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Undergraduate Bulletin 2009-2010
 

Courses in Art History

A ARH 170 Survey of Art in the Western World I (3)
Survey of art from prehistoric times through the 14th century focusing on architecture, sculpture and painting of the ancient Near East and Europe.

A ARH 171 Survey of Art in the Western World II (3)
Survey of art from the 14th century to the present focusing on painting, sculpture and architecture of Europe and the Americas.

A ARH 207/207Z (= A CLA 207/207Z) Egyptian Archaeology (3)
A survey of the remains of ancient Egypt from the earliest times to the Roman Empire. The pyramids, temples, tombs, mummies and works of art will be examined in an attempt to understand the unique character of ancient Egypt. Selections from Egyptian religious and historical texts will be read in translation. Only one version of A ARH 207 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 208/208Z (= A CLA 208/208Z) Greek Archaeology (3)
Survey of the prehistoric and historical cultures of ancient Greece, as revealed by archaeology, from the Neolithic to the Hellenistic era, with emphasis on the evolution of pottery style, painting, sculpture and architecture. Only one version of A ARH 208 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 209 (= A CLA 209) Roman Archaeology (3)
Survey of the monuments of ancient Rome and her empire in a cultural and evolutionary context, including major works of sculpture, wall painting and architecture. Roman towns and principles of town planning also studied. Translated selections from Roman literary and historical sources.

A ARH 230 The Art of Medieval  Knighthood (3)
The art and culture of medieval European knighthood from its beginnings in mounted soldiers of the eleventh century to its role in elaborate tournaments and jousts of the sixteenth. Attention will be given to the social expression of the knightly class through visual and literary means. Objects of study will include architecture, sculpture, manuscript painting and ivory carvings. Literature will include chivalric epics, romances, and manuals of war. Among the topics to be addressed will be arms and armor, castles and manor houses, the arts of courtly love and the visual spectacle of chivalry.

A ARH 238 (= A FRE 238) Great Classics of French Cinema (3)
An introduction with detailed analyses to a dozen of the most well known French classic films as contributions to the art of cinema and as reflections of French society at various historical moments. Taught in English. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French. Only one of version of A ARH/A FRE 238 and A FRE 315 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 260 Introduction to Cinema (3)
Survey of the silent and sound classics of the cinema with emphasis on the changing conceptions of cinematographic form and content. Screenings of selected European and American films.

A ARH 261 Independent Cinema (3)
Introduction to the study of film as an artistic and social practice through an examination of the various genres of independent filmmaking pursued in the United States during the 20th and 21st centuries.

A ARH 263 American Film Genres (3)
This course will explore traditional American film genres, centering on the manner in which they were developed, and their evolution across the decades. Such elements as script structure, camera placement and movement, acting and directing styles, and color and widescreen processes will be examined. Genres to be explored include musicals, comedies, horror, science fiction, westerns, and melodrama. Subgenres such as the adult western, the screwball comedy, and the social comment film also will be analyzed.

A ARH 264 New American Cinema (3)
During the late 1960s and early 1970s, great social changes were occurring in the United States. These changes were sparked by the emerging youth culture, the progression of the Civil Rights Movement, opposition to the war in Vietnam, and the advent of the modern-era feminist movement. This course will explore the manner in which these changes impacted on the American cinema. Editing styles, camera placement, and camera movement veered from traditional film language; film content reflected youth alienation, the drug culture, and alternative lifestyles and politics.

A ARH 265 History of Photography (3)
A survey of photography from its invention in 1839 to recent trends. Emphasizes why it was developed, the major 19th century documentary and artistic uses, and the extraordinary range of 20th century explorations. An integrated approach tied to parallel social and artistic events.

A ARH 266 Photography 1970 to the Present (3)
A thorough survey of recent photography. Emphasizes fine art photography and the use of photography by artists working in other media, including documentary and photojournalistic work, photography books, mixed media and digital work. The materials for study are drawn from slide lectures, local exhibitions, contemporary criticism, library materials, and the media. No prior photography or art history required.

