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Undergraduate Bulletin 2008-2009
 

Globalization Studies Program

Faculty

Distinguished Professors
 Edna Acosta-Belén, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
  Columbia University
  LACS, Women’s Studies
 John W. Delano, Ph.D.
  State University of New York at Stony Brook
  Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
 Helmut V. B. Hirsch, Ph.D.
  Stanford University
  Biology
 Daniel C. Levy, Ph.D.,
  University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  Educational Administration and Policy Studies & LACS
 John S. Pipkin, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
  Northwestern University
  Geography and Planning

Professors
 Henryk Baran, Ph.D.
  Harvard University
  Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
 Christine Bose, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
  Johns Hopkins University
  Sociology, Women’s Studies, LACS
 Katharine Briar-Lawson, Ph.D.
  University of California, Berkeley
  School of Social Welfare
 Ray Bromley, Ph.D.
  Cambridge University
  Geography and Planning
 James Collins, Ph.D. 
  University of California, Berkeley
  Anthropology
 Timothy B. Gage, Ph.D.
   Pennsylvania State University
  Anthropology
 Helen T. Ghiradella, Ph.D.
  Biology
  University of California, Santa Barbara
 Robert W. Jarvenpa, Ph.D.
  University of Minnesota
  Anthropology
 Judith E. Johnson, B.A.
  Barnard College
  English, Women’s Studies
 Lawrence M. Schell, Ph.D.
  University of Pennsylvania
  Anthropology
 Christopher J. Smith, Ph.D.
  University of Michigan
  Geography and Planning

Associate Professors
 Donna Armstrong, Ph.D.
  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  Epidemiology
 Donald Birn, Ph.D.
  Columbia University
  History
 Eloise A. Brière, Ph.D.
  University of Toronto
  Languages, Literatures and Cultures
 Jean-François Brière, Ph.D.
  York University
   Languages, Literatures and Cultures
 Teresa Ebert, Ph.D.
   University of Minnesota
   English
 Glyne Griffith, Ph.D.
   University of the West Indies, Mona Campus
   English, LACS
 Gail H. Landsman, Ph.D.
  Catholic University of America
  Anthropology
 Andrei Lapenis, Ph.D.
  State Hydrological Institute, Saint Petersburg
  Geography and Planning
 Karyn A. Loscocco, Ph.D.
  Indiana University
  Sociology, Women’s Studies
 Vivien W. Ng, Ph.D.
   University of Hawaii
   Women’s Studies
 Gregory P. Nowell, Ph.D.
   Massachusetts Institute of Technology
   Political Science
 Holly Sims, Ph.D.
  University of California, Berkeley
  Public Administration
 Roger W. Stump, Ph.D.
  University of Kansas
  Geography and Planning
 Jogindar S. Uppal, Ph.D.
  University of Minnesota
  Economics
 Gilbert Valverde, Ph.D.
  University of Chicago
  Educational Administration and Policy Studies, LACS
 James W. Wessman, Ph.D.
  University of Connecticut
  LACS, Film Studies
 Lawrence S. Wittner, Ph.D.
  Columbia University
  History

Assistant Professors
 Bret Benjamin, Ph.D.
  University of Texas at Austin
  English
Jennifer Burrell, Ph.D.
  University of Illinois
  Anthropology
Virginia Eubanks, Ph.D.
 Rensselaer Poly Institute University
 Women’s Studies
Susan M. Gauss, Ph.D.
 SUNY at Stony Brook
 History, LACS
Janell C. Hobson, Ph.D.
 Emory University
 Women’s Studies
Youqin Huang, Ph.D.
  University of California, Los Angeles
  Geography and Planning
 Catherine T. Lawson, Ph.D.
  Portland State University
  Geography and Planning
 Fernando Leiva, Ph.D.
  Coordinator of Globalization Studies
  University of Massachusetts at Amherst
  LACS
 David A Lewis, Ph.D.
  Rutgers University
  Geography and Planning 
 Walter E. Little, Ph.D.
  University of Illinois
  Anthropology
 Patricia Pinho, Ph.D.
  State University of Campinas Sao Paulo
  LACS
 Charles P. Rougle, Ph.D.
  University of Stockholm
  Languages, Literatures and Cultures
 Jennifer M. Rudolph, Ph.D.
  University of Washington
  History

