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Undergraduate Bulletin 2007-2008
 
Bulletin Homepage |College of Arts & Sciences | Courses

Courses in Arts and Sciences

A Cas 101 Understanding Language (3)

Non-technical introduction to the nature and role of human language in everyday life. Topics include factors which give rise to regional and social varieties, ways in which language is exploited (for example, in advertising and government,) and linguistic aspects of such fields as education, literature and computer science. Enrollment limited to freshmen and sophomores. May not be offered in 2007-2008.

A Cas 103 (=A Glo 103) Perspectives on Globalization (3)

An introduction to multidisciplinary perspectives on globalization processes including, among other topics, the economic configuration of the world economy, the changing nature of the state, the transformation of home and households in transnationalism, biological constraints and environmental problems, and the impact of and responses to globalization throughout the world. The course presents the perspectives of the social sciences, humanities and natural sciences, and encourages discussion and critical thinking. This is a team-taught course. [GC]

A Cas 109 Intermediate Science Research (2)

Students learn research methodology in the natural and social sciences by accessing scientific databases, by using on-line bibliographic search techniques, consulting doctoral-level research scholars, developing hypotheses and performing experiments to test them, and by writing research papers and making presentations at scientific symposia. It is expected that the students will have done many of these activities in the prerequisite high school course, and in this course emphasis in placed upon the formulation of hypotheses and initiation of experiments in consultation with mentors. Prerequisite(s): completion of one year of an approved course in science research at the high-school level; permission of instructor; may not be taken by students enrolled in college. Offered summer session only.

A Cas 110 Intermediate Methods of Research (4)

Students learn research methodology in the natural and social sciences by accessing scientific databases by using on-line bibliographic search techniques, consulting doctoral-level research scholars, developing hypotheses and performing experiments to test them, and writing research papers and making presentations at scientific symposia. It is expected that the students will have done many of these activities in the prerequisite high school course, and in this course emphasis is placed upon performing experiments in consultation with mentors. Students are expected to spend at least three hours per week outside of class. Prerequisite(s): Completion of one year of an approved course in science research at the high-school level; permission of instructor; may not be taken by students enrolled in college; available for year-long course of study only.

A Cas 111 Beginning Fundamentals of Research (2)

Students learn research methodology in the natural and social sciences. Students access scientific databases by using on-line bibliographic search techniques, consult doctoral level research scholars, develop hypotheses and perform experiments to test them, and write research papers and make presentations at scientific symposia. This course emphasizes the first group of these activities, up to the actual performance of experiments, but some students may go further. Students are expected to spend at least three hours working on class work per week outside of class. May be repeated once for credit.

A Cas 125 A Diversity of Voices in Literature and the Arts: Creating Ourselves and Our Cultures (3)

Examines the emergence of American literary and other creative endeavors from the diverse experiences and heritages of the American peoples. The course focuses on creative works that explore and create representations of the self in relation to individual and group identity, and on the ways that cultural values and ideologies influence creative expression. [DP]

A Cas 131 Diversity and Equity in America (3)

What are the sources, extent, and consequences of diversity in American society? Using various approaches in the social and behavioral sciences, this course compares the American beliefs about equality with evidence of unequal treatment of groups labeled on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, and religion. The course also considers how group conformity, stereotyping, and prejudice affect individuals in their everyday lives. [DP]

A Cas 141 Concepts of Race and Culture in the Modern World (3)

This course considers the complex dynamics of global human diversity from the vantage point of the various social sciences. It explores the use of race, nationality, ethnicity, culture, and gender as focal concepts in the critical analysis of human behavior and interaction in the modern world. Cross-cultural and cross-national aspects of these issues are of central concern to the course. [DP if taken before Fall 2004; GC]

A Cas 150 Cultural Diversity and the Human Condition (3)

Interdisciplinary study of selected cultures or societies focusing on six themes: family and social structure; religion and cultural values and traditions; art and nature; continuity; change and their global implications; work and play; health, ecology, science/technology. Each semester two or more cultures, including at least one non-Western culture, will be compared and contrasted with each other and with contemporary U.S. experiences. Examples will include Brazil, China, France, India, Mexico, Peru, Russia and West Africa. May be repeated once for credit when content differs. May be taken only by freshmen and sophomores. [DP, if taken before Fall 2004; GC]

A Cas 198 Special Topics in the Humanities (1–4)

Special group studies which provide students and faculty with the opportunity to explore significant themes, issues and problems from a broadly humanistic and interdisciplinary perspective. May be repeated for credit provided the subject matter is not repeated.

