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Aural History Productions


The Radio Archive ~ Recent Programs

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July 21, 2015
No broadcast this week. Check out or previous broadcasts below and through our menu to the left.

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July 14, 2015
Segment 1: Rear Vision (ABC's Radio National): "Canada's Lost Generation: Canada's Truth and Reconciiation Commission." (2015).
 Download: MP3



From ABC's Radio National's Rear Vision: "For over 100 years, Canada had a policy of removing indigenous children, some as young as six years old, from their families and putting them in residential schools. Known as Indian Residential Schools, their stated aim was to assimilate indigenous children into white society. Over six years, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Canada has heard the stories of the survivors of these schools. When the Commission released its final report last month, it concluded that the policy of placing indigenous children in residential schools was a form of cultural genocide. Rear Vision traces the story of Canada's Indian Residential Schools and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that exposed the truth.e National Security Council." For more details, see: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/rearvision/canada27s-truth-and-reconciliation-commission/6587188.

Segment 2 | From the Archives: Seneca Chief Red Jacket Speech Defending Native Religion (1805; 1976 reading - selection).
 Download: MP3



"The Senecas, members of the Iroquois Confederacy, fought on the side of the British in the American Revolution. Red Jacket, also known as Sagoyewatha, was a chief and orator born in eastern New York; he derived his English name from his habit of wearing many red coats provided to him by his British allies. After the hostilities, as the British ceded their territories to the Americans, the Senecas and many other Indian peoples faced enormous pressure on their homelands. Red Jacket was a critical mediator in relations between the new U.S. government and the Senecas; he led a delegation that met with George Washington in 1792, when he received a peace medal that appeared in subsequent portraits of the Indian leader. In 1805 a Boston missionary society requested Red Jacket's permission to proselytize among the Iroquois settlements in northern New York State. Red Jacket's forceful defense of native religion, below, caused the representative to refuse the Indian’s handshake and announce that no fellowship could exist between the religion of God and the works of the Devil" [DESCRIPTION SOURCE: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5790/]. For the full text and audio, see: http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/nativeamericans/chiefredjacket.htm.

Segment 3 | From Earshot (ABC's Radio National): "'The Soul of Darwin': the Story of the Kahlin Compound."
 Download: MP3



From ABC Radio National's Earshot , we bring you this oral history-rich tale of aboriginal removal in Australia: "In 1913 the NT Protector of Aborigines, Baldwin Spencer, decided with a stroke of his pen to solve what he called the 'half-caste problem' by rounding up hundreds of Aboriginal children and removing them from the 'native camps'. The 'Kahlin Compound and Half Caste Home' was established at Myilly Point, overlooking Mindil Beach in Darwin. A hundred years on from Baldwin Spencer's decision, the oldest survivors of Kahlin Compound are going back, some for the first time. They recall their childhoods there and the effect their removal has had on generations of their families." For more details, go to: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/earshot/kahlin-compound/6538842.

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July 7, 2015
Segment 1: BackStory: "Enemies." (2015).
 Download: MP3



From BackStory [http://backstoryradio.org/shows/enemies/] and the American History Guys: "Across generations, Americans have seen foes turn to friends and allies to enemies. So, as negotiations for a nuclear deal with Iran and resuming formal diplomatic relations with Cuba are in the works, the Guys consider how the United States has dealt with enemies across time, from the tarring and feathering British Loyalists during the Revolution to comic book perceptions of Nazi Germany -- and what those relations say about the American public and their government." Guests include: Maura Farrelly, Brandeis University; François Furstenberg, The Johns Hopkins University; Paul Hirsch, University of California, Santa Barbara; Ben Irvin, University of Arizona; Oleg Kalugin, Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies; Gary Sick, former member of the National Security Council.

Segment 2 | From the Archives: Mary McCarthy and Lillian Hellman on Dick Cavette (discussion, 2014)
 Download: MP3



Continuing with our theme of "enemies". . . here is a selection from a discussion from cunytv75's Theater Talk. The full discussion is available on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OfKEjABGGY). It features a discussion with actresses Roberta Maxwell and Marcia Rodd, with talk show host Dick Cavett about their roles as Lillian Hellman, Mary McCarthy and Dick Cavett respectively in the play "Hellman v. McCarthy." "The play dealt with the 1979 feud between the two eminent writers triggered by McCarthy saying of Hellman on Cavett's show, "Every word she writes is a lie, including 'and' and 'the'."