Lecturers
 Richard Collier, M.A.
  University at Albany
  Institutional Research
 Maria Keyes, M.A.
  State University of New York at Albany
  Languages, Literatures and Cultures
 Raghuvir J Mody, Ph.D.
  University of Minnesota
  Economics


Characteristics of the Globalization Studies Major
It aims at helping students gain a systematic awareness of the global forces and processes that shape our lives, and why we need to engage new ways of acquiring and applying knowledge so as to be more effective in the rapidly changing world of the 21st century.

It is designed to give students one of two different options for pursuing a major: A combined major and minor program requiring a minimum of 54 and/or maximum of 60 credits (depending on level of foreign language proficiency the student brings; see Degree Requirements).
The combined major/minor in Globalization Studies uniquely brings together training in multidisciplinary/transnational/comparative perspectives with a student’s particular area of thematic and geographic concentration, preparing students for more specialized careers and professional pursuits.

A second option is the regular 36-credit major. This alternative is similar to the one above, except for requiring less credits (15 rather than 21 credits) in the thematic concentration area, and not having a Geographic concentration requirement. However, students still have the flexibility to develop a regional focus (see Degree Requirements for the Major in Globalization Studies).

The curriculum for the major combines a richly diverse interdisciplinary program with opportunities to develop knowledge and expertise in a series of thematic concentration areas that will prepare students to address the intellectual, professional, and personal challenges of global society. These include: 1) Global Flows, Local Changes; 2) Power Relations, Governance, and Equity; 3) Cultures and Identities; 4) Global Environment, Local Access to Resources, and Social Ecology.

This set of set of thematic concentrations give the major a qualitatively unique and innovative character. 

The structure of the major allows for the inclusion of the perspectives of the social sciences, humanities, the natural sciences, and the professional fields; and encourages discussion, critical thinking, and engaged and applied learning through coursework, fieldwork, study-abroad, internships, and/or community service.
 
The major strives to prepare well-rounded individuals who are able to contribute to society benefiting from multi- and interdisciplinary approaches and methods. It does not attempt to replace disciplinary perspectives but engages each discipline to contribute to an understanding of complex current issues embedded in globalization processes.

The major combines flexibility and rigor, enabling students to design, in consultation with faculty, their own path of study within a broad yet coherent set of concentrations. Through careful advisement of each student, a custom-tailored major can be developed to serve an individual student’s interests and goals, including disciplinary and geographic preferences.

Globalization Studies promotes greater synergy across the College of Arts and Sciences and the entire University by drawing on existing courses, resources, and a closer collaboration across departments, disciplines, and among faculty.

As currently structured, the major depends on effective student advisement and the coordination of faculty efforts across departmental boundaries, both of which are to be the responsibility of a Director of the Globalization Studies who will engage the collaboration of members of the Resource Faculty.


Thematic Concentrations

Global Flows, Local Changes
: This concentration will study both the causes and consequences of the intensifying flows of goods, people, money, forms of capital, symbols, ideologies, information, and viruses across borders. It will also address development programs, transportation technologies, telecommunications, and forms of reorganization of production, distribution, and consumption. The students will be able to examine the multifaceted processes of the deterritorialization/re-territorialization of socioeconomic, political, and cultural spaces, as well as issues pertaining to social mobility and stratification in relation to the expansion of such flows. Courses in this concentration will include international political economy, international relations, international migration, transnationalism, economics, business, and finance, and social reproduction.

Power Relations, Governance, and Equity: This concentration will deepen a student’s understanding of how globalization transforms power relations among regions, countries, social classes, genders, ethnicities, racial groups, and other relevant social categories. It addresses issues of hegemony and subordination among nations and peoples, new forms of social organization, participation, and resistance within civil society, and the role of the State, non-state actors (e.g., social movements, non-governmental organizations) in transforming society. This concentration encompasses courses on the changing nature of power and power relations in a globalized world including international relations and public policies; the emergence of supranational governance systems and the role of the State; transformations in the systems of representation, political demand making, and policy formulation; and the emergence of transnational civil society. It studies newly emerging forms of State, market, and network–based social coordination, and their impact on the scope and quality of democracy, equity, and participation in all aspects of social life.
 