A ARH 267 European Film Movements (3)
This course will explore five European film movements, centering on the manner in which they developed and evolved and how each is a reflection of the cultural, economic, and political climate then existing in their respective countries. Movements to be explored include Revolutionary Experimental Soviet Cinema (covering the 1920s), Italian NeoRealism (1940s), British Kitchen-Sink Dramas (1950s-1960s), The French New Wave (1960s), and New German Cinema (1970s-1980s). Also spotlighted will be the manner in which these movements influenced, or were influenced by, the Hollywood motion picture. Film language and technique will be analyzed, with an emphasis on both narrative conventions and filmic structure.

A ARH 268 (= A ART 281) History and Practice of Video Art II (3)
This course is a continuation of Part I and will focus on the history of video art and the history of performance in video surveying the period between the late 1970s until the present. Screenings, readings, and studio exercises will be three equally important components in the course study. Students will be required to develop concepts for video artworks on a weekly basis. These artworks will be presented as a finished piece or a conceptual idea that will be presented, critiqued, and discussed during scheduled course hours. Students will also be required to write periodic short essays regarding required course readings. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 267 or A ART 280.

A ARH 280 (= A EAC 280) Chinese Painting (3)
Introduces students to the major works of traditional Chinese painting and analyzes those works to arrive at an understanding of life in traditional China. The major class activity will be viewing, discussing and analyzing slides of Chinese paintings. Only one version of A ARH 280 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 283  (= A ART 280) History and Practice of Video Art I (3)
This course will focus on the history of video art and the history of performance in video surveying the period between the late 1950s until the early 1970s. Screenings, readings, and studio exercises will be three equally important components in the course study. Students will be required to develop concepts for video artworks on a weekly basis. These artworks will be presented as a finished piece of a conceptual idea that will be presented, critiqued, and discussed during scheduled course hours. Students will also be required to write periodic short essays regarding required course readings. Prerequisite(s): A ART 250 or A ARH 171, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 298 Topics in Art History (3)
Introductory study of a special topic in Art History not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

A ARH 301 (= A CLA 301) Aegean Prehistory (3)
Archaeology of the Aegean area from Paleolithic times to the end of the Bronze Age, with emphasis on Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered in 2009-2010.

A ARH 302 (= A CLA 302) Villanovans, Etruscans, and Early Romans (3)
Archaeology of the Etruscans and of early Rome in the context of the Iron Age cultures of the Italian peninsula. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 209 or A CLC 134, or junior or senior standing. May not be offered in 2009-2010.

