USA TODAY AWARD

Aural History Productions   


The Radio Archive ~ July - December, 2002  

Dec. 26, 2002
Segment 1: "Gandhi."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 29:00
Dialogue's George Liston Seay talks with Kumari Ananthan, an Indian scholar researching Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr., about the themes of peace and tolerance found in their writings.

Segment 2: "Christ, A Crisis in the Life of God: Jack Miles on the Bible as Art and History."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 19:40.
Talking History's Bryan LeBeau interviews Jack Miles, a leader in the field of biblical scholarship. His book, God: A Biography, won him a Pulitzer Prize. His most recent book, Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God. is the subject of this interview.

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Dec. 19, 2002
Segment 1: "Robert Snyder on September 11th and New York City."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 18:42
Robert W. Snyder offers this cultural and historical analysis of response of New Yorkers to the destruction of the World Trade Center towers in September of 2001. Snyder, a cultural historian teaching at Rutgers University-Newark, is the author of three books: The Voice of the City: Vaudeville and Popular Culture in New York (Oxford, 1989; Ivan Dee 2000); Transit Talk: New York Bus and Subway Workers Tell Their Stories (Rutgers 1998); and (as co-author), Metropolitan Lives: The Ashcan Artists and Their New York (Norton, 1995). Snyder is a specialist in the history of New York City and currently directs the journalism and media studies program at Rutgers-Newark. He also served as an associate editor of The Encyclopedia of New York City (Yale, 1995) and is currently an associate editor of The Encyclopedia of New York State (Syracuse, forthcoming). Snyder was a consultant to Ric Burns' documentary series New York and appeared in Tom Lennon's documentary series The Irish in America: Long Journey Home. Snyder's own documentary short, City Kids Meet Ashcan Art, won a Gold Apple from the National Educational Media Network. He presented this talk at the annual RESEARCHING NEW YORK conference in November of 2002. He is introduced by Peter Eisenstadt, Editor of the Encyclopedia of New York State and chair of the conference session "Destruction of the World Trade Center: Historians' Perspectives."

Segment 2: "Eleanor Roosevelt: A Controversial First Lady."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 17:41.
Talking History's Eileen Dugan interviews Allida M. Black about the controversial life and influence of Eleanor Roosevelt. Black is the author and editor of several books on Roosevelt, including Casting Her Own Shadow: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Shaping of Postwar Liberalism (Columbia University Press, 1996).

Segment 3: "The Starting Five."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 8:55.
Joe Richman's short documentary on the early years of the National Basketball League. From his introduction: "The NBA, now a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry, looked very different a half century ago. When the league began in 1946, teams included the Providence Steamrollers, the Chicago Stags and the St. Louis Bombers. The New York Knickerbockers were also around back then, but today, few could name the first Knicks starting lineup: Kaplowitz, Schectman, Weber, Militzok, and Hertzberg."

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Dec. 12, 2002
Segment 1: "Afshin Molavi's Persian Pilgramages."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 28:13
George Liston Seay interviews Iranian author Afshin Molavi about his recent book, Persian Pilgramages. Molavi uses culture and Iranís 3000 years of history as a lens for discussing current political and social realities.

Segment 2: "Timothy P. Lynch on Strike Songs of the Great Depression."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 19:32.
Talking History's Fred Neilsen interviews Timothy P. Lynch, Professor of History at the College of Mount St. Joseph, about labor and protest music in America during the Great Depression. Lynch is the author of Strike Songs of the Depression (U. Press of Mississippi, 2001).

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Dec. 5, 2002
Segment 1: "James W. Loewen on Historical Lies and Distortions."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 34:22.
Talking History's Gerald Zahavi interviews sociologist James Loewen about historical lies and distortions -- by omission and commission -- in textbooks, historical markers, and monuments. Loewen, now retired from the University of Vermont, is the best-selling author of Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your High School History Textbook Got Wrong and Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong.

Segment 2: "The Tulsa Riot of 1921."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 17:41.
Alfred Brophy, author of Reconstructing the Dreamland: The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921, is interviewed by Eileen Dugan about one of the worst riots in U.S. History.

