Courses in Nanoscale Engineering

N ENG 101 (= N SCI 101) Nanotechnology Survey (3)
Introduction to the definitions, principles and applications of nanotechnology. Discussion of emergent nanoscale properties, atomic and molecular self-assembly and concepts of bottom-up and top-down processing and fabrication. Introduction to selected nanoscale systems, including quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Only one of N SCI 101 or N ENG 101 may be taken for credit.

N ENG 102/102Z (= N SCI 102/102Z) Societal Impacts of Nanotechnology (3)
Introduction to the societal implications of nanotechnology innovation including public perception of nanotechnology, public impacts, nanomaterials risk assessment, and impacts of nanotechnology on public health policy and energy/environmental sustainability. Only one version of N SCI 102 or N ENG 102 may be taken for credit.

N ENG 103 (= N SCI 103) Economic Impacts of Nanotechnology (3)
Introduction to the economic impacts of nanotechnology innovation. Basic economic principles will be presented and discussed in terms of emerging nanotechnologies. Topics will include economics of nanoelectronics; nanoscale technologies for energy and the environment; and nanobioscience/nanobioengineering. Only one of N SCI 103 or N ENG 103 may be taken for credit.

N ENG 104 (= N SCI 104) Disruptive Nanotechnologies (3)
Nanoscale technological innovation as central to the economic growth process will be examined within a historical context leading to an understanding of nanoscale technology evolution in industrial revolution. The technological, economic and business significance of nanotechnology will be discussed as an “enabling” force with profound economic, business and societal impacts. Emerging new models of innovation by firms and by regions will be explored as well as related measurement tools to better understand the economic and business environment of disruptive nanotechnologies. Only one of N SCI 104 or N ENG 104 may be taken for credit.

N ENG 110 (= N SCI 110) Chemical Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering I (4)
Fundamental chemical principles for nanoscale materials and systems. Basic chemical concepts of energy, enthalpy, thermodynamics, and quantum atomic theory are introduced with a focus on application to nanoscale materials and application architectures. Fundamentals of chemical bonding in nanoscale materials (covalent, ionic). Laboratory section included. N ENG 110, T ENH 110, N SCI 110 and T SCI 110 may be used interchangeably toward the prerequisite in any course; only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): four years of high school science (earth science, biology, chemistry and physics), and mathematics through precalculus, or equivalent.

T ENH 110 (= T SCI 110) Chemical Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering I (4)
Honors version of N SCI/N ENG 110. Same topics as N SCI/N ENG 110 but topics are covered in greater depth. This course is for students with greater than average ability and background in Nanoscale Engineering or Science. Fundamental chemical principles for nanoscale materials and systems. Basic chemical concepts of energy, enthalpy, thermodynamics, and quantum atomic theory are introduced with a focus on application to nanoscale materials and application architectures. Fundamentals of chemical bonding in nanoscale materials (covalent, ionic). Laboratory section included. N ENG 110, T ENH 110, N SCI 110, and T SCI 110 may be used interchangeably toward the prerequisite in any course. Only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): four years of high school science (earth science, biology, chemistry and physics), and mathematics through pre-calculus, or equivalent.

N ENG 112 (= N SCI 112) Chemical Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering II (4)
Introduces concepts of gas law, phases, equilibrium, and rates of reaction, applicable to nanoscale systems. Further development of the concepts and nature of chemical bonding. Application of chemical principles to the structure of matter, molecular materials, and crystals. Laboratory section included. Only one of N SCI 112 or N ENG 112 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 110 or permission of instructor.

N ENG 120 (= N SCI 120) Physical Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering I (4)
Newtonian mechanics, motion, momentum, work-energy equivalence as applied to nanoscale materials and systems. Includes static, dynamics, and mechanics of bulk and nanoscale materials. Laboratory section included. Only one of N SCI 120 or N ENG 120 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 112 or permission of instructor.

