\Crane, Diana. Invisible Colleges: Diffusion of Knowledge in Scientific Communities. Chicago:

 

\Crane, Diana. Invisible Colleges: Diffusion of Knowledge in Scientific Communities. Chicago:
The University of Chicago Press, 1972.\

This little book is often cited. It is a treatise on scientific structure and its consequences. The
book draws heavily on Price, Big Science, Little Science in its organization and for its methods.
The author makes use of sociometric methods in arriving at a description of science.

It is in her appreciation of the sociology of knowledge that she makes her biggest impression. She
correctly sees that Mannheim's approach to knowledge is paradoxical and any effort to study
knowledge "scientifically" is absurd, epistemologically, because the scientists studying
knowledge must, themselves, be affected by the social structure of which they are a part.
Therefore, scientific knowledge of knowledge cannot be achieved. However, one can study the
dynamics of science in other ways: by looking at and for the implications of society's relations to
science, of science's impact on society, of the economics of science, of the politics of science,
and of the structure of science itself. Unfortunately, my disagreement with her methods of
studying structure is so fundamental that I cannot accept any of her descriptions or conclusions.

She does supply a bibliography and does provide some insights into the nature of controversy in
science, but since the whole study is structural, in the static mode, it really doesn't help the
understanding of the dynamics of science.