Graduate Research Opportunities

Some Current Research Opportunities for Graduate Students in the Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University at Albany (DAES-UAlbany). More opportunities are available at the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

 

Prospective Graduate Student Visiting Weekend is February 28 - March 2 2019
(click for flyer)

 

Dr. Lance F. Bosart

Professor Bosart and Professor Daniel Keyser have a funded grant from the Office of Naval Research entitled: “Phenomenological and Predictability Studies of the Structure and Evolution of Arctic Cyclones, Polar Lows, and Tropopause Polar Vortices.” This grant might be able to support one new Ph.D. student beginning in Fall 2019.

Professor Bosart anticipates having support from the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at UC San Diego-Scripps via the California Department of Water Resources beginning in January 2019 that might be able to support a new graduate student to investigate the structure and evolution of large-scale weather regimes associated with California drought beginning in Fall 2019.

Professor Bosart is also open to working with a new graduate student who is a recipient of an externally funded fellowship in any area of synoptic-dynamic meteorology, mesoscale meteorology, or tropical meteorology beginning in Fall 2019.

Dr. Kristen Corbosiero

Professor Corbosiero and Professor Brian Tang are looking for one new graduate student to research the interactions between tropical cyclones (TCs) and the environments in which they are embedded. With funding from NSF and NASA, this research will seek to improve our understanding of how ventilation, the process by which vertical wind shear interacts with a TC to inject environmental air into the storm, affects TCs at all stages of development. This study will be conducted through the use of idealized numerical experiments or through the examination of NASA field campaign data, depending the interests of the student. Please contact Prof. Corbosiero at kcorbosiero@albany.edu and Prof. Tang at btang@albany.edu for more details.

Dr. Aiguo Dai

Depending on availability of external funding, support for new PhD students to study climate variability and change may be available. Dr. Dai's projects focus on how and why the climate, in particular the global water cycle, precipitation, and drought, has changed in the recent past and how it may change in the future as global warming continues. His current research includes 1) Regional climate downscaling and change; 2) unforced natural climate variations vs. externally forced long-term changes; 3) influences of oceanic conditions on climate over land on different time scales; 3) Arctic sea-ice loss and polar amplification of surface warming; 4) Arctic-midlatitude climate interactions; and 5) climate model diagnostics and evaluation. For a list his publications, please visit http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/cas/adai/publication-dai.html or https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=qYIJJ1AAAAAJ&hl=en

Dr. Oliver Elison Timm

There are no grant-supported research positions for new students at this time.

Masters thesis research opportunities are, however available in the following research areas:

Investigating climate-vegetation-ice-sheet interactions during past glacial-interglacial cycles using Earth System models of Intermediate Complexity.

Downscaling of future climate change scenarios with applications to environmental impact studies and emerging infectious diseases. (Focus areas have been the Hawaiian Islands and Northeast US in past research activities.)

Dr. Craig Ferguson

There are no opportunities for new students at this time.

Dr. Lee Harrison

There are no opportunities for new students at this time.

Dr. Sara Lance

The Lance Lab will be hiring a graduate student to support experimental investigation of multiphase chemical reactions, especially relevant to the formation of organic aerosol within haze and cloud droplets. This research will include deployment of cloud and aerosol instruments to the Whiteface Mountain (WFM) Summit Research Laboratory and evaluation of measurements obtained during the 2017 WFM pilot study 'Chemical Processing of Organics within Clouds' (CPOC). Other ongoing research projects include laboratory studies of cloud water composition using a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and development of an electrodynamic balance and/or optical trap to better characterize the timescale of physical and chemical changes single-particles undergo when exposed to different environmental conditions.

For more information about the CPOC pilot study, see: https://www.asrc-research.com/single-post/2017/08/29/WFM-Pilot-Study

Other focus areas within the Lance Lab include experimental investigation of:
1. ice nucleation and cloud phase transitions
2. the role of sea spray aerosol as Giant Cloud Condensation Nuclei (GCCN) and effects on cloud properties

Applicants interested in any of the above projects should contact Dr. Sara Lance at smlance@albany.edu.