N ENG 122 (= N SCI 122) Physical Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering II (4)
Concepts of charge, electrostatic potential, current, and fields relevant to nanoscale materials, devices, and systems. Electrical properties of bulk and nanoscale metals, semiconductors and insulators. RCL circuit behavior. Lorentz force and application to nanoscale systems and materials. Laboratory section included. Only one of N SCI 122 or N ENG 122 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 120.

N ENG 124 (= N SCI 124) Physical Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering III (4)
Formalism of vibratory phenomena (waves, oscillators, complex response functions) and scattering (including diffraction) as applied to nanoscale materials and systems. Wave nature of matter, DeBroglie hypothesis, fundamentals of the double slit experiment, electron diffraction, modern physics. Laboratory section included. N ENG 124, T ENH 124, N SCI 124 and T SCI 124 may be used interchangeably toward the prerequisite in any course; only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 122.

T ENH 124 (= T SCI 124) Physical Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering III (Honors) (4)
Honors version of N SCI/N ENG 124. Same topics as N SCI/N ENG 124 but topics are covered in greater depth. This course is for students with greater than average ability and background in Nanoscale Science or Engineering. Formalism of vibratory phenomena (waves, oscillators, complex response functions) and scattering (including diffraction) as applied to nanoscale materials and systems. Wave nature of matter, DeBroglie hypothesis, fundamentals of the double slit experiment, electron diffraction, modern physics. N ENG 124, T ENH 124, N SCI 124 and T SCI 124 may be used interchangeably toward the prerequisite in any course. Only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 120 or N SCI/N ENG 122, and admission to the CNSE undergraduate programs and the Honors College.

N ENG 130 (= N SCI 130) Biological Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering I (4)
This course will introduce basic concepts in nanobiology and nanomedicine. The course will initially focus on fundamental biological principles such as DNA/RNA synthesis and replication, protein synthesis, and cellular structure/function. Only one of N SCI 130 or N ENG 130 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 110, N SCI/N ENG 112, N SCI/N ENG 120 and N SCI/N ENG 122.

N ENG 132 (= N SCI 132) Biological Principles of Nanoscale Science and Engineering II (4)
The course will cover topics relating to the interface between nanosystems and biological systems. This will include general information about biomimetic systems and the uses of nanotechnology for biological research. Only one of N SCI 132 or N ENG 132 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 130.

N ENG 201 Introduction to Nanoengineering Design and Manufacturing (3)
Develops students' competence and self-confidence as nanodesign engineers. Emphasis on the creative design process bolstered by application of physical laws, design software (CAD) and learning to complete projects on schedule and within budget. Synthesis, analysis, design robustness and manufacturability are emphasized. Subject relies on active learning via a major design-and-build project. Lecture topics include idea generation, estimation, concept selection, visual thinking and communication, kinematics of mechanisms, machine elements, design for manufacturing, basic electronics, and professional responsibilities and ethics. N ENG 202 is is the CNSE honors program version of N ENG 201; only one may be taken for credit; N ENG 202 substitutes where N ENG 201 is a requirement or a prerequisite. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 110 and N SCI/N ENG 120.

T ENH 201 Introduction to Nanoengineering Design and Manufacturing (Honors) (3)
Honors College version of N ENG 201. Covers same topics, but in greater depth. This course is for students with greater than average ability in nanoengineering. Develops students' competence and self-confidence as nanodesign engineers. Emphasis on the creative design process bolstered by application of physical laws, design software (CAD) and learning to complete projects on schedule and within budget. Synthesis, analysis, design robustness and manufacturability are emphasized. Subject relies on active learning via a major design-and-build project. Lecture topics include idea generation, estimation, concept selection, visual thinking and communication, kinematics of mechanisms, machine elements, design for manufacturing, basic electronics, and professional responsibilities and ethics. T ENH 201 is the Honors College version of N ENG 201; only one may be taken for credit; T ENH 201 substitutes where N ENG 201 is a requirement or a prerequisite. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 110 and N SCI/N ENG 120, and admission to the CNSE undergraduate programs and the Honors College.

