Explore Opportunities by Academic Department

Students at the University at Albany are able to engage in research, creative activities, and experiential learning opportunities through their academic major and department. The listing below includes Academic Departments and courses that students can register for. Contact your advisor to discuss how and when you are able to include these courses in your registration!

Accounting

Accounting - Bachelor of Science

School of Business Faculty

B ACC 495 Independent Study in Accounting - Individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the department chair in conference with the student. Written and oral progress reports required. May not be repeated for credit. Not useable in the degree program or major. Prerequisite(s): open only to qualified senior accounting students in the School of Business. An application must be fled through the Office of Student Services in BB 201. S/U graded.

Africana Studies

Community Service Internship

Africana Studies Faculty

A AFS 325 Introduction to Research Methods -An introduction to paradigms, theories and models on research and the Black community. Emphasis will be placed on methodological concerns of validity, reliability, instrument development, data collection, data analysis and reporting of research outcomes. The ethics of research on people of African descent will be discussed.

A AFS 401 Seminar in African American History I - This course is an undergraduate seminar of African American History from the American Colonial period to the Civil War. Various historical themes will be reviewed, and students will have an opportunity to explore research topics related to the following: The Transatlantic Slave and Domestic Trades, Colonial and Antebellum slavery, African Americans and the Revolutionary War, Free Black Societies, Black Abolitionists, African Americans and the Civil War. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219.

A AFS 402 Seminar in African American History II - This course is an undergraduate seminar of African American History from 1865 to the present. Various historical themes will be reviewed, and students will have an opportunity to explore research topics related to the following: Reconstruction, The Age of Jim Crow, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, The Great Depression and New Deal era, World Wars I and II, The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power movement, and contemporary African American History and Culture. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219.

A AFS 490 Senior Seminar for Africana Studies Majors - An extensive examination of critical issues involving the experiences of Africans and African Americans in historical, cultural, and social contexts. A central theme will be selected for each semester's work. Students will synthesize and apply knowledge acquired in the major and will discuss their experiences. Attention will be given to the interrelationships of the values and ideas indigenous to Africana Studies, with a discussion of these with a senior faculty member. Students will review basic research methodology and will evaluate their experiences with a 20-page research paper. Prerequisite(s): major in the department and completion of 18 credit hours in the major.

A AFS 498 Topics in African Studies - Specific topics to be examined are announced during advance registration. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A AFS 499 Topics in African American Studies - Specific topics to be examined are announced during advance registration. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

Anthropology

Anthropology Research

Anthropology Faculty

A ANT 335 Introduction to Archaeological Field Techniques - Introduction to data gathering techniques used by archaeologists in the field. Taught prior to A ANT 338 as basic training for students con­centrating in archaeology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104 or permis­sion of instructor.

A ANT 338/338Z Archaeological Field Research - Directed archaeological excavation of selected sites, including experience in site location, map­ping, excavation, preservation, analysis, classification, and interpretation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 335 or permis­sion of instructor.

A ANT 339 Archaeological Lab Techniques - Survey and practical application of laboratory techniques using materials from the University collections. Emphasis on physical and chemical analysis, classification, and specialized analysis.

A ANT 438 Museum Research and Curation - The course emphasizes collections management and research with existing collections, including database management, basic museum methods for anthropologists, and approaches to problems of using data collected by other researchers. Stu­dents design and complete projects using exist­ing collections. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104.

A ANT 480 Introduction to Ethnographic Field Research - Ethnographic fieldwork experience for qualified undergraduates. Study of fieldwork meth­odology and principles together with actual fieldwork on selected topics under faculty super­vision. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

A ANT 481 (= A LCS 491) Research Projects - Introduction to basic research skills required to answer questions on human behavior, with special emphasis on cross-cultural communica­tion and learning and dynamics of cross-cultural interaction. Specific research projects familiar­ize students with the basic research methods including data collection, processing, and analy­sis. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

A ANT 490 (= A CLA 490) Internship in Archaeological Conservation and Documentation - Supervised placement in an agency engaged in conservation and documentation of archaeo­logical artifacts, such as the New York State Museum or State Conservation Laboratory. Pro­vides practical experience. Anthropology majors may use up to 3 credits toward major elective credit. May be taken by majors in anthropol­ogy only. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A ANT 493 Fieldwork in Mesoamerica: An Orientation - General overview of the social and economic contexts of an ethnographic field site in Meso­america. Emphasis is on the pragmatics of liv­ing in another cultural setting and preparing for a one-month intensive ethnographic research project. Discusses IRB guidelines and the specific ethnographic field project. Specific content of the course varies according to location of eth­nographic project and location of that project. Specific content of the course varies according to ethnographic project and location of that project. Prerequisite(s): permission of instruc­tor. S/U graded.

A ANT 498 Independent Study in Anthropology - Independent reading or research on selected topics under the direction of a faculty mem­ber. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

Art and Art History

Studio Art Internship

Art and Art History Faculty

Art Courses

A ART 490 Internship in Studio Art - Designed for undergraduate students inter­ested in pursuing a career in the arts. Students work with art professionals for one semester. Internships may include assisting the Times Union Photography Department, the Center for Photography at Woodstock, the New York State Museum, and several local galleries, or assisting professional artists. Students complete an academic component consisting of required meetings with the faculty supervisor in the area of focus, and may involve a journal and port­folio. Art majors may use three credits toward course requirements above the 300 level. Intern­ships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Consent for the internship must be obtained in the preceding semester by the submission of a plan of intent and a signed contract with a professional organization or individual artist. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, 2.50 or higher GPA, and permission of instructor.

A ART 491 Senior Studio - As the capstone course for the studio art pro­gram, this class is a requirement for all 60-credit studio art departmental majors. It is only offered in the fall semester, and it is to be taken in their senior year. Students are required to create a new body of artwork in their chosen concentration (painting and drawing, photogra­phy and related media, printmaking, and sculp­ture). At the end of the semester each student is expected to exhibit his or her new artwork at an off-campus art venue. Often this results in a group exhibition in which all the students in the class exhibit their artwork together. For this group exhibition, students are required to organize and execute all aspects of the event (staging, lighting, publicity, documentation, refreshments, etc.). Field trips to art institu­tions in the capital region as well as New York City to look at examples of contemporary art­work and exhibition design will serve as frst-hand examples for what they are doing in the classroom. Throughout the semester, students will also learn how to prepare for a career in the arts. Information concerning document­ing artwork, disseminating artwork samples, as well as graduate school in art, artist residen­cies, grants, awards, fellowships, and art-related employment opportunities will be covered in this course. Majors in the 36-credit studio art program will be allowed to enroll in the class if seating is available. Prerequisite(s): senior 60-credit art major or permission of instructor.

A ART 492 Internship in Art Museum Management and Operation - Designed for undergraduate students interested in pursuing a career in Arts Management or the Gallery/Museum administrative field. Projects may include computer database, archival records retrieval and storage, media relations skills, col­lections management, and exhibition organiza­tion and documentation. A final project will be assigned. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): interview by gallery administrative staff and per­mission of Art Department Chair. S/U graded.

A ART 497 Independent Study - Directed studio project in a selected art area. May be repeated with approval of department chair. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor and department chair. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

Art History Courses

A ARH 329 Archaeological Field Research - Supervised participation in the excavation of approved Old World prehistoric, classical or medieval sites. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of the department chair.

A ARH 490 Internship in Art History - Supervised placement in an institution devoted to the collection, exhibition and/or conserva­tion of works of art, such as the Albany Institute of History and Art or the State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical experience in working with original works of art and includes research and writing projects. Art History majors may use 3 credits toward course require­ments above the 300 level. May be repeated for credit, with permission of supervising instruc­tor. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): at least 6 credits in Art History and junior or senior standing. S/U graded.

A ARH 491 Internship in Film Studies - Internship in the study of film or in film produc­tion. Students are responsible for finding and securing the internship with an organization or individual, subject to approval by the director of the Film Studies minor. May be repeated for credit. Three credits may be applied to upper level coursework in the Film Studies minor or the Art History major. Prerequisite(s): open only to juniors or seniors with a Film Studies minor or with at least six credits of film studies course­work, and an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. S/U graded.

A ARH 497 Independent Study - Directed studio project in a selected art area. May be repeated with approval of department chair. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and department chair.

Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences

Undergraduate Opportunities

Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences Faculty

Atmospheric Science Courses

A ATM 297 Independent Study in Atmospheric Science - By advisement only and may be repeated once for credit. S/U graded. Offered fall or spring semesters.

A ATM 415 (= A ENV 415) Climate Laboratory - A hands-on course in climate modeling; stu­dents will gain an appreciation for what climate models are, their limitations, and how they can be used to study natural phenomena. Top­ics include the physical laws governing climate and climate change, the hierarchy of model complexity, parameterization versus simula­tion, using models for prediction versus under­standing, application of simple climate models to past and future climates on Earth (including radically different climates of the past such as Snowball Earth), accessing and analyzing results from IPCC models. Students will gain significant computer experience making calculations, analyzing results, and interpreting their significance. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210, A ATM 315 or A ENV 315 or permission of instruc­tor for students with computer programming experience; A MAT 111 or 112 or T MAT 118. Offered alternate spring

A ATM 490 Internship in Atmospheric Science - Research or operational experience in atmospheric-related activities with local governmen­tal agencies or private industry. The internship supervisor’s reference or contact information, a midterm report and a final report are required. No more than 3 credits for A ATM 490 may be applied toward major requirements in atmo­spheric science. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an over­all grade point average of 2.50 or higher. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing in atmospheric science. S/U graded.

