Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Course Descriptions
Fall 2020

The following course descriptions are presented as a guide for students and academic advisors. Although major alterations are unlikely, instructors reserve the right to make changes in content and requirements.


View the pdf for Discussion Section details


Foundation Courses in U.S. History

HIS 100 (6523) (3 crs) American Political & Social History I Hamm, Richard (rhamm@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 9:30am-10:25am
LC 20

The modest goal of this course is to impart to you the basics of American political and social history from early European contact through Reconstruction. At the same time it will also serve as an introduction to the discipline of history. When you finish the course you should have a rough understanding of the essentials of American history to 1876 and how historians use sources to construct histories of the past from primary sources.

*Note: Students registering for this course must FIRST register for one of the discussion sections.


HIS 100 (7244) (3 crs) American Political & Social History I Kozakiewicz, Lauren (lkozakiewicz@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 10:35am-11:30am
LC 22

This course surveys the exploration, discovery, colonization and development of the Americas. Emphasis in the course will be on the establishment and development of the United States of America up through the Civil War to Reconstruction. The course format is lecture plus assigned primary source readings.

*Note: Students registering for this course must FIRST register for one of the discussion sections.


HIS 101 (6184) (3 crs) American Political & Social History I Wittern-Keller, Laura (lwittern-keller@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 9:30am-10:25am
LC 24

This introductory course covers the area now known as the United States progressing chronologically from colonial rule under the Dutch and the English empires, to the colonies’ break with England, establishment of the republic, sectional strife within the federal republic, and the Civil War. We will address the political, economic, and social developments of the new nation, paying particular attention to the following course themes: religion, national unity, racially-based ideology, technology, and constitutional issues. We will also consider the tools of the historians’ trade and how the nation constructs its historical remembrance.

*Note: Students registering for this course must FIRST register for one of the discussion sections.


HIS 101 (6798) (3 crs) American Political & Social HistoryHochfelder, David (dhochfelder@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 10:35am-11:30am
LC 05

This course has several objectives. At the most basic level, we expect students to end the course with a solid grasp of the important events and historical trends experienced by ordinary Americans during this period. Students will also develop and refine their critical thinking, reading, and writing abilities.

As the title suggests, this course surveys U.S. history from the end of the Civil War to the present. We will examine the era through the framework of the three broad transformations in American life.

Technological change and industrialization. From the late 19th century onward, the pace of technological innovation has increased, bringing with it momentous changes in daily life, economic organization, and expectations about the future.

Demographic change. Racial, religious, and ethnic diversity has been a hallmark of American life in the past century and a half.

Increasing involvement in global affairs. During the late 19th and 20th centuries, America’s relationship with the rest of the world changed drastically.

*Note: Students registering for this course must FIRST register for one of the discussion sections.


HIS 101 (7255) (3 crs) American Political & Social HistoryWittern-Keller, Laura (lwittern-keller@albany.edu)
FULLY ONLINE COURSE

This introductory course will look at how the United States attempted to put itself back together again after the Civil War, the Gilded Age era of the 1890s, the beginnings of imperialism with the Spanish-American War and the building of the Panama Canal at the turn of the twentieth century, then we'll turn our attention to the astonishing levels of immigration and the rapid rise of urbanization and industrialization at the same time, the economic and social problems of the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the post-war world, the Cold War, the 1950s and the social rebellion of the 1960s, a terrible economic downturn in the 1970s, and the turn toward conservatism in the 1980s. The course finishes by looking at the presidencies of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. As a fully online course, there are no class lectures. Instead, students will use text and chapter readings, explanatory PowerPoint slideshows, and lots of fabulous documentaries. There are many opportunities to affect the course grade: students will watch and respond to documentaries, keep a historical journal, and take weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final exam. Assistance will always be available through email.


HIS 224 (9230) (3 crs) Nonfiction Media Storytelling | Bernard, Sheila Curran (sbernard@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 11:40am-1:00pm
LC 12

*Cross-listed with DOC 224 (9231)

The course explores the use of narrative in long-form articles, books, films, and plays intended to present factual (historical) content to the general public. Students will watch, read about, write about, and discuss a range of work, developing tools for analyzing and evaluating nonfiction media in terms of both content and craft. We’ll also be doing some writing and sharing of work in class. This is not a production course and does not meet any Gen Ed requirements. (Also, note the hour; eating in class will not be permitted, so be sure to plan accordingly.)


HIS 225 (9232) (3 crs) Modern Jewish Experience | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 3:00pm-4:20pm
HU 20

*Cross-listed with JST 225 (9233) & AARH 225

With a specific eye on films, this course examines the transformations of world Jewry as well as important historical themes that crossed geographical areas beginning with the early modern period and continuing throughout nowadays. It is intended to provide an opportunity for students to engage some of the main themes in modern Jewish history by analyzing, watching and discussing American, European, and Israeli feature and documentary movies and videos that document or fictionalize Jewish life in the modern era.


HIS 251 (4314) (3 crs) Introduction to Documentary Studies | McCormick, Susan (smccormick@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 3:00pm-4:20pm
HU 109

*Cross-listed with DOC 251 (4331)

This course is divided into 3 major sections. First, we will ask “What is a documentary?” One of the most widely quoted definitions is that of John Grierson who suggests that documentary is the “the creative treatment of actuality.” We will explore that definition, and others, as we lay the groundwork to examine the social, cultural, legal, and ethical considerations inherent in all documentary production. We will then look at specific documentary forms, their history, best examples, notable characteristics, and key practitioners. Finally we will look at some of the major themes in documentary work across forms and genres — in print, photography, film/video, audio, and hypermedia/multimedia. We will also consider how technological innovation has shaped the work of the documentarian over time. As the gateway course for the Documentary Studies major and minor, this course is not only about understanding what others have done in both the recent and distant past, but developing a foundation for future work in the major and minor. Those enrolled in HIS 251 are expected to bring an historical perspective to their work in the course.


HIS 277 (9235) (3 crs) Culture and History of Food in the United States | Smith-Howard, Kendra (ksmith-howard@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 9:00am-10:20am
LC 3A

Food. It sustains our lives, patterns our daily rhythms, and shapes our nation’s landscape. It is also central to American political, economic, and social history. This course examines changes in ecologies and technologies of food and agriculture, policies used to govern foods, and ways in which social communities and values have shaped these changes. The course will especially examine the role of food in sustaining slavery and sparking conflict over land, and its role in seeding movements of social justice; technological change in food in agriculture and politics to regulate such changes; geopolitical debates regarding food, especially in the twentieth century; food and its intersection with gender, family, and generational change. At least four field trips or guest speakers will take place outside of class time; students will be expected to attend one of them.