Cultures and Identities: This concentration explores changes in the forms of consciousness, identity construction, collective action, and cultural expression engendered by globalization’s processes of deterritorialization and re-territorialization.  It addresses debates on cultural homogenization/heterogeneity/hybridity accompanying the development of global media or cultural industry conglomerates. Students choosing this concentration take courses in literature, art, film, popular culture, the performing arts, and communication. Other course areas include the development of cultural expressions among different groups or regions of the world (e.g. Africans, African-Americans, Latin Americans, Caribbean peoples, U.S. Latinos, Asians, Middle Easterners, Europeans, North Americans), as well as other relevant courses in cultural studies, cultural anthropology, sociology of culture, history and dissemination of ideas, and feminist, postmodern, and postcolonial theories.

Global Environment, Local Access to Resources, and Social Ecology: This concentration examines how globalization processes interact and affect basic human values such as living a complete, healthy, fulfilling life, including control over one’s destiny, opportunities to develop and express one’s particular skills and abilities. Also explored are issues related to the sense of close family and community ties; and connectedness to culture, land, and the natural world. This concentration also seeks to understand how changing access to land and other resources transforms the livelihoods, structures, survival strategies, and composition of families and communities throughout the world. It includes courses that examine the access, use, and control over land and other natural resources; transformations in property rights regimes, as they expand to include intellectual property, culture, life forms, and previously commonly owned resources like water. Students choosing this concentration will also explore distribution, adaptation, and evolution of living organisms, global climate change, biodiversity, social ecology, and environmental-centered conflicts and public policies linked to globalization. Included here are also issues such as global warming, famine, nutrition, and health.

Alternative Conceptualizations and Visions: The major will promote alternative conceptions and policy proposals for influencing the processes through which globalization transforms the economy, social relations, political systems, democratic life, cultural production, and our own relations to other countries and the environment. The major’s pedagogical approach is to promote active, participatory, and engaged learning. The crowning educational experience of the major will be a required practicum whereby students will become active learners either in doing fieldwork in the United States or abroad, enrolling in study abroad programs, and/or participating in service internships in public, private, and civil society entities addressing relevant issues of globalization. These experiences are aimed at encouraging students to reflect on the modes through which knowledge is currently produced, validated, and disseminated.

Major Requirements

Students may choose a combined major/minor or a stand alone major in Globalization Studies. These options are described below.

Degree Requirements for the 54-60-credit Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary Combined Major and Minor in Globalization Studies

General Program B.A.: The combined major and minor in Globalization Studies requires a minimum of 54 credits or a maximum of 60 credits (depending on satisfaction of language requirements) distributed as described below.

Major Core Courses (6 credits)
A Glo 103 (Cas 103) Perspectives on Globalization (3)
A Glo 203 Theoretical Perspectives on Globalization (3)
The core sequence serves as the backbone of the major, providing coherence and linking the diverse and complex themes covered. Each student in the major, regardless of concentration or orientation towards the social sciences, humanities, or natural sciences, is afforded this common experience and a common space for joint reflection in the freshman, sophomore, and junior years. The A Glo 203 requirement may also be met by a course chosen from a designated list of 3 to 5 possible courses.
Other Major Course Requirements: 15 credits as follows:

