Migration studies at UAlbany

 

 

Faculty with research and/or teaching interests related to international migration and refugees:

 

Carl Bon Tempo, History http://www.albany.edu/history/carl_bon-tempo.php

 

Peter Brandon, Sociology http://www.albany.edu/sociology/Peter-Brandon.php

 

Jennifer L. Burrell, Anthropology http://www.albany.edu/anthro/burrell.php

 

Pedro Cabán, Latin American, Caribbean and U.S. Latino Studies http://www.albany.edu/lacs/caban.shtml

 

Angie Y. Chung, Sociology http://www.albany.edu/sociology/Angie-Y-Chung.php

 

José E. Cruz, Political Science http://www.albany.edu/rockefeller/faculty_pos_cruz.shtml

 

Nancy Denton, Sociology http://www.albany.edu/sociology/Nancy-Denton.php

 

Joanna Dreby, Sociology http://www.albany.edu/sociology/Joanna-Dreby.php

 

Samantha Friedman, Sociology http://www.albany.edu/sociology/Samantha-Friedman.php

 

Laura Gonzalez-Murphy, Political Science http://www.albany.edu/rockefeller/faculty_pos_gonzalez_murphy.shtml

 

Zoya Gubernskaya, Sociology http://www.albany.edu/sociology/Zoya-Gubernskaya.php

 

Janine Jurkowski, Health Policy, Management and Behavior http://csda.albany.edu/researchers/Jurkowski.asp

 

Rey Koslowski, Political Science http://www.albany.edu/~rk289758/

 

Zai Liang, Sociology http://www.albany.edu/sociology/Zai-Liang.php

 

Dina Refki, Center for Women in Government and Civil Society http://www.albany.edu/womeningov/about/staff.shtml

 

Puja Sahney, Lecturer, Writing and Critical Inquiry Program http://www.albany.edu/wci/faculty.php

 

Stephan Stohler, Political Science http://www.albany.edu/rockefeller/faculty_pos_stohler.shtml

 

 

 

Courses dealing with international migration and refugees

 

 

Courses listed in the Graduate Bulletin (and links to course syllabi when available):

 

Lcs 575 Caribbean Migration (3) Focus on post-World War II migration between the Caribbean and the United States. Interdisciplinary in nature, though highlighting approaches from the fields of economics, sociology, political science and history. Major topics include Migration theory; U.S. migration policy impact on receiving and sending populations; socio-historical background to post- war Caribbean Migration; and specific migrations from Cuba, the West Indies, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico.

 

Pos 605 (Pad 605) Politics of Migration and Membership (4)
Surveys dilemmas faced by local, national and international policymaking bodies addressing population movement.  Attention on the political and policy dimensions, including debates about national identity, immigration policy, political rights of immigrants, and integration (assimilation) policies.  U.S., international and comparative contexts examined. Koslowski_POS/PAD_605_Politics_of_Migraiton_and_Membership_S2015

 

Soc 576 (Lcs 509) International Migration and Transnationalism (3) This course is designed for graduate students seeking a deeper understanding of the processes of international migration and transnationalism. It addresses major conceptual and methodological tools that are being employed in the study of migration and transnationalism. It discusses, among others, the following issues: Why do people move internationally following certain patterns? Why and how do they develop transnational relations? How do migration and transnationalism relate to economic, cultural, political and social processes, and social agency including policymaking? What are the gender, class, and ethnic logic shaping these processes and being shaped by them? What are the global, regional, national, and individual implications of migration and transnationalism? What are the implications for households and enterprises?

 

Soc 666 Selected Topics in Sociology: Immigration in a Global Era (3)
Examines the values, processes and experiences associated with international migration to the U.S. as they have been specifically affected by globalization.  The course will loosely focus on three different stages of migration, including the processes of migration, the adaptation/ incorporation of immigrants into American society, and the future “assimilation” of their children.  Topics may include theories on migration/ adaptation, government policies, nation and citizenship, ethnic identity formation, transnational gender and family relations, interethnic relations, and globalizing ethnic enclaves. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study

 

 

Courses listed in the Undergraduate Bulletin (and links to course syllabi when available):

 

A LCS 374 International Migration and Transnationalism (3)
This course discusses basic concepts and theories related to the study of migration and transnationalism. It discusses, among others issues, the following: Why do people move internationally following certain patterns? Why and how do they develop transnational relations? How do migration and transnationalism relate to economic, cultural, political and social processes, and social agency? How do they relate to some gender, class, and ethnic factors? What are some of the global, regional, national, and individual implications of migration and transnationalism? What are the implications for households and enterprises?

 

A LCS 475 Caribbean Migration (3)
The focus of the course is post-World War II migration between the Caribbean and the United States—in particular migration from Cuba, the West Indies, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. The material is interdisciplinary in nature, though highlighting approaches from the fields of economics, sociology, political science, and history. The major topics include: (1) Migration theory; (2) U.S. migration policy—its impact on receiving and sending populations; (3) a socio-historical background to post-war Caribbean Migration; and (4) specific migrations from Cuba, the West Indies, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

 

R POS 474Z Politics of International Migration (3)
Surveys the domestic and international politics of migration. Examines labor migration to advanced industrial states, border control, immigrant incorporation, refugee policies, emigrant participation in home country politics and the effect of migration on international development, democratization, and security. RPOS_474Z_Koslowski_F2009; ------ RPOS_474Z_Dragomir_S2013.

 

A SOC 225/225W/225Y/225Z (= A LCS 225/225W/225Y/225Z) Global Migration and Transnationalism (3)
The course is an introduction to global and regional migration patterns since the 16th century with a concentration on post-World War II patterns. It has three modules: (1) Introduces basic concepts and approaches related to migration studies; (2) Examines global and regional historical patterns and major forces shaping them since the 16th century; (3) Emphasizes strategies launched by individuals, households, and enterprises related to the process of international migration. Geographically, the course covers several areas of the world, including the Americas, Western and Eastern Europe, and South East Asia. Only one version of A SOC 225 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115. May not be offered 2014-2015.

 

T SOC 240Z Contemporary Immigration and the Second Generation (3)
Examines various aspects of immigration from Asia, Latin America and the Caribbeans since 1965, including migration processes, community and identity, race/ class/ gender intersections, socio-economic and residential mobility, transnationalism, and assimilation into "mainstream" America. The course will explore the social, economic, cultural and political contexts within which immigrants and their children have been incorporated into American society and the various theoretical perspectives that have been proposed to explain their possible future. Open to Honors College students only. T SOC 240Z is the Honors College version of A SOC 440Z. Only one version may be taken for credit.