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Undergraduate Bulletin 2007-2008
 
Bulletin Homepage |College of Arts & Sciences | Courses

Courses in Chemistry

A Chm 100 Chemical ABCs: Atoms, Bonds, and Citizen Consumers (3)

Introduction to chemistry emphasizing its applications to problems in modern society, consumer goods, and life-related topics. Lecture and demonstration only. Does not yield credit toward the major or minor in chemistry.[NS]

A Chm 120 General Chemistry I (3)

Atomic theory, quantitative relationships in chemical change, electronic structure of atoms and chemical periodicity, chemical bonding, and states of matter. [NS]

A Chm 121 General Chemistry II (3)

Elementary principles of chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics; electrochemistry; descriptive chemistry of the elements and their compounds. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 120 or 130. [NS]

A Chm 124 (Previously A Chm 122A) General Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

Introduction to laboratory techniques, experiments demonstrating chemical principles in General Chemistry I, including stoichiometry, calorimetry, and properties of some elements and compounds. Co-requisite or Prerequisite(s): A Chm 120 or 130.

A Chm 125 (Previously A Chm 122B) General Chemistry Laboratory II (1)

Application of laboratory techniques, experiments demonstrating chemical principles of General Chemistry II, including solution properties, kinetics, equilibrium, and qualitative analysis of some anions and cations. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 124; co-requisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Chm 121 or 131.

A Chm 126 (Previously A Chm 123A) Problem Solving: General Chemistry I (1)

Applications of the principles and methods studied in General Chemistry I. Assignments selected from the subject matter of General Chemistry I are aimed at aiding the student to develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Co-requisite(s): A Chm 120.

A Chm 127 (Previously A Chm 123B) ) Problem Solving: General Chemistry II  (1)

Applications of the principles and methods studied in General Chemistry II. Assignments selected from the subject matter of General Chemistry II are aimed at aiding the student to develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Co-requisite(s): A Chm 121.

A Chm 130  Advanced General Chemistry I (3)

Energy, enthalpy, thermochemistry, quantum mechanics and atomic theory, general concepts of bonding, covalent bonding and orbitals, gases, liquids, and solids. Students will be introduced to faculty research within the Department of Chemistry, as well as interdisciplinary areas.  Only one of A Chm 120 and A Chm 130 may be taken for credit.

A Chm 131 Advanced General Chemistry II (3)

Chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, spontaneity, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, transition metals, coordination chemistry, organic and biochemical molecules. Only one of A Chm 121 and A Chm 131 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 130.

 

A Chm 133 (Previously A Chm 133A) Problem Solving: Chemical Principles I (1)

Discussions and applications of the principles and methods studied in Chemical Principles. Assignments selected from the subject matter of Chemical Principles are aimed at helping the student develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Co-requisite: A Chm 130, and S/U graded.

A Chm 134 (Previously A Chm 133B) Problem Solving: Chemical Principles II (1)

Discussions and applications of the principles and methods studied in Chemical Principles. Assignments selected from the subject matter of Chemical Principles are aimed at helping the student develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Co-requisite: A Chm 131. S/U graded.

A Chm 143 Pre-organic Chemistry (1)

The course provides a background and review of those topics necessary for success in organic chemistry. Topics may include bonding, Lewis acid/bases, hybridization, electronegativity, polarizability, 3-D structures, energy profile diagrams, oxidation states, and reaction mechanisms. Carbon containing compounds will be emphasized. Prerequisite: A Chm 120; prerequisite or co-requisite: A Chm 121.

A Chm 220 (Previously A Chm 216A) Organic Chemistry I (3)

Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principal classes of organic compounds, stressing the underlying principles of reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry techniques. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121 or 131 and A Chm 125.

A Chm 221 (Previously A Chm 216B) Organic Chemistry II (3)

Introduction to spectroscopic characteristics or organic compounds; continued classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules; chemistry of carbonyl compounds; aspects of aromatic chemistry, heterocycles, nitrogen compounds, polymers, and biologically important molecules. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 220.

A Chm 222 (Previously A Chm 217A) Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1)

Basic techniques of organic chemistry including extraction, crystallization, distillation, and chromatography; physical properties of compounds. Co-requisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Chm 220.

A Chm 223 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (Previously A Chm 217B) (1)

Application of basic techniques of organic chemistry to the synthesis and qualitative analysis of organic compounds. Applications of IR and NMR spectroscopy. Prerequisite: A Chm 222. Co-requisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Chm 221.

A Chm 225 Quantitative Analysis (3)

Theory of quantitative analysis based on modern chemical principles. Practical application to typical gravimetric, volumetric, and colorimetric analysis. Two class periods, one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121 or 131 and A Chm 125.

A Chm 307 (= Atm 307) Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry (3)

Chemical principles and concepts leading to understanding the composition and change in the chemical/atmospheric environment; sources and sinks of chemical constituents; chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere; measurement and theory; greenhouse gases; global pollution and ozone depletion. A Atm 307Z is the writing intensive version of A Atm 307 and A Chm 307; only one may be taken for credit. Does not yield credit toward the major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A Mat 113 or 119; A Phy150; and A Chm 121 or 131.