  1. Methodology Requirement (3 credits)
    One methods course, approved by the major adviser, should be taken in support of the student’s field of concentration from a list of options provided by participating departments. As the major matures, we will develop a third required course, as a single methods requirement for all globalization majors.
  2. Information Literacy Requirement (3 credits)
    One course approved by the student’s adviser to ensure the student can effectively use information technologies to successfully complete course work.
  3. Practicum (6 credits)
    The practicum six-credit requirement includes a study abroad experience or an internship in a relevant institution or organization, and will normally be completed in the junior or senior year. The practicum should be linked in some fashion to the student’s area of concentration and must be approved by the student’s adviser and Director of the Globalization Studies major. In addition, practicum students are required to participate in a web-based, faculty-moderated colloquium and produce a web-based journal/blog reflecting on their experience and understanding the issues discussed. This course will initially be UNI 390 and, once there are sufficient majors, a new course will replace it.
    Note: Since many internships and study abroad programs yield more than six credits, some or all of the additional credits may, with permission of the Director and student’s adviser, be applied to the major.
  4. A Glo 403 Senior Essay (3 credits)
    An extensive research project, which may be based on the practicum experience and incorporate elements of the web-based blog created during that experience. The essay should constitute some substantial and original critical or scholarly argument on a topic relevant to the student’s area of concentration. The student’s adviser should approve the topic and an outline beforehand. The essay should be between 35-50 pages long and demonstrate the student’s grasp of multi-disciplinary approaches and of new ways of acquiring and applying knowledge.

Major Thematic Concentration (21 Credits)
Each student works with an assigned faculty adviser in the program to develop an individualized and coherent area of concentration equivalent to a minor. Typically the concentration relates to the student’s thematic area, regional and disciplinary interests, and appropriate methodology course requirements (see #1-4 above). It may also relate to the student’s second major (if the student has one), and the student’s future career objectives.
Although the Globalization Studies major encourages students to choose from the four pre-designed thematic concentrations, students may also work with their faculty adviser to select the most appropriate courses for their concentration and special academic and career interests.

Geographic Region Requirement (12 credits)
A minimum of 12 credits relating to a specific geographical region or regions (Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, the Middle East, the United States) is required.

Foreign Language Requirement (0-6 credits)
To graduate with a major in Globalization Studies, a student must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at least equivalent to the intermediate level of the language. This requirement may be met by satisfactory completion of intermediate (or higher level) courses in the language or by demonstrated proficiency through an exam or other approved means.
Note: With approval of the major adviser, some foreign language courses at the intermediate level or above may be applied to the “Geographical Region” requirement or elsewhere in the major, if appropriate
.

Degree Requirements for the 36-credit Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major in Globalization Studies

General Program B.A.: The faculty-initiated interdisciplinary major in Globalization Studies requires a minimum of 36 credits distributed as described below.
Major Core Courses (6 credits)
A Glo 103 (CAS 103) Perspectives on Globalization (3)
A Glo 203 Theoretical Perspectives on Globalization (3)
The core sequence serves as the backbone of the major, providing coherence and linking the diverse and complex themes covered. Each student in the major, regardless of concentration or orientation towards the social sciences, humanities, or natural sciences, is afforded this common experience and a common space for joint reflection in the freshman, sophomore, and junior years. The A Glo 203 requirement may also be met by a course chosen from a designated list of 3 to 5 possible courses.
Other Major Course Requirements: 15 credits of the following:

  1. Methodology Requirement (3 credits)
    One methods course, approved by the major adviser, should be taken in support of the student’s field of concentration from a list of options provided by participating departments. As the major matures, we will develop a third required course, as a single methods requirement for all globalization majors.
  2. Information Literacy Requirement (3 credits)
    One course approved by the student’s adviser to ensure the student can effectively use information technologies to successfully complete course work.
  3. Practicum (6 credits)
    The practicum six-credit requirement includes a study abroad experience or an internship in a relevant institution or organization, and will normally be completed in the junior or senior year. The practicum should be linked in some fashion to the student’s area of concentration and must be approved by the student’s adviser and Director of Globalization Studies. In addition, practicum students are required to participate in a web-based, faculty-moderated colloquium and produce a web-based journal/blog reflecting on their experience and understanding of the issues discussed. This course will initially be UNI 390 and, once there are sufficient majors, a new course will replace it.
    Note: Since many internships and study abroad programs yield more than six credits, some or all of the additional credits may, with permission of the Director and student’s adviser, be applied to the major.
  4. A Glo 403 Senior Essay (3 credits)
    An extensive research project, which may be based on the practicum experience and incorporate elements of the web-based blog created during that experience. The essay should constitute some substantial and original critical or scholarly argument on a topic relevant to the student’s area of concentration. The student’s adviser should approve the topic and an outline beforehand. The essay should be between 35-50 pages long and demonstrate the student’s grasp of multi-disciplinary approaches and of new ways of acquiring and applying knowledge.