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Nov. 28, 2002
Segment 2: "Phillip Bobbitt on War, Peace, and the Course of History."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 20:00.
Talking History's Eileen Dugan interviews Philip Bobbitt on his new and controversial book (co-authored with Michael Howard), The Shield of Achilles: War, Peace, and the Course of History (Knopf, 2002).

Segment 2: "Commentary: Allan Winkler on Going to War."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 4.16.
Historian Allan Winkler of Miami University in Ohio offers the following perspective on how and why American leaders have decided to go to war in the past -- and in the present. 

Segment 3: "The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 18:15.
The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82 is the subject of this conversation with historian Elizabeth Anne Fenn, author of Pax Americana (Hill & Wang, 2002).

Segment 4: "The Spoons Teacher.."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 20:05.

The Spoons Teacher is a "portrait in words and music of 79-year-old A. Claude Ferguson--forester, musician, whistleblower, teacher." Ferguson grew up in the Missouri Ozarks in the1930s. Produced by Adam Schwartz. For more information about A. Claude Ferguson and his work, visit his Web site at: http://home.insightbb.com/~ferguson/index.html.

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Nov. 21, 2002
Segment 1: "Yiddish Radio Project: The Jewish Philosopher."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 12:14.
The ninth of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. C. Israel Lutsky, the "The Jewish Philosopher," broadcast over station WEVD in the late 1940s and 1950s, and offered daily advice to listeners seeking his opinions on a variety of personal issues. This is the story of Lutsky and his show.
For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org.

Segment 2: "Yiddish Radio Project: Victor Packer."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 12:20.
The tenth of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. From the producers' summary: "From the late-1930s to 1942, Victor Packer served as Jewish Program Director of Brooklyn's low-budget station WLTH. The title and function don't sound unusual until you listen to the discs in Packer's collection and begin to realize that Packer was WLTH's Jewish division. His charge: to fill -- as writer, director, host, and anything else necessary -- four hours of radio a day in 15-minute increments, each distinct from the last. . . . An avant-garde poet turned programming director, Victor Packer experimented with every genre imaginable in a desperate attempt to fill his four-hour slot."
For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org.

Segment 3: "Yiddish Radio Project: Seymour Rexite."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 6:19.
The final segment of the NPR series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. This segment looks at the work and career of Yiddish crooning sensation Seymour Rexite. As summarized by the producers, Rexite "starred on 18 half-hour radio shows a week. At its outset his career comprised an all-Jewish repertoire that spanned from liturgical song to Yiddish popular music. But when he took to the Yiddish airwaves, the bill of fare diversified. Whatever song happened to be popular on American radio, his wife, Miriam Kressyn, translated into Yiddish and Rexite sang on one of his shows. He feared nothing, sang everything, and stayed on the air for the better part of five decades."
For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org

Segment 4: "The Story of Christine Jorgensen."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 17:07.
Talking History's Eileen Dugan interviews Joanne Meyerowitz about the most famous event in the history of transsexuality in the United States - the operation by which George Jorgensen became Christine Jorgensen. Meyerowitz is a professor of history at Indiana University and the editor of the Journal of American History. Her most recent book is How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality (Harvard, 2002).  

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Nov. 14, 2002
Segment 1: "Yiddish Radio Project: 'Round the Family Table."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 12:45.
The seventh of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. 'Round trhe Family Table was the creation of Yiddish playwright, actor, and linguist Nahum Stutchkoff (1893-1965). This is a sample of his work. Round the Family Table, as described by the producers of this restored and translated episode, "portrayed a different fictional Jewish family struggling to adapt to life in America. Only 26 episodes from his long-running series Bei Tate-mames Tish (Round the Family Table) survive. These recordings are as close as we'll ever get to hearing what life was like in the tenements of New York City in the 1930s and '40s." For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org.