HIS 290 (9246) (3 crs) Making It New: American Women & The 20th Century Arts | Lenart, Camelia (ilenart@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed, Fri 8:25am-9:20am
HU 020

The 20th century brought unprecedented changes and challenges in the American women’s lives, who became increasingly visible and accomplished in the political and social life of the country. But, what happened to the American women in the arts, and which was their contribution in this field during the eventful long 20th century? The course would study and analyze the emergence, contribution and importance of the American women in writing, performing arts (modern dance, ballet, acting...) painting, photography, arts' patronage, etc., all in the context of the major transformation of the time, such as but not limited at, the feminism, the First and the Second World War, the Cold War and its cultural exchange, the civil rights movement, and the globalization. The course is a journey through American history, focusing on the way in which American women of diverse ethnic, social, and cultural backgrounds, made the American arts not only new, but also universal.


HIS 290 (9247) (3 crs) American Indian History | Kane, Maeve (mkane2@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 12:00pm-1:20pm
AS 014



Foundation Courses in European History
 

HIS 130 (6494) (3 crs) History of European CivilizationFord, Randolph (rbford@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 10:35am-11:30am
LC 04

This course surveys the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the West from its origins to the 18th century.

*Note: Students registering for this course must FIRST register for one of the discussion sections.


HIS 244 (6183) (3 crs) Zionism, Palestine, & Israel in Historical Perspective | Veeder, Stacy (sveeder@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 4:30pm-5:50pm
BB 08
*Cross-listed with HEB 244 (6465) & JST 244 (6153)

A study of 19th century Jewish and European history resulting in the formation of Jewish nationalism. Covers the development of various Zionist ideologies and organizations as well as their challengers within and outside the Jewish community. Examines the history of settlement in Palestine, the founding of the state of Israel, and the country’s subsequent development.


HIS 250 (7257) (3 crs) The Holocaust in History | Veeder, Stacy (sveeder@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 3:00pm-4:20pm
LC 3c

*Cross-listed with JST 250 (7259)

Begins with an overview of European Jewish life on the eve of the attempt at its destruction, examines the cultural, social, and intellectual roots of Nazism, and discusses the efforts to isolate and marginalize those marked as “a- socials” in German society. Explores the radicalization of the Nazi program and investigates the variety of ways targeted groups responded to the crisis. Covers a number of survivor accounts and the memorialization and politicization of the Nazi Holocaust in the United States and Israel.


HIS 253 (9270) (3 crs) Medieval & Early-Modern Jews among Muslims & Christians | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm
HU 020

*Cross-listed with JST 253 (9271) & REL 253 (9272) *Also meets with JST 343 (9273)

Explores the course of Jewish history from the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem until the French Revolution. Investigates the experience of Jews between and within the major religious and cultural systems that dominated medieval Europe; Islam and Christianity. The course charts the history of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewry, noting the important social, religious, cultural, and political characteristics of each community, as well as their interaction with two great world civilizations.


HIS 264 (8537) (3 crs) Art, Music, & History: A Multimedia ApproachKizenko, Nadieszda (nkizenko@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 12:00pm-1:20pm
HU 020

Russia, Ukraine, and Poland have occupied the front pages for much of the past several years. Demonstrations on the Maidan, the annexation of Crimea, and civil war have brought Ukraine to a political, economic, and civilizational crossroads. Poland and Russia, the neighbors who have ruled Ukrainians for much of their history, also represent two cultural and political choices contemporary Ukrainians face.

This course examines the intertwined histories of Poland, Ukraine, and Russia. We will consider their adoption of different versions of Christianity and subsequent cultural directions. We will deal with the rise of nationalism (and the treatment of minorities) from the nineteenth century to the present, focusing on World War II and the fall of communism. We will be looking at relations among Russians, Ukrainians, and Poles as a cultural struggle for hearts and minds—and memory. This will mean examining such sources as saints’ cults, paintings, music, war and Holocaust memorials, and films in which all sides depict each other—but also those aspects which they see as being most distinctively national. This is not meant to be an exhaustive history of each of the three countries, but a look at the flash points where they have most painfully—or fruitfully—intersected.

Many of the topics we discuss remain controversial and hotly contested among Poles, Ukrainians, and Russians. Their cultural wars are very much alive. Some of the sources you will read and watch describe things that are horrible. You, however, are expected to maintain a civil tone in your writing and in your speech, especially if you sharply disagree with the opinion you oppose.

This class emphasizes your ability to engage ideas in writing and in oral discourse. Therefore your grade will be assessed almost entirely on the writing you do, both in class and outside it. There is NO MIDTERM EXAM OR FINAL EXAM. By the end of this class, you will be able to write better articles, papers, and presentations. You will also be able to argue complicated positions from different points of view. This course will thus be excellent preparation for careers in journalism, diplomacy, law, education, government and NGOs, public relations, advertising, and business.


HIS 288 (8156) (3crs) Topics in European History: Collaboration in Nazi-Occupied Europe | Krosby, H.P. (hkrosby@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 10:30am-11:50am
SS 131

This course covers the history of treasonous collaboration of all kinds with their Nazi conquerors and occupiers during World War II from Norway in the north to Greece in the south and from France in the west to Russia in the east. The retribution that followed at the end of the war is also covered.



Foundation Courses in World History
 

HIS 144 (9665) (3 crs) Latin America Since the Aztecs | Schwaller, John (jschwaller@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 9:00am-10:20am
BB 06

This course will introduce students to the history of Latin America. Covering the great empires of the Aztec, Maya and Inca through the golden age of Spanish colonization to the present, this course will introduce students to the history of the culture, geography, society, politics, and economics of a region that is critical to the United States today.


HIS 158 (6495) (3 crs) The World in the 20th Century | Dawson, Alexander (adawson@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 3:00pm-3:55pm
LC 22

The twentieth century witnessed tremendous social, political, cultural and economic change and the course explores these changes in a global perspective. The course draws upon select themes which have been points of connection and contention in the modern world. Course content will emphasize the increasing interdependence between societies and regions and the forces which shaped the lives of people around the globe.

*Note: Students registering for this course must FIRST register for one of the discussion sections.


HIS 177 () (3 crs) East Asia: Its Culture & History | Hartman, Charles (chartman@albany.edu)
FULLY ONLINE COURSE
*Cross-listed with EAS 177 ()

An introduction to the history and cultures of East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea), their major institutions and their religious and philosophical traditions from ancient times to the present.


HIS 244 (6183) (3 crs) Zionism, Palestine, & Israel in Historical PerspectiveVeeder, Stacy (sveeder@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 4:30pm-5:50pm
BB 08

*Cross-listed with HEB 244 (6465) & JST 244 (6153)

A study of 19th century Jewish and European history resulting in the formation of Jewish nationalism. Covers the development of various Zionist ideologies and organizations as well as their challengers within and outside the Jewish community. Examines the history of settlement in Palestine, the founding of the state of Israel, and the country’s subsequent development.


HIS 253 (9270) (3 crs) Medieval and Early-Modern Jews among Muslims and Christians | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm
HU 020

*Cross-listed with JST 253 (9271) & REL 253 (9272) *Also meets with JST 343 (9273)

Explores the course of Jewish history from the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem until the French Revolution. Investigates the experience of Jews between and within the major religious and cultural systems that dominated medieval Europe; Islam and Christianity. The course charts the history of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewry, noting the important social, religious, cultural, and political characteristics of each community, as well as their interaction with two great world civilizations.