Major Thematic Concentration (15 credits)
Each student works with an assigned faculty adviser in the program to develop an individualized and coherent area of concentration. Typically the concentration relates to the student’s thematic area, geographical region, disciplinary interests, and appropriate methodology course requirements (see above). It may also relate to the student’s second major (if the student has one), and the student’s future career objectives.
Although the Globalization Studies major encourages students to choose from the four pre-designed thematic concentrations, students may also work with their faculty adviser to select the most appropriate courses for their concentration and special academic and career interests.

Foreign Language Requirement (0-6 credits)
In order to graduate with a major in Globalization Studies, a student must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at least equivalent to the intermediate level of the language. This requirement may be met by satisfactory completion of intermediate (or higher level) courses in the language or by demonstrated proficiency through an exam or other approved means.
Note: With approval of the major adviser, some foreign language courses at the intermediate level or above may be applied elsewhere in the major, if appropriate.

Supporting Courses By Thematic Area
This course information has been provided by the departments. Other courses will be added as they become available.
It should be noted that a student’s course work will depend on the particular thematic and/or discipline-based concentration chosen. As such, students will follow a wide variety of different paths to complete the major, according to their inclination and career objectives.  The courses listed below, therefore, represent those identified by departments as relevant to the Globalization Studies major, as well as illustrate what is currently possible.

Courses in Global Flows, Local Changes
A Ant 119 City & Human Health
A Eco 110 Principles:Microeconomics
A Eco 111 Principles: Macroeconomics
A Eco 130 The Third World Economies
A Eco 330 Economics of Development
A Eco 360 International Economic Relations
A Eco 371 Distribution of Income and Wealth
A Eco 445 International Trade
A Eco 446 International Finance
A Gog 160 China in the Post-Utopian Age
A Gog 180 Asian America
A Gog 225 World Cities
A Gog 240 Patterns of American Immigration
A Gog 250 Geography of Latin America
A Gog 270 Geography of Africa
A Gog 344 World Populations
A Gog 345 Economic Geography
A Gog 350 Urban Development in China
A Gog 470 China After Xiaoping
A His 158 The World in the 20th Century
A His (Aas) 287 Africa in the Modern World
A His ((Aas) 286 African Civilizations
A Lcs (His) 451 Gender and Class in Latin American Development
A Lcs 225 Global Migration and Transnationalism
A Lcs 358 Globalization and Culture in the Americas
A Lcs 359 Workers and Globalization in the Americas
A Lcs/Eco 361 Development of the Latin American Economy
A Lcs 405 Caribbean Migration
A Wss 303 Popular Technology: Activism and Advocacy
A Wss 308 (Soc 309) Global Perspectives on Women

Courses in Power Relations, Governance, and Equity
A Ant 140 Anthropological Survey of World Cultures
A Ant 361 Anthropology and Public Policy
A Ant 372 Urban Anthropology
A Gog 310 World Food Crisis
A Gog 328 Gender, Space, and Place
A Gog 440 Political Geography
A Gog 447 Geography of Development and Underdevelopment
A His 344 Europe 1914-1945
A His 345 Europe since WWII
A His (Lcs) 369 Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies since 1810
A His (Lcs) 371 South America since 1810
A His (Eas) 458 New Orders in Asia
A Lcs (Pos) 349 Urban Politics in Latin America
A Lcs (Pos) 357 Latin American and Caribbean Politics
A Lcs  375 (Pos 324) Latino Politics in the U.S.
A Pln 320 International Urban Planning
A Pln  430 Environmental Planning
A Wss 360 Feminist Planning and Political Thought