N ENG 202 Introduction to Computer Programming for Engineers (3)
Program and how to use computational techniques to solve nanoengineering problems. Topics include algorithms, simulation techniques, and use of software libraries. T ENH 202 honors substitutes for N ENG 202 toward the prerequisite in any course; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 110 and N SCI/N ENG 120, and admitted to CNSE undergraduate programs.

T ENH 202 Introduction to Computer Programming for Engineers (Honors) (3)
Honors version of N ENG 202. Same topics as N ENG 202 but topics are covered in greater depth. This course is for students with greater than average ability and background in Nanoscale Engineering. Program and how to use computational techniques to solve nanoengineering problems. Topics include algorithms, simulation techniques, and use of software libraries. T ENH 202 is the Honors College version of  N ENG 202; only one may be taken for credit; T ENH 202 substitutes where N ENG 202 is a requirement or a prerequisite. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Nanoscale Engineering honors program and satisfactory completion of N SCI/N ENG 110 and N SCI/N ENG 120, and admission to the CNSE undergraduate programs and the Honors College.

N ENG 203 Introduction to Nanoengineering Electronics (3)
Introductory subject that provides the knowledge necessary for reading schematics and designing, building, analyzing, and testing fundamental analog and digital circuits. Interactive examples and exploring the practical uses of electronics in engineering and experimental science, including signals and measurement fundamentals. Students have the use of state-of-the-art hardware and software for data acquisition, analysis, and control. T ENH 203 is the honors version of N ENG 203 and may substitute where N ENG 203 is the prerequisite; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N ENG 201 or T ENH 201.

T ENH 203 Introduction to Nanoengineering Electronics (Honors) (3)
Honors version of N ENG 203. Same topics as N ENG 203 but topics are covered in greater depth. This course is for students with greater than average ability and background in Nanoscale Science. Introductory subject that provides the knowledge necessary for reading schematics and designing, building, analyzing, and testing fundamental analog and digital circuits. Interactive examples and exploring the practical uses of electronics in engineering and experimental science, including signals and measurement fundamentals. Students have the use of state-of-the-art hardware and software for data acquisition, analysis, and control. T ENH 203 is the Honors College version of N ENG 203; only one may be taken for credit. T ENH 203 substitutes where N ENG 203 is a requirement or the prerequisite. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N ENG 201 or T ENH 201 and admission to the CNSE undergraduate program and the Honors College.

N ENG 301 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Nanomaterials (3)
Applies the concepts of reaction rate, stoichiometry and equilibrium to the analysis of materials systems. Use of rate expressions from reaction mechanisms and equilibrium or steady state assumptions. Design of reactions via synthesis of kinetics, transport phenomena, and mass and energy balances. Thermodynamics of multicomponent, multiphase chemical and biological systems. Applications of first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics to open and closed systems. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of A MAT 311, N ENG 122, N ENG 203 or N ENG 204, and N ENG 205 or N ENG 206.

N ENG 302 Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Nanomaterials (3)
Describes how the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials originate from their electronic and molecular structure and how these properties can be designed for particular applications, for instance in optical fibers, magnetic data storage, solar cells, transistors and other devices. Experimental exploration of the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials. Includes hands-on experimentation using spectroscopy, resistivity, impedance and magnetometry measurements, behavior of light in waveguides, and other characterization methods. Investigation of structure-property relationships through practical materials examples. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of A MAT 311, N ENG 122, N ENG 202 or T ENH 202, and N ENG 203 or T ENH 203.

N ENG 303 Mechanics of Nanomaterials (3)
Introduction to statics and the mechanics of deformable solids. Emphasis on the three basic principles of equilibrium, geometric compatibility, and material behavior. Stress and its relation to force and moment; strain and its relation to displacement; linear elasticity with thermal expansion. Failure modes. Application to simple engineering structures such as rods, shafts, beams, and trusses. Application to biomechanics of natural materials and structures. Introduces mechanical behavior of engineering materials, and the use of materials in mechanical design. Emphasizes the fundamentals of mechanical behavior of materials, as well as design with materials. Major topics: elasticity, plasticity, limit analysis, fatigue, fracture, and creep. Materials selection. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of A MAT 311, N ENG 122, N ENG 202 or T ENH 202, and N ENG 203 or T ENH 203.