HIS 278 (9066) (3 crs) Japanese Pop Culture from Edo to Present | Person, John (jperson@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm
HU 123

This course introduces some of the forms of "popular culture" prevalent in Japan from 1600 until the present day, with a strong emphasis on the social, economic and intellectual forces behind these major trends. This course, organized chronologically, offers a look at the many historical developments connected with popular forms of music, theater, film and comics, including the rise of a new urban print culture in the 17th century, the introduction of "Western" art forms such as motion pictures and jazz music in the 1920s, and the steady expansion of both domestic and international markets for Japanese film, music and comics in the years since 1945. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required.


HIS 286 (6537) (3 crs) African Civilizations | Essien, Frank (fessien@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 3:00pm-4:20pm
HU 137

*Cross-listed with AFS 286
Africa from prehistoric times to 1800 with emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa, the development of indigenous states and their response to Western and Eastern contacts.


HIS 287 (4824) (3 crs) Africa in the Modern World | Glovsky, David
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm HU 137

*Cross-listed with AFS 287
Africa since 1800: exploration, the end of the slave trade, the development of interior states, European partition, the

colonial period, and the rise of independent Africa.


HIS 287 (6588) (3 crs) Africa in the Modern World | Essien, Frank (fessien@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 4:30pm-5:50pm
HU 137

*Cross-listed with AFS 287

This course studies modern and contemporary Africa, surveying historical developments from the period of European colonization in the nineteenth century to contemporary period. It is concerned with how such historical developments as colonization, new economic and political systems, Christianization, western education, urbanization, nationalism and independence affected societies and changed people’s lives. Also, the course examines relations within Africa, issues of unity and stability, population growth and urbanization, and Africa’s relations with the rest of the world. While it emphasizes effects of colonial and post-independence conditions, discussing significance of internal factors in determining conditions in Africa, the course focuses on problems of everyday life, gender issues, and contemporary difficulties in environment, politics, economy and social life. Finally, it highlights achievement of African peoples, self-development and prospects for the future.


HIS 289 (9666) (3 crs) History of the Catholic Church | Schwaller, John (jschwaller@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 8:00am-9:20am
HU 128

This course will survey the role of religion in Latin America from the period before the arrival of the Spanish up until the current day. In particular the class will focus on indigenous religions as practiced by important civilizations such as the Aztec and Inca. The efforts of early missionaries in the conversion to Christianity will form an important part of the class, as will the indigenous response. The varied roles of the Catholic Church in the colonial period will be studied. The rise of Protestant denominations in the nineteenth and twentieth century will be analyzed, as will the important political role played by the Catholic Church in Latin America. Lastly, we will focus on the rise of Liberation Theology and the evolving role of Pope Francis.



History Methods Course
 

HIS 395 (7833) (3 crs) The Historian’s Craft | Schwaller, John (jschwaller@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 3:00pm-4:20pm
BB 213

Most people who major in History in university do not become professional historians. They become teachers, doctors, lawyers, bankers, government workers, stockbrokers, real estate agents, etc. And still, they employ the skills they learned while studying for their degree every day in their work. They conduct research, they analyze texts, they make written and oral arguments. More than this, they do all these things while thinking about the same questions that motivate professional historians. They read texts closely. They think about the larger contexts in which their documents are embedded. They think about precedent and change over time. They try to understand how the past shapes the present and how it will shape the future. In HIS 395 we will focus on deepening those capabilities, on bringing together a number of the skills you have been developing in your 100, 200, and 300 level history courses in a manner that asks you explicitly: What does it mean to think like a historian?

HIS 395 is mandatory for history majors because it prepares you for your senior research seminar. It also encourages you to step back and ask: how can my training as a history major inform my future career and life choices? In order to do that we will break the practice of history down into a series of discrete activities. We will read some work that makes us consider just what constitutes historical writing. We will work on diagramming arguments and critical analysis of texts. We will work on developing interesting and important research questions. Lastly, we will delve into research itself.



Advanced Courses in U.S. History
 

HIS 305 (8540) (3 crs) Colonial America to 1763 | Kane, Maeve (mkane2@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 9:00am-10:20am
LC 3C

This course surveys major aspects and events in the colonial period, with particular emphasis on the growth of uniquely American culture and institutions. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.


HIS 315 (8542) (3 crs) Roosevelt to Reagan, 1933-1988 | Bon Tempo, Carl (cbontempo@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 10:30am-11:50am
LC 12

This course examines United States political history from the 1930s through the 1980s. Topics include the New Deal and American liberalism, World War II and the Cold War at home, the civil rights movement, the role of the Courts in shaping American life, the counterculture and the 1960s, Watergate and the imperial presidency, and the resurgence of conservatism. Readings (about 125 pages/week) will include primary sources, several monographs, and a number of scholarly articles. The course’s graded assignments will include (at minimum) a midterm exam, a 7-page paper, and a final exam.


HIS 328 (9248) (3 crs) Lawyers in American Life, 1607 - Present | Wittern-Keller, Laura (lwittern-keller@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 1:10pm-2:30pm
HU 020

This lecture-and-discussion based, reading-intensive course focusing on the role of law and lawyers in American history will use a chronological and biographical approach. Since it is impossible to study lawyers in American history without knowing American legal history, this course will actually be two courses in one: a compacted legal history of the United States and a biographically based history of the legal profession. For each era of U.S. history, we will examine closely pivotal personalities whose work shaped both the legal profession and the nation. Along the way, we will consider the roles of private lawyers; public officials such as attorneys general, public defenders, and judges; and cause lawyers. We will pay special attention to the formative years of American law and the legal profession: the colonial and early republic years, the Gilded Age/Progressive Era when much of modern lawyering was created, and the Rights Revolution when much of the modern American legal culture was created.


HIS 332 (6119) (3 crs) Introduction to Public History in the United States | Campbell, Robin (rcampbell@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 3:00pm-4:20pm
LC 3C

Not all historians work in a university setting. Many work directly with the public in exciting ways. Through a combination of lecture, discussion, field trips and writing assignments, students in this course will explore what public historians do and what career opportunities exist in the field. You will learn that we all engage with history on a daily basis. This course might inspire some of you to consider a career as a public historian, but it will help all of you to become astute consumers of the many historical venues vying for your attention.


HIS 334 (6613) (3 crs) Foundations of Documentary Filmmaking | Roth, Julie Casper (jcasperroth@albany.edu)
Tue 3:00pm-5:50pm
BB 02

*Cross-listed with DOC 323 (6614)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of researching, planning, shooting and editing digital video documentaries. When DOC 323 is taught cross-listed with HIS 334, the content focus will be history. Restricted to History and Documentary Studies majors and minors; all others by permission of instructor. Recommended for students planning to take HIS or DOC 406.


