailed the effect of the changing roles of women on the family, and co-author of I Know Just What You Mean: The Power of Friendship in Women's Lives (2000, Simon & Schuster).

February 25
(Wednesday)


8:00 p.m. Reading
Page Hall

ZZ Packer ZZ PACKER

ZZ Packer is the author of the short story collection Drinking Coffee Elsewhere (2002), whose title story was included in The New Yorker's Debut Fiction issue in 2000. She attended Yale University and the Writing Seminar at Johns Hopkins University, The Writers' Workshop at Iowa University and was a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. Her work has also appeared in Seventeen, Harper's, Story magazine and in The Best American Short Stories (2000), Ploughshares and has been anthologized in 25 and Under: Fiction.

February 26
(Thursday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Assembly Hall, CC

8:00 p.m. Reading
Assembly Hall, CC

Russell Banks, State Author 2004-2006
RUSSELL BANKS
Billy Collins, State Poet 2004-2006
BILLY COLLINS

New York State Author/State Poet Awards Ceremony and Reading
In conjunction with the Governor's Office, the NYS Writers Institute will award the Edith Wharton Citation of Merit for Fiction Writers and the Walt Whitman citation of Merit for Poets for 2004-2006 to authors whose career achievements make them deserving of New York State's highest literary honors. The out-going State Author is
Kurt Vonnegut; the out-going State Poet is John Ashbery.
Russell Banks's writing career spans five decades and has published five short story collections, nine novels, and four poetry collections. His fiction captures the expereinces of working class people who live in the Northeast, and often deals with issues of family conflict, addiction, econimic hardship, and racism.
Billy Collins, former U.S. Poet Laureate for two consecutive terms (2001-2203), is one of America's best-loved and best-selling poets. His readings are usually standing room only, and his audience--enhanced tremendously by his appearances on National Public Radio--includes people of all backgrounds and age groups. Author of seven collections, his poems are enjoyed by critics and readers alike for their plain language, friendly tone, intelligent humor, and profound observation about the meaning of everyday life.

March 4
(Thursday)

7:30 pm Ceremony
& Reading
Page Hall


WORDS WITHOUT WALLS

The First Annual Capital Region Creative Writing Conference
An all-day conference featuring intensive workshops in many genres including poetry, fiction, screenwriting, song lyrics, and self-publishing/book arts. Also panel discussions about multi-media and creative writing, slam and performance poetry and on building literary communities, an open mike, and informal opportunities for networking and mingling. Presented by The Writing Center at UAlbany, in collaboration with the English Dept and several area colleges. All area undergraduate creative writers are welcome.

March 6
(Saturday)

10:30 am-7:00 pm
Humanities Bldg

442-4064
Art & Culture Talks
KATY SIEGEL

Katy Siegel is a contributing editor of Artforum and teaches contemporary art history and criticism at Hunter College, CUNY. She is the co-author of Art & Money, forthcoming from Thames & Hudson, as well as an edited volume of Sidney Tillim's art critical writings, forthcoming from Routledge. Seigel is also the author of numerous articles and catalogues essays on contemporary art. Sponsored by the University Art Museum as part of their Art & Culture Talks.

March 8
(Monday)

7:00 p.m. Reading
Art Museum
Fine Arts Bldg

Staged Reading of Mohawk
STAGED READING

W. Langdon Brown's adaptation of Richard Russo's novel Mohawk will be presented as a staged reading. Mohawk (1986) is Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Richard Russo's first novel about a town set on the wrong side of the tracks and the hard-luck lives of its citizens. Brown, Director of Graduate Studies, UAlbany Department of Theatre, has directed plays in professional theatres in New York City and London including the world premiere of his translation of Le System Ribadier by Feydeau. His university and college directing credits include the world premiere of John and Elizabeth Fuller's Not Just a Love Story, and the American premiere of Ladies in Waiting by Canadian playwright Ellen Fox, among numerous others. Cosponsored by the Department of Theatre.

