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Undergraduate Bulletin 2007-2008
 
Bulletin Homepage |College of Arts & Sciences | Courses in Russian

Courses in Russian


A Rus 151 Tolstoy’s War and Peace (3)

In 1963, at age 35, Tolstoy began writing War and Peace. Over the next seven years, it transmogrified from a novel about decadent Russian society in the 1850s to an epic about Russian society during the Napoleonic wars of the 1810s. Our exploration of War and Peace includes Tolstoy’s own letters and later interpretations in Bondarchuk’s film (1967) and Prokofiev’s opera (1952), as we examine the big questions: the individual in relation to history, free will, the psychological hero, knowledge, historical determinism, death and war, as well as more specific subjects such as the cultural war between Russia and France, the Napoleonic Wars, the nobility, and love.

A Rus 161 Russian Civilization (3)

The cultural and ideological development of Russia from the inheritance of the Byzantine Empire through the 1917 Russian Revolution. Includes various aspects of history, political systems, economy and culture and the arts. Conducted in English. A Rus 161Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 161; only one may be taken for credit. [EU]

A Rus 161Z Russian Civilization (3)

A Rus 161Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 161; only one may be taken for credit. [EU WI]

A Rus 162: Russia Today (3)

Introduction to the society and culture of contemporary Russia, focusing in part on the continuities and differences between Soviet and post-Soviet period. Topics to be studied include: the linguistic and cultural revolution of the 1990’s, individual adaptation to a new economic environment, official and unofficial attempts to “construct” a new Russia. Conducted in English. A Rus 162Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 162; only one may be taken for credit. [BE]

A Rus 162Z Russia Today (3)

A Rus 162Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 162.; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]

A Rus 171 (= A Wss 171) Women in Russian Culture (3)

The course will examine the roles of women in Russian culture through a study of film, literary works by and about women. Only one of A Rus 171 & A Wss 171 may be taken for credit. [HU]. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 190 Women Writers in Russian Literature (3)

The course examines Russian women’s writings beginning with the 18th century to the present. The texts are studies in the context of Russian literature in general and women’s writings in particular. It includes: autobiographies by Catherine the Great, Alexandra Durova and Nadezda Mandelshtam; prose works by Karolina Pavlovana, Elena Guro, Tatjana Tolstaia, and the plays by Liudmila Petrushevskaia. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 240 Great Works of Russia in English Translation (1)

Each mini-course in A Rus 240 focuses on a great book by a Russian author and examines it in depth. Emphasis on textual analysis with consideration of diverse critical approaches and the work’s significance for Russian society and world literature. Conducted in English. A Rus 239 and/or 240 may be repeated for credit when content differs.

A Rus 251 Masterpieces of 19th-Century Russian Literature (3)

Survey of the development of Russian literature. particularly prose fiction. from the age of Pushkin to 1900. Readings will be chosen from short stories and novels by the following writers: Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Goncharov, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. Conducted in English. [HU]

A Rus 252 Masterpieces of 20th-Century Russian Literature (3)

Survey of the development of Russian literature, particularly prose fiction, from the turn of the century to the death of Stalin (1953). Readings will be chosen from short stories and novels by the following writers: Chekhov, Gorky, Olesha, Bulgakov, Babel, Pasternak, Zamyatin, Sholokhov. Conducted in English. [HU]

A Rus 253 Contemporary Russian Literature (3)

Survey of Soviet literature from the death of Stalin (1953) to the present. Readings taken primarily from prose fiction by such writers as Solzhenitsyn, Trifonov, Aksyonov, Shukshin, Bitov and Erofeyev. Discussion of how the changing political situation has affected writers and literature. Conducted in English. [HU]

A Rus 261 (formerly A Rus 361) Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in English Translation (3)

Examination of the life, times and works of Russia’s two most important 19th-century prose writers. Approximately one-half of the course will be devoted to each writer. Reading of novels, short stones and essays, and discussion of the authors’ extra-literary significance. Conducted in English. A Rus 261Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 261; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in literature or junior or senior class standing. [HU] May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 261Z (formerly 361Z) Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in English Translation (3)

Conducted in English. A Rus 261Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 261; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in literature or junior or senior class standing. [HU WI] May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 266 Gogol in English Translation (2)

Gogol’s fiction and his role in the development of Russian prose. Quarter course; conducted in English. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 267 Chekhov in English Translation (2)

Chekhov’s stories and plays with emphasis on social, psychological and philosophical insights. Special attention to Chekhov’s role in the development of the short story and drama. Quarter course. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 270 Topics in Slavic Literatures and Cultures (1–3)

A short course on various topics in Slavic literatures and cultures (Russian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Polish, etc.). May include instruction in language, or lecture-style courses on literature and culture. Course may cover an individual work, an individual author or a genre. Course may be repeated for credit when topic differs. Quarter course; conducted in English.