HIS 356 (1750) (3 crs) The World at War, 1939-45 | Krosby, H.P. (hkrosby@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 9:00am – 10:20am
SS 131

This is a comprehensive history of the Second World War. Topics covered include the rise of fascism and the origins of the war; the campaigns on land, at sea, and in the air in the European, North African, Pacific, and Southeast Asian theaters of war, the pervasiveness of racism; the Holocaust and other atrocities; and the costs and legacies of the war. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.


HIS 390 (9253) (3 crs) Crime & Society in the American Past | Hamm, Richard (rhamm@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 1:10pm-2:30pm
HU 129

This mixed lecture and discussion course is designed to allow students to study crime, criminal justice, punishment in the American past. It is an overview of the place of crime in American culture and society. It will compare what was said about crime with the realities with the goal of gaining a better understanding of crime as it related to some of the central themes of American history from the colonial era into the 21st century.



Advanced Courses in European History
 

HIS 351 (9249) (3 crs) History of Germany | Lenart, Camelia (ilenart@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed, Fri 9:30am-10:25am
HU 020

Germany from 1806 to the present. From a collection of disunited and relatively backward states in 1806, Germany evolved into the leading power of Europe in 1900, nearly its master in successive world wars, an unequally divided nation after 1945, and now again a single state. In tracing these changes the course will consider the influence of personalities (Bismarck, William II, Hitler), the social and economic forces which worked against and for democratic development, and the origins and significance of Nazism.


HIS 356 (1750) (3 crs) The World at War, 1939-45 | Krosby, H.P. (hkrosby@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 9:00am-10:20am
SS 131

This is a comprehensive history of the Second World War. Topics covered include the rise of fascism and the origins of the war; the campaigns on land, at sea, and in the air in the European, North African, Pacific, and Southeast Asian theaters of war, the pervasiveness of racism; the Holocaust and other atrocities; and the costs and legacies of the war. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.


HST 362 (9274) (3 crs) The Hellenistic World: 331-81 | B.C. Taylor, Michael (mjtaylor@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 11:40am-1:00pm
HU 109

This course examines the world-shaking conquests of Alexander the Great, and the new geopolitical order that arose in the aftermath. Topics include the Wars of the Successors, the establishment of the Antigonid, Seleucid and Ptolemaic dynasties, the enduring role of Greek city-states, culture and society in an increasingly cosmopolitan world, and the coming of Rome. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.


HST 363 (9275) (3 crs) The Roman Republic: 751-31 B.C. | Taylor, Michael (mjtaylor@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 1:10pm-2:30pm
HU 020

A history of Rome from the foundation of the city to the Battle of Actium. The course examines the evolution of Rome's republican government, the conquest and incorporation of Italy, imperial operations in the Mediterranean, and the internal disruption and civil way that ultimately destroyed the Republic. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.


HIS 366 (9250) (3 crs) War, Society, and Culture since 1789 | Fogarty, Richard (rfogarty@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 1:10pm-2:30pm
ES 242

This course will examine the profound effects of modern warfare, as it has developed since the time of the French Revolution and Napoleon, upon societies engaged in armed conflict. Not merely a review of past wars, battles, or leaders, the class situates the violence of war in its broadest social and cultural contexts. Topics include: the expansion of war as the forces of nationalism developed after 1789; the nature and effects of European colonial wars and decolonization; the origins and development of total war in the 19th and 20th centuries; the military, political, social, and cultural histories of the two world wars; women, gender, and war; atrocity, war crimes, and the laws of war; the history of post-traumatic stress disorder; soldier and civilian experiences of modern war; nuclear war; and terrorism. Throughout, we will pay special attention to the experiences of ordinary men and women. By the end of the term, we will have gained a deeper understanding and appreciation of the transformative power of modern war, both on and off the battlefield.


HIS 391 (9254) (3 crs) Advanced Topics in European History: Generalship in Europe & Africa in WWII | Krosby, H.P. (hkrosby@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm
SS 131

This course deals with the quality of command in the European theater of war, including North Africa, during World War II. It will be conducted as a seminar, with students preparing brief contributions and participating actively in class discussions. Readings consist mainly of assigned internet articles. Grading is based on class participation, essay tests, and a brief research paper. Prerequisite: seniors and juniors only! Permission of instructor.


HIS 463 (9255) (3 crs) The Byzantine Empire, 300-1453 | Korobeynikov, Dmitry (dkorobeynikov@albany.edu)
Wed 6:00pm-8:50pm
SS 145

*Also meets with HIS 563 (9256)
Survey of the socioeconomic, ethnic, political, religious, intellectual, and artistic history of Byzantine civilization from

late antiquity to the 15th century. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.



Advanced Courses in World History
 

HIS 356 (1750) (3 crs) The World at War, 1939-1945 | Krosby, H.P. (hkrosby@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 9:00am-10:20am
SS 131

This is a comprehensive history of the Second World War. Topics covered include the rise of fascism and the origins of the war; the campaigns on land, at sea, and in the air in the European, North African, Pacific, and Southeast Asian theaters of war, the pervasiveness of racism; the Holocaust and other atrocities; and the costs and legacies of the war. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.


HST 376 (8761) (3 crs) History of Premodern Korea | Kwon, Peter (pbkwon@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 3:00pm-4:20pm
HU 128

Cross-listed with EAK 376

This course will introduce students to premodern Korea, from earliest recorded history to the Chosŏn dynasty (1392- 1897), while also examining the roles played by China and Japan in shaping Korean history. The class will explore social, political, economic, intellectual, and cultural dimensions of the premodern period. Topics will include: traditional social structures, local society and culture, religions and ideology, governing institutions, foreign relations, gender and family, encounters with Western civilization, marginalized groups, and indigenous reforms for social and economic development. No knowledge of Korean language is required. There are no prerequisites.


HIS 384 (7759) (3 crs) History of Premodern Japan | Person, John (jperson@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 3:00pm-4:20pm
HU 123

*Cross-listed with EAJ 384
This course will cover Japanese history from prehistory through 1600. Focus will be on political and economic trends.

Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.


HIS 387 (9251) (3 crs) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture I Korobeynikov, Dmitry (dkorobeynikov@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 3:00pm-4:20pm
BB 209

*Cross-listed with REL 387 (9252)

Social, political, economic and religious dimensions of Islam from the time of Mohammed through the 18th century with emphasis on the intellectual, cultural, and educational institutions of the Middle East. Among topics discussed will be Sunnism–Shi’ism and the schools of law, social and economic infrastructure, science and education, and reasons for the waning of the Muslim world. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.


HIS 463 (9255) (3 crs) The Byzantine Empire, 300-1453 | Korobeynikov, Dmitry (dkorobeynikov@albany.edu)
Wed 6:00pm-8:50pm
SS 145

*Also meets with HIS 563 (9256)
This course surveys the socioeconomic, ethnic, political, religious, intellectual, and artistic history of Byzantine

civilization from late antiquity to the 15th century. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.