Priority will be given to applications received before Jan 15, 2018

Dr. Andrea Lang

Professor Lang interests span spatial scales ranging from synoptic to planetary and timescales of days to weeks. More information on projects will be posted as funding becomes available. Contact Prof. Andrea Lang (alang@albany.edu) for more details.

Dr. Jiping Liu

Dr. Liu is looking for a graduate student to improve seasonal predictability and prediction of Arctic sea ice and associated feedbacks on mid- and high-latitude climate in NCEP climate forecast system. This serves as an important incremental step toward achieving improved operational prediction system. The successful applicant is likely to have some previous experience working with large data sets, and some knowledge of statistics.

Dr. Cheng-Hsuan (Sarah) Lu

There are no opportunities for new students at this time.

Dr. Scott Miller

Dr. Miller has support for a graduate student for a field project focused on the measurement of air-sea carbon dioxide exchange from mobile platforms (e.g., buoys).

Students with strong technical skills and interest in field work, instrumentation, geophysical fluid mechanics and surface-atmosphere interaction are especially encouraged to apply.

For more information, please contact Dr. Scott Miller at smiller@albany.edu.

Dr. Qilong Min

Dr. Min’s research interests encompass the combination of passive/active instrumentation and modeling to improve the understanding of the physics of the atmosphere, land-atmosphere interactions, and atmosphere-climate interactions. Ongoing projects in his group are:

1. Advancing the WRF-solar model to improve solar irradiance forecast for renewable energy applications

2. Integrating multi-platform observations and WRF simulations to understand the feedback mechanisms associated with the water and energy cycles

3. Establishing innovative remote sensing techniques through the synthesis of visible, infrared, and microwave passive and active measurements for retrieving aerosol and cloud optical properties, vegetation properties, and precipitation and latent heat

4. Developing novel instrumentation for applications in weather, climate, air quality, and renewable energy

For more information, please contact Dr. Qilong Min at qmin@albany.edu.

Dr. Justin Minder

Depending on availability of external funding, Dr. Justin Minder may be seeking graduate students to work on research in one or more of the following areas:

  1. Understanding the response of lake-effect snow storms to climate variability and change using high-resolution numerical simulations
  2. Seasonal to sub-seasonal forecasting of lake-effect snow based on observations
  3. Improving forecasts of snowpack and streamflow in hydrological models with observations from the New York State Mesonet
For more information, please contact Dr. Minder at jminder@albany.edu

Dr. John Molinari

I anticipate 1-2 new openings for new grad students in Fall 2018. Topics include secondary eyewall cycles and study of the tropical cyclone outflow layer.

Dr. Paul Roundy

Various projects in large scale organized tropical convection and the global atmospheric circulation.

Dr. Jim Schwab

Dr. Schwab expects an opening for a new graduate student interested in atmospheric chemistry measurements starting in 2019. His group is currently involved in the following projects:

  1. Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements: Our group has a high resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer that we have recently used in support of cloud chemistry related measurements at Whiteface Mountain, New Particle Formation related measurements at Pinnacle State Park, and the LISTOS project described below. (New student opportunities)
  2. Long Island Sound Tropospheric Ozone Study: ASRC participated in this multi-organization field study in 2018 to investigate the complex chemistry and transport downwind of NYC influenced by the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound. Additional mobile monitoring and fixed site measurements are planned. (New student opportunities)
  3. ASRC Mobile Laboratory: we operate a 2007 Dodge Sprinter van with 6-8 hours of battery capacity (depending on instrument and air conditioning load). Instruments we have deployed on the lab include the AMS – see above – ozone and nitrogen dioxide monitors, Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, and more. We have used this for projects across New York State and could go beyond. (New student opportunities)
  4. Accountability and Air Pollution–Using long–term measurements to assess progress in air pollution reduction, or other projects involving "mining" the extensive archive of ASRC (and NYS) measurement data. (funded)
  5. New Particle Formation and Growth: Measurements and Modeling. This is a collaborative project involving Dr. Schwab and ASRC colleague Dr. Fangqun Yu. Our group has carried out two year-long campaigns measuring particle size distributions at an urban and a rural location in New York State. Dr. Yu’s group is using their modeling tools to describe these measurements and improve the performance of models in this important area. (nearly complete)