March 9
(Tuesday)

7:30 p.m. Staged Reading
Recital Hall, PAC

Paul Auster
PAUL AUSTER

Paul Auster, novelist, memoirist, poet and screenwriter, captured a wide audience with his best-selling "New York Trilogy" of post-modern detective novels, including City of Glass (1985), Ghosts (1986), and The Locked Room (1987). Celebrated for rich prose and inventive plots, Auster's novels also include The Music of Chance (1990), Leviathan (1992), Timbuktu (1999), The Book of Illusions (2002), and most recently Oracle Night (2003). Recent books include Collected Poems (2004), and the best-selling True Tales of American Life (editor, 2002) of the NPR National Story Project. Auster's film collaborations with Wayne Wang have included Smoke (1995), Blue in the Face (1995), and The Center of the World (2001).

March 11
(Thursday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Campus Center 375

8:00 p.m. Reading
Recital Hall, PAC

All in the Timing Sketches
David Ives' collection of six fast-paced and wickedly funny sketches twists and skewers reality in ways that will astound and amaze. Sponsored by the Department of Theatre. For tickets call the Performing Arts Center Box Office at (518) 442-3997.

March 12,13, 17-20
(March 14, 3pm)

$12/$8 for students
8 pm Performance
Studio Theatre
Janice Galloway
JANICE GALLOWAY

Janice Galloway, Scottish fiction writer, is the author of three award-winning novels: Clara, winner of the 2002 Saltire Society Scottish Book of the Year Award; Foreign Parts, which won the 1994 McVitie's Prize; and The Trick is to Keep Breathing, which won the 1990 MIND/Allen Lane Book of the Year Award. Galloway will read from Clara, a fictional portrait of 19th-century pianist Clara Schumann, wife of composer Robert. The reading will be interspersed with music of the Schumanns performed by The Musicians of Ma'alwyck. This ensemble, in residence at both UAlbany and the Schuyler Mansion, a NY State Historical Site, has performed by invitation for TV producer Norman Lear. Cosponsored by the New York State Writers Institute, The Musicians of Ma'alwyck and the NY State Museum.

March 15
(Monday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Standish Room, LE

8:00 p.m. Reading
(w/musical accompaniment)
NYS Museum, CEC


DIGITAL EXPRESSION

Digital Expression displays the vitality and artistic creativity on the UAlbany campus showcasing music, digital art, dance, and multimedia by students and faculty from the Music, Art, and Theatre Departments. Cosponsored by the Departments of Music, Art and Theatre. For tickets and directions call the PAC Box Office at 518-442-3997.

March 23 & 30
(Tuesdays)

$7/$3 for students
Both nights $12/$5

8 pm Performance
Studio Theatre
Russell Shorto
RUSSELL
SHORTO

Russell Shorto, journalist and nonfiction writer, discusses his latest book The Island at the Center of the World (March 2004), the story of Dutch Manhattan and the crucial role the Dutch played in the shaping of America. Material from the collection of the New York State Library and the New York State Archives relating to the early settlement of New Amsterdam will also be on display. Shorto is also the author of Gospel Truth (1998), about the search for the historical Jesus, and Saints and Madmen: Psychiatry Opens Its Doors to Spirituality (1999). Shorto also writes regularly for the New York Times Magazine. Cosponsored by the New York State Writers Institute, the NYS Library, and Friends of the NYS Library. Registration advised: call 486-4815.

March 24
(Wednesday)

5:00 p.m. Reading/Exhibit
Cultural Ed Ctr

Art & Culture Talks

ROBERT STORR

Facts and Fiction: Stories and Histories in Recent Art
Artist, critic and curator Robert Storr is Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. As a curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York from 1990-2002, Storr organized numerous shows including retrospectives on Gerhard Richter, Chuck Close, Tony Smith, and Bruce Nauman. He is the co-curator of "Max Beckmann" an exhibition on view at MOMA QNS through the end of October 2004. Sponsored by the University Art Museum as part of their Art & Culture Talks.