A ATM 497 Independent Study II - May be repeated once for credit. No more than 6 credits from A ATM 490, 497, 498, and 499 may be applied toward major requirements in atmo­spheric science. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and by advisement only. Offered fall or spring semesters. S/U graded.

A ATM 498 Computer Applications in Meteorological Research - Directed individual study of a particular prob­lem in atmospheric science that requires use of the University Computing Center and/ or departmental computers. May be repeated once for credit. No more than 6 credits from A ATM 490, 497, 498, and 499 may be applied toward major requirements in atmospheric sci­ence. Prerequisite(s): I CSI 201 or permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A ATM 499 Undergraduate Research in Atmospheric Science - Guided research leading to a senior thesis. Oral presentation of results required. May be repeated for credit. No more than 6 credits from A ATM 490, 497, 498, and 499 may be applied toward major requirements in atmospheric sci­ence. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of department chair. S/U graded.

Environmental Science Courses

A ENV 496 Environmental Internships - Provides students with practical work experience in environmental science through placements with federal, state, or local government agen­cies, or private firms. The supervisor’s reference, a mid-internship and a final report are required. Internships are open to qualified juniors and seniors with a GPA of at least 2.50 overall and in the Environmental Science major. A maximum of 3 credits may be applied toward the major. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of department internship coordina­tor. S/U graded.

A ENV 497 (= A GEO 497) Independent Study - Field or laboratory investigation of a chosen environmental or geological problem, including the writing of a research report to be undertaken during the senior year. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. Offered fall or spring semesters.

A ENV 498 Undergraduate Research in Environmental Science - Guided research leading to a written thesis. Oral presentation of results required. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of depart­ment chair. Offered fall or spring semesters. S/U graded.

Bioinstrumentation

School of Public Health

Undergraduate Programs

School of Public Health Faculty

Research & Training Centers

H BMS 410 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Molecular Core Lab - Students will acquire practical, hands-on experience with the use of instrumentation in molecular biology/genomics research in a core laboratory environment. Projects may include the usage of instrumentation for nucleic acid extraction, PCR, quantitative PCR, and DNA sequencing. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 310.

H BMS 411 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Genomics Core Lab - Students will acquire practical, hands-on experi­ence with the use of instrumentation in genomics/microarray research in a core laboratory environment. Projects may include the usage of instrumentation for nucleic acid extraction, microarray analysis, and Next Generation DNA sequencing. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 311.

H BMS 412 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Proteomics Core Lab -Students will acquire practical, hands-on experience with the use of instrumentation in proteomics research in a core laboratory envi­ronment. Projects may include the usage of instrumentation for 2D gel electrophoresis, high pressure liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 312.

H BMS 414 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Cell Analysis Core Lab - Students will acquire practical, hands-on expe­rience with the use of instrumentation in cell analysis research in a core laboratory environ­ment. Projects may include the usage of instru­mentation for histological examination of cells and tissues, laser capture microdissection, and flow cytometry. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 314.

H BMS 415 Instrumentation in Biotechnology Research Internship, Academic Lab - Students will acquire practical, hands-on expe­rience with the use of instrumentation in an academic laboratory environment. Projects will include the use of instrumentation rel­evant to the research activities of the particular academic laboratory. Permission of the Prin­ciple Investigator of the laboratory is required. Prerequisite(s): H BMS 310.

H BMS 420 Bio-Instrumentation Cooperative Training Internship - Students will perform a research internship with a local biotechnology company or aca­demic laboratory. Students will gain a more full understanding of how instrumentation is used in biotechnology to address complex research questions, as well as the expectations that come with a professional career in laboratory research. Prerequisite(s): any two courses from H BMS 410, 411, 412, 414, 415.

Biology

Supervised Research: A BIO 399 and 499

Biology Faculty

A BIO 296 Biological Sciences with Laboratory - Laboratory training in biological sciences. Yields laboratory credit towards the major in biological sciences. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

A BIO 399/399Z Supervised Research for Juniors - Individual, independent research on selected topics in biology. Critical analysis of selected research papers. Junior majors in the depart­ment of biological sciences apply for this course through the prospective research adviser. Stu­dents taking two or more semesters of A BIO 399, 399Z, 499, or 499Z will prepare a poster or make an oral presentation at the Departmental Research Symposium. A copy of the final writ­ten report of each semester’s work, preferably typewritten in journal format, is kept on perma­nent file in the department. May be taken either semester. A maximum of 6 credits may be earned in A BIO 399 and 399Z.

A BIO 499/499Z Supervised Research for Seniors - Individual, independent research on selected topics in biology. Critical analysis of selected research papers. Senior majors in the depart­ment of biological sciences apply for this course through the prospective research adviser. A copy of the final written report of each semester’s work, preferably typewritten in journal format, is kept on permanent file in the department. May be taken either semester. Students taking two or more semesters of A BIO 399, 399Z, 499, or 499Z will prepare a poster or make an oral presentation at the Departmental Research Symposium. A maximum of 8 credits may be earned in A BIO 499 and 499Z.

Business Administration

Business Administration - Bachelor of Science

Business Administration Concentrations

Financial Analyst Honors Program

School of Business Faculty

B BUS 495 Independent Study in Business I - Individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the dean in con­ference with the student. Written and oral prog­ress reports required. Prerequisite(s): open only to qualified students who have senior status in the School of Business. May not be repeated for credit. May not be used in the concentration. An application must be fled through the Office of Student Services, BB 201. S/U graded.

B BUS 496 Independent Study in Business II - Advanced or expanded individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the dean in conference with the student. Written and oral progress reports required. Prerequisite(s): B BUS 495. Open only to qualified students who have senior status in the School of Business. May not be repeated for credit. May not be used in the concentration. An application must be fled with the Office of Stu­dent Services, BB 201. S/U graded.

B BUS 497 Internship in Business I - Internships involving off-campus participation in the work of an agency, institution, or corpo­rate body other than the University, with collat­eral academic study. Prerequisite(s): contingent on the approval of a University at Albany School of Business full-time instructor willing to super­vise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student’s progress. Approval of the Undergradu­ate Affairs Committee also required. Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.10. Open only to School of Business majors with a minimum of 75 com­pleted degree credits who have completed the 300 level foundations courses. S/U graded.

B BUS 498 Internship in Business II - Internships involving off-campus participa­tion in the work of an agency, institution, or corporate body other than the University, with collateral academic study. Prerequisite(s): contingent on the approval of a University at Albany School of Business full-time instructor willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student’s progress. Approval of the Undergraduate Affairs Committee is also required. Minimum cumulative GPA require­ment is 3.10. Open only to School of Business majors with a minimum of 75 completed degree credits. Internship experience must be different from that of B BUS 497. S/U graded.

B BUS 499 Honors Research and Thesis in Business - An intensive reading, research and writing course in a functional area of business. The course culminates with a 40 page, double-spaced honors thesis written under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will also have to pres­ent their findings to the faculty and administra­tion. Final written thesis due on the last day of classes. Prerequisite(s): open only to juniors and seniors who have been admitted to the School of Business, have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.50 and who have completed a total of at least 75 degree credits. Visit the Office of Stu­dent Services, BB 201, for more complete details and the application materials. Research must be conducted in the student’s concentration or accounting. S/U graded.

Chemistry

Undergraduate Research

Chemistry Faculty

  • A CHM 390 Chemistry Internship - Students will have the opportunity to acquire practical, “hands-on” experience in chemis­try by participating as an intern in the work of an agency, institution, or corporation other than the University. The student’s work will be supervised and evaluated by a designated individual at the internship site. This supervi­sor will provide an evaluation of the student’s work to the University at Albany Department of Chemistry faculty member who is the instruc­tor of record for final assessment and grading. Students majoring in Chemistry may apply to the Department of Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course. Admission to ACHM 390 will be dependent upon the acceptability of the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and to the host institution or agency. Enrollment in the course is limited in number in order to pro­vide substantial individual hands-on training, and therefore, is determined on a competitive basis. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. S/U graded.

    A CHM 425 Introduction to Undergraduate Research in Chemistry - Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits of A CHM 425 and/ or 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor; prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 424. S/U graded.

    A CHM 426 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry - Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. May be repeated for credit but not more than 3 credits of A CHM 425 and/or 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Labora­tory and conference hours to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 424. S/U graded.