A ARH 303/303Z (= A CLA 303/303Z) Early Christian Art and Architecture (3)
This course examines the art and architecture serving Christian, Jewish, and Muslim communities in Europe and the Middle East from the second through the tenth century of the Common Era. Particular attention will be paid to those objects and monuments which articulate the common values and areas of tension among the adherents of all three religions. Only one version of A ARH 303 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 310 (= A ANT 336 & A CLA 310) Art and Archaeology of Cyprus I (3)
An examination or the material culture (art, archaeology, and architecture), settlement patterns and changing environmental setting of successive cultures of the east Mediterranean island of Cyprus from the first human occupation to the Roman period (10,000 B.C.E. to 50 B.C.E.) The island's role as a major point of contact between Near Eastern and Western Mediterranean civilizations will be emphasized. Only one version of A ARH 310 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 311 (= A ANT 337 & A CLA 311) Art and Archaeology of Cyprus II (3)
An examination of the material culture (art, archaeology, and architecture) and history of the island of Cyprus from the Roman period through its recently won independence in 1960 and up to the present. Byzantine church painting, Gothic ecclesiastical and military architecture, the Venetian preparations for an Ottoman invasion emphasize the significance of this Christian enclave in the Moslem east under Latin, Venetian, Ottoman, and British colonial rule. Finally, the strategic importance of Cyprus during the Cold War still continues to affect its history. Only one version of A ARH 311 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 331/331Z Monks, Monarchs, and Medieval Art: Europe 500-1100 C.E. (3)
An examination of European architecture, painting, sculpture and minor arts from the 6th to the 12th century. Course covers early Germanic and Celtic art, Carolingian and Ottonian periods. French. English, German, Italian Romanesque architecture and sculpture of the Pilgrimage route of Santiago, Monastic manuscript illumination, mural painting, objects in bronze and precious metals. Only one version of A ARH 331 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 332/332Z Gothic Art and Architecture (3)
Examines Gothic Art of the 13th and 14th centuries in France and its spread throughout Europe. Includes a study of religious and lay architecture (cathedrals, castles, town halls); cathedral sculpture; stained glass, murals and mosaics; manuscript illumination, painted altarpieces and art of precious metals. Only one version of A ARH 332 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 170 or 331, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 341 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture: 1250-1450 (3)
This course will focus on paintings, sculptures, and architectural structures produced in Italy between 1250 and 1450. We will focus on works produced in major centers like Florence and Milan, as well as those made in smaller cities like Siena and Padua. The course will stress the effects of historical, social, and political contexts on the production of images and structures. Topics to be covered include the influence of the mendicant orders, the effects of the Black Death, patronage, urbanism, the construction and decoration of churches and palaces, the influence of antiquity, courtly art and architecture, the role of gender in art, and the social status of the artist. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or 171, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 342 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture: 1450-1600 (3)
This course will focus on artistic and architectural monuments created in Italy between 1450 and 1600, a period that saw the development of the High Renaissance and the eventual emergence of the Mannerist style. We will focus on paintings, sculptures, architectural structures, and graphic work produced in major centers, including Florence, Venice, Rome, and Milan. Topics to be covered include the role of the patron, politics and art, the continuing influence of antiquity, sexuality and gender in imagery, and the evolving social position of the artist. Special attention will be paid to papal patronage and, naturally, the influence of the Protestant Reformation and the Counter-Reformation on art in Italy. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or 171, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 343 Northern European Art: 1350-1600 (3)
This course will focus on art created in northern Europe between 1350 and 1600. We will focus on paintings, sculptures, and graphic work produced in France, the Netherlands, and Germany. Topics to be covered include the meaning of realism, symbolism and the use of iconographic analysis, the development of the art market, artistic specialization, the function of images in religious and domestic contexts, the emergence of the self-conscious artist, and sexuality and gender in imagery. Attention will be paid to the influence of antiquity and the Italian Renaissance in the north. We will also examine the influence of the Protestant Reformation on images produced after 1517. Prerequisites: A ARH 170 or 171, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 350/350Z Art in the Courts of 17th Century Europe (3)
A study of the painting, sculpture and architecture  produced in Italy, France and Spain during the  17th century. Attention will focus on the religious,  political and ceremonial demands of the Catholic Church and the royal courts, as well as on the  careers of individual artists such as Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio, Poussin and Velasquez. Only one version of A ARH 350 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 351/351Z Netherlandish Painting in the Age of Rembrandt and Rubens (3)
An examination of the painting and graphic art produced in the Netherlands during the 17th century. In addition to studying artistic trends and individual artists such as Rembrandt and Rubens, students will explore the ways in which the art addressed the social needs and concerns of Dutch and Flemish audiences. Only one version of A ARH 351 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 352/352Z Art in the Era of Rococo and Enlightenment (3)
A study of painting, sculpture, architecture, garden design, graphic and decorative arts produced in Europe during the 18th century. Special emphasis will be placed upon the original context, use and significance of the art, as well as upon the association between artmaking and philosophical pursuits during this era of profound European change. Only one version of A ARH 352 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 361 European Screen Artists (3)
Study of the European cinema from the silent film era to recent years. Consideration is given both to the careers of prominent artists and to the social and economical context in which they worked. Directors to be examined include, among others, Sergei Eisenstein, Ingmar Bergman, Leni Riefenstahl, and Jean Renoir. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 362 Significant Cinema Directors (3)
Examination of the artistry and cultural significance of films by selected directors, such as Charles Chaplin, Stanley Kubrick, Dorothy Arzner, Ingmar Bergman, or Ousmane Sembene. American and/or international in scope. This course may be repeated for credit as the content varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 363 Art of American Silent Films (3)
Examination of the silent film in America, with an emphasis upon Hollywood. Topics to be addressed include: the studio and star systems; significant personalities; the writing of silent film; technological developments; and the various film genres, such as epics, comedies, and melodramas. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 364 The Hollywood Crime Film (3)
The Hollywood Crime Film will explore the crime film genre and its various sub-genres, spotlighting the manner in which they serve as mirrors of American society and focusing on both narrative conventions and filmic structure. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 365/365Z Modern Art I (3)
Survey of the first phase of Modernism, focusing on painting and sculpture in Europe and the USA from circa 1780–1880. Movements covered include Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism; artists include David, Goya, Manet, Cassatt. Only one version of A ARH 365 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 366/366Z Modern Art II (3)
Survey of Modern art from circa 1880–1945, focusing on painting and sculpture of Europe and the Americas. Movements covered include Post-impressionism, Cubism, German Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism; artists include Van Gogh, Picasso, Kollwitz, Duchamp, O’Keeffe, Douglas, Kahlo. Only one version of A ARH 366 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 367 The Hollywood Combat Film (3)
The Hollywood Combat Film will explore the contrasting manners in which war and war veterans have been portrayed on screen, with a focus on narrative conventions and filmic structure. The course will spotlight the First and Second World Wars and Vietnam. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 368 The Documentary Film (3)
Documentaries are factual films that portray actual events and real people. This course examines the history of the documentary film, spotlighting the different types of documentaries and how filmmakers have utilized them to educate, persuade, and entertain audiences. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 369 (= A ART 382) Experimental Film and Video (3)
This course is an introduction to the elements, structure, and history of experimental film and video art. Experimental film and video art share similarities in their fundamental historical development but adopt very different approaches in style, form, and media. This course will follow each development through screenings and discussions relating to film and video beginning in the 1920s to the present. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 or 267 or A ART 280.