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June 30, 2015
Segment 1: Open Source: "The Rebirth of a Nation: A History of Reconstruction." (2015).
 Download: MP3



From Open Source: "Both our guests Eric Foner and Heather Cox Richardson want to shout it from the rooftops: the little-known history of Reconstruction is where the story of the Civil War gets really interesting. It’s the period when, as Drew Faust has said, Americans became modern. The federal government came into its own, bringing with it new institutions: absentee ballots, common currency, an income tax, new rails, and global trade. W.E.B. DuBois called Reconstruction black America’s “brief moment in the sun.” Two of history’s nine black U.S. Senators represented Mississippi briefly during the 1870s. Black empowerment during Reconstruction was incomplete and, ultimately, doomed by Klan violence and a national loss of nerve. But it birthed the ideas of inclusion, citizenship, and democracy that we’ve struggled to realize ever since."

Segment 2 | From the Archives: Paul Laurence Dunbar's Poetry (1896; modern readings).
 Download: MP3



Paul Laurence Dunbar was one of the most prominent African American poets of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Here are a couple of selections (modern readings) from his 1896 book of poetry, Lyrics of a Lowly Life -- reprinted in 1913 in The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar. Dunbar's poems often focused on African American life under slavery and during the Reconstruction/post-Reconstruction era and utilized both dialect and mainstream English. For more selections of Dunbar's poems, see: http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/authors/172/paul-laurence-dunbar/, from which these two readings were taken.

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June 23, 2015
Segment 1: BackStory: "Speed Through Time: The Changing Pace of America" (2015).
 Download: MP3



From BackStory: " BackStory goes into overdrive with a show all about speed in America. How fast — and slow — has life moved in different eras? And how has the pace of social change, well, changed over time? Join Brian, Ed and Peter as they head out to the racetrack, the ballpark and the trading floor … and hustle from the halls of the Supreme Court to the speedy courtrooms of Reno, Nev. — once the divorce capital of America." Guests include: Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University; Barbara Davis, twice a Reno divorcee, and retired showgirl; Matthew Goodman, author of Eighty Days: Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland's History-Making Race Around the World; Mella Harmon, formerly of the Nevada Historical Society; Oliver Hill Jr., Virginia State University; Bill "Spaceman" Lee, former Major League Baseball pitcher; John Mason, University of Virginia; Bob Pisani, CNBC on-air stocks editor; John Thorn, Major League Baseball historian.

Segment 2 | From the Archives: [Re-Broadcast of] "The Easier Way" (1946 General Motors film sound track).
 Download: MP3



Since it's appropriate for the theme of "Speed Through Time," we are repeating the piece we used several weeks ago:
"Here's the sound track from a time and motion studies promotional film available at the Internet Archive (archive.org), https://archive.org/details/EasierWa1946: "It was not a friendly time at General Motors after a 113-day strike in the winter of 1945-46. The United Auto Workers (UAW) had been recognized by GM just four and a half years before the start of World War II, and wartime controls had regulated wage and price increases. Embryonic before being interrupted by war, the relationship between labor and management was young and poorly developed, and management was used to having its way, accustomed to telling workers what to do and how to do it. The Easier Way, which GM commissioned in 1946, expresses this attitude, selling efficiency as a boon for the worker rather than a means of maximizing profits. The Easier Way was designed to convince line management (many of whom had risen from the ranks) that time and motion study was a good thing for industrial workers. Bob (a motion study expert) and Marge invite Dick Gardner, an assembly-line foreman and his wife over for dinner. The two men start talking about motion study. Bob asserts that "a man can produce more without working a bit harder." Dick has risen from the ranks and is suspicious of all this time and motion study stuff, feeling that it's just designed to wring more work out of people. Bob tries to disabuse him of this idea, saying, "Now we're able to produce more and more stuff with less and less effort on the part of the guys who do the work. That's what motion study's for. We point out how the machines and tools and the methods of using them should be changed to make it easier for the operator." Dick is still suspicious: "It's gonna be hard to make some of the boys understand that." Bob answers, "It'll take time. But first, I've gotta sell men like you." Bob, Marge and the Gardners play with a pegboard and practice different ways of inserting the pegs into the holes. This hands-on demo convinces Dick of the righteousness of Bob's views: "The boys will listen to stuff that makes sense. Especially if it makes it easier for us to get production." Like a grown-up Alexander Phipps, Bob tries to infiltrate motion study into the domestic routine. "Now take this simple job of setting the table. Women do it the hard way." "Now Bob," says Marge, "you can't run a house like a factory." Bob responds: "Why not? Think of the effort you'd save. Maybe you wouldn't be so tired at the end of the day." As Marge sets the table, Bob sneaks a look at his timepiece. As the film ends, she ties an apron around Bob and makes him do the dishes. In The Easier Way, we see company management drawing a line between issues subject to bargaining and others that it considers non-negotiable. GM is asserting here that the work process -- its technology, design and management -- is its own to plan and control, no matter how much influence unions exert in its plants. In fact, productivity increases were a major agenda item for General Motors at the time. In 1948, GM chairman Alfred P. Sloan, Jr. and president Charles E. Wilson proposed that the new GM-UAW contract link wage increases to increases in worker productivity, with adjustments for the cost of living. This clause was adopted in 1948 and was part of labor agreements for over twenty years. The business community praised the linkage between productivity and wages, and General Motors 'got its production.'"

