Delicia Greene, Assistant Professor

Ph.D., Syracuse University
Education Bldg.-Room 347:(518) 442-5135

dgreene@albany.edu

Dr. Delicia Tiera Greene is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Literacy Teaching and Learning at the University at Albany- SUNY. She earned her Ph.D. from Syracuse University' in Information and Technology from The School of Information Studies (The iSchool). With an interdisciplinary research focus, Dr. Greene also specialized in the areas of Literacy, Language and Culture.

Dr. Greene is a community-engaged scholar-activist whose work focuses on bridging the gap between out-of-school and in-school literacy and language through culturally relevant pedagogy. Dr. Greene’s research agenda focuses on enhancing teaching and learning for literacy educators, school librarians, and students in the urban secondary digital literacy contexts. Her research and teaching expertise focuses on digital literacies, urban literacies, young adult literature, teacher education and reflexive practice, black feminist rhetoric, the sociopolitical nature of literacy, and black girlhood studies. She employs ethnographic and Critical Discourse methodologies in her research. In her most recent study, she drew upon Hip-hop Feminist Theory, New Literacy Studies, and Reader Response Theory to explore black adolescent girls’ literacy and language practices in an online out-of-school street literature book club. The study examined how societal, institutional, and situational factors influenced meaning making.

Dr, Greene’s upcoming research project focuses on how literacy educators respond to multicultural texts in a virtual professional learning community. This study will highlight the strategies literacy educators employ in incorporating multicultural texts and digital technologies in their secondary literacy classroom. She also has an upcoming research project that focuses on black adolescent girls’ engagement in multimodal composition and how they use digital stories to self-express and develop their own personal narratives.

Dr. Greene was awarded the highest university fellowship at Syracuse University, the Ronald E. McNair University Dissertation Fellowship. She was also the recipient of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Pre-Dissertation Fellowship over the course of her doctoral studies. She is also the recipient of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Conference on English Education (CEE) Cultural Diversity Award for her research. Dr. Greene’s dissertation research was supported by the Joan N. Burstyn Endowed Fund for Research in Education.

Dr. Greene has presented at national and regional conferences, including NCTE, LRA, CEE, ALISE, Hip-hop Literacies Conference, and the Digital Blackness Conference. She recently presented her research “We Need More US in Schools!”: Centering Black Girls’ Literacy and Language Practices in Digital in-School Spaces” at the Hip-Hop Literacies Conference. Dr. Greene also presented “Through the Looking Glass: A Black Female Scholar’s Facilitation of a Black Adolescent Girls’ Out-of-School Online Street Literature Book Club” at the Digital Blackness Conference. Her recent manuscript “We Need More US in Schools!”: Centering Black Girls’ Literacy and Language Practices in Digital in-School Spaces has recently been accepted in the Journal of Negro Education’s (JNE) Special Issue on Black Girls and Women in Education.

Prior to pursuing doctoral studies, Dr. Greene served as school librarian and English educator at the Paul Laurence Dunbar Academy- Middle School 301 in the South Bronx section of New York City. During that time she also served on the school’s inquiry team designed to engage educators in action-based research to inform practice. She procured two 400K grants to fully renovate the outdated library at Paul Laurence Dunbar Academy. Dr. Greene has also served as a young adult public librarian with the New York Public Library and as the Director of Community, Schools, and Library Partnerships at Syracuse University. She also served as a project manager and literacy consultant on Cheddar Bowl in- 3D, a virtual literacy gamification project designed to support middle and high school students. Dr. Greene served as a team leader and mentor for the IT GIRL Project designed to increase middle and high school girls’ interest in careers in the STEM field. Dr. Greene was recently invited to serve as a member of the Liberty Partnerships Rising Stars Program (LPRSP) Advisory Board, a state funded program that encourages young people in grades 5-12 to achieve academic and personal excellence. She is a member of the Black Girls’ Literacies Collective (BGLC), which consists of black female scholars that conduct research and write with and about Black girls’ multiple literacies within school spaces and outside of schools spaces.

Dr. Greene also holds an Advanced Certification in Administration and Supervision from CUNY-Hunter College in New York, a Master’s in Secondary English Education (Grades 6-12) from CUNY- The City College of New York, a Master’s in Library and Information science from Pratt Institute in New York, New York, and a Bachelor’s in Legal Studies with a minor in Psychology from CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York.