N ENG 304 Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes (3)
Introduces the mechanical principles governing fluid flow. Stress in a fluid. Conservation of mass and momentum, using differential and integral balances. Elementary constitutive equations. Hydrostatics. Exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Approximate solutions using control volume analysis. Mechanical energy balances and Bernoulli's equation. Dimensional analysis and dynamic similarity. Introduces boundary-layer theory and turbulence. Principles of heat and mass transfer. Steady and transient conduction and diffusion. Radiative heat transfer. Convective transport of heat and mass in both laminar and turbulent flows. Emphasis on the development of a physical understanding of the underlying phenomena and upon the ability to solve real heat and mass transfer problems of engineering significance. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of NENG 301, NENG 302, and NENG 303.

N ENG 390X Capstone Research I (3)
First course in a 3-course series representing and original, substantive, team-based research project to introduce the student to professional-level Nanoscale Science and Engineering research. During this introductory course the student will work with a CNSE research team to investigate and identify a topical research problem of interest to the wide fields of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. Emphasis will be placed on a functional understanding of the current technical, peer-reviewed literature in the area of interest and the drafting of a coherent research plan with relevant proof-of-concept research results. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N ENG 301, N ENG 302, and N ENG 303.

N ENG 405 Micro and Nano Materials Processing Technology (4)
Introduces the theory and technology of micro/nano fabrication. Lectures and laboratory sessions on basic processing techniques such as vacuum processes, lithography, diffusion, oxidation, and pattern transfer. Students will gain experience with state of the art 300mm process technology as they follow the fabrication of advanced test sites at leading edge ground rules. Emphasis on the interrelationships between material properties and processing, device structure, and the electrical, mechanical, optical, chemical or biological behavior of devices. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N ENG 304 and N ENG 390X.

N ENG 406 Fundamentals of Nanoelectronics (4)
An introduction to the fundamentals of semiconductor materials and the effects of variations in the material properties on the resulting current-voltage characteristics for two terminal devices, namely resistors and diodes. Topics include electron energies in solids, the statistical physics of carrier concentration and motion in crystals, energy band models, drift and diffusion currents, recombination-generation of carriers, continuity equations, and the p-n junction under equilibrium and bias conditions, and metal-semiconductor Schottky and ohmic contacts. Non-idealities associated with real diodes are introduced. Students will be introduced to manufacturing level device testing through the use of advanced wafer level probes in the CNSE 300mm full flow process facility. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N ENG 304 and N ENG 390X.

N ENG 407 Thin Film and Nanomaterials Characterization (4)
Current methods of directly examining the nanostructure of materials. Topics: optical microscopy, scanning electron and focused ion beam microscopy, field ion microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and microanalytical surface science methods. Emphasis is on the electron-optical techniques. Samples to be examined will be selected from the various steps in the CNSE baseline 300mm advanced test site working at leading edge ground rules. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N ENG 405 and N ENG 406.

N ENG 408 Industrial Nanomanufacturing (3)
Materials and manufacturing based on nanoprocess systems. Industrial engineering concepts are introduced and the student prepared to perform basic engineering tasks, including design of workstations, cells and lines. The key in operating a manufacturing facility is to make optimum use of all of the available resources including labor, capital, technology, materials and time. Quality systems will cover metrology and overall systems for industrial and service companies, including DOE, SPC, ISO, QS, TQM. The materials used in Electronic manufacturing will be reviewed including materials and components that are used to produce chips and systems. DOE will cover statistical methods for determining settings of independent experimental variables, prior to experimentation, in order to make meaningful inferences based upon subsequent measurements or simulations. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N ENG 405 and N ENG 406.