A Chm 320 Introduction to Physical Chemistry (3)

Behavior of gases chemical thermodynamics (including solution equilibria, phase equilibria and electrochemistry), dynamics of chemical reactions (reactions, mechanisms, theory) and fundamentals of quantum chemistry with focus on chemical bonding, molecular structure and spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121 or 131; co-requisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Mat 113 or 119 and A Phy 108. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. major in chemistry.

A Chm 321 Introduction to Experimental Physical Chemistry (1)

Experimental illustration of physical principles and introduction to instrumentation. Techniques of physical measurements, treatment of experimental data and generalization of results to illustrate the fundamental principles. Co-requisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Chm 320. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. major in chemistry.

A Chm 342 Biological Chemistry (3)

The chemistry and biochemical interrelationship of carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; enzyme catalysis and introduction to metabolism. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 215or 221. May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Chm 343 Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory (1)

Experiments illustrating the fundamentals of biochemistry as discussed in A Chm 342. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 222; co-requisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Chm 342. .May not be offered in 2006-2007.

A Chm 350 (Previously A Chm 340A) Physical Chemistry I (3)

Mathematical description of physiochemical systems and their interpretation in terms of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, reaction rates and statistical mechanics. Atomic and molecular structure from the viewpoint of quantum theory with special emphasis on bonding and spectra. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 221, A Mat 214; A Phy 150.

A Chm 351 (Previously A Chm 340B) Physical Chemistry II (3)

A continuation of A Chm 350. The course contains the principles of Chemical Kinetics, Quantum Theory and Spectroscopy. Topics include the rate laws, systems displaying complex kinetics, enzyme catalysis, Atomic Structure, Molecular Structure, Microwave, Raman, Infrared and Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy, and Statistical Mechanics. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 350 or consent of instructor.

A Chm 352Z (Previously A Chm 341Z) Physical Chemistry Lab (3)

The experimental understanding of the basic principles of physical chemistry and development of familiarity with instrumentation. Includes experiments on the electrical properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, microcalorimetry and computer experiments in molecular orbital theory. The course also includes instruction on searching the chemical literature, data processing, and writing laboratory reports. One lecture and two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 225. Co-requisite or prerequisite: A Chm 350.

A Chm 411 (Previously A Chm 411A) Computer Applications in Chemistry I (3)

Introduction to the language of BASIC and the use of microcomputing in chemistry. The topics included in the course are the Windows Operating System, numerical methods associated with chemical computations, and instruction in the use of PC-based applications programs. These applications consist of general utility (productivity) programs, chemical structure drawing programs, molecular viewing and molecular modeling programs and quantum chemistry programs. Also included in the course is an introduction to Combinatorial Chemistry and Bioinformatics. Prerequisite(s) or co-requisite(s): A Chm 320 or 350 or permission of instructor.

A Chm 412 (Previously A Chm 411B) Computer Applications in Chemistry II (3)

Introduction to the language of Fortran and the use of mainframe and microcomputing in chemistry. The topics included in the course are the UNIX Operating System, numerical methods associated with chemical computations, and instruction in the use of mainframe and PC-based applications programs. These applications consist of molecular modeling programs, molecular dynamics programs, and quantum, chemistry programs. Also included in the course is an introduction to Hartree-Fock theory, Density Functional Theory, Quantitative Structure Activity Relations (QSAR), Rational Drug design, statistical methods in drug design, Combinatorial Chemistry and Bioinformatics. Prerequisite(s) or Co-requisite(s): A Chm 320 or 350 or consent of instructor.

A Chm 417 Advanced Synthesis Laboratory (2)

Experimental investigation of advanced syntheses of organic and inorganic compounds including their separation and analysis. The development of skills and understanding for the application of complex procedures and methods common in current practice. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 221.

A Chm 420 (Previously A Chm 420A) Inorganic Chemistry I (3)

Bonding and reactivity in inorganic systems, including metal complexes and covalent molecules. Applications of crystal field theory and introductory molecular orbital theory to coordination compounds, including group theory and symmetry, the spectrochemical series, and substitution mechanisms. Metal carbonyl complexes and an introduction to organometallic compounds and their reactions. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 320 or 351.

A Chm 421 (Previously A Chm 420B) Inorganic Chemistry II (3)

Topics in advanced inorganic chemistry, including organometallic chemistry, catalysis, and bioorganic chemistry. Other selected topics may include solid-state chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, electron-transfer, applications of vibrational and electronic spectroscopies, and the chemistry of the main-group elements. Prerequisite(s): ): A Chm 420.

A Chm 424 Retrieval and Presentation of Chemical Information (1)

Instruction and practice in modern methods of searching the chemical literature. Students are required to develop their skills in preparing written presentations and speeches. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. S/U graded.

A Chm 425 Introduction to Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (2)

Original experimental and theoretical research problems A printed or typewritten final report is required. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. May not be repeated for credit. Not more than 3 credits of A Chm 425 and/or A Chm 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor. Co-requisite(s) or prerequisite: A Chm 424. S/U graded.