Segment 2: "Yiddish Radio Project: Levine and His Flying Machine."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 11:21.
The eighth of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. This segment tells the story of Charles A. Levine, the first man to cross the Atlantic in an airplane as a passenger. For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org

Segment 3: Civil War Politics.
Real Media. MP3. Time: 15:56.
Talking History's Jim Madison interviews Mark E. Neely Jr., author of The Union Divided: Party Conflict in the Civil War North (Harvard, 2002) about political party conflict during the American Civil War.

Segment 4: "Commentary: Prof. Cass Sunstein on the US Constitution."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 3:34.
Prof. Cass Sunstein of the University of Chicago talks about the constitution and explores how it has changed since the late 18th century." 

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Nov. 7, 2002
Segment 1: "Yiddish Radio Project: Reunion With Siegbert Freiberg."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 12:08.
The fifth of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org.

Segment 2: "Yiddish Radio Project: The Dramas of Nahum Stutchkoff."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 8:23.
The sixth of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org

Segment 3: "The Salem Witch Trials Revisited."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 18:27.
From the Organization of American Historians. Eileen Dugan interviews Cornell historian Mary Beth Norton about her new book on the Salem witch trials, In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 (2002).

Segment 4: "Commentary: Prof. Andrew Kidd on Preventive War."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 3:27.
Prof. of Government Andrew Kidd of Harvard University offers these views on the history of "preventive war." 

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October 31, 2002
Segment 1: "Yiddish Radio Project: Commercials on Yiddish Radio."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 11:09.
The third of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. This segment explores Yiddish radio advertising. For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org.

Segment 2: "Yiddish Radio Project: Yiddish Melodies in Swing."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 15:02.
The fourth of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. This segment examines Yiddish swing music. For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org

Segment 3: "Sex in Advertising."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 17:03.
From the Organization of American Historians. Creighton University historian Eileen Dugan interviews Charles Sable of the Eisner Museum of Advertising and Design about the history of women in advertising.  

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October 24, 2002
Segment 1: "Yiddish Radio Project: The Yiddish Radio Dial"
Real Media. MP3. Time: 16:31.
The first of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. This segment introduces the series and gives an overview of Yiddish radio in America. For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org.

Segment 2: "Yiddish Radio Project: Rabbi Rubin's Court of the Air"
Real Media. MP3. Time: 12:54.
The second of a series of programs produced by Dave Isay, Henry Sapoznik, and Yair Reiner focusing on the golden age of Yiddish radio in the 1930s to the 1950s. This segment looks at Rabbi Shmuel A. Rubin's "court of the air" -- an on-air mediation court. For more information on the series and to obtain CD copies of all of the segments contact: www.YiddishRadioProject.org

Segment 3: "The Foodways of Immigrants."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 15:35.
From the Organization of American Historians. Historian Jim Madison of Indiana University explores the history of ethnic food in America with Hasia Diner, author of Hungering for America: Italian, Irish, and Jewish Foodways in the Age of Migration.

Segment 4: "Commentary: For TR, Government Was the Solution."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 5:35.
Kathleen Dalton, Associate Fellow at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University and author of Theodore Roosevelt: A Strenuous Life (2002), offers the following comparison of the corporate policies of President George Bush and Theodore Roosevelt. This commentary first appeared in print form in the New York Times in July of 2002. We thank the Times for their cooperation in bringing this to our listening audience. 

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October 17, 2002
Segment 1: "Joshua Rubenstein: Stalin's Secret Pogrom"
Real Media. MP3. Time: 27:30.
During World War II, Josef Stalin asked many prominent Soviet Jews to enlist Jewish support for the anti-fascist efforts. The group, although successful in their efforts, incurred Stalin's wrath after the war's end. Joshua Rubenstein talks with Dialogue's George Liston Seay about the persecution of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee members.

Segment 2: "Daniel Wickberg: Senses of Humor."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 19:39.
From the Organization of American Historians, Fred Neilsen talks with Daniel Wickberg about the history of humor in the 19th and 20th century. They consider what we can learn about ourselves, our society, and our politics from our humor.