A Cas 201 Perspectives on the Humanities (4)

This interdisciplinary course draws upon ideas and texts across the Humanities, introducing students to language, text, thought, and culture, using intellectual and research methods, theoretical concepts, and discourses appropriate to those disciplines, as well as to interdisciplinary thought within the Humanities. Typical semesters might include: the intellectual history of a topic or a movement and its historical context; the work of a specific writer, artist, or thinker; or a period of intellectual history. Content will vary according to the faculty and departments represented. Examples include Modernism, Post-Modernism, Language and Textuality, Architecture and Music, the Renaissance, Literature and Art of Liberation, and Culture and Diversity. This course will satisfy the Humanities General Education requirement. In addition, this course will also satisfy the Writing Intensive, Oral Discourse, and the Information Literacy requirement. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor.
 
A Cas 202 Understanding the Arts (3)

Interdisciplinary course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of the significance of great works of Western art, music and literature. Students will study how to perceive and analyze works of art drawn from various periods. Categories include: architecture, sculpture, painting, music, drama, poetry and fiction.

A Cas 209 Advanced Science Research (2)

Continuation of work undertaken in A Cas 109 or equivalent with emphasis placed upon the completion of experiments in consultation with mentors. Students will consult with their teachers as necessary, but will not meet in a formal classroom period. Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of A Cas 109 or completion of two years of an approved science research course at the high school level; permission of instructor; may not be taken by students enrolled in college; offered summer session only.

A Cas 210 Advanced Methods of Research (4)

Continuation of work undertaken in A Cas 110 or equivalent with emphasis placed upon the communication of results. Students are expected to spend at least three hours per week outside of class. Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of A Cas 110 or completion of two years of an approved science research course at the high school level; permission of instructor; may not be taken by students enrolled in college; students must be enrolled throughout an entire academic year to obtain credit.

A Cas 211 Intermediate Fundamentals of Research (2)

Students learn research methodology in the natural and social sciences. Students access scientific databases by using on-line bibliographic search techniques, consult doctoral level research scholars, develop hypotheses and perform experiments to test them, and write research papers and make presentations at scientific symposia. In this course emphasis is placed upon performing experiments and the communication of results. Students are expected to spend at least three hours per week working on class work outside of class. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): completion of A Cas 111.

A Cas 220 Literatures of the World I (3)

Major works in English translation from literatures of ancient Mediterranean (Judaic, Graeco-Roman), China, Italy, France, Germany, Spain, and francophone world. The first-semester course feeds into the second-semester course, but either semester may be taken alone. The course is team taught by faculty from the respective literature departments. May not be offered during 2007-2008.

A Cas 221 Literatures of the World II (3)

Major works in English translation from more recent literatures of Hebrew, China, Italy, France, Germany, Spain, and francophone worlds. The first semester course feeds into the second semester course, but either semester may be taken alone. The course is team taught by faculty from the respective literature departments. May not be offered during 2007-2008.

A Cas 240 Images and Issues of Diversity in the Visual Arts (3)

This course will look at the visual arts produced in selected subcultures and will consider the ways in which such social identities as race, class, gender and age are represented. The course focuses on the relationship of artists and their work to cultural and critical history, on social conditions under which these artists create, and the effect of these conditions on the themes, content, forms and shape of the reality in their art. [DP]
 
A Cas 360Z Passion and Choice (3)

Through film drama, fiction and philosophy, this team-taught course will focus generally on the inner and outer dynamics of the individual as he/she interacts with the world and culture, and will take up such issues as the authority of reason versus the authority of the passions; personal responsibility versus allegiance to society; wealth as redemption and corruption; finding one’s personal myth; and gender identity and the quest for happiness. May not be offered during 2007-2008. [WI]

A Cas 390 New York State Theatre Institute Internship (1–15)

A full- or part-time program involving academic study through classes, individualized instruction and written projects, and supervised applied experiences structured around the Institute’s theatrical productions and its residencies in New York State schools. These internships emphasize interdisciplinary learning about the arts in society, in the education of children, and the arts’ aesthetic, technical, and business aspects. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Open to qualified majors in diverse fields or undeclared majors through a competitive selection process. Applications should be made to the Arts and Sciences faculty coordinator by November 1 or April 1 for the following terms. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A Cas 497 & 497Z Special Topics in the Humanities (1–4)

Special group studies which provide students and faculty with the opportunity to explore, on an advanced level, significant themes, issues, and problems from a broadly humanistic and interdisciplinary perspective. A Cas 497Z is the writing intensive version of 497; A Cas 497 and/or 497Z may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor. [WI]