A Chm 426 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (3)

Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. May be repeated for credit but not more than 3 credits of A Chm 425 and/or A Chm 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor. Co-requisite(s) or prerequisite: A Chm 424.

A Chm 427 (Previously A Chm 426T) Honors Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (4)

Original experimental and theoretical research problems in chemistry with the results reported in a written Honors Thesis, as well as a public Department Seminar.

A Chm 430 Instrumental Analysis (3)

Theoretical principles and chemical applications of selected methods of instrumental analysis. Main emphasis is on electroanalytical methods including polarography, conductance, potentiometry, and coulometric methods, and on trace methods of analysis such as spectrograph emission, flame emission, atomic absorption, and fluorometric analysis. Two class periods, one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 225; prerequisite(s) or co-requisite(s): A Chm 320 or 351 or permission of the instructor.

A Chm 436 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)

Organic chemistry at an advanced level, including introduction of theoretical background and application in synthesis. Prerequisite(s) or co-requisite(s): A Chm 320 or 351.

A Chm 442 (Previously A Chm 440A) Comprehensive Biochemistry I (3)

Chemical characteristics of living matter, amino acids, polypeptides and proteins, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics; bioenergetics and chemistry of metabolism. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 221 or permission of instructor.

A Chm 443 (Previously A Chm 440B) Comprehensive Biochemistry II (3)

Biosynthesis, storage, and expression of genetic information; electron transport and other transports across membranes, membrane protein structure and function. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 221 or permission of instructor.

A Chm 444 (Previously A Chm 441A) Physical Chemistry for Biochemical Sciences I (3)

Foundations of the physical principles and their application to biochemical systems. Topics include: first and second laws of thermodynamics, application of these to chemical reactions and equilibria, and molecular motion and transport phenomena. Does not yield credit toward any B.S. major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121 or 131, A Phy150, and A Mat 113 or 119 (A Chm 220 or 221, and A Chm 342 or A Bio 365 recommended).

A Chm 445 (Previously A Chm 441B) Physical Chemistry for Biochemical Sciences II (3)

Foundations of the physical principles and their application to biochemical systems. Topics include: transport phenomena and sedimentation and electrophoresis, chemical and biochemical kinetics, chemical quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy. Does not yield credit toward any B.S. major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 444.

A Chm 446 Chemical Biology Laboratory (2)

The lab will provide the basics for protein purification, protein characterization, and DNA manipulation through the use of chromatographic, electrophoretic, and spectroscopic tools of biochemistry and biophysics. Prerqeqisite(s): A Chm 221 and A Chm 223. Pre-or co-requisites: A Chm 350, A Chm 442, A Chm 443.

A Chm 450 Previously A Chm 450A) Forensic Chemistry I ( (3)

This introductory course combines a series of seminars, lectures, and laboratories which focus on current topics and analytical methods utilized in today’s modern forensic laboratories. Seminars in Forensic Chemistry will include topics such as: Introduction to Criminalistics, Ethical Dilemmas, and Computer-Assisted Data Analysis. Lecture and laboratory courses will include: Microscopy, Drug Chemistry, Questioned Documents, Toxicology, Latent Prints, Trace- and Firearms/Tool-marks. Various analytical methods currently being used in modern forensic laboratories will be performed utilizing chromatography (TLC, GC, CG/MSD, etc.) and liquid/liquid extractions. One lecture and two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 225 and A Chm 430 or consent of the instructor.

A Chm 451 (Previously A Chm 450B) Forensic Chemistry II (3)

Continuation of A Chm 450. This course combines a series of advanced seminars, lectures and laboratories in Forensic Chemistry. Topics such as: public speaking on technical and non-technical subjects, as well as courtroom testimony, will be covered. Lecture and laboratory topics will include: DNA, Quantitative Methodologies in Drug Chemistry and Toxicology, as well as Advanced Statistical Methods such as: chi-square tests, multiple regression and correlation, nonparametric statistics and analytical variances. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 450 or consent of the instructor.

A Chm 455 Forensic Chemistry Internship (3)

Students will have the opportunity to acquire practical “hands-on” experience in forensic chemistry by participating as an intern in the work of an agency, institution, or corporation other than the University. The student’s work will be supervised and evaluated by a designated individual at the internship site. This supervisor will provide an evaluation of the student’s work to the University at Albany faculty member who is the instructor of record for final assessment and grading.

Students majoring in chemistry with a forensic chemistry emphasis may apply to the Department of Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course. Admission to the Forensic Chemistry Internship course will be dependent upon the acceptability of the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and the host institution or agency. Among the criteria used by these agencies will be completion of A Chm 450 and a possible background check of the applicant. Enrollment in the course is limited in number in order to provide substantial individual hands-on training, and therefore is determined on a competitive basis. Application to the program must be made six months in advance of the beginning of the proposed internship. S/U graded.

A Chm 495 Materials Independent Study (3)

Individually selected topic of independent study in materials science-(chemistry) culminating in a comprehensive written report. The material covered is to be beyond that offered in any other formal undergraduate course. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A Chm 497 Independent Study (3)

Individual, independent study of selected topics above or beyond those offered in formal undergraduate courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor. S/U graded.