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Neonatology Project
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New York State Perinatal Quality Collaborative (NYSPQC) Safe Sleep Project

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The NYSPQC Safe Sleep Project aimed to reduce infant sleep-related deaths by improving safe sleep practices in NYS.  Eighty-two NYS birthing hospitals participated in the active phase of the project.  The central goals of the NYSPQC Safe Sleep Project included: educating health care professionals so they understand, actively endorse and model safe sleep practices, and providing infant caregivers with education and opportunities so they have the knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy to practice safe sleep for every sleep. The project evaluated key performance measures, including: percent of medical records with documentation of safe sleep education; percent of infants, sleeping or awake-and-unattended in crib, positioned supine, in safe clothing, with head of crib flat and crib free of objects; percent of caregivers who reported they received information on how to put their baby to sleep safely and indicating they understand safe sleep practices (indicating infant should be alone, on his/her back, in a crib, without items in the crib).

Data showed continuous improvement throughout the active phase of the project period. From September 2015, to July 2017, project participants reported:
               

  • An 8% increase in participating hospitals’ medical records indicating safe sleep education occurred during the birth hospitalization (90% to 98%);
  • A 38% increase in the percent of infants, sleeping or awake-and-unattended in a crib, in a safe sleep environment during the birth hospitalization (66% to 91%);
  • A 24% increase in the percent of primary caregivers indicating they understood safe sleep practices (72% to 88%); and
  • Nearly all caregivers indicated they planned to practice safe sleep once discharged home.

Beginning in August 2017, the project entered sustain mode, and through October 2018, the percent of infants, sleeping or awake-and-unattended in a crib, in a safe sleep environment during the birth hospitalization remained stable at around 90% as reported by the sixty-seven hospital teams that continued to submit data.