EAPS 745 - INDIVIDUAL STUDENT REPORTS





  • Eileen Borden and Debbie Chicorelli: Will identify each of the 79 districts in terms of the actual number of students per district having an educational disability and district reported expenses in running their special education program. After discussing the districts in terms of general education expenses and how they relate to special education expenses, Debbie will determine if there is any relationship of special education spending with Business Review or Regents performance ratings. Eileen will look at the relationship of costs for pre school special education throughout the Capital region and the relationship with municipal government cost and service sharing for the fifteen districts in Albany county.


  • Dorothy Donlon: Will investigate the impact of rising or declining enrollment patterns upon Regents subject performance as percent of children taking the year end tests and percents of students passing. Enrollment practices in Regents courses will be analyzed to determine optimal achievement levels. In addition, the effect of district level student placement practices on long range achievement in Regents math courses will be analyzed.


  • Eric Isselhardt: Will expand the Capital region data base by adding census information to 1) explore issues of equity and regents-level assessment and 2) how technology expandsthe policy making players to anyone with a computer and a modem.


  • Ruth Lang: will do a longitudinal comparison of the dropout, college bound and expenditures per pupil of the ten highest Regents point getting Capital region districts with the ten districts that have deliberately low Regents diploma production but very high student expectations to be college bound (listed in Networking text). Will add the recently released l994-l995 data to the class data set.


  • Karen McSharry: Will compare Albany County and Suffolk county school districts for the policy implications of establishing regional tax bases and, second, the relationship between tax equity and Regents performance measures.


  • Martin Miller: Will analyze the 11 districts of the Suburban Council in term of foreign language programs and Regents, Business Review ratings. Will survey schools to determine full extent of foreign language curriculums and find ouit why Business Review does not use Regents foreign language perfromance in its rating scheme.


  • Art Recesso: Will compare fifteen Capital region districts in Fulton and Montgomery county on the development of School to Work standards and the Business Review and Regents performance standards. Information from a multiple item survey administered to the superintendents of the fifteen districts will form the basis for standards measures.


  • Delilah Reyes: Will survey the principals of secondary schools in each of the 79 Capital Region districts about the Higher Education Corporation effort to promote student interest in attending college. The reference will be a recent brochure distributed to 60,000 students state wide. The principals will be asked to assess the response of teachers, guidance counselors and students to the brochure and the kinds of questions they may have about present and expected levels of "college bound" intentions. The results will be compared to Business Review and Regents performance ratings.


  • Roberto Reyes: Will analyze the relationship of PEP scores in elementary schools receiving Title 1 funding, then compare the Capital region ratings to determine the extent that secondary performance can be identified in the early years.


  • Andreea Serban: Will assess a select number of districts state wide as to the readiness to embrace the "horizontal keiretsu networking" concept as a minimum technology level in secondary schools. The pool of thirteen districts are identified by web pages available on the world wide web. Special attention to the technology, political and human operator implications of networking will be given to New York districts with the most developed web pages ( Niskayuna, Johnson City, Northport-East Northport and Sachem) and the other districts beginning their technology portraits.


  • Ted Smith: From his larger study of 1800 elementary buildings state wide, Ted will compare the "technology richness" of approximately 300 buildings in the Capital Region 79 districts. Each building will be classified in terms of "richness" on (a) computers in building ratio better than 14:1,(b) percent of computers available are 486 or PowerMac(c) percent of use of high speed(14.4 or better) and (d) percent of CD-Rom. The results will be aggregated to districts on a classification scale of technology impoverished to enriched. Technology richness will be compared to Business Review and Regents performance rating, PEP and Grade 6 reading and writing performance, as well and a variety of socio-economic measures.


  • Constance Spohn: The relationship of twenty six Capital Area districts who have active programs in "career bound" secondary education (i.e., Tech Prep or School to Work) to Business Review and Regents performance ratings. Connie will create an assessment scale to classify each district in terms of involvement and persistence of "career bound" emphasis. She will also identify the proportion of secondary student involvement in occupational education programs to be compared with other socio-economic measures of the districts.


  • Shireen Yadegari and John Polnak: Will analyze the recent evaluation of mandated shared decision committees submitted to State Education Department. John will analyze the 79 districts mission statements in the original proposal for the extent of updating (i.e.. revision or refinement), the detail or ambiguity of expectations and the prioritizing or emphasis on child centered objectives. Shireen will analyze the operational features of the shared decision making committee implementation. She will attempt to relate the type and extent of shared decision making implementation to the Business Review and Regents ratings.