A ARH 401 (= A CLA 401) Greek Sculpture (3)
Study of selected sculptural monuments from the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic eras, considered in relation to their historical, intellectual and religious context. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208.

A ARH 402 (= A CLA 402) Roman Sculpture (3)
Selected monuments representing the historical development of Roman sculpture in its social and religious context from the early Republic to the time of the emperor Constantine. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208 or 209 or A ARH 170.

A ARH 403 (= A CLA 403) Greek Painting (3)
A survey of ancient Greek painting from the beginnings about 1000 B.C. through the Hellenistic age; primarily painted vases, but also including the limited evidence that exists for wall painting and other forms. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208.

A ARH 405 (= A CLA 405) Greek Architecture (3)
The development of Greek monumental architecture from the earliest temples through the Hellenistic Age. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208.

A ARH 406  (= A CLA 406) Roman Architecture and Town Planning (3)
The development of Roman public and private architecture, with emphasis on its urban setting and function, and the evolution of Roman towns in Italy and the Empire from the early Republic to the time of the emperor Constantine. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208 or 209 or A ARH 170.

A ARH 432 Gothic Painting (3)
Study of the style and technique of stained glass, manuscript illumination, wall and panel painting in the 13th and 14th centuries, with emphasis on France and Italy. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 442 Early Painting of the Netherlands (3)
Study of northern Renaissance panel and manuscript painting from Jan van Eyck to Bruegel. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or A ARH 171, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 450W/450Y/450Z (= A FRE 460W/460Y/460Z) Art and Society in Early Modern France (3)
Seminar examining selected topics in art and architecture produced in France from the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. Special emphasis upon the cultural significance of art in an era that saw the rise and fall of monarchical power as well as dramatic changes in understandings of social hierarchy, gender, the natural world, and philosophy. Only one version of A ARH 450 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and at least nine credits of upper-level coursework in Art History or French Studies.

A ARH 460  Special Topics in Cinema (3)
In-depth study of selected topics in film not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 and 261.