A Rus 280 Soviet and Russian Cinema (3)

Main trends in the development of Russian and Soviet cinema, from the silents of the early 20th century to the period of glasnost and the post-Soviet era. Introduction to the theories of Eisenstein, Vertov, Kuleshov and others. Social and political issues explored through famous classic and contemporary films. Conducted in English.

A Rus 354 The Russian Novel in its Western Context (3)

A comparative course concentrating on 19th-century prose fiction by Russian authors such as Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Pushkin and Lermontov, examined as it relates to the work of their European and American contemporaries, including Dickens, Balzac, Byron, Flaubert, Henry James, George Eliot and others. A Rus 354Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 354; only one may be taken for credit. Conducted in English. Prerequisite(s): one course in literature or junior or senior class standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2006-2007. [HU]

A Rus 354Z The Russian Novel in its Western Context (3)

A Rus 354Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 354; only one may be taken for credit. Conducted in English. Prerequisite(s): one course in literature or junior or senior class standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2006-2007. [ HU WI]

A Rus 359 (= A Thr 359) Russian Drama in English Translation (3)

Surveys major trends in Russian drama and analyzes major works from the comedies of Fonvizin and Griboedov satirizing the Russian social scene to the twilight melancholy of Chekhov and the theatre of 20th-century Soviet Russia. Conducted in English. Offered in alternate years. A Rus 359Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 359 & A Thr 359; only one of the three courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 251, or junior or senior class standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 359Z (= A Thr 359) Russian Drama in English Translation (3)

A Rus 359Z is the writing intensive version of A Rus 359 & A Thr 359; only one of the three courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 251, or junior or senior class standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2006-2007. [WI]

A Rus 380 Topics in Soviet and Russian Cinema (3)

In-depth study of individual directors, genres and themes; cinema and the other arts; cinema and the state. Film as propaganda tool and as vehicle for formalistic experimentation, social criticism, and cultural/historical recollection. Films by Eisenstein, Romm, Kalatozov, Chukhral, Tarkovsky, Gherman, Muratova, Mamin and others. Conducted in English. Content varies; repeatable with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 280 or with permission of the instructor.

Courses in Russian Language

A Rus 101 Elementary Russian I (4)

Introduction to the fundamentals of Russian grammar and basic vocabulary through extensive classroom drills, graded readings and translations. Systematic attention to essentials of pronunciation. Four classes each week. Some laboratory work. Native speakers of Russian may not take this course without permission of chair. Only one of A Rus 101, 103, 105 may be taken for credit.

A Rus 102 Elementary Russian II (4)

Continuation of A Rus 101. Four classes a week. Some laboratory work. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 101 or permission of chair. Native speakers of Russian may not take this course without permission of chair. Only one of A Rus 102, 104, 105 may be taken for credit. [FL]

A Rus 103 Russian for Bilingual Students I (3)

For students of Russian descent who speak Russian but have no formal education in the language. Students will learn to read and write Russian, and will be exposed to the fundamentals of Russian grammar. May be required as a prerequisite to enrolling in more advanced courses in Russian. Only one of A Rus 101, 103, 105 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 104 Russian for Bilingual Students II (3)

A continuation of A Rus 103. Only one of A Rus 102, 104, 105 may be taken for credit. [FL] May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 105 Intensive Introductory Russian (8)

Intensive first-year Russian. Introduction to the fundamentals of Russian grammar and basic vocabulary through extensive classroom drills, graded readings and translations. Systematic attention to essentials of pronunciation. Equivalent to A Rus 101 and A Rus 102 sequence. Native speakers of Russian may not take this course without permission of chair. Only one of A Rus 101, 102, 103, 104, 105 may be taken for credit. [FL] May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 201Intermediate Russian I (5)

Review of basic grammar; major grammatical issues not covered in elementary Russian; reading, translation, composition conversation. Five classes, one laboratory or drill each week. Also offered in the University in High School Program. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 102, 104, 105 or equivalent.

A Rus 202 Intermediate Russian II (5)

Continuation of A Rus 201 with increased use of Russian as language of instruction. Five classes, one laboratory or drill each week. Also offered in the University in High School Program. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 201 or equivalent.

A Rus 301 Advanced Russian I (3)

Essential fine points of morphology and syntax; reading, translation, composition. Taught predominantly in Russian. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 202 or equivalent.

A Rus 302 Advanced Russian II (3)

Continuation of A Rus 301. Taught predominantly in Russian. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 301 or equivalent.

A Rus 311 Russian Conversation (3)

Advanced conversation in idiomatic, colloquial Russian; oral reports, free discussion; systematic practical phonetics; content reflecting everyday activities and current events. Taught in Russian. Three classes two laboratories or drills each week. Repeatable for credit when content varies, with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 202 or equivalent. [OD]

A Rus 312 Russian Conversation: The Press (3)

Advanced conversation in idiomatic, colloquial Russian; oral reports, free discussion; content based on topics of current importance as reflected in the Russian language press. Taught in Russian. Three classes one laboratory or drill each week. Repeatable for credit when content varies, with permission of the instructor. [OD]

A Rus 397 Independent Study (1–6)

Directed reading and conferences on selected topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor and the undergraduate program director.