N ENG 411 Nanoelectronic IC Fabrication Processes (3)
Basic tools and principles of single electronic component construction and some of the problem areas encountered are discussed. Structural and electrical differences between logic, DRAM, flash devices will be given. Fundamental modules of ion implantation, PECVD, LPCVD, RIE behavior, control of profiles, diffusion, Lithography, yield control tactics, deposition, and oxidation kinetics will be covered. Future changes will be given in terms of factors that drive speed of microprocessors. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 412 Micro and Nano Devices and Circuits (3)
Micro- and nanoelectronic devices modeling, and basic micro- and nanoelectronic circuit analysis and design. Physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices. Relating terminal behavior to internal physical processes; developing circuit models; and understanding the uses and limitations of different models. Use of incremental and large-signal techniques to analyze and design bipolar and field effect transistor circuits, with examples chosen from digital circuits, single-ended and differential linear amplifiers, and other integrated circuits. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 413 Nanoscale Optical and Optoelectronic Devices (3)
Introduction to solid-state optoelectronic devices; display devices, laser diodes, photodetectors, and light modulators; optical waveguides and fibers; topics also include design and fabrication of nanoscale optoelectronic components, monolithic and hybrid integration between photonics and electronic components and associated challenges. System application of optoelectronic devices will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 414 Applications of Fields and Waves to Nanoscale Systems (3)
Starting from Maxwell's Equations, this course explores fundamental properties of quasistatic and dynamic properties of electromagnetic waves including: radiation, diffraction, plane waves in lossless and lossy media, skin effect, flow of electromagnetic power, Poynting's Theorem, interaction of fields with matter and particles, and applies these concepts to nanoscale systems and devices. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 415 Nanoelectronic Devices (3)
Focus in on device physics and operation principles. Device and material options for advanced silicon FETs at the nanoscale. Topics identified by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, emerging research devices section. Non-silicon based devices such as carbon nanotubes, semiconductor nanowires, molecular devices; and non-FET based devices such as single electron transistors (SET), resonant tunneling diodes (RTD), and quantum dots, logic and memory devices. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 421 Introduction to Solar Cell Nanotechnology (3)
Theory of conventional pn junction and excitonic solar cells. Design, fabrication, and characterization of crystal-line silicon, amorphous silicon, CdTe, CIGS, and tandem and organic solar cells. Emerging solar cell concepts such as intermediate band gap and bioinspired solar cells. Emphasis is on the materials science aspects of solar cells research. Module design and economic hurdles that must be overcome for solar cell technology to generate a significant fraction of the world's electricity. Group project to explore one solar cell approach in depth. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 422 Introduction to Fuel Cell Nanotechnology (3)
The course provides an introduction to the basic science and technology of fuel cells. It begins with an overview of the various types of fuel cells and their technologies including hydrogen production and storage. Next, the fundamental principles involved in the design and analysis of fuel cell components and systems are described. Topics include the thermodynamics of fuel cells, namely, cell equilibrium, standard potentials, and Nernst equation; ion conduction and sorption in proton-exchange membranes; mass transport in gas-diffusion layer; and kinetics and catalysis of electrocatalytic reactions of anode and cathode for hydrogen, direct methanol, solid oxide, and molten carbonate fuel cells. The transport and reaction in fuel cells are finally combined to provide their overall design and performance characteristics. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 423 Renewable and Alternate Energy Nanotechnologies (3)
An overview of various renewable energy technologies and their current applications. Emphasis will be placed on energy consumption, efficiency, and conservation. Quantification of incident solar energy is covered in detail along with the basic physics of energy conversion. Technologies include passive and active solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind turbines, small-scale hydrodynamic generation, fuel cells, and hydrogen. Topics will include thermoelectrics, batteries, ultracapacitors etc. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 424 Nanoscale Chemical and Biological Sensors (3)
Principles of design, operation, and implementation principles of chemical and biological sensors. Focus on the application of fundamental sensing mechanisms and architectures to prevailing and emerging techniques for device design and integration within a specific chemical and/or biological sensing system. Emphasis will be placed on the engineering of the signal transduction mechanism and implications towards design and fabrication. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 431 Advanced Materials Processing for NEMS/MEMS (4)
The course will cover advanced topics of good practices in the selection of organic and inorganic materials based on properties, processes and economics for product design. Students fabricate MOS capacitors, nanomechanical cantilevers, and micro/nanofluidic mixers. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 432 Interfacial Engineering in Nanobiological Systems (3)
Fundamentals of interfacial dynamics, energy transduction, kinetics, and transport for nanobiological and bioengineered systems. This course will explore how biological systems interact with engineered systems at the nanoscale, including how energy is generated and transduced at the nano-bio interface.

