What does Information Literacy Mean for
Women's Studies?

What are all the possible methods to search for information for your research questions? Let's Explore!

Information literacy is broadly defined in some of the sources on this page. However, information literacy for feminist studies must incorporate critical reading and reflection on research methodologies questioning, for example, "Who is left out of this story as it is told? or How have the many voices and experiences of people, particularly women, been incorporated into this story as it is told?

Research often begins with a question. When asking your research questions, it is useful to understand the differences between libraries, scholarly academic databases, primary resources, datasets on the Web, Internet Search Engines, and Subject Directories. Developing guidelines for learning how to evaluate information critically and use information responsibly is part of the information literacy campaign. As there are multiple ways to access information, making these distinctions may provide a clearer path for approaching your research process.

[Defining Women's Studies Scholarship]
[Research Paths]
[Information Literacy] [Critical Reading and Evaluation]
[Finding Journal Articles and Books through the Library Home Page]
[Internet Searching and Search Engines]
[Subject Directories]
[Data Resources]
[What have you found useful or what would you like to see added to this page?]

Defining Women's Studies Scholarship

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Research Paths

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Information Literacy

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Critical Reading and Evaluation

Finding Journal Articles and Books through the Library Home Page

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Internet Searching

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Subject Directories

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Data Resources

What have you found useful or what would you like to see added to this page?

dlafonde@albany.edu

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updated July 2005

Deborah M. LaFond
Social Sciences Bibliographer
State University of New York at Albany
dlafonde@albany.edu