Senior Research Seminar
 

HIS 489Z (6299) (3 crs) Senior Research Seminar Bernard, Sheila Curran (sbernard@albany.edu)
Wed 3:00pm-5:50pm
SL G24

In this intensive research and writing-based U.S. history (19th-20th centuries) seminar, senior history majors will move from their roles as consumers of knowledge to new roles as producers of knowledge. During the semester, you will become working historians, asking questions of original sources such as primary archival and web-based documents, analyzing the answers, and presenting your findings (which move beyond existing knowledge) to the class through oral presentation, and on paper in a well-written, scholarly article of about twenty pages. Each phase of creating a scholarly product will be guided, starting with the choice of topic and moving through the proposal, archival and library research, annotated bibliography, outline, first draft, critique, oral presentation, and revised version.


HIS 489Z (7852) (3 crs) Senior Research Seminar | Kizenko, Nadieszda (nkizenko@albany.edu)
Tue 3:00pm-5:50pm
SS 145

In this intensive research and writing-based course, senior history majors will move from consumers of knowledge to producers of knowledge as they research, write, and present an article on some aspect of religion.

Religion has long been both a subject of historical inquiry and provided a wide variety of sources for historical research on a broad range of topics, both in Europe and the United States.

For those who are interested in the chance to work on local history, New York State offers a particularly rich area for exploring religious history. New York State has been the first introduction to the United States for many immigrant groups; virtually every religion is represented on its territory. New York has also been the birthplace of numerous indigenous religious movements.

During the semester, students will become working historians, asking questions of original sources such as primary archival and web-based documents, analyzing the answers, and presenting the findings in a paper of fifteen to twenty pages. Each phase of creating a scholarly article will be guided starting with the choice of topic and moving through the proposal, bibliography, outline, first draft, final draft, and presentation. Research topics can range widely, including local saints’ cults and parades, the Church of Latter Day Saints (including its Hill Cumorah Pageant), relations between such groups as the Amish and Hasidic Jews with their surrounding communities, such African American phenomena as Father Divine and the Nuwaubian Nation, campus-centered religious groups, depictions of Native American religion in film and Catholic hagiography, and the Second Great Awakening. One could also argue that sports are a religion and work with that.



Senior Honors Course
 

HIS 495z (4294) (4 crs) Senior Honors Thesis | Pastore, Christopher (cpastore@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 10:30am-11:50am
SS 145

Preparation of a substantial honors thesis under the supervision of a member of the Department of History. Students present periodic progress reports, criticize each other's work, and deliver an oral summary of the completed thesis. Students in the honors program must satisfactorily complete both HIS 495Z and 496Z. Prerequisite(s): admission to the history honors program.



Independent Study and Projects in History
 

HIS 497 (ARR) (2-4 crs) Independent Study in History | TBD
ARR

Directed reading and conferences on selected topics in history. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies; junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. S/U graded.


HIS 499 (ARR) (1-3 crs) Special Projects in History | Please speak to your advisor.
ARR

Supervised work on projects in coordination with local museums and historical agencies. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair. S/U graded.



Judaic Studies Program
 

JST 150 (7905) (3 crs) Jewish Civilization: From the Birth of the Israelites until the Present | Manon, Nomi (nmanon@albany.edu)
Wed, Fri 11:40am-1:00pm
ES 245

This class explores the dynamic history of the Jewish people and its interaction with great world cultures. Beginning with the origins of Israelite monotheism, we will first trace the consolidation and subsequent fragmentation of the ancient Israelites. We then explore several dispersed Jewish communities through the Middle Ages, and examine the ways they redefined themselves and Judaism in light of their experiences in several different host societies. Finally, we examine the Jewish encounter with the Modern world, including the Jewish Enlightenment, the nationalization of the Jews, the rise of new Jewish centers on the eve of the Nazi Holocaust, and Judaism as it is expressed in contemporary America and Israel.


JST 225 (9233) (3 crs) The Modern Jewish Experience in Film | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 3:00pm-4:20pm
HU 020

*Cross-listed with HIS 225 (9232) & AARH 225

With a specific eye on films, this course examines the transformations of world Jewry as well as important historical themes that crossed geographical areas beginning with the early modern period and continuing throughout nowadays. It is intended to provide an opportunity for students to engage some of the main themes in modern Jewish history by analyzing, watching and discussing American, European, and Israeli feature and documentary movies and videos that document or fictionalize Jewish life in the modern era.


24 May 18, 2020

JST 244 (6153) (3 crs) Zionism, Palestine, & Israel in Historical Perspective | Veeder, Stacy (sveeder@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 4:30pm-5:50pm
BB 08

*Cross-listed with HEB 244 (6465) & HIS 244 (6183)

This course explores the course of Jewish history from the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem until the French Revolution. Investigates the experience of Jews between and within the major religious and cultural systems that dominated medieval Europe; Islam and Christianity. The course charts the history of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewry, noting the important social, religious, cultural, and political characteristics of each community, as well as their interaction with two great world civilizations.


JST 250 (7259) (3 crs) The Holocaust in History | Veeder, Stacy (sveeder@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 3:00pm-4:20pm
LC 3C

*Cross-listed with HIS 250 (7257)

Begins with an overview of European Jewish life on the eve of the attempt at its destruction, examines the cultural, social, and intellectual roots of Nazism, and discusses the efforts to isolate and marginalize those marked as “a- socials” in German society. Explores the radicalization of the Nazi program and investigates the variety of ways targeted groups responded to the crisis. Covers a number of survivor accounts and the memorialization and politicization of the Nazi Holocaust in the United States and Israel.


JST 253 (9271) (3 crs) Medieval & Early-Modern Jews among Muslims & Christians | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm
HU 020

*Cross-listed with HIS 253 (9270) & REL 253 (9272) *Also meets with JST 343 (9273)

The course explores various forms and manifestations of anti-Jewish hatred, in the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and in modern history. It will also examine several contemporary manifestations of Antisemitism. It will consider how anti-Semitic hatred has been used for various purposes, and how Jews have responded to its challenge. The course explores the ideological, political, and socioeconomic underpinnings of Antisemitism, allowing us to see how anti-Jewish intolerance and prejudice became embedded in the worldviews of significant sectors of society. This course includes a mixture of lecture and discussion.


JST 343 (9273) (3 crs) Issues in Medieval Jewish History | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm
HU 020

*Also meets with JST 253 (9271), HIS 253 (9270), & REL 253 (9272)

This course covers the same period as JST 253, but on an advanced level. Students attend class meetings for JST 253, but have a separate, more sophisticated reading list, a research paper, and a separate recitation session. Prerequisite (s): JST 150 or permission of instructor.


JST 450 (8731) (3 crs) Judaic Studies Practicuum | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
ARR

Advanced Judaic Studies students receive undergraduate credit for assisting with 100 or 200 level Judaic Studies courses under the close supervision of the instructor. Students at this level lead small group discussions several times in the semester; offer one class presentation, which will also be written up as a paper and submitted to the instructor; and may assist in grading quizzes and examinations. Students meet regularly with the instructor, who helps students improve their knowledge of the topic and discusses pedagogical techniques. Course may be repeated once for credit with approval of department chair. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.