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October 10, 2002
Segment 1: "Patricia O'Toole: Money and Morals in America."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 28:06.
America's first colonists came searching for both material success and the pursuit of individual virtue. Money and morals have been the subject of constant, and often contrary, concerns in America. Patricia O'Toole talks with Dialogue's George Liston Seay about how intersecting concerns about money and morals have resulted in a conflict over the years.

Segment 2: "Sex in the Heartland."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 17:38.
From the Organization of American Historians, this interview Beth Bailey, University of New Mexico, and the author of Sex in the Heartland considers how much of the sexual revolution of the 1960s was really about sex. Bailey examines these questions by looking at both politics and culture in Lawrence, Kansas during the 1960s.

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October 3, 2002
Segment 1: "Why September 11th Happened: Conflicting Interpretations."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 27:30.
Siena College professor Karl Barbir, a specialist in Middle East and Islamic studies, spoke at the "9/11 Teach-in Memoriam" on September 11, 2002 at the University at Albany.

Segment 2: "The Hatfields and the McCoys."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 17:53.
The feud between the Hatfields and the McCoys is legendary, but how much of what is known is true? Talking History's Eileen Dugan talks with Altine Waller about the fact and the fiction surrounding the tales of the Hatfields and the McCoys.

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September 26, 2002
Segment 1: "The Cultural Cold War."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 26:30.
UCLA historian Jon Weiner interviews Frances Stonor Saunders, author of The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters (New Press, 2001). Saunders and Weiner explore the history of the CIA, particularly as it relates to the cultural politics of the U.S. during the Cold War. This interview comes to us from Mark Cooper and RadioNation.

Segment 2: "The American West in Advertising."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 17:53.
Bryan Le Beau discusses images of the West in advertising with historian Elliot West of the University of Arkansas. West is the author of a number of works, including "Selling The Myth: Western Images of Advertising," which appeared in Wanted Dead or Alive: The American West in Popular Culture (University of Illinois Press, 1996).

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September 19, 2002
Segment 1: "Gibtown."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 26:27.
Gibsonton, Florida lies on highway 41 just south of Tampa. The people who live there call it Gibtown. It's a small town; at one time this was considered the oddest town in America. For half a century Gibsonton has been the off-season home for thousands of carnival and circus sideshow performers. But the sideshows are mostly a thing of the past and Gibsonton has slowly become less of a winter quarters and more of a retirement village. Recorded in 1995 by producer Joe Richman, "Gibtown" is a visit to the place where the carnival sideshow has come to retire. A town where being different has always meant being normal.

Segment 2: "Comment: Benjamin Filene Recalls Alan Lomax."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 06:36.
Benjamin Filene, author of Romancing the Folk: Public Memory and American Roots Music recalls the life and contributions of Alan Lomax, musicologist and collector of folk music and folklore.

Segment 3: "Richard Etulain: Hollywood and the Amerian West."
Real Media. MP3.Time: 17:27
Talking History's Bryan Le Beau talks with Richard Etulain, author of The Hollywood West: Lives of Film Legends Who Shaped It, about how Hollywood films have represented the West.

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September 12, 2002
Segment 1: "The Peace Corps in the Sixties."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 28:50.
Historian Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman, the author of All You Need Is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the Sixties speaks with Dialogue host George Liston Seay about The Peace Corps. Since its inception 30 years ago the organization has continued to make a significant contribution to developing societies around the world. Hoffman discusses the inception of the Peace Corps in John F. Kennedy's administration and describes the forces that created and continue to sustain this singular government agency.

Segment 2: "Jerome Shapiro: Atomic Bomb Cinema."
Real Media. MP3.Time: 16:26
Talking History's Fred Nielsen talks with Jerome Shapiro, professor of cinema and comparative culture at Hiroshima University and author of Atomic Bomb Cinema: The Apocalyptic Imagination on Film (2001).