March 24
(Wednesday)

7:00 p.m. Reading
Art Museum
Fine Arts Building

Dave Baron

Dave Baron has reported on science, medicine, technology, and the environment for National Public Radio for more than 15 years. His work has received numerous honors including three journalism awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Baron will discuss his recent book The Beast in the Garden: A Modern Parable of Man and Nature (2003), which explores the advance of mountain lions into areas of human habitat in Boulder, Colorado, and the conflicts that arise when humans attempt to coexist with wildlife. Sponsored by the Science Library.

March 25
(Thursday)

3:00 p.m. Lecture
Standish Room, LE



Fossieck Lecture
ALAN TAYLOR

"Covering the Grave: Murder on the Eighteenth-Century Frontier"
Alan Taylor is an historian and award-winning author whose books focus on early American and colonial history. He is the author of William Cooper's Town (1995), a biography of the land developer and political leader, and a study of Cooperstown, New York, founded by Cooper. The book won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for American History as well as the Bancroft and Beveridge prizes. His other works include American Colonies (2001) and Liberty Men and Great Proprietors (1990). Taylor is a professor of history at the University of California, Davis. Sponsored by the Department of History.

March 31
(Wednesday)


4:00 p.m. Lecture
Campus Ctr 375

Barbara Smith
BARBARA SMITH

Barbara Smith, African-American feminist editor and essayist, whose work focuses on the social and economic conditions of and prejudices against women of color, is the founder of Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press. She is the author of The Truth That Never Hurts: Writings on Race, Gender and Freedom (1998) and has edited three publications including Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology (1983). Cosponsored by the Departments of Women's Studies, Africana Studies, English, School of Social Welfare, Pride Alliance, ASUBA, and the New York State Writers Institute.

March 31
(Wednesday)


7:00 p.m. Lecture
Ballroom, CC

Ruth Ozeki
RUTH OZEKI

Ruth Ozeki, fiction writer and filmmaker, is the author most recently of All Over Creation (2003), a humorous novel about potato farmers, eco-saboteurs, globalization and genetically modified food crops. Her earlier novel, My Year of Meats (1998), a brilliant burlesque of the meat and media industries in the U.S. and Japan, received the Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize and the Special Jury Prize of the World Cookbook Awards in Versailles, France. Cosponsored by the New York State Writers Institute and the Greater Capital Region Teacher Center.
Ozeki's documentary film, Halving the Bones, which was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, will be screened on Friday, March 26th at 7:30 p.m. in Page Hall.

April 1
(Thursday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Assembly Hall, CC

8:00 p.m. Reading
Recital Hall, PAC

10 Brecht Poems is a sharp, humorous two-woman work of performance poetry starring Tannis Kowalchuk and Leese Walker. A co-production of the NaCl Theatre and the Strike Anywhere Performance Ensemble, 10 Brecht Poems employs physical theatre, song and visual arts to give expression to trenchant anti-war poems by German playwright and social critic Bertolt Brecht.

April 13
(Tuesday)

8:00 p.m. Performance
Recital Hall, PAC
Iris Chang
IRIS CHANG

Journalist Iris Chang is the bestselling author of The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II (1997), an account of the terrible events that took place in the Chinese city of Nanking under Japanese occupation. The book spent more than four months on the New York Times bestseller list. Chang will read from and discuss her latest book The Chinese in America (March 2004), an engrossing narrative history of more than 150 years of Chinese immigration. Cosponsored by the New York State Writers Institute and the Greater Capital Region Teacher Center.