    A CHM 428 Forensic Chemistry Research - Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. May be repeated for credit but not more than 6 credits total may be applied toward the advanced elective course requirement of the comprehensive forensics chemistry or honors forensics chemistry emphases. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    A CHM 455 Forensic Chemistry Internship - Students will have the opportunity to acquire practical “hands-on” experience in forensic chemistry by participating as an intern in the work of an agency, institution, or corporation other than the University. The student’s work will be supervised and evaluated by a designated individual at the internship site. This supervisor will provide an evaluation of the student’s work to the University at Albany faculty member who is the instructor of record for final assessment and grading. Students majoring in chemistry with a forensic chemistry emphasis may apply to the Department of Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course. Admission to the Forensic Chemistry Internship course will be dependent upon the acceptability of the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and the host institu­tion or agency. Among the criteria used by these agencies will be completion of A CHM 447 and 448 and a possible background check of the applicant. Enrollment in the course is limited in number in order to provide substantial indi­vidual hands-on training, and therefore is deter­mined on a competitive basis. Application to the program must be made six months in advance of the beginning of the proposed internship. S/U graded. May be repeated once for a maximum of 8 credits.

    A CHM 495 Materials Independent Study - Individually selected topic of independent study in materials science (chemistry) culminating in a comprehensive written report. The material covered is to be beyond that offered in any other formal undergraduate course. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    A CHM 497 Independent Study - Individual, independent study of selected topics above or beyond those offered in formal under­graduate courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

  • Communication

    Internships

    Faculty Research Areas

    Communications Faculty

    A COM 470 Methods of Communication Research - Intermediate-level study of research strategies, design of experiments, and field methods in human communication. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265X. Statistics course recommended. May not be offered in 2018-2019

    A COM 465 Studies in Communication Theory - Study of a selected topic in communication theory; e.g., nonverbal communication, consis­tency theory, or mass communication. May be repeated for a total of 15 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265X.

    A COM 297 Research Practicum - Supervised participation in established research projects. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credits, but only a maximum of 3 credits may be applied toward major requirements. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    A COM 390 Internship in Communication - Supervised participation in communicative prac­tices. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. A maximum of 3 credits can be taken in any one semester. This course is designed to provide practical experience and cannot be counted among the 12 credits at the 300-level or above in “A COM” courses required for majors. Course can be counted towards elective credits needed for the major as well as credits needed to meet the residency requirement for majors. Open only to Communication majors or minors in their junior or senior years with a GPA of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265X and per­mission of Internship Coordinator. S/U graded.

    A COM 392 Internship in Operational and Applied Communication Theory - Supervised field placement in an approved setting. Cumulative average of at least 2.50 required. (Open only to rhetoric and com­munication majors and minors, except with permission of instructor.) Student attends a weekly seminar (A COM 393Z) and prepares a major project and weekly reports in conjunc­tion with that seminar. Does not satisfy major or minor requirements. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Corequisite(s): A COM 393Z, and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    A COM 397 Independent Study and Research in Communication - Directed reading and conferences on selected topics. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265X, and per­mission of instructor.

    Computer Science

    College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

    Department of Computer Science

    Faculty

    CEAS Research

    I CSI 490 Internship in Computer Science - Research or development experience with Uni­versity units or external agencies or companies requiring significant solutions of problems in areas such as software design, development, programming of tests or extensions, etc. in a practical environment. The relevance to com­puter science and the technical level of the pro­posed internship, and the intern’s qualifications must be approved by the department. A writ­ten report must be accepted by the department before the end of the internship semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): I CSI/I CEN 213 and permission of the department. S/U graded.

    I CSI 496 Independent Teaching and Learning - Participants extend and apply their under­standing of computer science by tutoring or assisting in laboratory, tutoring or discussion activities, under faculty supervision, for one or more associated courses. One credit for each weekly contact hour or each 2 to 4 hours of scheduled tutoring, staff meetings, lecture attendance or grading. May be repeated for credit. Total credits of I CSI 496 and I CSI 497 may not exceed 9. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    I CSI 496Y Independent Teaching and Learning - Oral discourse version of I CSI 496. In addi­tion to the I CSI 496 requirements, at least two different lab or discussion exercises will be pre­pared and conducted, and will be evaluated by the faculty supervisor and section students. May be repeated for credit. Total credits of I CSI 496 and I CSI 497 may not exceed 9. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    I CSI 497 Independent Study in Computer Science - Independent study of advanced topics under the guidance of a computer science faculty member which are not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Three to four hours per week per semester credit should be spent on readings, technology research, problem solv­ing, experimentation with student created and existing software, faculty discussion, etc., culminating in an acceptable and significant written report or paper. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior stand­ing or equivalent experience, at least I CSI/I CEN 213, and the permission of instructor with whom the student wishes to study.

    I CSI 499 Senior Project in Computer Science - Introduction to software engineering. Students will participate in the design and production of a large, modular program typical of those encoun­tered in business and industry. Prerequisite(s): I CSI 311 or I CSI/I CEN 333, and permission of instructor.

    Criminal Justice

    School of Criminal Justice

    Criminal Justice Undergraduate Program

    Criminal Justice Research

    Criminal Justice Faculty

    R CRJ 423 Student Legal Services Internship Seminar - Interns work in the Legal Service Office on campus under the supervision of a practicing attorney gaining valuable first-hand experience with the legal process. Interns must take R CRJ 424 or 425 during the fall semester. During the spring semester participation in a weekly semi­nar covering various areas of substantive law is required in addition to office hours. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): R CRJ 424 or 425, and permission of instructor.

    R CRJ 494 Internship in Criminal Justice - The field experience requires both a minimum of 15 hours/week in an approved Capital Dis­trict community placement that will engage the student in the study of crime and/or criminal justice policy and programs. Also, participation in a biweekly seminar in which analysis of the field placement and related issues will take place. Corequisite(s): R CRJ 493. Prerequisite(s): only open to criminal justice majors with senior standing and an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher; one relevant upper division course and permission of department required. S/U graded.

    R CRJ 498 Independent Study in Criminal Justice - Independent study or research on selected top­ics in criminal justice under the direction of a faculty member. The student is responsible for locating a faculty member who is willing to direct the independent study. May be repeated for credit but no more than 6 credits may be accumulated. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and undergraduate program director, and junior or senior standing. S/U graded.

    Digital Forensics

    Digital Forensics - Bachelors of Science

    School of Business Faculty

    B FOR 414 Cyber Threat Modeling - This course is an introduction to cyber threat modeling from a variety of perspectives. Included in the course are threat modeling, application of cyber threat intelligence, analysis of technical threats, 360-degree cyber threat analysis techniques, data and information sources that feed the threat analysis cycle and hands-on exercises using security data. The course is heavily lab-oriented and each class will have a specific lab objective to be achieved by students working in teams of two. Periodic quizzes will make up the testing portion of the course but instead of a mid-term and final exam there will be a final lab exercise that will involve all of the tools and techniques used during the course. That final lab will be constructed from real world events occurring during the final half of the semester. Students also will prepare a research project and present it both as a formal paper to be turned in and a class presentation. Prerequisite(s): B FOR 203, working knowledge of networking (TCP/IP protocol stack).

    B FOR 420 National Cybersecurity Challenge Problems - This course exposes students to national cybersecurity challenge problems that our National Labs are currently dealing with and is suitable for seniors who are majors in Digital Forensics, Computer Science, Mathematics, and Cybersecurity. This is an experiential learning course where student teams will work closely with the faculty instructor and scientists in a National Lab or a Government Agency dealing with cybersecurity or intelligence problems. Students will work in teams to plan and solve the problems.

    Documentary Studies

    Documentary Studies Website

    Documentary Studies Faculty

    A DOC 294Y (= A HIS 294Y) Field Research in Oral and Visual History: The Hudson River Region - Utilizing the Hudson River region as our labo­ratory, from the river’s source in the Adiron­dacks to Manhattan Island in the south, this course is intended to be both a theoretical and practical introduction to the use of oral and video history in documentary and historical field research. As a course, it covers a wide territory -- from the gathering of oral/video interviews to explorations of how to utilize them in the­atrical plays, radio programs, films, and televi­sion documentaries. From in-class discussions of memory, historical distortion, and interview theory, to technical instruction on the use of audio, video, and transcribing equipment, the course is designed to teach students critical and practical skills and to demonstrate the poten­tial of this important research and presentation methodology — and to do it utilizing the com­munities and vast resources of the Hudson River corridor. A major component of the course will be student-initiated and led interviews with individuals from a variety of walks of life who live along the shores, or work on, the Hudson River. [Please note that in future years, the “Field Research in Oral and Visual History” course will vary in its regional focus]. Only one version of A DOC 294Y may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A DOC 450 Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum - The Documentary Studies Seminar and Field­work Practicum is the capstone course for majors and minors in documentary studies. Students are expected to complete a substantial project in any one of five documentary concen­trations (radio/audio, video/film, hypermedia/ multimedia, photography, and print). Students will work with individual concentration advisers as well as the course instructor; they will receive feedback, as well, from fellow students enrolled in the course. Discussion of selected readings, production techniques, research strategies, and legal and ethical issues, as well as viewings of documentary films/photographs and airings of audio documentaries, will inform and comple­ment in-depth examinations of individual proj­ects. The course will be offered once a year, generally in the spring semester. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

    A DOC 451 Honors Section for Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum - The course, for Honors students taking A DOC 450, offers students an opportunity to complete a major project in their area of docu­mentary concentration: radio/audio, video/ film, hypermedia/multimedia, photography, and print journalism. This 1 credit Honors course allows Honors students to take on a more ambitious project than normally expected of majors. It culminates in a public presentation of their projects.