Courses in Cultures and Identities
A Ant 172 Community and Self
A Eng 222 World Literature
A Eng 243 Literature and Film
A Eng 362 Critical Approaches to Gender and Sexuality
A Eng 366 Critical Approaches to Ethnicity and Literature
A Eng 372 Transnational Literature
A Eng 373 Literature of the Americas
A Eng 374 Cultural Studies
A Eng 385 Topics in Cultural Studies
A Eng 410 Topics in Contemporary Literary and Critical Studies
A Eng 416 Gender, Sexuality, Race, or Class
A Eng 447 The Historical Imagination
A Eng 449 Topic in Comparative Literatures & Cultures
A Eng 460 Topics in Transnational Studies
A Eng 465 Topics in Ethnic Literatures
A Eng 485 Topics in Cultural Studies
A Fre 208  Haiti through Film and Literature
A Fre 218  Contemporary France
A Fre 238  Great Classics of French Cinema
A Fre 338  French Cinema and Society
A Fre 341  Introduction to Global French Studies
A Fre 355 Contemporary French Society
A Fre 360 Social and Cultural History of France
A Gog 202  Place, Space, and Landscape
A Gog 180 Asian America
A Gog 225 World Cities
A Gog 321 Exploring the Multicultural City
A Gog 356 Geography of the United States
A Gog 442 Cultural Geography
A His (Eas)177 Cultures and Societies of Asia
A Ita 213 The Italian American Experience
A Ita 318 Italian Cinema
A Ita 414 Contemporary Italian Society
A Lcs (His)100 Cultures of Latin America
A Lcs (His)102 Introduction to Caribbean History
A Lcs (Ant) 150 Puerto Rico: People, History, and Culture
A Lcs 201 Hispanic Cultures in the U.S.
A Lcs 203 Introduction to Afro-Latin America
A Lcs 103 Introduction to Afro-Brazilian Culture
A Lcs 216 Music and Society in Latin America
A Lcs (Aas, Ant) 269 The Caribbean: People, History, and Culture
A Lcs (Spn) 302 Los Latinos en EE.UU
A Lcs 315 Latin American and Caribbean Film
A Lcs(Spn) 317 Latin American Civilization
A Lcs 330 Globalization and Culture in the Americas
A Lcs 410 Tourism, Cultures, and Identities
A Rus 161 Russian Civilization
A Rus 162 Russia Today
A Wss 281 Women and the Media
A Wss (His)357 Chinese Women and Modernity
A Wss 412 Race, Gender, and Cultural Politics in Asia
A Wss (Eas) 270 Women in East Asian Literature

Courses in Global Environment, Local Access to Resources, and Social Ecology
A Aas 150 Life in the Third World
A Ant 355 Environment, Economy and Culture
A Ant 365 (Wss 365) The Anthropology of New Reproductive Technologies
A Ant 414 Anthropology and Demography
A Atm 100 The Atmosphere
A Atm 102  Science and Major Environmental Issues
A Atm 107 The Oceans
A Bio 320 Ecology
A Bio 450 Biodiversity
A Eco 385 Environmental Economics
A Geo (Gog) 201 Environmental Analysis
A Geo 450 Climate Change (4)
A Gog 304 Climatology
A Gog 310 (Bio 311N and U Uni 310) World Food Crisis
A Gog 344 World Populations
A Gog (Lcs) 354 Environment & Development
A Gog 431 Climatic Change
A Gog 480 Advanced Urban Geography
A Lcs 420 Latinos and Health Issues
A Pln (Wss) 328 Gender, Space, and Place
A Pln 330 Principles of Environmental Management
A Pln 456 Geographic Information Systems
A Pos (Pub) 396 Energy Policy, Domestic and International (3)
A Wss 109 Women, Biology, and Health
A Wss 309 Activism and Health
A Wss 430 Environmental Justice: Racism, Classism, Sexism

Courses with a Globalization Focus
A Cas 103 Perspectives on Globalization
A Fre 341 Introduction to Global French Studies
A Eng 385 Globalization and Culture
A Lcs (Soc) 223 Global Migration and Transnationalism
A Lcs 358 Globalization and Culture in the Americas
A Lcs 359 Workers and Globalization in the Americas
A Wss 308 (Soc 309) Global Perspectives on Gender