JST 497 (5610) (1-6 crs) Independent Study in Judaic Studies | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
ARR

Directed reading and conferences on selected topics in Judaic studies. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of program director.



Documentary Studies Program
 

DOC 224 (9231) (3 crs) Nonfiction Media Storytelling | Bernard, Sheila Curran (sbernard@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 11:40am-1:00pm
LC 12

*Cross-listed with HIS 224 (9230)

The course explores the use of narrative in long-form articles, books, films, and plays intended to present factual (historical) content to the general public. Students will watch, read about, write about, and discuss a range of work, developing tools for analyzing and evaluating nonfiction media in terms of both content and craft. We’ll also be doing some writing and sharing of work in class. This is not a production course and does not meet any Gen Ed requirements. (Also, note the hour; eating in class will not be permitted, so be sure to plan accordingly.)


DOC 225 (7406) (3 crs) Media Law & Ethics | Roberts, Nancy (nroberts@albany.edu)
Mon. 11:40am-1:00pm
SS 131

*Cross-listed with JRL 225

This course examines strategies for making good ethical decisions in newsgathering and writing as well as the laws that pertain to daily journalism and public relations. The course covers the major ethical theories and philosophies and the major legal cases that journalists must know. Emphasis will be on actual cases and hypothetical situations encountered in daily journalism. The course pays special attention to some of the most common dilemmas - libel, free press/fair trial conflicts, anonymous sources, and publishing content that can harm people.

Prerequisite(s): restricted to Journalism, Documentary Studies, and History majors and minors. Others may be admitted space permitting, and with permission from the instructor.


DOC 251 (4331) (3 crs) Introduction to Documentary Studies | McCormick, Susan (smccormick@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 1:10pm-2:30pm
HU 109

*Cross-listed with HIS 251 (4314)

This course is divided into 3 major sections. First, we will ask “What is a documentary?” One of the most widely quoted definitions is that of John Grierson who suggests that documentary is the “the creative treatment of actuality.” We will explore that definition, and others, as we lay the groundwork to examine the social, cultural, legal, and ethical considerations inherent in all documentary production. We will then look at specific documentary forms, their history, best examples, notable characteristics, and key practitioners. Finally we will look at some of the major themes in documentary work across forms and genres — in print, photography, film/video, audio, and hypermedia/multimedia. We will also consider how technological innovation has shaped the work of the documentarian over time. As the gateway course for the Documentary Studies major and minor, this course is not only about understanding what others have done in both the recent and distant past, but developing a foundation for future work in the major and minor. Those enrolled in HIS 251 are expected to bring an historical perspective to their work in the course.


DOC 308Z (7407) (3 crs) Narrative Journalism | Salisbury, Elaine (esalisbury@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 3:00pm-4:20pm
HU 115

*Cross-listed with JRL 308Z

Students will explore a variety of journalistic styles, with emphasis on compelling narrative and description, combined with the skillful use of quotes and dialogue. The class features intensive critiques of students' work. A variety of formats will be studied: newspapers, magazines, non-fiction books, and online publications. Readings for the course include works by Janet Malcolm, Barbara Ehrenreich, Ellen Ullman, Mary Karr, Edward Abbey, Edmund Wilson, Michael Herr, and James Baldwin. Students submit weekly writing assignments and a final portfolio of edited work. Prerequisite(s): JRL 200Z, or permission of instructor.


DOC 323 (6614) (3 crs) Foundations of Documentary Filmmaking | Roth, Julie Casper (jcasperroth@albany.edu)
Tue 3:00pm-5:50pm
BB 02

*Cross-listed with HIS 334 (6613)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of researching, planning, shooting and editing digital video documentaries. When DOC 323 is taught cross-listed with HIS 334, the content focus will be history. Restricted to History and Documentary Studies majors and minors; all others by permission of instructor. Recommended for students planning to take HIS or DOC 406.


DOC 380 (6118) (3 crs) Photojournalism | VanAcker, Katherine (kvanacker@albany.edu)
Thu 4:30pm-7:20pm
SL G3

*Cross-listed with JRL 380

Photojournalism is a digital photography workshop. Students are taught the fundamentals, theory and practices of photojournalism through lectures, readings, writings and practical photography assignment work. Students are required to photograph weekly assignments and present their work for group critique. Students produce a final project that they research, photograph and execute in a multi-media format which demonstrates the breadth of material and techniques covered over the course of the semester. Because the class has a multi-media component, students will use a combination of their still photography along with audio that they record and edit to create audio slideshows to further advance their photojournalism narrative storytelling skills. Some prior photography experience is recommended. A digital SLR camera is required for this class. The software you will use for this class includes PhotoShop, audio editing software like Audacity or Garage Band, video and multimedia software like iMove, Windows Movie Maker, Final Cut, Sony Vegas and SoundSlides and is available on various computers throughout campus. Open only to JRL Majors/Minors and DOC Majors.


DOC 499 (4669) (1-4 crs) Special Projects & Internship in Documentary Studies | Zahavi, Gerald (gzahavi@albany.edu)
ARR

This is a course designed for students interested in engaging in documentary fieldwork and production projects through internships with on-campus and off-campus organizations, or on their own with close faculty supervision. Students should already have the specific production skills (e.g. filmmaking, photography, audio recording/editing, hypermedia authoring) necessary for the project or internship they wish to undertake. Typical projects or internship they wish to undertake. Typical projects or internships might involve mounting documentary photography exhibits, participating in documentary editing projects (including online, nonfiction journals), designing virtual museums and podcasting/video-casting websites, or working as production members on film/video or radio projects. Credit load will depend on the level of engagement and time obligations associated with the specific project undertaken by the student. This course may be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, a minimum GPA of 2.50, and permission of the instructor. S/U graded.



Religious Studies Program
 

REL 100 (6976) (3 crs) Introduction to the Study of Religion | Proffitt, Aaron (aproffitt@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm
HU 109

Exploration of the religious dimension of life, with an introduction to the theory and practice of religion, including such topics as myth, ritual, belief, reason, revelation, mysticism, religious organization, etc., and their relation to other personal, social and cultural aspects of human experience, past and present.


REL 253 (9272) (3 crs) Medieval and Early-Modern Jews among Muslims & Christians | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:50pm
HU 020

*Cross-listed with HIS 253 (9270) and JST 253 (9271)

This course explores the course of Jewish history from the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem until the French Revolution. Investigates the experience of Jews between and within the major religious and cultural systems that dominated medieval Europe; Islam and Christianity. The course charts the history of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewry, noting the important social, religious, cultural, and political characteristics of each community, as well as their interaction with two great world civilizations.