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June 16, 2015
Segment 1: Against the Grain: Radical Italians (2015).
 Download: MP3



From Against the Grain: " Many of the Italians who migrated to the US in large numbers at the turn of the twentieth century were drawn to anarchism. Jennifer Guglielmo has studied Italian immigrant political culture with an emphasis on working-class women who espoused anarchism, labor militancy, and a radical, transnational feminism." For additional information, see: Jennifer Guglielmo, Living the Revolution: Italian Women's Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945 (U. of North Carolina Press, 2010); Guglielmo and Salerno, eds., Are Italians White? (Routledge, 2003); Thomas Guglielmo, White on Arrival (Oxford U. Press, 2004).

Segment 2 | From the Archives: "LibriVox Reading: Margaret Fuller - Journals and Letters, Part 3.
 Download: MP3



Selections from Margaret Fuller's journals and letter -- published along with Woman in the Nineteenth Century (1845), "considered the first major feminist work in the United States." Fuller's "life was short but full. She became the first editor of the transcendentalist journal The Dial in 1840, before joining the staff of the New York Tribune under Horace Greeley in 1844. By the time she was in her 30s, Fuller had earned a reputation as the best-read person in New England, male or female, and became the first woman allowed to use the library at Harvard College. Her seminal work, Woman in the Nineteenth Century, was published in 1845. A year later, she was sent to Europe for the Tribune as its first female correspondent. She soon became involved with the revolutions in Italy and allied herself with Giuseppe Mazzini. She had a relationship with Giovanni Ossoli, with whom she had a child. All three members of the family died in a shipwreck off Fire Island, New York, as they were traveling to the United States in 1850. Fuller's body was never recovered." (Summary by Wikipedia and Elizabeth Klett)

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June 9, 2015
Segment 1: BackStory: "In Plain Sight: Stories of American Infrastructure" (2015).
 Download: MP3



From BackStory: " As crash experts sort out why an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last month, killing eight passengers, Congress is still haggling over how to replenish the nation’s Highway Trust Fund before it goes dry. All the while, the safety of America’s roads and rails hangs in the balance. So on this show, Brian, Ed and Peter uncover the stuff of modern life that’s hidden in plain sight. How have Americans decided what infrastructure to invest in, how to maintain it, and who ultimately has to pay for it? Our stories take a look behind the scenes at the electric grid, the shipping industry and the origins of oil pipelines." Guests incude: Bernie Carlson, University of Virginia; Christopher Jones, Arizona State University; Marc Levison, Economist and historian, author of The Box; Allen Miller, Lancaster Country Day School.

Segment 2 | From the Archives: "De Tocqueville on American Culture and on Manufacture and Building." (LibriVox Reading -- Section 2, Chapter 19 of Democracy in America ("That Almost All the Americans Follow Industrial Callings").
 Download: MP3


Here is an excerpt from Alexis De Tocqueville's Democracy in America (1835), focusing on those qualities in American cultural that led many Americans to pursue industry and manufacturing.

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June 2, 2015

Segment 1 | With Good Reason: "Kremlin to Kremlin" & "We Fight for Peace: American Prisoners of War in Korea" (2015).

 Download: MP3



From the Virginia Foundation For the Humanities' radio series, With Good Reason: "Joseph Roane, an agronomist trained at Virginia State University, was part of a group of African American expatriates who were encouraged by the Stalinist government in the 1930s to work in the Soviet Union building a society free of class and racism. Jon Bachman (Stratford Hall) and Marian Veney Ashton (A.T. Johnson Museum) are making a film on how Roane survived Stalin’s purges and returned to the United States to become a mentor to young African American agricultural students. Also: Brian McKnight’s (University of Virginia at Wise) new book We Fight for Peace tells the story of American prisoners of war in the Korean War, who defected to North Korea and what happened to them when they decided to return to the United States.

Segment 2 | From the Archives: "Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman on "Deportation, Its Meaning and Menace." (1919; LibriVox reading)
 Download: MP3



When anarchists Alexander Berkman and Emma Goldman were deported by the U.S. government in 1919 during the post-WWI Red Scare, they penned this 'good-bye message'. The full text of this pamphlet is available on line hre: authorshttps://archive.org/details/2917032.0001.001.umich.edu.

Segment 3 | Earshot: "Wish you weren't here: dark tourism and memory" (2015).
 Download: MP3



From Radio National and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, we bring you this episode of Earshot, focusing on what has become known as Dark Tourism -- tourist visitations to historic sites associated with war, mass death, and holocaust: "Gallipoli, Auschwitz, the 9/11 memorial: sites commemorating death, violence and human suffering have always been a source of fascination. But 'dark tourism raises a host of complex ethical questions." For more information and a transcript of this segment, go to: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/earshot/dark-tourism/6391668.

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May 26, 2015
Segment 1: BackStory: "Tools of the Trade ~ America's Workplace Technologies" (2015).
 Download: MP3



From BackStory: "Two hundred years ago, there was no such thing as the 'workplace' -- and the tools of one'’s trade were rudimentary by today's standards. Since then, of course, America has witnessed the Industrial Revolution, the rise of white-collar work and, now, an age of digital devices that allows the workplace to follow us everywhere. So on this episode of BackStory, from utopian visions of the cubicle to video surveillance in law enforcement, the Guys size up some of the stuff Americans have worked with -- and, in turn, how that stuff has shaped the lives of American workers." Guests include: Wells Bullard, Vice president for Marketing and Development, E.D. Bullard Co.; David Franz, Sociologist and Director of the City of Shafter, Calif., Education Project; Jonathan Olivares, industrial designer, author of A Taxonomy of Office Chairs (Phaidon Press, 2011); Larry Muncey, Chief of police, Madison, Alabama; Nikil Saval, Editor at n+1 and author of Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace (Doubleday, 2014).

Segment 2 | From the Archives: "The Easier Way" (1946 General Motors film sound track).
 Download: MP3



Here's the sound track from a time and motion studies promotional film available at the Internet Archive (archive.org), https://archive.org/details/EasierWa1946: "It was not a friendly time at General Motors after a 113-day strike in the winter of 1945-46. The United Auto Workers (UAW) had been recognized by GM just four and a half years before the start of World War II, and wartime controls had regulated wage and price increases. Embryonic before being interrupted by war, the relationship between labor and management was young and poorly developed, and management was used to having its way, accustomed to telling workers what to do and how to do it. The Easier Way, which GM commissioned in 1946, expresses this attitude, selling efficiency as a boon for the worker rather than a means of maximizing profits. The Easier Way was designed to convince line management (many of whom had risen from the ranks) that time and motion study was a good thing for industrial workers. Bob (a motion study expert) and Marge invite Dick Gardner, an assembly-line foreman and his wife over for dinner. The two men start talking about motion study. Bob asserts that "a man can produce more without working a bit harder." Dick has risen from the ranks and is suspicious of all this time and motion study stuff, feeling that it's just designed to wring more work out of people. Bob tries to disabuse him of this idea, saying, "Now we're able to produce more and more stuff with less and less effort on the part of the guys who do the work. That's what motion study's for. We point out how the machines and tools and the methods of using them should be changed to make it easier for the operator." Dick is still suspicious: "It's gonna be hard to make some of the boys understand that." Bob answers, "It'll take time. But first, I've gotta sell men like you." Bob, Marge and the Gardners play with a pegboard and practice different ways of inserting the pegs into the holes. This hands-on demo convinces Dick of the righteousness of Bob's views: "The boys will listen to stuff that makes sense. Especially if it makes it easier for us to get production." Like a grown-up Alexander Phipps, Bob tries to infiltrate motion study into the domestic routine. "Now take this simple job of setting the table. Women do it the hard way." "Now Bob," says Marge, "you can't run a house like a factory." Bob responds: "Why not? Think of the effort you'd save. Maybe you wouldn't be so tired at the end of the day." As Marge sets the table, Bob sneaks a look at his timepiece. As the film ends, she ties an apron around Bob and makes him do the dishes. In The Easier Way, we see company management drawing a line between issues subject to bargaining and others that it considers non-negotiable. GM is asserting here that the work process -- its technology, design and management -- is its own to plan and control, no matter how much influence unions exert in its plants. In fact, productivity increases were a major agenda item for General Motors at the time. In 1948, GM chairman Alfred P. Sloan, Jr. and president Charles E. Wilson proposed that the new GM-UAW contract link wage increases to increases in worker productivity, with adjustments for the cost of living. This clause was adopted in 1948 and was part of labor agreements for over twenty years. The business community praised the linkage between productivity and wages, and General Motors 'got its production.'"

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May 19, 2015
Segment 1: BackStory: "Another Man's Treasure ~ History of Trash" (2015).
 Download: MP3



From BackStory: "This week on the show we’re picking through history’s waste basket. What does America’s garbage tell us about its past? How have ideas about what is disposable and what isn’t changed over time? And have Americans always generated so much junk? To get to the bottom of things, the Guys are salvaging all kinds of trashy stories… about filth-eating pigs that once ran amok in New York City… about Americans’ legal rights to their own garbage… and about how Big Soda promoted recycling to boost the industry’s own bottom line. Plus, find out what an anthropologist sees in the decades-old debris now washing ashore at a place called Dead Horse Bay." Guests include: Gary Anderson, designer of the recycling symbol; Bart Elmore, University of Alabama; Catherine McNeur, Portland State University e Brett Mizelle, California State University, Long Beach; Robin Nagle, New York University, and anthropologist-in-residence at New York City's Department of Sanitation; David Sklansky, Stanford University Law School; Carl Zimring, Pratt Institute.

Segment 2 | From the Archives: "Bill Steele's Garbage, Earth Day Anthem (Pete Seeger 1996 performance; written by Steele in 1969).

 Download: MP3



From the Cornell Chronicle: "A year before the first Earth Day observance on April 22, 1970 -- a nationwide environmental "teach-in" for 20 million participants -- folk musician Bill Steele [Cornell University] '54 wrote one of the environmental movement's anthems: "Garbage!" Forty years on, the song still resonates as much as it did when Steele wrote it in San Francisco in 1969. "There was a big fuss in San Francisco at the time about dumping garbage in the bay, not as trash but as landfill to build new waterfront condominiums. So that sort of inspired it all," Steele says." For more informaton on the sing and its writer, go to: http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2009/04/bill-steeles-garbage-earth-anthem-40-years-later.

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May 12, 2015
Segment 1: Against the Grain: Sheila Rowbotham on Feminism" (2015).
 Download: MP3



From Against the Grain: "They were socialists, free love advocates, birth control campaigners, and trade unionists. Feminist historian Sheila Rowbotham describes the women who transformed gender relations in the US and the UK at the turn of the last century, prefiguring in many ways the New Left, and embodying an optimism about social change that is sorely lacking today." For more details on this subject, see: Sheila Rowbotham, Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century (Verso, 2010).

Segment 2 | From the Archives: "Speeches of Victoria Woodhull, Election of 1872 (Selective readings).
 Download: MP3



Victoria Claflin Woodhull (Martin), born in Homer, Ohio in 1838, became one of the most outspoken and notorious spokeswomen of radical feminism in the latter half of the 20th century. As a child, Victoria was drawn to the growing spiritualist movement of the mid-19th century, first attempting to communicate with the spirits of three of her dead siblings, and then -- as a young woman -- working as a clairvoyant telling fortunes and contacting spirits. She moved to New York City in 1868, and she and her sister, Tennessee began working as clairvoyants for the railroad baron Cornelius Vanderbilt. Tapping the financial knowledge and relying on advice obtained from Vandebilt (by that time Woodhull and Vanderbilt had grown quite close), the two sisters began successfully speculating in stocks. With Vanderbilt’s financial backing, Victoria and Tennessee were able to open their own investment -- Woodhull, Claflin & Co. -- becoming the first female stockbrokers on Wall Street. As a strognly independent and successful woman who still faced obstacles in her public life (she was denied a seat on the NY Stock Exchange), Woodhull was also drawn to the feminist movement -- though her brand of feminism went far beyond what other feminists advocated. She soon became an important leader of the woman's suffrage movement but achieved notoriety when she began to advocate "free love," or complete sexual freedom, for women. In 1872, Woodhull became the first female candidate for President of the United States, running along with Frederick Douglas under the banner of the Equal Rights Party. She died in 1877. For more information of Victoria Claflin Woodhull, see http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/ww/woodhull.html: and http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/04/victoria-woodhull-first-woman-presidential-candidate-116828.html#.VVnjpeehR9U. For the original video version of our audio selection -- a reading of selections from 1872 campaign speeches of Woodhull -- go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvYr9c1T4QQ.

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