N ENG 433 NEMS/MEMS for Chemical and Biological Sensors (3)
NEMS/MEMS design, processing, fabrication approaches, and operational principles for chemical and biological sensors. Focus on fabrication strategies and techniques for integrating specific transduction techniques and engineered coatings for chemical and biological applications. Emphasis will be placed on design and fabrication to enable target sensitivity and selectivity. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 434 BioMEMS and BioNEMS (3)
Introduction to the cross-disciplinary application of MEMS and NEMS to the biological sciences. Topics include the interaction of living cells/tissues with nanofabricated structures, micro/nanofluidics for the movement and control of solutions, and the development of I/O architectures for efficient readout of bio-reactions. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 435 Nanobiological Systems (3)
Introduction to basic concepts in nanobiology and the interface between nano and biological systems. This course will seek to introduce basic nanobiological concepts to non-biologists. The course will initially focus on fundamental biological principles such as DNA/RNA synthesis/replication, protein synthesis, and the biochemistry of basic biomolecules and cells. The course will then discuss nanobiological applications. These include biosensors, bioinformatics, nanobiological materials, and biomimetics. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 441 Nanoscale Patterning (3)
The class will follow the transition of a sample pattern from a CAD file to its physical realization for both production manufacturing and research. Topics covered include optical reduction lithography, electron beam lithography, imprint lithography and resist systems. Sources of error and error characterization of pattern placement, size control and pattern fidelity. Practical limits of resolution will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 442 Light Optics for Nanoengineering (3)
Applied optics for nanoscale patterning and metrology. Paraxial optics, lens makers equation, 3rdst order optics, Seidel aberrations, Zernike polynomials, compound systems, numerical aperture, diffraction limit. Specific examples applied to lithography using 193nm immersion and EUV techniques. Optical specifications for patterning and metrology equipment including economic tradeoffs. Techniques for optical resolution enhancement. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 443 Charged Particle Optics for Nanoengineering (3)
Applied optics using charged particles for nanoscale patterning and metrology. Lorentz force law, electrostatic and magneto static lenses. Sources, correction and deflection elements. Geometrical optics based upon relativistic classical mechanics. Quantum based wave optics. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 444 Electron Beam Pattern Generation (3)
A comprehensive review of electron beam pattern generator technology including beam generation, control electronics, mechanical subsystems and system software. Special attention will be given to issues that arise when patterning for nanoscale dimensions and accuracy such as proximity effects and throughput limitations. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 451 Nanophotonics (3)
Recent developments in micro- and nanophotonic materials and devices. Concepts of photonic crystals. Integrated photonic circuits. Photonic crystal fibers. Superprism effects. Optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Sub-wavelength phenomena and plasmonic excitations. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 452 Magnetic Nanostructures (3)
Magnetic moments, magnetic exchange and ferromagnetism, types of magnetic order, magnetic anisotropy, domains, domain walls, hysteresis loops, hard and soft magnetic materials, demagnetization factors, and applications of magnetic materials, especially magnetic nanostructures and nanotechnology. Tools include finite-element and micro/nanomagnetic modeling. Design topics include electromagnet and permanent magnet, electronic article surveillance, magnetic inductors, bio-magnetic sensors, and magnetic drug delivery. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 453 Organic Semiconductors (3)
The science and engineering of organic semiconductors and their use in electronic and photonic devices. methods for fabricating thin films and devices; relationship between chemical structure and molecular packing on proper┬Čties such as band gap, charge carrier mobility and luminescence efficiency; doping; field-effect transistors; light-emitting diodes; lasers; biosensors; photodetectors and photovoltaic cells. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 454 Analysis of Thin Films and Interfaces (3)
The science and technology of micro/nanoanalytical techniques, including Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA). Generic processes such as sputtering and high-vacuum generation. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 455 Nanoscale Polymer Science & Engineering (3)
Overview of engineering analysis and design techniques for nanoscale synthesis of polymers. Treatment of materials properties selection, mechanical characterization, and processing in design of load-bearing and environment-compatible structures. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 456 Nanoscale Interfacial Engineering (3)
The dynamic behavior of fluid interfaces. Concepts of interfacial stress, dynamic interfacial properties, and surfactant adsorption applied to surface tension driven flow, interfacial instabilities, the influence of surface-active agents on interfacial hydrodynamics. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 457 Modeling of Nanomaterials and Systems (3)
Introduction to modeling, analysis, and control of dynamic systems. Modeling of mechanical, electrical and electromechanical systems. Time-domain and Laplace-Transform solutions. Block diagrams and transfer functions. Analysis and design of feedback control systems. Control system representation and characteristics. System performance specifications. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