REL 265 (6829) (3 crs) Introduction to Buddhism | Proffitt, Aaron (aproffitt@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 12:00pm-1:20pm
HU 123

*Cross-listed with EAS 265

This course is an introduction to Buddhism, covering its early history in South Asia, its expansion into Central, East, and Southeast Asia, and its recent growth in Europe and the Americas. Students will acquire a foundational knowledge about basic Buddhist doctrines and practices, as well as the diversity of Buddhism as a lived religion. Class content will focus on textual, artistic, philosophical, literary, social, and political expressions of the Buddhist tradition.


REL 357 (7766) (3 crs) Zen Buddhism | Proffitt, Aaron (aproffitt@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 10:30am-11:50am
HU 123

*Cross-listed with EAS 357

An introduction to the religious, philosophical, and artistic tradition of Zen Buddhism in China, Korea, and Japan and the West. This course looks at the birth and subsequent historical evolution of the Zen or Ch’an school of Buddhism in East Asia. We will look at the intersection of: Buddhist and Chinese presumptions about spirituality that gave rise to this unusual religious form, discussing precisely what is and is not iconoclastic about its tenets. The experience of American Zen communities will also be considered.


REL 363 (9087) (3 crs) Ethnology of Religion | Burkhart, Louise (lburkhart@albany.edu)
FULLY ONLINE COURSE

This course explores how cultural anthropologists approach the diversity of human religious expression, including those aspects typically considered magical or irrational. As anthropologists, we are not concerned with theological or philosophical searches for “ultimate truths” but, instead, with how religion functions in society, how it creates meaningful worlds within which people live their lives, and also how conflicts and struggles for power are played out in religious terms. The class is organized around topics of long and ongoing interest in the anthropological study of religion: belief, ritual, myth, shamanism, witchcraft, and others. As a comparative course, we will discuss how each topic has been studied over time and how examples from a variety of religious expressions provide a deeper knowledge of religion as a cultural phenomenon that is an integral part of people’s lives. For each topic, we will read original ethnographic studies, including both “classic” ground-breaking works from the past and more recent research, to see how these key subjects have been viewed over time and continue to be relevant in the present. The class also includes films, individual responses, short papers, and a research project and presentation.


REL 387 (9252) (3 crs) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture I Korobeynikov, Dmitry (dkorobeynikov@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 3:00pm-4:20pm
BB 209

*Cross-listed with HIS 387 (9251)

Social, political, economic and religious dimensions of Islam from the time of Mohammed through the 18th century with emphasis on the intellectual, cultural, and educational institutions of the Middle East. Among topics discussed will be Sunnism-Shi’ism and the schools of law, social and economic infrastructure, science and education, and reasons for the waning of the Muslim world. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or 3 credits of history.


REL 397 (2333) (1-4 crs) Independent Study of Religious Studies | Kizenko, Nadieszda (nkizenko@albany.edu)
ARR

Independent reading and research on selected topics under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit when topics differ. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing, permission of faculty member, and approval of program director.


REL 499 (2334) (3 crs) Senior Seminar in Religious Studies | Kizenko, Nadieszda (nkizenko@albany.edu)
ARR

Seminar on selected topics in religious studies. Preparation of a paper under the direction of a faculty member. Open to seniors with permission of the instructor.



Hebrew Studies Program
 

HEB 101 (7243) (4 crs) Elementary Hebrew I Zilberberg, Keren (kzilberberg@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 1:30pm-2:25pm
Mon, Wed 11:40am-12:35pm
HU 115

Ivrit min HaHatchala (Hebrew from Scratch) is a program developed at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem to teach others to communicate in Hebrew. It includes vocabulary and syntax in a gradual sequence, enabling learners to build and expand on their acquired knowledge. Students learn to read and communicate in different contexts. The program is interactive and uses a variety of methods for teaching and learning. This course will introduce you to the fundamentals of modern spoken and written Hebrew. Learn the 4 skills of language: reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Hebrew. Study of fundamental speech patterns. Listening comprehension and oral ability, using audiovisual method. Progressively greater emphasis placed on reading and writing skills.

For students with no previous knowledge of Hebrew.


HEB 201 (8510) (3 crs) Intermediate Hebrew I Zilberberg, Keren (kzilberberg@albany.edu)
Tue, Thu 12:00pm-1:20pm
HU 115

Hebrew from Scratch, Part 2 continues right where the first volume leaves off.

Upon completion of both volumes of Hebrew from Scratch, the student should be able to recognize and understand the basic elements of the language, and should have attained a good command of and familiarity for the language in terms of writing, speaking, reading comprehension and listening comprehension. Students will apply and extend their knowledge of Hebrew grammar, and continue to build their vocabulary with the goal of enhancing their ability to independently read and understand ancient through modern Jewish texts in Hebrew. In this course, the student is exposed to a variety of reading selections on various subjects, including Jewish, Israeli and general topics. The student is exposed to conversation from various levels of language. Alongside the texts and conversations you will find systematic and staged exercises in grammar, structure, composition and use of the dictionary.


HEB 244 (6465) (3 crs) Zionism, Palestine, & Israel in Historical Perspective | Veeder, Stacy (sveeder@albany.edu)
Mon, Wed 4:30pm-5:50pm
BB 08

*Cross-listed with JST 244 (6153) & HIS 244 (6183)

A study of 19th century Jewish and European history resulting in the formation of Jewish nationalism. Covers the development of various Zionist ideologies and organizations as well as their challengers within and outside the Jewish community. Examines the history of settlement in Palestine, the founding of the state of Israel, and the country’s subsequent development.


HEB 497 (1704) (1-6 crs) Independent Study in Hebrew | Francesconi, Federica (ffrancesconi@albany.edu)
ARR

Directed readings and conferences on selected topics in Hebrew language and literature. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.

Graduate Course Descriptions
Fall 2020

HIS 500 (4812) (1cr) Practicum in College Teaching | Bon Tempo, Carl (cbontempo@albany.edu)

ARR Discussion and analysis in a workshop setting of teaching techniques and aims as well as of various aspects of the historical professions, such as job interviews, ethics, departmental responsibilities, and non-academic careers. Required of, and limited to, doctoral candidates. The course will be taken over two semesters for one credit each semester.


HIS 501 (1774) (3crs) Introduction to Public History | Hochfelder, David (dhochfelder@albany.edu)
Tue 3:00pm-5:50pm
SL G24

Ever wondered what you can do with a degree in history? This course introduces students to the ways that historians create historical narratives for broad audiences outside of academia including: history as entertainment, historic preservation, museums, archeology, family genealogy, and more. Through readings, multi-media, papers, projects, and discussions we explore what public historians do and the career opportunities that exist in the field. While this course might inspire some of you to become imaginative and effective public historians in the future, it will hopefully help all of you to be astute consumers of the many historical venues vying for your attention. * Site visits will be required.


HIS 503 (9257) (3crs) Introduction to Historical Agency Management and Practice | Leader, Aine
Thu 3:00pm-5:50pm
HU 125

Overview of the practical components of historical agency management, as well as current challenges of sustainability, ethics, stewardship, and engagement.


