China Diary:
Downtown


[Leaving Home] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Settling in Shanghai] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Getting to Work] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Becoming Routine] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Western Contacts] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) ["National Day" Trip] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Meeting Folks] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Plenty to Eat] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Downtown] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [South by Southwest] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Socializing] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Dance Fever] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Exchanges] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Business Week] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [North by Northeast] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Computer Crash] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [The Good and the Bad] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Wrapping Up]


Oct. 19: Family of Four – It’s getting dark earlier, so I head to the courts late afternoon now. I’m finally hitting from the outside and getting off some decent passes, so I’m having some good games even with my pinky wrapped up. Feeling good and hungry, I head to our local family-run restaurant phrase-book in hand. I’ve thought about what I want to order and pretty much get what I want with enough left over for tomorrow. At the next table are two brothers and a sister toasting ganbei with alternating beer and wine. The only one who speaks any English is the bookstore manager on campus and he convinces me to visit tomorrow afternoon. His brother manages Fudan Press and convinces me to visit Friday morning. Their sister teaches Chinese at Fudan and not to be outdone I convince her to tutor me. They pull out their cell phone and call their other brother who is getting a Ph.D. in English literature at Fudan. By the time he arrives it is nearly ten but the beer and wine continue to flow. They are all very friendly, happy, and obviously tight with each other and one solo American.

Oct. 21: USIS – Go downtown to the U.S. Consulate offices to meet the cultural affairs staff. First I stop for some tea with Akif, the Turkey General Consul whose office is in the same building. By noon I go to Terry, who is responsible for Fulbrighters in this region. We wander over to a restaurant across the street where we meet Tony, the USIS cultural affairs and information officer in Shanghai; Linda, who coordinates USIA programs in East Asia and the Pacific; one of their assistants and a Fudan graduate; Bob, a Fulbrighter at Shanghai International Studies University; and Cheryl, a Fulbrighter at Jiao Tong University. Later I take my T.A., Jackie, and his fiancée, Amy, to dinner followed by more than a few drinks at a local disco.

Oct. 22: Theory vs. Practice – I give back-to-back lectures to an MS class at the Jiao Tong University Management School on Conducing Research on the Internet and Industry Analysis and Competitive Dynamics. After, several of us do another banquet. We discuss the possibility of my teaching a Ph.D. course next fall. Then I take a cab to the Shanghai Lesterian Technical Consulting Co. The Chairman and CEO was retired ten years ago as a high official in the Shanghai Ministry of Foreign Trade and set up this company to consult Western businesses wanting to operate in China. Turns out he visited Albany last year where his son-in-law got an MBA at a local college.

Oct. 23: All-America – In the afternoon, Mark, Maurice, and I go to The American Educator’s Meeting at the U.S. Consulate intended to acquaint American Teachers and Foreign Experts with services provided by the Consulate and to discuss initiatives that have taken place over the past two years. First, I get my flu shot. Then, to the presentations. Among the foremost initiatives have been the job search presentation for Chinese college and university juniors and seniors and the "Top Gun" program that funnels the resumes of the best and brightest of the Chinese students to American joint ventures, wholly-owned enterprises, and representative companies. There are also some fun activities we hope to participate in, such as the Shanghai Hash which entails running six miles with stops at every bar along the route. After the presentations, we get some refreshments at Sasha’s which was the residence for a prominent Shanghai family. Then, Mark, Maurice, and I head to the Marine House in the Portman Hotel to watch "The Big Lebowski." We end the evening with some ribs at Tony Roma’s.

Oct. 25: Restaurant Row – Bob, the Hyundai representative in Shanghai, invites me to meet him and his fiancée Jenny for dinner downtown. We meet in front of People’s Park then wander down Huang He Lu (Yellow River Road), which I dub "Restaurant Row" because it resembles Chinatown, USA and is well-known as the place to eat. He takes me to the most-famous one on the street, which occupies six floors and they are all packed with families eating Sunday dinner. We have many dishes, and the bill is a bit higher than I expected. Still, it’s the place to eat. Jenny is in the securities industry, working at Pu Dong. Both of them would like to pursue their MBAs.


[Leaving Home] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Settling in Shanghai] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Getting to Work] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Becoming Routine] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Western Contacts] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) ["National Day" Trip] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Meeting Folks] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Plenty to Eat] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Downtown] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [South by Southwest] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Socializing] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Dance Fever] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Exchanges] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Business Week] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [North by Northeast] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Computer Crash] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [The Good and the Bad] arrow.jpg (877 bytes) [Wrapping Up]

Rainbow

Copyright © 1998 Paul Miesing. All rights reserved. Please do not use without permission unless in the People’s Republic of China which does not enforce intellectual property rights. Revised on January 17, 2001.