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September 5, 2002
Segment 1: "The Heart of George Cotton."
[AUDIO REMOVED, by request of the producer]. Time: 26:42.
From Donnie L. Betts/No Credits Production and Destination Freedom: Black Radio Days, this dramatization depicts the accomplishments of heart surgeons Dr. Ulysses Grant Dailey and Dr. Daniel Hale Williams. This radio drama is performed from a script originally produced by Richard Durham in the late 1940s; it is part of a series that recreates radio dramas from a different era, highlighting the achievements of African Americans. Further information on Destination Freedom: Black Radio Days is available at www.blackradiodays.com.

Segment 2: "The History of Caffeine."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 16:48.

Talking History's Eileen Dugan discusses the history of caffeine with her guest, Bennett Alan Weinberg, author, with Bonnie K. Bealer, of The World of Caffeine: The Science and Culture of the World's Most Popular Drug.

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August 29, 2002
Segment 1: "The Bible Salesman."
Real Media. Time: 10:48.
In this segment, from producer Dan Collison's American Worker Series, former door-to-door bible salesman Jim "The Rabbit" Baker, featured in the classic 1969 Maysles Brothers film "Salesman," explains the secrets of his now extinct occupation.

Segment 2: "Mother Jones."
Real Media.    MP3. Time: 16:48.

Jim Madison explores the life of Mother Jones, one of the most noted figures in American labor history, with Elliott J. Gorn, author of Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America.

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August 22, 2002
Eric Foner: "Abolitionism and the Idea of American Freedom"
Part 1: Real Media. MP3. Time: 19:22.
Part 2: Real Media. MP3. Time: 22:41.
Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University and former president of the Organization of American Historians (OAH), talks about the contributions that the 19th century Abolitionist Movement made to the development of American ideas about freedom. Foner is the author of a number of books, including: Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party Before the Civil War (1970), Tom Paine and Revolutionary America (1976), Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War (1980), Nothing But Freedom: Emancipation and Its Legacy (1983), Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863–1877 (1988), Freedom's Lawmakers: A Directory of Black Officeholders During Reconstruction (1993), The Story of American Freedom (1998), and Who Owns History? Rethinking the Past in a Changing World (2002).
Foner delivered this talk in Elizabethtown, New York, on August 11, 2002 as part of the John Brown Lives! lecture series. [Recorded, edited and produced by Talking History ~ University at Albany.]

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August 15, 2002
Segment 1: "Woman With a Mission: Ida B. Wells."
[AUDIO REMOVED, by request of the producer]. Time: 29:00.
From Donnie L. Betts/No Credits Production and Destination Freedom: Black Radio Days, this dramatization of the early years of Ida B. Wells and her anti-lynching crusade is part of a series that recreates radio dramas from a different era, highlighting the achievements of African Americans. Further information on Destination Freedom: Black Radio Days is available at www.blackradiodays.com.

Segment 2: "Amos 'n' Andy."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 19:00.
Melvyn Patrick Ely talks about the radio program, Amos 'n' Andy, which originated on WMAQ in Chicago in 1928 and became one of the longest running programs in broadcast history. Ely discusses the controversy—both then and now—surrounding Amos 'n' Andy, which also became a television show in 1951.

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August 8, 2002
Hollywood Films and American Culture
Part 1: Real Media. MP3. Time: 32:49.
Part 2: Real Media. MP3. Time: 21:01.
New York University film, labor, and Greek-American history scholar Dan Georgakas delivered the following talk at the Deerfield Progressive Forum in Deerfield Beach, Florida. Georgakas has edited and published monographs, poetry, articles, historical pamphlets, and reviews on a variety of subjects, including American cinema, communism, the IWW, the Greek diaspora, and black revolutionaries. Among his works are: The Broken Hoop; Red Shadows; The Methuselah Factors; Detroit, I Do Mind Dying;and Through Another Lens.

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August 1, 2002
Segment 1: "John Sutter"
Real Media. Time: 29:00.
Radio Curious producer Barry Vogel presents another of his Chautauqua style interviews. Here he speaks with John Sutter, in the person of David Fenimore, about the establishment of Sutter's settlement in Mexican California and the subsequent effects of the California Goldrush on the settlement.