    A DOC 499 Special Projects and Internships in Documentary Studies - This is a course designed for students inter­ested in engaging in documentary fieldwork and production projects through internships with on-campus and off-campus organizations, or on their own with close faculty supervision. Students should already have the specific pro­duction skills (e.g. filmmaking, photography, audio recording/editing, hypermedia authoring) necessary for the project or internship they wish to undertake. Typical projects or internships might involve mounting documentary photog­raphy exhibits, participating in documentary editing projects (including online, nonfiction journals), designing virtual museums and pod-casting/video-casting websites, or working as production members on film/video or radio projects. Credit load will depend on the level of engagement and time obligations associated with the specific project undertaken by the stu­dent. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, a minimum GPA of 2.50, and permission of the instructor. S/U graded.

    East Asian Studies

    East Asian Studies Website

    East Asian Studies Faculty

    A EAC 205X Chinese Studies Research and Bibliographic Methods - This course will cover research and biblio­graphic methods in Chinese Studies. Students will learn how to navigate library catalogs and the Internet with specific emphasis on Chi­nese databases and resources. Students will also learn how to use reference materials, such as character dictionaries. Only one of A EAC 205X, A EAJ 205X, and A EAS 205X may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one year or equivalent of Chinese.

    A EAC 497 Independent Study in Chinese - Projects in selected areas of Chinese studies, with regular progress reports. Supervised read­ings of texts in Chinese. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): two 300 level Chinese courses or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

    A EAJ 205X Japanese Studies Research and Bibliographic Methods - This course will cover research and biblio­graphic methods in Japanese Studies. Students will learn how to navigate library catalogs and the Internet with specific emphasis on Japa­nese databases and resources. Students will also learn how to use reference materials, such as character dictionaries. Only one of A EAJ 205X, A EAC 205X, and A EAS 205X may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one year or equivalent of Japanese.

    A EAJ 497 Independent Study in Japanese - Projects in selected areas of Japanese studies, with regular progress reports; or supervised read­ings of texts in Japanese. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 302 or permission of instructor.

    A EAK 497 Independent Study in Korean - Projects in selected areas of Korean studies, with regular progress reports; or supervised readings of texts in Korean. May be repeated once for credit if content varies. Prerequisite(s): two 300 level Korean courses or equivalent, or permis­sion of instructor.  

    Economics

    Economics Research

    Economics Faculty 

    A ECO 496 Economics Internship - Economics Internship requires active partici­pation in economic research outside the Uni­versity, together with senior standing as an economics major. May be taken only once for credit. Internships are open only to qualified seniors who have an overall grade point aver­age of 2.50 or higher. Permission of instructor is required. S/U graded.

    A ECO 497/497Z Independent Study and Research - Student-initiated research project under fac­ulty guidance. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 credits with permission of depart­ment. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300, 301 and 320; a B average or higher in all economic courses attempted.

    Educational & Counseling Psychology

    School of Education

    Department of Educational & Counseling Psychology

    Undergraduate Program in Human Development

    Faculty

    E CPY 497 Independent Study - Designed to meet needs of undergraduate stu­dents who possess interest in counseling or counseling psychology and plan for graduate education. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    E PSY 481 Research Project in Human Development - This course will provide students with the opportunity to use various types of research methods for designing and conducting small-scale empirical studies in human development, using small-size newly collected or already exist­ing quantitative and qualitative data. Prereq­uisites: E PSY 250, E PSY 330, and junior or senior class standing. S/U graded.

    E PSY 497 Research Apprenticeship - Student and instructor will participate in a joint research endeavor. With scaffolding provided by the instructor, the student will contribute to the majority of phases of research: conceptual­ization, design, implementation, data gathering, report writing, and presentation. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    Educational Policy & Leadership

    School of Education

    Department of Educational Policy & Leadership

    Faculty & Research

    E APS 497 (formerly E EST 497) Independent Study in Educational and Social Thought - Independent reading, study, and research in educational and social thought. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and consent of department.

    Educational Theory and Practice

    School of Education

    Department of Educational Theory and Practice

    Faculty

    Research Centers and Projects

    E TAP 497 Independent Study in Teacher Education - Independent reading, study, and research in teacher education. Prerequisite(s): senior stand­ing and consent of Department of Educational Theory and Practice.

    Electrical and Computer Engineering

    College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    Faculty

    CEAS Research

    I CEN 440 Design Lab I - Part one of a two-semester-long capstone design experience that provides the opportu­nity for teams of students to propose, proto-type/design, build, test, demonstrate, present and fully document a working prototype of a sophisticated electronic system. In this first part, student teams interact with industry spon­sors and/or faculty to develop a proposal for a system, component or process to meet desired needs and specifications within constraints. Stu­dents teams will identify opportunities, develop requirements, perform analysis and synthesis, generate multiple solutions, evaluate solutions against requirements, consider risks, and make trade-offs. Prerequisite(s): I CEN 350, I CEN 380, and I CEN/ICSI 333.

    I CEN 450 Design Lab II - Part two of a two-semester-long capstone design experience that provides the opportu­nity for teams of students to propose, proto-type/design, build, test, demonstrate, present and fully document a working prototype of a sophisticated electronic system. In this second part, student teams continue to interact with industry sponsors and/or faculty as they imple­ment their design and conduct validation experi­ments to demonstrate that their design meets all engineering specifications, standards, and con­straints. In documenting their work, student teams will also evaluate their designs in global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic context and develop recommendations for future development. Prerequisite(s): I CEN 440.

    I CEN 497 Independent Research in Computer Engineering - Independent research project under faculty guidance. Students will present their research as appropriate. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 credits with permission of department. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

    Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity

    College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity

    Undergraduate Programs

    Experiential Learning

    Centers, Institutes, and Research

    CEHC Faculty

    C EHC 342 Semester in Washington Internship - This course is the internship component of the Semester in Washington program in the fall semester. Admission is by application. Enroll­ment is limited. Three of the nine credits may be used to satisfy the requirement for the C EHC 390 internship course in the BA/BS in Emer­gency Preparedness, Homeland Security, and Cybersecurity. Prerequisite(s): one of C EHC 101 or R PAD 140 or R POS 101 or R POS 102; one 300 level course in C EHC, R PAD or R POS; junior or senior standing; or permission of the Department. S/U graded.

    C EHC 390 Internship Experience in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity - This course is intended to give students an opportunity to effectively apply what they have learned in their classroom studies through work in relevant professional settings. Stu­dents will work with the staff of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity to secure placement at an off-campus agency or organization, including public, private, and not-for-profit organiza­tions. Alongside that internship, there will be an accompanying class meeting in which students will integrate the theoretical concepts that they have learned in their courses with the practical experience of their internship as well as engage in career preparation activities. Prerequisite(s): C EHC/R PAD 101 and junior or senior stand­ing. S/U graded.

    C EHC 410 Capstone Project in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security & Cybersecurity - Capstone Projects are designed to be the syn­thesizing educational experience for students majoring in Emergency Preparedness, Home­land Security, and Cybersecurity. The experi­ence provides students with an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge acquired in their academic careers to solve a problem for a cli­ent. The Capstone Project requires students to engage in higher-order intellectual activity such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a new or novel situation. In addition, students are expected to communicate the results of this intellectual activity in oral or written form to an appropriate audience. Capstone Projects are student-centered experiences that demonstrate that the students have become independent learners. Prerequisite(s): C EHC/R PAD 101, C EHC 210, and C EHC 310 or permission of instructor.

    English

    English Department: Undergraduate Studies

    English Internship Program

    English Department Faculty

    English Department: Advisement

    A ENG 390 Internship in English - Supervised practical apprenticeship of 10-15 hours of work per week in a position requiring the use of skills pertaining to the discipline of English, such as reading and critical analysis, writing, research, tutoring, etc., with an aca­demic component consisting of the intern­ship colloquium. Written work and report required. Selection is competitive and based on early application, recommendations, interviews and placement with an appropriate internship sponsor. Open only to junior or senior Eng­lish majors and minors with a minimum overall grade point average of 2.50 and a minimum 3.00 average in English. A ENG 390 credits may not be used toward the 18 credits minimum required for the English minor. Prerequisite(s): A ENG 205Z. S/U graded.

    A ENG 497 Independent Study and Research in English - Senior level course designed to address intel­lectual needs that have grown out of previous coursework, or subject matter that is not regu­larly covered under the English department’s curriculum. May be repeated. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210 and permission of a faculty member in the department and of the appropriate departmental committee. Reserved for English majors.

    Environmental and Sustainable Engineering

    College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

    Department of Environmental and Sustainable Engineering

    Faculty

    CEAS Research

    I ESE 497 Capstone Senior Design - Teams of students conduct preliminary and final design of real-world Environmental Engi­neering projects. Students will be able to hone their design skills based upon knowledge, tools and skills learned from other courses. Progress reports and presentations from all team mem­bers are required for this course. Prerequisite(s): senior standing or instructor consent.