A Rus 401 Advanced Russian Grammar (3)

Careful review of problematic grammar topics, development of reading and analysis with particular attention to morphology and syntax, improvement of writing skills. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 302 or permission of instructor or the undergraduate program director.

A Rus 408 Translation into Russian (3)

Written translation and linear interpreting from English into Russian on a variety of subjects. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 411 Stylistics (2)

Theoretical foundations of stylistics; basic concepts of functional styles of language; lexical, grammatical, syntactic stylistics; analysis of individual styles and their accurate rendering in translation. Quarter course. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 302 or equivalent.

A Rus 412 Advanced Russian Conversation (3)

Continuation of A Rus 311 on a more advanced level. Three hours a week. Some laboratory and drill work. Semester course. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 311 or 312 or permission of chair. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 447 Russian Language Through Film (3)

The course uses Russian films of the late 20th century to enhance students’ language skills and deepen their cultural knowledge. Work involves intensive class discussion and written assignments. Films are selected on the basis of artistic merit, language quality, and general interest. Conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisites(s): Permission of the instructor.

Literature Courses in Russian

A Rus 421 Introduction to Literary Theory and Analysis (3)

Types of analysis; basic terms; basic theoretical approaches and their application. Detailed discussion of individual works to illustrate concepts, theories and methods. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 202. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 422 Russian and Slavic Folklore and Mythology (3)

Introduction to popular customs and literature of Russian and Slavic peoples. Survey of main genres: fairy tale, epic narratives, songs, folk dramas, proverbs and sayings, charms and incantations. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 202. .May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 423 History of Russian Drama and Theatre (3)

Survey of the Russian theatre and theatrical literature from its origins to the present. Main emphasis on plays of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (Fonvizin, Gogol, Pushkin, Ostrovsky, Chekhov, Mayakovsky, Gorky). Discussion of the role of the arts (music and painting) in the development of Russian theatre. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 202. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 425 Russian Versification (2)

Basic concepts of verse analysis. Survey of verse systems in Russian poetry of the 18th-20th centuries. Quarter course. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 301 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Rus 426 Russian Nineteenth-Century Poetry (3)

Course will examine major representative poets representing pre-romanticism, romanticism, pre-realism, realism and aestheticism (or protosymbolism). Major poets include Krylov, Zhukovskij, Pushkin, Lermontov, Baratynskij, Tjutchev, Mekrasov and Fet. Distinguishing characteristics of literary schools will be examined against the background of Russia’s cultural and political environment.

A Rus 427 Russian Twentieth-Century Poetry (3)

Course will survey major poets and schools, including Decadence, Symbolism, Acmeism, Futurism, Independent figures, Socialist Realism and subsequent trends. Poets include Sologub, Bal’mont, Brjusov, Bolk, Belyj, Gumilev, Axmatova, Cvetaeva, Majakovskij, Xlebnikov, Zabolockij, Vysockij and Brodskij. Writers and schools will be studied with major cultural and political developments of the times. S/U graded.

A Rus 428 Pushkin’s Evgenij Onegin (2)

Reading of Pushkin’s novel in verse in the Russian original as well as major secondary and critical works. Prerequisite(s): A Rus 301 or permission of instructor.

A Rus 470 Structure of a Slavic Language (3)

Study of the structure of a Slavic language other than Russian, or occasionally, a non-Indo-European language of Eastern Europe or the former USSR. May be repeated for credit in a different language: Bulgarian, Old Church Slavonic, Czech, Polish, Romanian, Serbo-Croatian, Ukrainian. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

Courses in Polish

A Pol 101 Elementary Polish (4)

Beginner’s course with audio-lingual approach: fundamentals of language structure and sounds; emphasis on correct pronunciation. Four classes, two laboratories each week. Native speakers of Polish may not take this course without permission of chair. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Pol 102 Intermediate Polish (4)

After completion of structural study, emphasis is given to reading in conjunction with a continuation of the audio-lingual method. Four classes, two laboratories each week. Prerequisite(s): A Pol 101 or equivalent. Native speakers of Polish may not take this course without permission of chair. May not be offered in 2006-2007. [FL]

A Pol 290 Topics in Polish Studies (3)

Selected topics in Polish literature, film, theater and culture. May be repeated for credit with change of topic. Consult current schedule of classes for topic. The course is also counted for credit in the Slavic program.

Courses in Ukrainian

A Ukr 101 Elementary Ukrainian I (4)

Introduction to the fundamentals of Ukrainian grammar and basic vocabulary through extensive classroom drills, graded readings and translation. Systematic attention to essentials of pronunciation. Four classes each week. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Ukr 102 Elementary Ukrainian II (4)

Continuation of A Ukr 101. Four classes a week. Some laboratory work. Prerequisite(s): A Ukr 101 or permission of chair. May not be offered in 2006-2007. [FL]