For more information, please contact Dr. Schwab at jschwab@albany.edu

Dr. Kara Sulia

For more information, please contact Dr. Sulia at ksulia@albany.edu

Dr. Brian Tang

Professor Brian Tang and Professor Corbosiero are looking for one new graduate student to research the interactions between tropical cyclones (TCs) and the environments in which they are embedded. With funding from NSF and NASA, this research will seek to improve our understanding of how ventilation, the process by which vertical wind shear interacts with a TC to inject environmental air into the storm, affects TCs at all stages of development. This study will be conducted through the use of idealized numerical experiments or through the examination of NASA field campaign data, depending the interests of the student. Please contact Prof. Corbosiero at kcorbosiero@albany.edu and Prof. Tang at btang@albany.edu for more details.

Dr. Chris Thorncroft

My research is mainly focused on improving our understanding of the West African monsoon and how it impacts Atlantic tropical cyclone variability. The research spans a wide range of timescales from diurnal to multidecadal. At the weather scale my research is focused on understanding the physical processed that impact the nature and variability of African easterly waves (AEWs). This includes a special emphasis on how AEWs interact with the ubiquitous mesoscale convective systems and ultimately how this affects the probability that AEWs will help spawn tropical cyclones. Recent work at the weather scale has also emphasized the role of convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin waves on the West African monsoon and Atlantic tropical cyclogenesis frequency. At the climate scale I am interested in better understanding the annual cycle of the West African monsoon as well as the processes that impact interannual to decadal variability and predictability of Sahel rainfall. Depending on the availability of external funding I would be interested in advising students in any of these areas.

Dr. Ryan Torn

Professor Torn has a research assistant position for Fall 2019 admission to study why some midlatitude cyclogenesis lead to a significant reduction in downstream predictability while other midlatitude cyclogenesis events do not. In addition, Professor Torn could also advise a student who is offered a teaching assistant for the Fall 2019 semester. The student can work with Professor Torn to develop a research project related to prediction and/or dynamics of tropical cyclones or midlatitude weather. Please contact him for more information.

Dr. Mathias Vuille

There are no funded openings for new students at this time.

Dr. Wei-Chyung Wang

A PhD student is needed to use observations and climate model simulations to study weather extremes over Northeastern United States and East Asia. Potential future changes in these weather extremes under global climate changes are also the focus of the graduate research.

Dr. Fangqun Yu

Dr. Yu´s research is focused on the following topics: 1. Multiple-component nucleation processes: Quantum calculation, theoretical development, and application. 2. Regional (with WRF-Chem and GEOS-Chem nested) and global (with GEOS-Chem and CESM-CAM5) modeling of size-resolved particle microphysics; oxidation aging of organic species and particle growth; Atmospheric chemistry and particulate pollution. 3. Aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions; Aerosol direct/indirect radiative forcing and climate change. Students with an interest in one or more of the above topics are encouraged to apply. For more information, please contact Dr. Fangqun Yu at fyu@albany.edu

Dr. Liming Zhou

Prof Zhou is recruiting one (potentially two pending funding approval) graduate student(s) as research assistant (RA) to study tropical climate variability and change. He is interested in understanding climatic change and its potential impacts on the most vulnerable ecosystems that are poorly studied and currently under debate. His ongoing projects are focused on two least-studied ecoregions: the central African rainforest, the driest and second largest on Earth, and the Sahara Desert, the world’s largest, driest and most famous desert. The obtained knowledge and technical skills can be applied to other climate issues. If necessary, one position could be offered in the spring semester 2019.

For more information about Prof. Zhou’s past and current research projects, visit his website http://www.atmos.albany.edu/facstaff/zhou/lzhou.html. Please contact Prof. Zhou lzhou@albany.edu for more details.