A ARH 461 (= A WSS 461) Women in Cinema (3)
A multi-dimensional examination of women in cinema—as they are seen in films, as they make films, as they see films. Addresses the contributions of women through the first one hundred years of cinema and analyzes various genres. Women studied include: Dorothy Arzner, Marilyn Monroe, Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Anita Loos, Frances Marion, Ida Lupino, Verna Fields, Barbra Streisand, Lillian Gish, Lenore Coffee, and others. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 462 Research Seminar in Film Studies (3)
Seminar focusing on selected topics in film history research. Students will study various aspects of research in film history, including primary research investigation (the film itself and archival holdings), oral history, published research tools and other sources such as scholarly journal articles, trade journal information, film criticism, genre studies and biographies.  The focus of the coursework will be an individual research project. The course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Restricted to juniors and seniors; Art History major, Art History minor, or Film Studies minor; or permission of instructor. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260, 261, at least two Film Studies courses at the 300 or 400 level, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 466 Art Criticism of the Modern Period (3)
A study of the major European and American critics of 20th century art up to circa 1970. Student essays in criticism of actual artworks will emphasize understanding of historically significant critical perspectives, as well as the development of personal approaches to criticism. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171; junior or senior standing; permission of instructor.

A ARH 467/467Z Art Criticism of the Post-Modern Period (3)
Investigation of practice and theory of contemporary art criticism. Readings will concentrate on critics and writers from the 1970s to the present. In writing about works of art, students will practice basic critical skills of description, formal analysis, interpretation, and articulation of personal responses. Only one version of A ARH 467 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171; junior or senior standing; permission of instructor.

A ARH 468/468Z Art Since 1945 (3)
Survey and critical analysis of art from circa 1945 to the present. The course will cover directions in late Modernism and Post-modernism, including Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Feminist Art, Graffiti Art and Political Art. Only one version of A ARH 468 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 475/475Z (formerly A ARH 455; = A WSS 475/475Z) Women in Art (3)
Survey of women artists from 1550 to the present, including Artemesia Gentileschi, Elizabeth Vigee-Lebrun, Mary Cassatt, Alice Neel. The course also includes a feminist analysis of images of women since the Renaissance. Only one version of A ARH 475 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 480 (= A EAC 395) YŁan and Sung Painting (3)
A seminar on Chinese painting during the Sung and YŁan Dynasties (960-1368) with research into selected paintings. The course will combine a detailed survey of painting during this period with examination of selected topics such as the rise of literati painting, Court painting as government art, and painting as political expression during the Sung-YŁan transition. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 280 and permission of instructor.

A ARH 490/490Z Internship in Art History (3)
Supervised placement in an institution devoted to the collection, exhibition and/or conservation of works of art, such as the Albany Institute of History and Art or the State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical experience in working with original works of art and includes research and writing projects. Art History majors may use 3 credits toward course requirements above the 300 level. May be repeated for credit, with permission of supervising instructor. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 and 171. S/U graded.

A ARH 491 Internship in Film Studies (3)
Internship in the study of film or in film production. Students are responsible for finding and securing the internship with an organization or individual, subject to approval by the director of the Film Studies minor. May be repeated for credit. Three credits may be applied to upper level coursework in the Film Studies minor or the Art History major. Prerequisite(s): open only to juniors or seniors with a Film Studies minor or with at least six credits of film studies coursework, and an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. S/U graded.

A ARH 497 Independent Study (1–4)
Directed studio project in a selected art area. May be repeated with approval of department chair. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and department chair.

A ARH 498 Topics in Art History (3)
In-depth study of selected topics in art history not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 499Y Research Seminar in Art History (3)
Seminar focusing upon selected topics in art historical research. Students will study all aspects of research in art history, including the formulation of a topic; establishing the state of research on the topic; preparing an annotated bibliography and scholarly notes; and using library and web-based catalogues, databases, museum archives, image banks, and other research tools. The main focus of the coursework will be an individual research project. The course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and Art History major or minor, or permission of instructor.