Segment 2: "David Ruth: The 1920s Gangster Phenomenon."
Real Media. Time: 18:24.
Gangsters are stock figures in American popular culture, often serving as the focus for films, novels, and television programs. Here, Eileen Dugan explores the gangster phenomenon in its hey-day, the 1920s, with historian David Ruth, author of Inventing the Public Enemy: The Gangster in American Culture, 1918-1934.

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July 25, 2002
Segment 1: "Louis Menand: The Metaphysical Club"
Real Media. Time: 17:24.
Talking History's Fred Neilsen interviews Louis Menand, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas in America (2001), about the rise of the American philosophical movement known as "Pragmatism" in the post-Civil War era. Menand explores the lives and contributions of Oliver Wendell Holmes, William James, Charles Sanders Peirce, and John Dewey—the founding fathers of the movement.

Segment 2: "Commentary: Norman Markowitz on Social Security"
Real Media. Time: 3:53.
Rutgers University historian Norman D. Markowitz offers this commentary on the past and future of Social Security in America.

Segment 3: "Radio Row."
Real Media. Time: 12:59.
A documentary about the streets of lower Manhattan before the coming of the World Trade Center--first aired on NPR in May of 2002. Produced by Talking History contributing producer, Joe Richman, and Ben Shapiro as part of the Sonic Memorial Project, in collaboration with Lost and Found Sound.We've included the NPR introduction: "When City Radio opened on Cortlandt St. in 1921, radio was a novelty. Over the next few decades, hundreds of stores popped up. Metro Radio, Leotone Radio, Blan the Radio Man, Cantor the Cabinet King. The six square block area in lower Manhattan became a bazaar of radio tubes, knobs, hifi equipment and antenna kits. It was the largest collection of radio and electronics stores in the world. Then in 1966 the stores were condemned and bulldozed, to make way for the new World Trade Center. A look back at the people and stories of Radio Row."

Segment 4: "Civil War Re-enactors."
Real Media. Time: 08:32.
Talking History contibuting producer Lester Graham brings us this exploration of the of reenactors who recreate Civil War battles.

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July 18, 2002
Joshua Freeman: New York City Labor History
Part 1: Real Media. MP3.Time: 30:53.
Part 2: Real Media. MP3.Time: 18:20.
Professor Joshua B. Freeman of CUNY is interviewed by Gerald Zahavi about the history or New York City unions and workers. Freeman is the author of Working-Class New York: Life and Labor Since World War II (2000), In Transit: The Transport Workers Union in New York City, 1933-1966 (1997, revised ed., 2001), and a co-author of Vol. 2 of Who Built America?: Working People and the Nation's Economy, Politics, Culture, and Society: From the Gilded Age to the Present. Produced at the University at Albany.

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July 11, 2002
Segment 1: "A Tale of Three Cities (Chicago, Moscow, and Meiji Osaka, Japan)"
Real Media. Time: 27:49.
Dialogue host George Liston Seay and Blair Ruble discuss the emergence of modern urban society as reflected in the explosive growth of Gilded Age Chicago, Silver-Age Moscow, and Meiji Osaka, Japan in the late 19th century. Ruble is the author of Second Metropolis: Pragmatic Pluralism in Gilded Age Chicago, Silver Age Moscow, and Meiji Osaka (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2001) and several other works of urban geography.

Segment 2: "Sacred Remains: Early American Attitudes on Death and Dying."
Real Media. Time: 17:25.
Talking History's Eileen Dugan interviews Gary Laderman, author of The Sacred Remains: American Attitudes Toward Death, 1799-1883 (1999) and the forthcoming Rest in Peace: A Cultural History of Death and the Funeral Home in Twentieth-Century America (2003), about early American attitudes toward death and dying.

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July 4, 2002
Carol Berkin ~ "A Brilliant Solution"
Part 1: Real Media. Time: 18:36.
Part 2: Real Media. Time: 24:52.
Professor Carol Berkin, City University of New York, is interviewed by Professor G.J. Barker-Benfield about the "invention" of the American constitution. Produced at the University at Albany.

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