    Geography and Planning

    Geography and Planning: Undergraduate Program

    Geography and Planning Faculty

    Faculty Research Interests

    A GOG 366 (= A GLO 366) India: Field Study of Development Issues - A faculty-led field course requiring a mini­mum of three weeks full-time study in India. Broadens and deepens the agenda of A GOG/A GLO/A USP 364Y “India: Development Debates”, examining urban and rural develop­ment issues in and around three major Indian cities. Each city will be home to the course for one week. Students will study major issues (e.g., the management of urban traffic flows, the organization of small-scale retailing, the redevelopment of poor neighborhoods, and the work of micro-business and social welfare NGO’s) through a combination of direct obser­vation, institutional visits, and conversations with local experts. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and the Center for International Education and Global Strategy.

    A GOG 417 Geography Internships - Work in cartography, remote sensing, environ­mental, or other offices to gain pre-professional experience in applied geography. Carried out under the joint supervision of faculty and the host office. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    A GOG 450 Independent Study in Geography - The student will work independently on a directed reading, field survey, or individual research project in geography. A member of the faculty will authorize and advise the proj­ect, which will be dimensioned in proportion to the number of credits being taken. The stu­dent will submit a fnal report for assessment. May be repeated up to 6 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): 9 credits in Geography, junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor.

    A GOG 492 Geography Internship - An internship enabling students to extensively use their geographic knowledge and skill in a professional setting. Students need to provide detailed responsibilities and requirements for the internship for the approval of their advisor, and arrange for the supervisor of their proposed Internship to discuss it with their advisor, before registering for the Capstone Experience. At the end of the internship, students need to submit a report to position their internship experience in the broader context of geographic debates and paradigms, which must be approved by the advisor. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): completion of all required geography core courses and at least two advanced courses in the cluster that it is related to the Capstone Experi­ence, or permission of the advisor. S/U graded.

    A USP 490 (formerly A PLN 490) Planning Internship - Provides students with practical work experi­ence in the general field of urban and regional planning. Internship placements are typically with federal, state, or local government agen­cies, consultancy firms, community develop­ment corporations, or private voluntary or political action groups specializing in a specific sub-field relating to planning. Supervisor’s ref­erence and final report required. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    A USP 497 (formerly A PLN 497) Independent Study in Planning - Provides an opportunity for students with a strong interest in a specific topic or sub-field in urban and regional planning to do directed read­ing, independent study or research with faculty supervision. May be repeated once for credit when content varies, but not for more than a total of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201, and junior or senior standing.

    Globalization Studies

    Globalization Studies

    Globalization Studies Faculty

    A GLO 366 (= A GOG 366) India: Field Study of Development Issues - A faculty-led field course requiring a mini­mum of three weeks full-time study in India. Broadens and deepens the agenda of A GOG/A GLO/A USP 364 “India: Development Debates,” examining urban and rural develop­ment issues in and around three major Indian cities. Each city will be home to the course for one week. Students will study major issues (e.g., the management of urban traffic flows, the organization of small-scale retailing, the redevelopment of poor neighborhoods, and the work of micro-business and social welfare NGOs) through a combination of direct obser­vation, institutional visits, and conversations with local experts. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and the Center for International Education and Global Strategy.

    A GLO 402 Globalization Studies Internship - An internship enabling students to experience professional work or community service, focus­ing on international relations, on the work of international organizations, on environmen­tal, social or economic problems in a foreign country, or on the needs of multicultural and/ or immigrant populations in the United States. The placement and report must be approved by the Globalization Studies Director. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): At least two courses from A GLO 103, A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225, and A GLO 303, or permission of Globalization Studies Director. S/U graded.

    A GLO 403Z Research Projects in Globalization Studies - An overview and critique of information sources and research methods applied to Globalization Studies. Each student will also select a research topic and prepare an 8-12 page essay in consul­tation with the Instructor. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of the Glo­balization Studies Director.

    A GLO 410 International Development Internship - An internship enabling students to experience professional work on international develop­ment. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 and permis­sion of instructor. S/U graded.

    A GLO 411 Independent Study in International Development - Independent reading or research on selected topics in international development under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 and permission of instructor.

    History

    History Undergraduate Program

    Internships for History Majors

    History Department Faculty

    A HIS 395 The Historian’s Craft: Methods - This seminar is a methods course that prepares students to succeed as they transition from foun­dational to advanced coursework in the History Department. It will teach students how to ask appropriate research questions, collect evidence using the university’s research tools, and cho­reograph that evidence to advance a persuasive argument. Prerequisite(s): history major and completed foundational work.

    A HIS 294Y (= A DOC 294Y) Field Research in Oral and Visual History: The Hudson River Region - Utilizing the Hudson River region as our labo­ratory, from the river’s source in the Adiron­dacks to Manhattan Island in the south, this course is intended to be both a theoretical and practical introduction to the use of oral and video history in documentary and histori­cal field research. As a course, it covers a wide territory — from the gathering of oral/video interviews to explorations of how to utilize them in theatrical plays, radio programs, films, and television documentaries. From in-class discussions of memory, historical distortion, and interview theory, to technical instruction on the use of audio, video, and transcribing equipment, the course is designed to teach stu­dents critical and practical skills and to demon­strate the potential of this important research and presentation methodology — and to do it utilizing the communities and vast resources of the Hudson River corridor. A major compo­nent of the course will be student-initiated and led interviews with individuals from a variety of walks of life who live along the shores, or work on, the Hudson River. [Please note that in future years, the “Field Research in Oral and Visual History” course will vary in its regional focus]. Only one version of A HIS 294Y may be taken for credit.

    A HIS 489Z Senior Research Seminar - The Senior Research Seminar is an integrated, capstone course that is the culmination of the history student’s major. It will extend skills that students have established and practiced in their previous history courses, and will include an in-depth exploration of the tools and concepts used by historians. Students will conduct indi­vidual research, using primary and secondary sources to produce a substantial body of writ­ing. This course cannot be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): senior standing in the history major.

    A HIS 492 Undergraduate Group and Individual Research Project - This course is for both History and Documen­tary Studies majors and minors interested in pursuing a fieldwork/archival research project culminating in 1) a media documentary on a topic that interests them or 2) a research paper based on extensive and intensive primary source research. History students taking the course must select historical projects; Documentary Studies students, for whom this course is a required core course, may select either historical or contemporary topics. Students are expected to complete a substantial research-based docu­mentary project in any one of the following forms: audio, video, hypermedia, still photogra­phy (with an “exhibit catalog”), or text. Students will work with the course instructor as well as appropriate on-campus experts; they will receive feedback, as well, from fellow students enrolled in the course. Team projects may also be under­taken, so long as individual responsibilities of participating students are clearly identified. Discussions of selected readings in history and media, media ethics, documentary and contem­porary issues, and production techniques will complement the discussions of individual proj­ects. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

    A HIS 497 Independent Study in History - Directed reading and conferences on selected topics in history, or mentored historical research and writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies, junior, or senior standing, or 3 credits in history. S/U graded.

    A HIS 499 Special Projects in History - Supervised work on projects in coordination with local museums and historical agencies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): permis­sion of instructor and department chair. S/U graded.

    Informatics and Information Studies

    College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity

    Informatics Bachelor of Science

    Experiential Learning

    Centers, Institutes, and Research

    CEHC Faculty

    I INF 465 Senior Capstone in Informatics - Students create teams, each representing their specialization, to solve a current technology challenge. The purpose of this course is for stu­dents from all the different Informatics tracks to come together and work on a real world Infor­matics related problem. This course will require completion of 100 hours in a field placement. During their field placement students will work as part of a team comprised of their peers from other Informatics tracks to complete a capstone project. The project itself will be dictated by the individual needs of the placement and the strengths of the team. The Instructor of I INF 465 will act as a mentor to the student teams and help to guide them through their proj­ects. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 credits with permission of department. Prerequisite(s): Informatics seniors only and instructor permission.

    I INF 466 Independent Research - Student-initiated research project under faculty guidance. Students will present their research as appropriate. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 credits with permission of department. Prerequisite(s): Informatics juniors and seniors only.

    I INF 467 Technology-Based Community Support - Students work on-site with a non-profit to pro­vide technology support. Possible projects could include website creation and development, com­puter lab support, or networking. At least 100 hours/semester are required. Students will also meet with a faculty supervisor throughout the semester and complete a final presentation of their work. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 credits with permission of department. Prerequisite(s): Informatics juniors and seniors only.

    I INF 468 (formerly I IST 468) Undergraduate Internship - The internship has two components: (1) work experience in position related to students inter­ests in computing and information. Interns are expected to spend 8 hours per week during the semester at their internship location; (2) academic seminar where students and faculty mentor meet together monthly to discuss their experiences and general career preparation topics. Assignments may include preparing a resume and cover letter, career development, assessing skills for and barriers to career devel­opment, and planning for graduate or profes­sional school. Students are expected to research, identify and find their own possible internship opportunities. This activity will help students to identify their own career goals and manner in which they may best be achieved, and it will also help students to learn career preparation skills that will be useful after graduation. All internship opportunities must be reviewed and approved by appropriate faculty prior to course registration. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor, junior or senior status and a minimum GPA of 2.50.