April 14
(Wednesday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Standish Room, LE

8:00 p.m. Reading
Recital Hall, PAC

Danielle Jones
DANIELLE JONES
Kreg Jones
KREG JONES

Danielle Jones, poet and multimedia artist, creates texts that play with graphic, electronic, and physical forms. Her projects not only merge poetry and architecture, virtual and material, aesthetic and experimental, but also push the possibilities and blur the boundaries of each of these areas. Jones often collaborates on her various projects with her husband Kreg, who is an architect. She is completing a Ph.D. in English at UAlbany. Among her awards is the Phyllis Hurd Liston Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets for the poem "A Cosmology," and she was commissioned to write the poem "To Show the Existence of Unreal, Subjective Space" for a M.C. Escher exhibition at the Hiraklidon Museum in Athens, Greece. Future venues include presenting her poetry at the Craft, Critique and Culture Conference at UIowa and her electronic poetry will be featured in the forthcoming edition of The Little Magazine. Kreg Jones works for John G. Waite and Associates Architects--one of the premier design firms for restoration and preservation artchitecture.

McKINNEY LECTURE
Poetry in 3 Dimensions

April 14
(Wednesday)

7:30 p.m. Reading
Russell Sage Bldg
Lab Room 3303
RPI, Troy
Bonnie Smith
BONNIE SMITH

24th Annual Phi Alpha Theta Distinguished Lecture in History
Bonnie Smith is a prize-winning historian whose work emphasizes the lives of ordinary individuals, particularly women. Her books include Gendering Disability (with Beth Hutchison, 2004), Imperialism (2000), The Gender of History (1998), Confessions of a Concierge (1985), and Ladies of the Leisure Class (1981). She also is editor of the five volume Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History (2005). Sponsored by the Department of History.

April 16
(Friday)


3:00 p.m. Lecture
Humanities 354

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The University Chorale and University Chamber Singers perform in this annual event with accompanist Gordon Hibberd under the direction of David Janower. Sponsored by the Department of Music. For tickets call the Performing Arts Center Box Office at (518) 442-3997.

April 18
(Sunday)

$5/$2 for students

7:00 p.m. Concert
Main Theatre, PAC
Elizabeth Rosner
ELIZABETH
ROSNER

Elizabeth Rosner is the author of the debut novel The Speed of Light (2001), which received the 2002 Harold U. Ribalow Prize and was selected for the Hadassah National Book Club in 2003. Her prize-winning short fiction and poetry have been published in numerous literary journals. Much of her writing explores the impact of her parents' experiences as holocaust survivors on her own life. Sponsored by The Center for Jewish Studies.

April 21
(Wednesday)


8:00 p.m. Reading
Campus Center 375

Marisol is a wild, hallucinogenic riff on hope and despair in the Big Apple, by playwright Jose Rivera. Rivera mixes gritty reality with bold flights of fantasy to create an unforgettable theatrical landscape. Sponsored by the Department of Theatre. For tickets call the Performing Arts Center Box Office at (518) 442-3997.

April 23, 24, 28-5/1
(April 25, 3pm)

$12/$8 for students
8 pm Performance
Lab Theatre, PAC

HumaniTech*

HumaniTech*: Humanities, Technology, Science, & the Nexus of Discourse Conference
A series of panel discussions, lectures, and exhibits on the topics Writing and Technology, Aesthetics and Visual Culture, Applied Technology and the Human Subject, Games, Play and New Media, among others. Full schedule TBA. For information contact Mary Valentis at 518-442-4082. Sponsored by HumaniTech*.

April 23-25
(Friday-Sunday)


?:00 p.m.
TBA

Edwidge Danticat EDWIDGE DANTICAT

Haitian-American fiction writer, Edwidge Danticat will read from her most recent story The Dew Breaker (March, 2004), the tale of a quiet man from Haiti, a former state torturer, now living a "respectable" life in Brooklyn, New York. Danticat received the American Book Award for her novel The Farming of Bones (1998). Her first short story collection krik? krak! (1995) earned her a National Book Award nomination. Her other novels are Breath, Eyes, Memory (1994) and The Farming of Bones, which won the American Book Award. Cosponsored by Fonkoze Albany and the French Studies Program in conjunction with the ongoing celebration of the Bicentennial of Haitian Independence.

