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Indian Arts of the Amazon

20 Selected Objects for Exhibit Research

click here to view the full checklist with images (in progress)

click here to the Word document of the checklist

 

Fan headdress ahetô
Karajá (Tocantins State)
Feathers, cane, cotton
Worn during initiation ceremony for young men

 

 

Cylindrical cane crown [upper]
Gorotire (Pará State)
Feathers, cane, cotton              

Women’s body ornament with nape covering [lower]
Tembé (Maranhão State)                                             

 

                                          

 

Feather headdress [left] [right]
Kalapaló (Xingú Indigenous Reserve, Mato Grosso State)
Feathers, cotton

Man’s crown headdress tucunapé [middle]
Kalapaló (Xingú Indigenous Reserve, Mato Grosso State)
Feathers, palm leaves
Worn during dance ceremonies

Feather cap headdress with central plume projection [left]
Kubenkokre   (Pará State)
Feathers imbricated into loose netted fiber foundation                           

Feather cap headdress with central plume projection [middle]
Kayapo-Mentuktire (Xingú Indigenous Reserve, Mato Grosso State)
Feathers imbricated into netted fiber foundaton  

Man’s head covering [right]
Karitiane  (Roiama State)
Feathers, palm leaf   

Fish-shaped bull roarer
Waurá (Xingú Indigenous Reserve, Mato Grosso State)
ritual use by men
wood  and pigments

 

 

Animal effigy ant shield kunana
Wayana Aparai  (Pará State)
Palm, split cane, feathers

After fire ants or wasps are applied to the panel during the ant-shield ceremony, the shield is pressed against a male initiate’s body.  If a boy cannot endure the excruciating pain of the insect stings, he cannot become a man.

 

 

Painted fiber dance mask with palm-fiber mantle
Kuikuro  (Xingú Indigenous Reserve, Mato Grosso)

 

 

Trophy-head mask upé
Tapirapé (Mato Grosso State)
Wood, feathers, freshwater mother-of-pearl, wax, fiber, cotton

These trophy-head masks commemorate people of importance who have died.

Contrast-woven, twill-weave basket with feather danglers
Waiwai  (Amazonas State)

Used by men to store their feathers and by shamans to store their ritual paraphernalia

 

 

Grater
Waiwai (Pará State)
wood with tiny stone chips embedded in the board,  pigments

Used for grating manioc

 

 

Ceremonial rattle
Araweté  (Pará State)
split cane, cotton, feathers, metal

 

 

Animal effigy stool
Karajá (Ilha do Bananal, Mato Grosso State)                                       

 

 

Bird-shaped food turner
Meinaco  (Xingú Indigenous Reserve, Mato Grosso State)
wood, pigments

 

 

Feather headdress
Kalapaló (Xingú Indigenous Reserve, Mato Grosso State)
Feathers, cotton

 

Man’s freshwater mother-of-pearl necklace with seed and bead danglers
Kayapó (Mato Grosso State)

 

 

Man’s radial headdress
Bororo (Mato Grosso State)
Ceremonial use            

 

 

Pair of man’s arm bands
Rikbaktsá (Mato Grosso State)
Shell, feathers, cotton

 

 

Man’s nose pin
Rikbaktsá (Mato Grosso State)
Feathers, cane, fiber

 

 

Man’s labret
Rikbaktsá (Mato Grosso State)
Freshwater mother-of-pearl, feathers

 

 

Cotton-wrapped cane comb with a bird-bone top, feather danglers, and palm wood teeth. Mexkaryana. or Waiwai   (Amazonas State)