    I INF 469 Internship for Fully Online Students - The internship has two components: (1) work experience in position related to the Informa­tion technology track. Interns are expected to spend at least 24 hours per week during the semester at their internship location; (2) online academic seminar where students and faculty mentor discuss their experiences and general career preparation topics. Assignments may include preparing a resume and cover letter, career development, assessing skills for and bar­riers to career development, and planning for graduate or professional school. Students are expected to research, identify and find their own internship opportunities. This activity will help students to identify their own career goals and manner in which they may best be achieved, and it will also help students to learn career prepa­ration skills that will be useful after graduation. All internship opportunities must be reviewed and approved by appropriate faculty prior to course registration. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor, Informatics juniors and seniors only, IT online track only, fully online students.

    I IST 469/469Z Independent Study - Student-initiated research project under faculty guidance. May be repeated for credit up to total of six credits with permission of department. Prerequisite(s): written approval of the inde­pendent study proposal by a supervising faculty member and the department chair is required prior to registration. S/U graded.

    Journalism

    Journalism Program

    Advising: Journalism

    Journalism Faculty

    A JRL 495 Internship in Journalism - The course is limited to Journalism majors and minors. Internships in a variety of media are offered for variable credit. The internship requires that students work on-site in a pro­fessional media organization, under the direct supervision of a qualified supervisor. A faculty supervisor will also design an academic compo­nent for the internship, based on readings, daily journals, and the writing of papers that analyze and reflect on the work experience. The fac­ulty supervisor will meet regularly with interns. May be repeated for up to a total of six cred­its. Prerequisite(s): internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an over­all grade point average of 2.50 or higher and an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher in their coursework in Journalism. S/U graded.

    A JRL 497 Independent Study in Journalism - For variable credit (1-3), students in Journalism pursue an independent project under the super­vision of a full time faculty member. A student might use this course to enhance a portfolio, gain expertise in journalistic practices, research a special topic, or complete work on a major assignment. An application to a faculty mem­ber is required. A written agreement outlining the goals and work to be completed during the independent study is also required. The course is limited to seniors with prior journalism expe­rience, although they do not have to be a jour­nalism major or minor.

    Judaic Studies

    Judaic Studies

    Judaic Studies Faculty

    A HEB 297 Independent Study in Hebrew - Directed readings and conferences on selected topics in Hebrew language and literature. May be repeated for credit when content var­ies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A HEB 497 Independent Study in Hebrew - Directed readings and conferences on selected topics in Hebrew language and literature. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.

    A JST 497 Independent Study in Judaic Studies - Directed reading and conferences on selected topics in Judaic studies. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): per­mission of department chair.

    Languages, Literatures and Cultures

    Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

    Faculty & Lecturers

    A ARA 397 Independent Study in Arabic - Study by a student in Arabic language and lin­guistics or a related area of special interest. Work performed under direction of a professor chosen by the student on a topic approved by the program. May be repeated for credit with approval of the program. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A DCH 397 Independent Study Dutch - Study by a student in an area of special inter­est not treated in courses currently offered. May be repeated once for credit with special depart­mental approval. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A FRE 297 Independent Study in French - Study in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. Topic must be approved by the undergraduate adviser and directed by a member of the faculty. May be repeated once for credit with approval. May not be offered 2018-2019.

    A FRE 397 Independent Study in French - Study in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. Topic must be approved by the undergraduate adviser and directed by a member of the faculty. May be repeated once for credit with approval. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 341Z.

    A CLG 497 Independent Study - Seniors may offer 2 to 4 credits of independent study in place of regular course work in Greek. Projects must be approved by the department chair. May be repeated once for credit. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A ITA 397 Independent Study in Italian - Study by a student in an area of special interest not treated in currently offered courses. Work performed under direction of a professor cho­sen by the student on a topic approved by the program. May be repeated once for credit with special departmental approval. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 313. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A LLC 440 Internship in Translation - Employment in and study of theory and prac­tice of professional translation. Practice and study of professional relationships and tech­nology of translation, with a final report on the experience and a paper based on a list of readings selected in consultation with faculty. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): per­mission of instructor. S/U graded. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A CLL 497 Independent Study - Seniors may offer 2 to 4 credits of independent study in place of regular course work in Latin. Projects must be approved by the department chair. May be repeated once for credit. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A POR 397 Independent Study in Portuguese - Study in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. May be repeated once for credit with program approval. Prerequisite(s): permission of department. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A RUS 397 Independent Study - Directed reading and conferences on selected topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and program director.

    A SPN 328 Spanish-Language Applied Learning Internship - Internships involve the students’ participation in the work of an agency, institution, or corporate body, with collateral academic study. By enroll­ing in the Spanish program’s internship course, students can earn degree credit for professional experience before they graduate. At their intern­ship site, students work on assignments closely related to their Spanish major/minor. The university-approved internship is an integrated learning experience that enhances both their studies and career development. This is a mutu­ally beneficial program whereby students acquire industry related skills, while the industries/ agencies benefit from the student’s advanced language and intercultural skills. Enrollment is contingent on the approval of a University at Albany full-time member of the instructional staff willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student’s progress. Open only to Spanish majors or minors. Does not yield credit towards the major or minor in Spanish. The student can only enroll in this course once. Prerequisites: permission of department chair. S/U graded.

    A SPN 397 Independent Study in Spanish - Study by a student in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. Work performed under direction of a professor chosen by the student on a topic approved by the pro­gram. May be repeated once for credit with spe­cial approval of the program. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 311 and A SPN 312.

    Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies

    Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies: Undergraduate Program

    LACS: Special Opportunities

    LACS Faculty

    A LCS 300 Introduction to Theories and Research Methods in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies - This is a team-taught course designed to intro­duce students to some of the disciplines within, as well as fields of study that bridge the Social Sciences and Humanities. Guest lecturers with different disciplinary and interdisciplinary trainings will explain the origin, development, and some of the major theories and methods of their respective discipline or field of study. The experts will also discuss the processes of insti­tutionalization of these disciplines and trans-disciplines as academic programs in U.S., Latin American, and Caribbean universities, and how they claim to add new knowledge to university curricula. Students will be exposed to the dif­ferent theories, methods, and epistemologies of both traditional disciplines (e.g. Sociology, Anthropology, Geography, etc.) as well as inter or transdisciplinary fields of study (e.g. Latin America Studies, Latino Studies, Women Stud­ies, Africana Studies, and Judaic Studies, etc.). Students will build Information Literacy skills, learn the difference between quantitative and qualitative research, and study how to write empirical research reports. Offered fall semes­ter only.

    A LCS 450 Legislative Internship - Internships involving off-campus participation in the NYS Legislature, with collateral academic study. Contingent on the approval of a faculty member of the Department of Latin Ameri­can and Caribbean Studies willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student’s progress. Students must apply two weeks prior to the start of the academic term, and are subject to an interview and selection process. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): Open to students of any major. Bilingual and multicultural skills will prove particularly useful since students will be working with legislative members of the NYS Assembly Puerto Rican/ Hispanic Task Force. S/U graded. May not be offered in 2018-2019.

    A LCS 491 (= A ANT 481) Research Projects - Introduction to basic research skills required to answer questions on human behavior, with special emphasis on cross-cultural interaction. Specific research projects provide students with the basic research methods, including data col­lection, processing, and analysis. Only one version of A LCS 491 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

    A LCS 497 Independent Study - Independent study in an area of special inter­est to the student under the supervision of the sponsoring faculty member. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and Department Chair.

    Linguistics and Cognitive Science

    Linguistics and Cognitive Science

    Linguistics and Cognitive Science Faculty

    A LIN 289 Directed Study in Foreign Language - Study of a foreign language not regularly taught at the University; independent work with the guidance of a faculty member using record­ings and other material; meetings with native speakers when possible. A limited number of languages may be offered in any one year. May be repeated for a different language or for more advanced study in the same language. Does not count toward the 36 credit requirement for the major. Prerequisite(s): permission of undergrad­uate advisor.

    A LIN 497 Independent Study in Linguistics - Independent reading or research on a selected topic in linguistics, under the direction of a faculty member.  Normally taken for 3 credits, but it the nature of the project warrants it, as many as 6 credits may be earned in one term; may be taken a second time, with approval, for a maximum total of 12 credits.  Prerequisite(s):  a 300 level course from the list of courses approved for the linguistics major; permission of instructor and director of linguistics program.

    Mathematics and Statistics

    Mathematics Undergraduate Program

    Mathematics Faculty

    Department Research

    A MAT 497 Independent Study in Mathematics - Individual, independent study of selected top­ics not covered in a regularly scheduled course. Open only to majors in mathematics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor with whom student wishes to study.