N ENG 490 Capstone Research II. Team Research and Project Review (3)
Second course in a 3-course series representing and original, substantive, team-based research project to introduce the student to professional-level Nanoscale Science and Engineering research. During this intermediate course the student will report progress of the CNSE research team in the designated project area focusing on the student's efforts and results. This 'project review' will conform to prevailing formats and reporting structures for profession-level industry or government-funded research to introduce the student to professional research management. Emphasis will be placed on implementation of the student's research plan and reporting of progress or challenges encountered. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of N ENG 304 and N ENG 390X.

N ENG 491 Capstone Research II. Team Research and Project Review (Honors) (3)
Second course in a 3-course series representing and original, substantive, team-based research project to introduce the student to professional-level Nanoscale Science and Engineering research for students in the Nanoengineering Honors Program. During this intermediate course the student will report progress of the CNSE research team in the designated project area focusing on the student’s efforts and results. This ‘project review’ will conform to prevailing formats and reporting structures for profession-level industry or government-funded research to introduce the student to professional research management. Emphasis will be placed on implementation of the student’s research plan and reporting of progress or challenges encountered. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of  N ENG 304 and N ENG 390X and admission to the Nanoengineering Honors Program.

N ENG 492W Capstone Research III. Team Research and Final Report (3)
Third course in a 3-course series representing and original, substantive, team-based research project to introduce the student to professional-level Nanoscale Engineering research. During this final course the student will provide a final report on the research project with an emphasis placed on achievement of the initial goals of the study as well as challenges encountered and lessons learned. N ENG 493W is the honors version of 492W; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): N ENG 490 or 491 (Honors) and permission of instructor.

N ENG 493W Capstone Research III. Team Research and Final Report (Honors) (3)
This course is the honors program version of N ENG 492W; the student will take on a more in-depth topic, and the research thesis produced will be presented publicly to the CNSE faculty and students. Third course in a 3-course series representing and original, substantive, team-based research project to introduce the student to professional-level Nanoscale Engineering research. During this final course the student will provide a final report on the research project with an emphasis placed on achievement of the initial goals of the study as well as challenges encountered and lessons learned. N ENG 493W is the honors version of 492W; Only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of CNSE Honors Director and satisfactory completion of N ENG 491.

N ENG 498 Current Topics in Nanoscale Science and Engineering (1-6)
Seminar course for upper-level undergraduate students. Students will receive individualized instruction regarding literature review on topics relevant to student's capstone research and concentration areas. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.