Donna Scanlon, Professor

B.A., Ph.D. University at Albany, State University of New York
Education Building-Room 338; (518)-442-3774
dscanlon@albany.edu

Dr. Scanlon joined the Reading Department faculty in Fall 2000, and has been affiliated with the University's Child Research and Study Center (CRSC) for many years. The CRSC is an organized research center that focuses primarily on reading development and reading difficulties.

Dr. Scanlon’s research has focused on the characteristics of children who experience substantial difficulty in learning to read and on how to prevent and remediate reading difficulties. In the course of this research, she and her colleagues developed an approach to early literacy instruction and intervention, the Interactive Strategies Approach (ISA), which has been found to be effective in helping teachers to reduce the incidence of reading difficulties in the early primary grades. The ISA has been successfully implemented by classroom teachers as well as by intervention teachers in small group and one-to-one contexts and is therefore an appropriate approach for use in Response to Intervention (RTI) contexts. The ISA-RTI Professional Development Project, which is housed at the Child Research and Study Center, currently uses distance learning technologies to offer extended, job-embedded professional development for teachers.

Dr. Scanlon’s current research focuses on extending the ISA for use with older struggling readers and on evaluating the utility of providing teacher educators with ISA-based instructional resources for use in their undergraduate and graduate literacy methods courses with the goal of enhancing new and in-service teachers' ability to understand and address the needs of beginning and struggling literacy learners. Most of Dr. Scanlon’s research has been supported by grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the United States Department of Education.

Dr. Scanlon has presented both locally and nationally on Response to Intervention, and is the author of several recent publications on the topic, and is a member of the International Reading Assocations' RtI Task Force.

Courses taught:
ERDG 779: Quantitative Methods in Literacy Research
ERDG 600: Practicum in Literacy Teaching and Learning
ERDG 781: Literacy Acquisition Across the Lifespan

Recent Publications:
Scanlon, D.M., Anderson, K.L., & Vellutino, F.R. (in press). The Interactive Strategies Approach to early intervention. In D. Barone and M. Mallette (Eds.), Best Practices in Early Literacy. New York: Guilford Press.

Gelzheiser, L.M., Scanlon, D.M., Vellutino, F.R., Hallgren-Flynn, L. & Schatschneider, C. (2011). Effects of the Interactive Strategies Approach-Extended: A responsive and comprehensive intervention for intermediate grade struggling readers. Elementary School Journal, 112 (2), 280-306.

Scanlon, D.M. (2011). Response to intervention as asn assessment: The role of assessment and instruction. In A. McGill-Franzen and R.L. Allington (Eds.), The Handbook of Reading Disabilities Research, New York: Routledge.

Scanlon, D. M., Anderson, K. L., & Sweeney, J. M (2010). Early Intervention for Reading Difficulties: The Interactive Strategies Approach. New York: Guilford.

Scanlon, D.M. & Anderson, K.L. (2010). Using the Interactive Strategies Approach to Preventing Reading Difficulties in an RTI Context. In M. Y. Lipson and K. K. Wixson (Eds.), Successful Approaches to RTI: Collaborative Practices for Improving K-12 Literacy. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Scanlon, D. M. & Sweeney, J.M. (2010). Kindergarten intervention: Teaching to prevent reading difficulties. In P. Johnston (Ed.), RTI in Literacy: Responsive and Comprehensive. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Gelzheiser, L.M., Scanlon, D.M., & Hallgren-Flynn, L. (2010). Spotlight on RTI for Adolescents: An Example of Intensive Middle School Intervention Using The Interactive Strategies Approach-Extended. To appear in M. Y. Lipson and K. K. Wixson (Eds.), Successful Approaches to RTI: Collaborative Practices for Improving K-12 Literacy. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Scanlon, D.M. & Sweeney, J.M. (2008). Response to Intervention: An Overview. Educator’s Voice, 1, 16-29.

Scanlon, D.M., Gelzheiser, L.M., Vellutino, F.R., Schatschneider, C., & Sweeney, J.M.(2008). Reducing the incidence of early reading difficulties: Professional development for classroom teachers vs. direct interventions for children. Learning and Individual Differences, 18, 346-359.

Vellutino, F.R., Scanlon, D.M., Zhang, H., & Schatschneider, C. (2008). Using response to kindergarten and first grade intervention to identify children at-risk for long-term reading difficulties. Reading and Writing, 21, 437-480.