April 26
(Monday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Assembly Hall, CC

8:00 p.m. Reading
Assembly Hall, CC

Mary C Henderson MARY C.
HENDERSON

Noted American theatre historian Mary C. Henderson, a member of the Tony Award committee for her twelfth season, will speak on "Confessions of a Tony Nominator: Two Decades of New York Theatre." Henderson is the author most recently of Mielziner: Master of Modern Stage Design (2001), an illustrated biography of celebrated stage designer Jo Mielziner. Her previous books include Broadway Ballyhoo: The American Theatre Seen in Posters, Photographs, Magazines, Caricatures and Programs (1989), The City and the Theatre, New York Playhouses from Bowling Green to Times Square, and Theatre in America: Two Hundred Years of Plays, Players and Productions (1986, revised 1996). The Burian Lecture is cosponsored by the Theatre Department and is funded by the Jarka and Grayce Susan Burian Endowment.

Burian Lecture
April 27
(Tuesday)

8:00 p.m. Lecture
Recital Hall, PAC

Eugen K. Garber EUGENE K. GARBER

Eugene K. Garber is a Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus of English at the University at Albany. He has published two collections of fiction: Metaphysical Tales, winner of the 1981 Associated Writing Programs Award for Short Fiction, and The Historian, winner of TriQuarterly's 1992 William Goyen Prize for Fiction. He is the recipient of awards from the National Endowment for Arts, the National Endowment for Humanities, the New York State Council for the Arts, and the Fulbright Foundation. His fiction has been anthologized in The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Fiction, Best American Short Stories, and The Paris Review Anthology, among others. Garber will read from his latest collection of short stories Beasts in Their Wisdom (2004). Eugene Garber was Acting Associate Director of the NYS Writers Institute from 9/94 to 9/95.

April 29
(Thursday)

4:00 p.m. Reading
Campus Center 375


Crossing the BLVD is a multimedia presentation based on the book Crossing the BLVD: Strangers, Neighbors, Aliens in a New America, by Warren Lehrer and Judith Sloan. Using slides, sound, storytelling, and character monologues, Lehrer and Sloan reveal the voices and images of people who live in Queens, New York, the most ethnically diverse locality in the U.S. Sponsored by Capital Voices~Capital Lives, a Talking History Project, and the Department of History.

April 29
(Thursday)


7:30 p.m. Presentation
Page Hall

Eamon Grennan EAMON
GRENNAN
Originally scheduled for April 28 - Note date change

Irish-born poet Eamon Grennan is the author of nine collections of poetry including Still Life With Waterfall (2002), Relations: New & Selected Poems (1998), So It Goes (1995),and As If it Matters (1991). His poems, which have won numerous awards and honors, most recently the Lenore Marshall Prize from the Academy of American Poets, often blend Irish remembrances and American experiences. Grennan is the Dexter M. Ferry Jr. Professor of English at Vassar College and is Poet-in-Residence at the New York State Writers Institute for Spring 2004.

May 3Date/Location Changes
(Monday)

4:15 p.m. Seminar
Humanities 354

8:00 p.m. Reading
Campus Ctr 375

Dave Barry
DAVE BARRY

Dave Barry is one of America's most popular humor columnists. His satirical observations on daily life in middle-class America earned him the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for commentary. Based at the Miami Herald, his column has been syndicated in more than 150 newspapers nationwide since 1986. He has also published over 20 books including the best-sellers Dave Barry Slept Here: A Sort of History of the United States (1989), and Dave Barry Turns Forty (1990). Barry writes about various major issues relating to the international economy, the future of democracy, the social infrastructure and exploding toilets.

May 4
(Tuesday)

8:00 p.m. Reading
Page Hall