    A MAT 499Z Undergraduate Thesis - Individual, independent study leading to an undergraduate thesis under the direction of faculty chosen by the student. The thesis may be used to fulfill the thesis requirement in the honors program with the approval of the depart­ment. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

    Medieval and Renaissance Studies

     

    A MRS 497 Independent Study and Research in Medieval and Renaissance Studies - Senior-level directed study and independent research in a selected area of medieval or early modern art, history, literature, or music. Interdisciplinary projects encouraged. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): open to majors or minors with demonstrated success in upper-level Medieval/ Renaissance Studies courses; by permission of instructor and approval of program director.

    Music and Theatre

    Department of Music and Theatre

    Music Studies and Performance

    Music Faculty

    Theatre Program

    Theatre Faculty

    Music Courses

    A MUS 495 Research Seminar - A capstone course focused on writing about music from historical and theoretical per­spectives. Discussion and analysis of seminal readings and repertory are based on skills and conceptual tools acquired through prior course­work in the major. Strategies for critical writing about music will be developed through exami­nation of current methodologies and resources. The course culminates in the development of a substantial independent research project, which may include a performative component. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A MUS 247 and A MUS 301.

    A MUS 490 Internship in Music - Opportunities for qualified individual students for training in an internship capacity with respected professional organizations. Students write an internship report under the direc­tion of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 credits provided the internship offers different learning and training. Prerequisite(s): music major and permission of department chair. S/U graded.

    A MUS 497 Independent Study - Intensive study in areas of specific interest to the music major. This restricted offering repre­sents a culmination of concentration in one of the designated programs and serves as a basis for further study at the graduate level. The project report is completed under the direction of a staff member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): music major and permission of department chair.

    Theatre Courses

    A THR 397 Independent Study in Theatre - Directed reading and conferences on selected topics. A student may take the course once as strictly research and once as a production-related study, but not repeat one or the other. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and program director.

    A THR 490 Internship - Internships in professional theatre enable stu­dents to examine the way the theories and the practical experiences of our discipline interact. They provide opportunities for observation and participation which are not available in the class­room. Prerequisite(s): internships with profes­sional theatrical organizations are available for qualified juniors and seniors with an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher, and permission of Theatre Program Director. S/U graded.

    Philosophy

    Department of Philosophy

    Philosophy Faculty

    A PHI 497 Independent Study and Research - Guided research and writing on a selected problem in philosophy on a tutorial basis. May be taken more than once for credit if content varies. Prerequisite(s): a 300 level course in philosophy and the approval of the individual faculty member acting as project supervisor and of the departmental Undergraduate Stud­ies Committee.

    Physics

    Department of Physics

    Department Research

    Physics Faculty

    A PHY 497/497Y Research and/or Independent Study - Research and/or independent study under the direct supervision of a faculty member with whom the student has made an arrangement. Ambitious students are encouraged to engage in an activity that broadens their experience con­siderably beyond that of conventional course work. A written report is submitted on the work of each semester. May be repeated for credit. S/U graded.

    Political Science

    Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy

    Department of Political Science

    Political Science Faculty

    Centers, Institutes & Partners

    R POS 342 (= R PAD 342 & C EHC 342) Washington Internship - This is the internship component of the spring Washington Semester program. Admission by application. Enrollment limited. Preference to R POS Honors students. For information and applications, see Department of Political Sci­ence office or website. Deadlines and interviews in the early fall. Does not count toward a Pub­lic Policy and Management major or minor. Prerequisite(s): R POS 101, one 300 level course in American government, junior class standing. Corequisite(s): R POS 341 and R POS 495 or R PAD 341 and R PAD 490. S/U graded.

    R POS 390 (= R PAD 390; formerly R PUB 390) Internship: Political Science/ Public Administration & Policy -Students will actively participate in the politi­cal process through working in a staff position at a recognized political agency, organization or institution to test — in a nonacademic setting — the concepts and theories examined in the classroom. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    R POS 397 Experiential and Service Learning in Political Science - This course provides academic structure and oversight to service-learning and community engagement components available as options in other Political Science offerings. May be repeated but only three credits total may apply for the major in Political Science.=

    R POS 495Z (= R PAD 490Z; formerly R PUB 490Z) Research and Writing in Washington - This is the research and writing component of the department’s spring Semester in Washing­ton program. Admission by application. Enroll­ment limited. For information and applications, see Rockefeller College’s website. Only one ver­sion may be taken for credit. Corequisite(s): R POS/R PAD 341 and R POS/R PAD 342.

    R POS 498/498Z Independent Study - Reading, research and intensive writing course work in a one-on-one relationship with a fac­ulty member. To be overseen by the Chair of the Department. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite(s): R POS 101 and R POS 102, or junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and department chair. A–E graded.

    Psychology

    Psychology Department

    Undergraduate Research Opportunities

    Psychology Faculty

    A PSY 297/297W/297Y/297Z Directed Study in Psychology - Provides an opportunity for a sophomore to work on a project under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to majors and nonma­jors. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 3 credits in independent study courses (A PSY 297, 397, or 497) may be applied to major credit, but may not be used to satisfy the 300-or-above requirement. Applicant must present a state­ment which defines the research, lists resources, provides method(s) of evaluating student, and bears the approval by signature of the faculty supervisor. Prerequisite(s): A PSY 101 and per­mission of instructor. S/U graded.

    A PSY 397/397T/397Z Directed Research in Psychology - Provides the opportunity for a junior to work on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to majors and nonma­jors. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 3 credits in independent study courses (A PSY 297, 397, or 497) may be applied to major credit, but may not be used to satisfy the 300-or-above requirement. Each applicant must pres­ent a statement of the intended project which clearly defines the problem and/or topic, lists resources for the project, provides the basis of student evaluation, and bears the approval by signature of the faculty adviser. Prerequisite(s): A PSY 210 and 211, and permission of instruc­tor. S/U graded.

    A PSY 497W/497Z Independent Study and Research - Survey of the research literature and/or conduct of a research project on a selected methodologi­cal, theoretical, or applied problem. Each stu­dent must have a faculty adviser. Open to majors and nonmajors. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 3 credits in independent study courses (A PSY 297, 397, or 497) may be applied to major credit, but may not be used to satisfy the 300-or-above requirement. Each applicant must present a statement of the intended project which clearly defines the problem and/or topic, lists resources for the project, provides the basis of student evaluation, and bears the approval by signature of the faculty adviser. Prerequisite(s): A PSY 101 and 12 additional credits in psychol­ogy and permission of instructor; statement of the intended project and a study plan; A PSY 210 and 211 recommended. S/U graded.

    Public Administration and Policy

    Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy

    Department Public Administration & Policy

    Public Administration Faculty

    Centers, Institutes & Partners

    R PAD 342 (= R POS 342 & C EHC 342) Washington Internship - This is the internship component of the spring Washington Semester program. Admission by application. Enrollment limited. Preference to R POS Honors students. For information and applications, see Department of Political Sci­ence office or website. Deadlines and interviews in the early fall. Does not count toward a Pub­lic Policy and Management major or minor. Prerequisite(s): R POS 101, one 300 level course in American government, junior class standing. Corequisite(s): R POS 341 and R POS 495 or R PAD 341 and R PAD 490. S/U graded.

    R PAD 390 (= R POS 390; formerly R PUB 390) Internship: Political Science/ Public Administration & Policy - Students will actively participate in the politi­cal process through working in a staff position at a recognized political agency, organization or institution to test — in a nonacademic set­ting — the concepts and theories examined in the classroom. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Only one version may be taken for credit. Permission of instructor required. S/U graded.

    R PAD 490Z (= R POS 495Z; formerly R PUB 490Z) Research and Writing in Washington - This is the research and writing component of the department’s spring Semester in Washing­ton program. Admission by application. Enroll­ment limited. For information and applications, see Rockefeller College’s website. Only one ver­sion may be taken for credit. Corequisite(s): R POS/R PAD 341 and R POS/R PAD 342.

    R PAD 497 (formerly R PUB 497) Independent Study - Reading or research under the direction of appropriate faculty. Prerequisite(s): R PAD/R POS 140, or junior or senior standing; and per­mission of instructor and department chair.

    R PAD 498 Applied Public Affairs Capstone - This capstone course includes the completion of an internship and a linked classroom experience. This internship course integrates the policy and management coursework with practical experi­ence in political and administrative institutions. Students are required to undertake an internship in public policy or public management, typically with a state agency or a non-profit organization. In the course, students will learn practical issues of implementing policy or managing public affairs. They will use written assignments and oral presentations to discuss how their course­work relates to their internship experience. May not be taken by students with credit for R PAD/R POS 390. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 140, R PAD 316, A ECO 110, R POS 101, R PAD 302, and a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

    R PAD 499 (formerly R PUB 499) Policy Capstone - This course builds on the analytical tools and theoretical concepts developed in the Public Policy and Management core to explore the feld of policy analysis, rationales for policy intervention, and a range of policy tools. Stu­dents will learn how to locate and apply external information sources, evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of existing policy analyses, develop a plan to study a new policy issue, and effectively communicate these complex ideas in writing. May not be taken by students with credit for R POS/R PAD 340. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 140, R PAD 316, A ECO 110, A ECO 111.