Vellutino, F.R., Scanlon, D.M., Small, S.G., Fanuele, D.P., & Sweeney, J. (2007). Preventing early reading difficulties through kindergarten and first grade intervention: A variant of the three-tier model. In D. Haager, S. Vaughn, and J. K. Klinger (Eds.), Validated Practices for Three Tiers of Reading Intervention. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

Vellutino, F.R., Scanlon, D.M., Zhang, H. (2007). Identifying reading disability based on Response to Intervention: Evidence from early intervention research. In S.R. Jimerson, M.K. Burns, and A.M. VanDerheyden (Eds.) The Handbook of Response to Intervention: The Science and Practice of Assessment and Intervention. New York: Springer Science.

Vellutino, F.R., Scanlon, D.M., Small, S.G., & Fanuele, D.P. (2006). Response to Intervention as a Vehicle for Distinguishing Between Reading Disabled and Non-Reading Disabled Children: Evidence for the Role of Kindergarten and First Grade Intervention. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 39:2, 157-169.

Scanlon, D.M., Vellutino, F.R., Small, S.G., Fanuele, D.P. & Sweeney, J.M. (2005). Severe reading difficulties - Can they be prevented? A comparison of prevention and intervention approaches. Exceptionality, 13:4, 209-227.

Vellutino, F. R., Fletcher, J. M., Snowling, M. J., & Scanlon, D. M. (2004). Specific reading disability (dyslexia) : What have we learned in the past four decades? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45:1, 2-40.

Vellutino, F. R., Scanlon, D. M., & Jaccard, J. (2003). Toward distinguishing between cognitive and experiential deficits as primary sources of difficulty in learning to read: A two year follow-up of difficult to remediate and readily remediated poor readers. In B. R. Foorman (Ed.), Preventing and Remediating Reading Difficulties: Bringing Science to Scale (pp. 73-120). Baltimore, MD: York Press.

Vellutino, F.R. & Scanlon, D.M. (2002). The interactive strategies approach to reading intervention. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 27, 573-635.

Vellutino, F. R. & Scanlon, D. M. (2001). Emergent literacy skills, early instruction, and individual differences as determinants of difficulties in learning to read: The case for early intervention. In S. Neuman and D. Dickinson (Eds.) Handbook for research on early literacy (pp. 295-321). New York: Guilford Press.

Vellutino, F. R., Scanlon, D. M., & Lyon, G. R. (2000). Differentiating between difficult-to-remediate and readily remediated poor readers: More evidence against the IQ--Achievement discrepancy definition of reading disability. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 33 (3), 223-238.

Vellutino, F. R. & Scanlon, D. M. (1999). Early intervention can reduce the number of children diagnosed as reading disabled. New England Reading Association Journal, 35 (3), 3-13.

Vellutino, F. R. & Scanlon, D. M. (1999). Focus, funding, phonics – What’s the point?: A reply to Pressley and Allington. Issues in Education, 5, 147-159.

Vellutino, F. R., Scanlon, D. M., & Tanzman, M. S. (1998). The case for early intervention in diagnosing specific reading disability. Journal of School Psychology, 36, 367-397.

Scanlon, D. M. & Vellutino, F. R. (1997). A comparison of the instructional backgrounds and cognitive profiles of poor, average and good readers who were initially identified as at risk for reading failure. Scientific Studies of Reading, 1, 191-216.

Scanlon, D. M. & Vellutino, F. R. (1997). Instructional influences on early reading success. Perspectives, 23 (4), 35-37.

Vellutino, F. R., Scanlon, D. M., & Sipay, E. R. (1997). Toward distinguishing between cognitive and experiential deficits in learning to read: The importance of early intervention in diagnosing specific reading disability. In B. Blachman (Editor), Foundations of Reading Acquisition and Dyslexia: Implications for Early Intervention (pp. 347-379). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Scanlon, D. M. & Vellutino, F. R. (1996). Prerequisite skills, early instruction and success in first-grade reading: Selected results from a longitudinal study. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 2, 54-63.

Vellutino, F. R., Scanlon, D. M., Sipay, E. R., Small, S. G., Pratt, A., Chen, R., & Denckla, M. B. (1996). Cognitive profiles of difficult-to-remediate and readily remediated poor readers: Early intervention as a vehicle for distinguishing between cognitive and experiential deficits as basic causes of specific reading disability. Journal of Educational Psychology, 88, 601-638.