HIS 563 (9256) (4crs) The Byzantine Empire | Korobeynikov, Dmitry (dkorobeynikov@albany.edu)
Wed. 6:00pm-8:50pm
SS 145 *Also meets with HIS 463 (9255)

Survey of the socio-economic, political, ethnic, religious, intellectual and artistic history of the Byzantine civilization from late antiquity to the 15th century.


HIS599 (3592) (1-4crs) Special Projects in History | Zahavi, Gerald (gzahavi@albany.edu)

ARR Students will be able to choose from among several projects sponsored by area institutions. These projects might involve archival or museum work, or primary historical research. See instructor for further information. PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR IS REQUIRED. S/U graded.


HIS 599 (8268) (1-4crs) Special Projects in History | Bernard, Sheila (sbernard@albany.edu)

ARR Students will be able to choose from among several projects sponsored by area institutions. These projects might involve archival or museum work, or primary historical research. See instructor for further information. PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR IS REQUIRED. S/U graded.


HIS 599 (8546) (1-4crs) Special Projects in History | Hochfelder, David (dhochfelder@albany.edu) ARR Students will be able to choose from among several projects sponsored by area institutions. These projects might involve archival or museum work, or primary historical research. See instructor for further information. PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR IS REQUIRED. S/U graded.


HIS 600 (8122) (4crs) Colloquium on the Theory & Practice of History | Nold, Patrick (pnold@albany.edu)
Thu 6:00pm-8:50pm
SS 145

Discussions and readings on the theory and historiography of the five doctoral fields: Public Policy, International History, Work, Gender, and Culture. Required of all doctoral students in their first semester of doctoral study. By permission only.


HIS 603(7845) (4crs) Graduate Readings Seminar in American Environmental History | Smith-Howard, Kendra (ksmithhoward@albany.edu)
Mon. 4:30pm-7:20pm
ES 108 *Also meets with HIS 628 (9259)

Through discussion of classic works and new scholarship, this seminar will introduce students to the methodological approaches and questions defining the field of environmental history. Themes will include: ecological and economic change; urban environments; climate and history; energy regimes and their environmental implications; health and environment; and the role of non-human actors, like animals, on human history.  Questions to be explored will include: Is nature an agent of historical change?  What are the implications of considering it as such?  On what scale can historians best address landscape change?  How can they address the cultural meanings people attach to natural forces?  How have environmental forces intersected with human agendas and be used to constitute social categories of class, race, gender, and sexuality? Each student will be expected to read carefully and offer lively observations about weekly readings, and to serve as a designated discussion launcher for at least one course session.  Written assignments will include regular thesis/analysis papers and afinal paper in which students investigate a course theme in greater detail.


HIS 610(9685) (4crs) History Graduate Seminar | Zahavi, Gerald (gzahavi@albany.edu)
Tue. 6:00pm-8:50pm
SS 145

This course will explore all aspects of planning, researching, structuring, and writing original scholarly papers based on primary source research. It will also cover the basics of: 1) identifying and obtaining research support and 2) disseminating your research (as conference paper and journal article submissions). Though the emphasis of the course will be on research methodologies and sources relevant to U.S. local, regional, social, and economic history projects, students interested in pursuing research in international, environmental, cultural or other thematic concentrations are welcome to do so and will also find most --if not all --of the course coverage quite useful.


HIS 616 (8672) (4crs) Readings in Late Modern Europe: War & Gender | Fogarty, Richard (rfogarty@albany.edu)
Wed. 3:00pm-5:50pm
SS 145

This course will explore the role of gender in shaping war and experiences of war, and the role of war in shaping understandings of gender. Readings will focus primarily, though not exclusively, on these themes in Western (including the United States) and European History since the eighteenth century, and will address theoretical concerns as well as the lived experiences of people from all walks of life.Without forgetting the importance of battles and military institutions in the history of warfare, this course will seek to place war firmly in its broadest social and cultural contexts.


HIS 628 (9259) (4crs) Graduate Readings Seminar in American Environmental History | Smith-Howard, Kendra (ksmithhoward@albany.edu)
Mon. 4:30pm-7:20pm
ES 108 *Class also meets with HIS 603 (7845)

Through discussion of classic works and new scholarship, this seminar will introduce students to the methodological approaches and questions defining the field of environmental history.  Themes will include: ecological and economic change; urban environments; climate and history; energy regimes and their environmental implications; health and environment; and the role of non-human actors, like animals, on human history.  Questions to be explored will include: Is nature an agent of historical change?  What are the implications of considering it as such?  On what scale can historians best address landscape change?  How can they address the cultural meanings people attach to natural forces?  How have environmental forces intersected with human agendas and be used to constitute social categories of class, race, gender, and sexuality? Each student will be expected to read carefully and offer lively observations about weekly readings, and to serve as a designated discussion launcher for at least one course session.  Written assignments will include regular thesis/analysis papers and a final paper in which students investigate a course theme in greater detail.


HIS 697 (1-4crs) Independent Study in History

ARR Directed reading and conferences on selected topics in history for the MA student. Faculty have individual class numbers for HIS 697. PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED.


HIS 699 (2-6crs) Master’s Thesis in History

ARRIndependent research leading to an acceptable thesis for a master’s degree. Faculty have individual class numbers for HIS 699. PERMISSION of INSTRUCTOR REQUIRED.


HIS 797 (1818) (2crs) Directed Reading in Public History | Hochfelder, David (dhochfelder@albany.edu)

ARR Supervised reading related to the student's project in His 798B. Prerequisite: Registration in 798B and consent of the director of the program in public history.


HIS 798A (1819) (6crs) Internship in Public History | Hochfelder, David (dhochfelder@albany.edu)

ARRA full-time internship with an agency concerned with historical and cultural resource policy. All interns will be required to participate in regularly scheduled internship colloquium meetings. Interns will be expected to undertake and complete a major project. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of the Program in Public History.


HIS 798B (1820) (6crs) Internship in Public History | Hochfelder, David (dhochfelder@albany.edu)

ARRA full-time internship with an agency concerned with historical and cultural resource policy.  All interns will be required to participate in regularly scheduled internship colloquium meetings.  Interns will be expected to undertake and complete a major project. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of the Program in Public History.


HIS 799 (1821) (6crs) Public History Project Thesis | Hochfelder, David (dhochfelder@albany.edu)

ARR A major work on an aspect of historical and cultural resource policy, deriving from the project in HIS 798A, B. Required of all students in the public history certificate program. Prerequisites: Student must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in HIS 798A, B, and must have consent of the Director of the Program in Public History.


HIS 897 (1-6crs) Directed Reading in History

ARRSupervised reading in history to prepare students for the general examinations in the History PhD program. Prerequisite: Consent of the student’s advisor and instructor.


HIS 899 (1cr) Doctoral Dissertation

ARR Required of all candidates completing the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Faculty have individual class numbers for HIS 899. PERMISSION of INSTRUCTOR is REQUIRED.