    Public Health

    School of Public Health

    Undergraduate Programs

    Research & Training Centers

    School of Public Health Faculty

    H SPH 397 Independent Study in Public Health - Independent study or research on selected top­ics in public health will be offered under the direction of a faculty member. The student is responsible for locating an appropriate faculty member who is willing to direct the research of independent study. An independent study or research assignment may be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 credits may be earned. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and undergraduate program director, and junior or senior standing. S/U graded.

    H SPH 490 Field Placement in Public Health - Supervised placement in a public health agency or organization. Provides practical experiences to engage students in the application of pub­lic health principles and practices to comple­ment knowledge gained in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): open only to public health seniors; at least 9 credits of public health major core coursework, including H SPH 201 and H SPH 231, which must be completed prior to enrolling in H SPH 490; G.P.A. of 3.00 or above; permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    H SPH 499 Research Placement in Public Health - Research Placement in Public Health will pro­vide a supervised research experience with a School of Public Health faculty member. The goal of the placement is to provide an oppor­tunity for students to integrate and apply the knowledge learned in the public health major courses while learning about public health research. May be repeated for up to 6 cred­its. Prerequisites: seniors in the public health major with an overall GPA of 3.00 or above; at least 9 credits of public health major course­work, including H SPH 201, H SPH 231 and one other public health course must be com­pleted prior to enrolling; permission of instruc­tor. S/U graded.

    Religious Studies

    A REL 397 Independent Study of Religious Studies - Independent reading and research on selected topics under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit when topics differ. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, per­mission of faculty member, and approval of pro­gram director.

    Russian and East European Studies

    A RES 498Z Senior Seminar in Russian and East European Studies - Senior research project done under the direction of a faculty member participating in the Russian and East European Studies Program. A reading knowledge of one European language, preferably Russian, is highly recommended.  

    Social Welfare

    School of Social Welfare

    Social Welfare Bachelor of Science

    Centers & Institutes

    Faculty

    R SSW 290 Community and Public Service Program - This is a service based course that requires a minimum of 100 hours per semester (about 7.5hours per week full semester; about 12.5 hours per week for 8 Week 2) of volunteer work in public or nonprofit organizations that provide service to the community. In addition to volunteering, the course requires the devel­opment of learning goals, refection on service experience and additional required documents. Prerequisite(s): at least second semester fresh­man and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    R SSW 291 Human Service in the Community - This is a service based course that requires a minimum of 60 hours per semester (about 4.5 hours per week full semester; about 7.5 hours per week for 8 Week 2) of volunteer work in public or nonprofit organizations that provide service to the community. In addition to volunteering, the course requires the development of learn­ing goals, refection on service experience and additional required documents. Prerequisite(s): at least second semester freshman and permis­sion of instructor. S/U graded.

    R SSW 390 Community and Public Service Program II - This is a service based course that builds on prior community service experience by asking students to think critically about their commu­nity service experience through the lens of rel­evant scholarly literature. Requires 100 hours of service at a not-for-profit or public organization. In addition to volunteer service, each student is required to read selected articles and reflect on their experience by responding to discussion questions and completing a reflective writing assignment centered on personal leadership assessment and development. Prerequisite(s): R SSW 290 or R SSW 291 and permission of instructor. A–E graded.

    R SSW 400 Field Instruction in Social Welfare I - Internship in an affiliated social welfare agency where, under a qualified social work practitio­ner, students are assigned tasks which enable them to apply, integrate and extend the social work practice theory learned in the classroom. Assignment to a specific agency is made accord­ing to each student’s educational needs. Stu­dents are in field 16 hours per week supervised by approved field instructors. For majors only. Prerequisite(s): grades of C or higher in R SSW 301, 305, 306, 322 and by permission of instruc­tor. Concurrent with R SSW 401 and R SSW 405Z. S/U graded.

    R SSW 410 Field Instruction in Social Welfare II  - Continuation of R SSW 400. Internship in an approved social welfare agency. Hours per week are set to meet acceptable professional stan­dards. Must be taken concurrently with R SSW 406. Prerequisite(s): grade of C or higher in R SSW 401, 405Z and 408; grade of S in R SSW 400 and by permission of instructor. S/U graded.

    R SSW 450 Independent Study in Social Welfare - Independent reading or research on a selected experimental, theoretical, or applied problem is planned under the direction of a faculty mem­ber. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): written permission of instructor and chair of undergraduate program.

    Sociology

    Sociology Department

    Sociology: Undergraduate Major

    Internship Program: A SOC 490

    Sociology Faculty

    A SOC 488W/488Z Research Proposal Seminar - This writing intensive seminar is intended for students who wish to acquire experience in sociological research, are considering writing an honors thesis in sociology (A SOC 498), or may be interested in graduate studies in sociology. Topics covered include the choice of a research question, theoretical issues, review of literature, research design, collection and analysis of data, and presentation of results. A research proposal is written under the supervision of a member of the department of sociology. Only one version of A SOC 488 may be taken for credit. Students may not take both R CRJ 490 and A SOC 488 for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235; and an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher, and permission of instructor.

    A SOC 490 Internship in Sociology - Individually designed internships for students who wish to acquire experience in a field or area of sociology that interests them. Student-instructor conferences are arranged at regular intervals. May be taken only once for credit. Open to senior sociology majors only, with permission of instructor. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, 235; one sociology course directly related to the internship; an over­all GPA of 3.0; and permission of Internship Director. S/U graded.

    A SOC 491 Research Practicum in Experimental Methods I - This course and its sequel, A SOC 492, are designed to give undergraduate students an opportunity to learn about and actively par­ticipate in the sociological research process. This will be accomplished in two ways. First, students will gain practical experience in the use of experimental methods to test sociologi­cal principles. Second, students will work col­lectively to develop and test experimentally an idea of their own related to research program of the course instructor. In the fall semester A SOC 491 students will focus primarily on choice of topic and research design and procedure. In the spring semester (A SOC 492) students will focus primarily on performance of the proposed experiment, data analysis, and preparation of the research report. [Note that A SOC 491 and 492 do not satisfy the Department of Sociolo­gy’s 400-level seminar requirement for majors.] Prerequisite(s): students may enroll in the practicum with the permission of the instructor. Prior completion of A SOC 260 or A SOC 460 (Selected Topics Seminar in Social Psychology) is preferred, but not required.

    A SOC 492 Research Practicum in Experimental Methods II - Together with A SOC 491, this course is designed to give undergraduate students an opportunity to learn about and actively partici­pate in the sociological research process. This will be accomplished in two ways. First, stu­dents will gain practical experience in the use of experimental methods to test sociological principles. Second, students will work collec­tively to develop and test experimentally an idea of their own related to research program of the course instructor. In the fall semester (A SOC 491) students will focus primarily on choice of topic and research design and procedure. In the spring semester (A SOC 492) students will focus primarily on performance of the proposed experiment, data analysis, and preparation of the research report. [Note that A SOC 491 and 492 do not satisfy the Department of Sociolo­gy’s 400-level seminar requirement for majors.] Prerequisite(s): students must take A SOC 491 prior to A SOC 492. Enrollment is with the permission of the instructor. Prior completion of A SOC 260 or A SOC 460 (Selected Topics Seminar in Social Psychology) is preferred, but not required.

    A SOC 497 Independent Study in Sociology - Independent reading or research on a selected experimental, theoretical, or applied problem under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s) for soci­ology majors: A SOC 115, 12 additional cred­its in sociology, and junior or senior standing. Prerequisite(s) for non-sociology majors: senior standing and two courses in sociology. All stu­dents must have a contractual agreement with a departmental instructor to supervise project.

    Women's, Gender and Sexulatiy Studies

    Department of Women's Gender, and Sexuality Studies

    Faculty

    A WSS 397 Independent Study - Study by a student in an area of special inter­est not treated in courses currently offered. Work performed under direction of a profes­sor chosen by the student on a topic approved by the program. May be repeated with approval. Prerequisite(s): permission of Chair of the Wom­en’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Department.

    A WSS 490Z Research Seminar in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies - Seminar in the theory and practice of Women’s Studies research to examine what distinguishes Women’s Studies from other disciplines; the relationship between feminist research and community/political activism; how feminist research is changing the traditional disciplines and the methods used in research. Prerequisite(s): senior standing or permission of instructor.

    A WSS 492Y Internship in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies - The Internship in Women’s Studies has two components. (1) Work experience in a place­ment related to student’s interests in career development and social justice. Interns are expected to spend eight (8) hours per week at their placements. Each student works closely with a feminist mentor who provides guidance on projects as well as an analysis of the structure and function of the organization and its role in social change. (2) Academic seminar where stu­dents meet together weekly to apply feminist theory, praxis, and analysis to their placement. Assignments include preparing a resume, ana­lyzing current issues of workplace and economic justice, career development, assessing skills for and barriers to career development, and plan­ning for graduate or professional school. The Internship is a requirement for the major but is open to any responsible junior or senior who has taken a course in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Prerequisite(s): permission of Internship Director is required; placements must be arranged during advanced registration. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher.