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Undergraduate Bulletin 2007-2008
 
Bulletin Homepage |College of Arts & Sciences | Courses

Courses in Anthropology


A Ant 100 Culture, Society, and Biology (3)

Introduction to the issue of human diversity, the course poses the question of what it means to be human. Through study of biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and ethnology, students will explore the range of diversity within our shared humanity, and seek explanations that might account for it. Only one of A Ant 100, 100 or 100 may be taken for credit. [DP if taken before Fall 2004.]

A Ant 104 Archaeology (3)

Introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to study ancient sites and artifacts. Topics include archaeological fieldwork, laboratory analysis, dating, interpretation of artifacts, and the reconstruction of past cultural patterns. Examples include studies of ancient and recent societies. Two lectures, one laboratory period per week.

A Ant 108Z Cultural Anthropology (3)

A Ant 108Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 108; only one may be taken for credit. [GC SS WI]

A Ant 108 Cultural Anthropology (3)

Survey of the theory, methods, and goals of cultural anthropology, emphasizing the nature of culture and the varied forms in which it is expressed among the peoples of the world. Two lectures, one discussion period per week. A Ant 108Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 108; only one may be taken for credit. [GC SS]

A Ant 110 Introduction to Human Evolution (3)

Introduction to human evolution. This course spans the human fossil record from “Lucy” to Cro-Magnon. Topics include our primate past and the evolution of upright walking. The steady increase in our ancestors’ brain size is explored along with the cultural correlates of biological evolution such as stone tools, language origins and cave art. [NS]

A Ant 111 Introduction to the Primates (3)

Survey of the basic morphology and behavior of nonhuman primates. Prosimian and anthropoid primates are studied in terms of their comparative morphology and behavior, with reference to these same features among humans. [NS]

A Ant 119 The City and Human Health (3)

Survey of the history of health and disease from the earliest humans before the development of settlements to contemporary populations living in industrialized cities. Emphasizes the role of culture and behavior in disease. [NS]

A Ant 131 (= A Cla 131) Ancient Peoples of the World (3)

Ancient cultures from around the world will be presented and analyzed from the available archaeological data. The gradual development of civilization in both the Old and New Worlds will be the focus of the course. Only one of A Ant 131 & A Cla 131 may be taken for credit. [SS]

A Ant 133 (= A Clc 133) Ancient History of the Near East and the Aegean (3)

An examination of key ancient Near Eastern civilizations in Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Syro-Palestine, and Turkey and the influence they exerted on the Minoan the Mycenaean civilizations. This is followed by the rise of Greece, the development of Athenian democracy, the decline of Greece leading to Macedonian domination, the conquests of Alexander the Great and the cosmopolitan Hellenistic world.

A Ant 140 Anthropological Survey of World Cultures (3)

In-depth survey of selected ancient, historical, and modern world cultures. Major themes include production of goods and services, authority systems, legal processes, and religious and ritual life. A Ant 140Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 140; only one may be taken for credit.

A Ant 140Z Anthropological Survey of World Cultures (3)

A Ant 140Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 140; only one may be taken for credit. Offered every semester. [WI]


A Ant 145 (= A His 145 and A Lcs 145) Continuity and Change in Latin America (3)

Introduction to the historical development of Latin America’s diverse cultural heritage and to its contemporary institutions and civilization. Broadly interdisciplinary perspective reflecting diverse approaches and fields. Only one of A Ant 145, A His 145, & A Lcs 145 may be taken for credit. [BE]

A Ant 146 (= A Lcs 150) Puerto Rico: People, History, and Culture (3)

Survey of Puerto Rican culture on the island from the prehispanic era to the 20th century. Special emphasis will be placed on the change of sovereignty in 1898, the national question, class and culture, and migration. A Ant 146Z and A Lcs 150Z are writing intensive versions of A Ant 146 and A Lcs 150; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit.

A Ant 146Z (= A Lcs 150Z) Puerto Rico: People, History, and Culture (3)

A Ant 146Z and A Lcs 150Z are writing intensive versions of A Ant 146 and A Lcs 150; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. [WI]

A Ant 160Z Symbol and Human Nature (3)

A Ant 160Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 160; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]

A Ant 160 Symbol and Human Nature (3)

Introduction to ideas in the social sciences and humanities pertaining to the central place of symbolic behavior in human evolution, human nature, and contemporary human communities. Comparative perspective, including both Western and non-Western materials. Opportunity for fieldwork in the local community. A Ant 160Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 160; only one may be taken for credit. [SS]

A Ant 172 Community and Self (3)

What is the “self”? Individual and social diversity are considered cross-culturally, in conjunction with personal identity, class, nationality, and ethnicity. Implications for the students’ own lives are discussed, as well as questions of freedom and authority in America. [DP]

A Ant 175 (= A Rel 175) Anthropology and Folklore (3)

Introduction to the study of folklore as an aspect of culture, symbolically expressing people’s identity, beliefs and values. The focus is on oral text traditions—myths, folktales, and legends. Topics in folk custom and ritual, folk music and folk art are also included. Includes folklore from Western and non-Western cultures. Only one of A Ant 175 and A Rel 175 may be taken for credit. [HU]

A Ant 189Z Writing in Anthropology (Lower Division) (1)

Students who are concurrently registered in any 100- or 200-level anthropology course, may with permission of the instructor of that course, enroll in A Ant 189Z and fulfill a writing intensive version of that other course. The writing intensive version will involve: 1) a body of written work beyond that normally required by the companion course, 2) opportunities for students to receive assistance in progress, and 3) an opportunity for students to revise some pieces. [WI]

A Ant 197 Special Topics in Anthropology (1–4)

Study of a selected topic in anthropology. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic.

A Ant 211 (formerly A Ant 411) Human Population Biology (3)

Biological variation in human populations, with emphasis on genetics, adaptability, demography and related aspects of population dynamics. Two lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110 or A Bio 110Z.


A Ant 220 (= A Lin 220 and A Eng 217) Introduction to Linguistics (3)

Introduction to the study of language, including examination of the characteristics and structural principles of natural language. After exploring the basic characteristics of sound, word formation and sentence structure, these principles are applied to such topics as: language variation, language change, psycholinguistics, pragmatics, and animal communication. Only one of A Ant 220, A Lin 220, & A Eng 217 may be taken for credit. [SS]

A Ant 233 (= A Lcs 233) Aztecs, Incas and Mayas (3)

Introductory survey of the archaeology and ethnohistory of the three best-known indigenous civilizations of the New World. Each is presented in terms of prehistoric background and evolution, social organization, politics and economics, religion and art. Consideration is given to the Spanish conquest of these three groups and to their modern legacies. Only one of A Ant 233 & A Lcs 233 may be taken for credit. [BE]

A Ant 236 American Indian Archaeology (3)

Introductory survey of the prehistory of North America and Mesoamerica. Emphasis on the prehistoric developments in the Eastern Woodlands, Plains, Southwest, Mexico, and the Arctic. An introduction to current theoretical issues as applied in these culture areas. [BE]

A Ant 240 The North American Indian (3)

The nature and distribution of North American Indian cultures from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100, or A Ant 108Z, or 108. [BE SS]

A Ant 243 (= A Jst 243) Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3)

The main features of the “Middle Eastern culture continent.” A comparison of selected societies in Southwest Asia and North Africa. The impact of modernization on preindustrial cities and peasantries in the area. A Ant 243Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 243 and A Jst 243; only one of these courses may be taken for credit. [BE]

A Ant 243Z (= A Jst 243) Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3)

The main features of the “Middle Eastern culture continent.” A comparison of selected societies in Southwest Asia and North Africa. The impact of modernization on preindustrial cities and peasantries in the area. A Ant 243Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 243 and A Jst 243; only one of these courses may be taken for credit. [BE WI]

A Ant 268 (= A Lcs 268) Ethnology of Pre-Columbian Art (3)

Survey of the art and architecture of the pre-Columbian Mesoamerican civilizations, from the origins of the Olmec civilization (c. 1500 B.C.) through the native art produced under Spanish colonial rule in the 16th century. The objects are viewed in relation to their cultural and historical context. Issues of collection and exhibition are also discussed. Only one of A Ant 268 & A Lcs 268 may be taken for credit. [AR HU]

A Ant 269 (= A Aas 269 and A Lcs 269) The Caribbean: Peoples, History and Cultures (3)

Peoples, history and cultures of the 20th century Caribbean. Special emphasis will be placed on responses to colonialism and nationalism. Only one of A Ant 269, A Aas 269, & A Lcs 269 may be taken for credit. [BE]

A Ant 310 Human Paleontology (3)

Examination of the human fossil record and of the major theories dealing with fossil record. Prerequisite(s): A Geo 230 or A Geo 230Z or permission of the instructor.


A Ant 311 (formerly A Ant 413) Functional Anatomy of the Human Skeleton (4)

Laboratory course in skeletal and dental identification and analysis, with emphasis on the interaction of the muscular and skeletal systems. A Ant 311Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 311; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110 or A Bio 325.

A Ant 311Z (formerly A Ant 413Z) Functional Anatomy of the Human Skeleton (4)

A Ant 311Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 311; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [WI]

A Ant 312 (= A Bio 318; formerly A Ant 412/A Bio 419) Human Population Genetics (3)

Population genetics theory is the foundation of evolutionary biology and contributes heavily to modern ideas in ecology, systematics, and agriculture. This course is an introduction to that theory with special emphasis on evolution. Only one of A Ant 312 and A Bio 318 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 211 or A Bio 205 or 212.

A Ant 317 (= A Bio 307) Exercise Physiology  (3)

This course will provide a broad introduction t the field of exercise physiology. Topics covered will include cellular energy metabolism, pulmonary and cardiovascular responses to exercise, muscle physiology, training, nutrition, bode composition, and exercise testing. Students will spend some time in the human performance laboratory where the focus will on be applied exercise physiology and performance testing. Specialized topics include exercise at high altitude, temperature regulation, sports nutrition, exercise performance during the growth and development period, and the relationship of exercise and physical activity to human health and disease. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 110 and A Bio 111.

A Ant 319 Physical Growth and Development (3)

Analysis of the pattern of human growth during the prenatal and postnatal periods and their variation around the world. The course focuses on the influence of social factors, nutrition, alcohol and cigarette use, race/ethnicity, pollution, and features of the physical environment which modify growth patterns. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100, or A Bio 110 and 111, or A Bio 102 or A Bio 103Z or 103.

A Ant 321 (= A Lin 321) Introduction to Syntax (3)

The human ability to produce and understand an infinite number of different sentences is one of the most remarkable capabilities we have. The study of the structure of sentences is called syntax, and this course is an introduction to syntactic theory. The particular approach we will be pursuing is called generative grammar, the approach to syntax pioneered by linguists such as Noam Chomsky. Chomsky argues that all humans are born with an unconscious knowledge of Universal Grammar, the basis on which the grammars of all languages are built. Through a detailed examination of English sentence structure, we will investigate the connections between English syntax and Universal Grammar. Only one of A Lin 321 & A Ant 321 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 220 or permission of instructor.

A Ant 322 (= A Lin 322) Introduction to Phonology (3)

Introduction to the description and analysis of human speech sounds and their organization. Introduction to articulatory phonetics and the International Phonetic Alphabet followed by examination and generative phonological analysis of data from English and a wide range of other languages. Only one of A Ant 322 & A Lin 322 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 220 or permission of instructor.

A Ant 325 (= A Lin 325) Sociolinguistics (3)

Introduction to the study of language as a social phenomenon. Includes basic sociolinguistic concepts, interactional sociolinguistics, social dialects, Black English, diglossia, bilingualism, and bilingual education. Only one of A Ant 325 & A Lin 325 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 220 or permission of instructor.

A Ant 330 Topics in Archaeology (3)

Survey of a topic in archaeology or regional prehistory for upper division students. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.

A Ant 331 Early Civilization of the Old World (3)

The development of early complex societies in the Old World, including the origins of agriculture, urbanism, states, and empires. Examines the nature of the archaeological evidence for these developments and its interpretation, employing case studies drawn from the Near East, the Indian Subcontinent, and China. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

A Ant 332 Ethnoarchaeology (3)

Ethnoarchaeology combines the archaeologist’s interest in material culture with the cultural anthropologist’s interest in ongoing behavior. Included are the archaeology of living populations, action archaeology, experimental and replication studies, formation processes, and ethnographic analogy, among other subjects. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104 or permission of instructor.

A Ant 333 Iroquois Archaeology and Ethnohistory (3)

An intensive survey of the archaeology, history, and ethnology of the Iroquois. Coverage begins with the first appearance of the Iroquois in the region and continues to modern reservation life. A Ant 333Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 333; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.

A Ant 333Z Iroquois Archaeology and Ethnohistory (3)

A Ant 333Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 333; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104. [WI]

A Ant 334 The Earliest Cities (3)

Comparative treatment of the earliest urban settlements around the world. Case studies include Mesopotamia, Egypt, Sub-Saharan Africa, China, Southeast Asia, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Cities are compared in terms of planning, political roles, religious features, economic patterns, and their rise and fall. Also covers archaeological methods for the study of early cities. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104

A Ant 335 Introduction to Archaeological Field Techniques (3)

Introduction to data gathering techniques used by archaeologists in the field. Taught prior to A Ant 338 as basic training for students concentrating in archaeology. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104 or permission of instructor.

A Ant 336 (=A Cla 310) Art and Archaeology of Cyprus I (3)

An examination or the material culture (art, archaeology, and architecture), settlement patterns and changing environmental setting of successive cultures of the east Mediterranean island of Cyprus from the first human occupation to the Roman period (10,000 BCE to 50 BCE) The island’s role as a major point of contact between Near Eastern and Western Mediterranean civilizations will be emphasized.

A Ant 337 (=A Cla 311) Art and Archaeology of Cyprus ll (3)

An examination of the material culture (art, archaeology, and architecture) and history of the island of Cyprus from the Roman period through its recently won independence in 1960 and up to the present. Byzantine church painting, Gothic ecclesiastical and military architecture, the Venetian preparations for an Ottoman invasion emphasize the significance of this Christian enclave in the Moslem east under Latin, Venetian, Ottoman, and British colonial rule. Finally, the strategic importance of Cyprus during the Cold War still continues to affect its history.

An examination of the archaeology, art, architecture and history of the island of Cyprus from the Roman Period to its recently won independence. The wealth of mosaics, Byzantine church painting and Gothic ecclesiastical and military architecture emphasize the significance of the Christian enclave in the Moslem east under Latin, Venetian, Ottoman and British colonial rule.

A Ant 338 Archaeological Field Research (6)

Directed archaeological excavation of selected sites, including experience in site location, mapping, excavation, preservation, analysis, classification, and interpretation. A Ant 338Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 338; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 335 or permission of instructor.

A Ant 338Z Archaeological Field Research (6)

A Ant 338Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 338; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 335 or permission of instructor. [WI]

A Ant 339 Archaeological Lab Techniques (3)

Survey and practical application of laboratory techniques using materials from the University collections. Emphasis on physical and chemical analysis, classification, and specialized analysis. A Ant 339Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 339; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.

A Ant 339Z Archaeological Lab Techniques (3)

A Ant 339Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 339; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104. [WI]

A Ant 340 Topics in Ethnology (3)

Survey of the cultures of one of the major regions of the world. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108Z or 108.

A Ant 341 (= A Lcs 341) Ethnology of Mesoamerica (3)

Survey of the cultures and history of the native peoples of Mexico and Central America. Beginning with the documents created by and about native peoples around the time of the Spanish invasion, the course follows the experiences of these societies through the colonial period and up to the present. A Ant 341Z & A Lcs 341Z are writing intensive versions of A Ant 341 & A Lcs 341; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100 or 108 or 108Z. [BE SS]

A Ant 341Z (= A Lcs 341Z) Ethnology of Mesoamerica (3)

A Ant 341Z & A Lcs 341Z are writing intensive versions of A Ant 341 & A Lcs 341; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100 or 108 or 108Z. [BE SS WI]

A Ant 343 Native American Literature (3)

Survey of the literature of the native peoples of North America and Mesoamerica, from early colonial times to the present. Readings include oral narratives, songs, autobiography, and contemporary poetry and fiction. Discussion focuses on the use of texts for cultural analysis, Native American literary aesthetics, and the survival of native literary traditions. A Ant 343Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 343; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

A Ant 343Z Native American Literature (3)

A Ant 343Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 343; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. [WI]

A Ant 351 Ethnicity in North America (3)

Analysis of ethnicity, assimilation and pluralism with regard to one or more North American ethnic group(s). Social, political, economic and symbolic adaptations. Consideration of relative merits of integration and separation in modern society. This course is cross-listed with A Jst 351 & 351Z when Jewish ethnicity and assimilation are a major focus of those courses. When cross-listed, A Jst 351Z & A Ant 351Z are writing intensive versions of A Jst 351 & A Ant 351; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. A Ant 351Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 351; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor. [DP US*]

A Ant 351Z Ethnicity in North America (3)

This course is cross-listed with A Jst 351 & 351Z when Jewish ethnicity and assimilation are a major focus of those courses. When cross-listed, A Jst 351Z & A Ant 351Z are writing intensive versions of A Jst 351 & A Ant 351; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. A Ant 351Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 351; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor. [DP US WI]

A Ant 355 Environment, Economy and Culture (3)

Cross-cultural survey of the systematic relations between environment, behavior and culture. Analysis of production and exchange systems at hunting and gathering, agricultural, and industrial stages of social evolution. Environmental and economic disruption, perception and management in cultural perspective. A Ant 355Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 355; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108 or 108Z or 102 or 104 or permission of instructor.

A Ant 355Z Environment, Economy and Culture (3)

A Ant 355Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 355; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108 or 108Z or 102 or 104 or permission of instructor. [WI]

A Ant 360 Social Anthropology (3)

Comparative study of social systems, tribal, traditional, and modern societies. Deals with economic, kinship, political, and other aspects of social structure. Social systems in functionalist, evolutionary, and dialectic perspectives. Combines in one course kinship, political, economic, and stratificational anthropology. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108 or 108Z. A Ant 360Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 360; only one may be taken for credit.

A Ant 360Z Social Anthropology (3)

A Ant 360Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 360; only one may be taken for credit. [WI]

A Ant 361 Anthropology and Public Policy (3)

The practical application of anthropological theory and research to policy areas such as economic development, environment, welfare, and mass media. The ethics of applied anthropology. A Ant 361Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 361; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits in anthropology or political science or sociology.

A Ant 361Z Anthropology and Public Policy (3)

A Ant 361Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 361; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits in anthropology or political science or sociology. [WI]

A Ant 363 (= A Rel 363) Ethnology of Religion (3)

Topical and theoretical survey of anthropological approaches to understanding human religious expression. Topics include myth, ritual, world view, shamanism, gender, and religious change. Emphasizes the religions of non-literate, non-Western peoples but also includes examples from major world religions and contemporary Western societies. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 100 or 108, or A Phi 214.

A Ant 364 Anthropology of Health and Health Care (3)

Introduction to medical anthropology. Cross-cultural examination of different views of health, disease, healing and curing, their effect on medical care and maintenance of health of individuals and communities. Analyses of interface of modern medicine with traditional systems and dilemmas caused by the application of recent medical advances in our own culture. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits in anthropology or biology.

A Ant 365 (= A Wss 365) The Anthropology of New Reproductive Technologies (3)

A cross-cultural perspective on how new reproductive technologies (including invitro-fertilization, surrogacy, ultrasound, prenatal screening for disability, sex selection, fetal surgery, and neonatal intensive care) are transforming the experience of procreation and challenging cultural notions of kinship, personhood, and what it means to be human. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits in anthropology, philosophy, or women studies.

A Ant 372 Urban Anthropology (3)

Introduction to urban anthropology. Emphasis on rural-urban migrations, adjustment and assimilation of urban migrants, urban kinship and family structure, poverty culture, rural-urban typologies, and the application of anthropological methods to the study of urban societies. A Ant 372Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 372; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology, sociology, political science or geography.

A Ant 372Z Urban Anthropology (3)

A Ant 372Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 372; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology, sociology, political science or geography. [WI]


A Ant 381 (= A Wss 381) Anthropology of Gender (3)

Cross-cultural analysis of gender roles. Focuses on non-Western societies, using data from other societies to better understand the gender system of our own culture. Issues include status of women and men, the meaning of “femaleness” and “maleness”, and women and health care systems. A Ant 381Z and A Wss 381Z are writing intensive versions of A Ant 381 and A Wss 381; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology or sociology.

A Ant 381Z (= A Wss 381Z) Anthropology of Gender (4)

A Ant 381Z and A Wss 381Z are writing intensive versions of A Ant 381 and A Wss 381; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology or sociology. [WI]

A Ant 389Z Writing in Anthropology (Upper Division) (1)

Students who are concurrently registered in any 300- or 400-level anthropology course, may with permission of the instructor of that course, enroll in A Ant 389Z and fulfill a writing intensive version of that other course. The writing intensive version will involve: 1) a body of written work beyond that normally required by the companion course, 2) opportunities for students to receive assistance in progress, and 3) an opportunity for students to revise some pieces. [WI]

A Ant 390 Ethnological Theory (3)

Historical survey of theoretical approaches to the study of culture, with emphasis on contemporary trends. Recommended for majors planning graduate work. Content may vary with instructor. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108 or A Ant 108Z.

A Ant 414 (formerly A Ant 313) Demographic Anthropology (3)

Demographic theory as it applies to anthropological populations, with emphases on birth, death and growth rates, population size and dispersion, mating, and migration. Aspects of historical and paleodemography accompany analyses of living populations. A Ant 414Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 414; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110 and 211.

A Ant 414Z (formerly A Ant 313Z) Demographic Anthropology (3)

A Ant 414Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 414; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110 and 211. [WI]

A Ant 415 Nutritional Anthropology (3)

This course provides an introduction to the biological, ecological, and social factors influencing diet and nutrition. Basic nutritional physiology and biochemistry are presented in the first part of the course. Later topics include paleonutrition as well as nutritional issues of contemporary human population groups. The core focus is on the concept of energy balance. Time is spent in the metabolic laboratory learning how to measure metabolic energy expenditure and assess nutritional status in humans. Students participate in the collection and analysis of individual and class data on nutritional intake and energy expenditure, with an emphasis on basic techniques of data presentations, analysis, and interpretation. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 211

A Ant 416 Topics in Human Biology (3)

Selected topics in biological anthropology. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 110 and 211.


A Ant 418/Z Culture, Environment, and Health (3)

Anthropological study of health and disease patterns in human populations with emphasis on human-made influences on the health of contemporary societies. The effects of societal and cultural factors on disease patterns, and the assessment of health status through epidemiological and anthropological methods are explored. A Ant 418Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 418; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisites: A Ant 119.

A Ant 419 Human Evolutionary and Environmental Physiology (3)

This course will focus on human (and animal) adaptation to the environment. We will cover the basic physiology of high altitude, thermoregulation (temperature), water-balance, hyperbaria (deep sea diving), energy production and procurement, and the weightlessness of space (micro-gravity). While the focus is on humans, the course will take a comparative approach, examining how different species have adapted to various environments, including evolutionary, developmental, and homeostatic modes of adaptive response. The course meets twice a week, with class time divided between lecture, student presentation/discussion, and laboratory activities in the SUNY Albany Human Performance Laboratory. Prerequisite(s): A Bio 110 and A Bio 111.

A Ant 421Z (formerly 421; = Lin 421Z) Advanced Syntax (3)

This course continues the investigation of the relationship between the grammars of particular languages and Universal Grammar. We will examine the syntax of several languages from around the world asking ourselves the following questions: a.) How do the principles that organize the grammars of other languages around the world compare to English? b.) What grammatical properties are true for all languages? We will discuss the answers to these questions in the light of generative grammar. Only one of A Lin 421Z and A Ant 421Z may be taken for credit. The former A Lin 421 & A Ant 421 do not yield writing intensive credit, Prerequisite(s): A Lin 321 with grade of C or higher. [WI]

A Ant 422 (= A Lin 422) Advanced Phonology (3)

Advanced studies in generative phonological theory, with a focus on the analysis of prosodic phenomena such as stress, tone, and accent. Discussion of recent theoretical trends in phonology. Only one of A Ant 422 & A Lin 422 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 322 with grade of C or higher.

A Ant 423 Linguistic Structures (3)

Investigation of the structure of a selected language, language family, or language area. Prerequisite(s): a prior course in linguistics or consent of instructor. [OD]

A Ant 424 Language and Culture (3)

Study of the nature of the interrelationships that exist between linguistic behavior and other aspects of culture. Prerequisite(s): A Lin 220 or A Ant 221 or permission of instructor.

A Ant 425 (= A Lin 425) Comparative and Historical Linguistics (3)

Language development and change. Language classification, linguistic reconstruction. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 322 or A Lin 322.

A Ant 430 Archaeological Theory (3)

Advanced theory and method in archaeology, emphasizing topics such as quantitative applications, spatial analysis, cultural processes, systems analysis, the application of dating techniques, and the reconstruction of extinct cultures. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.


A Ant 431 Seminar in Social Archaeology (3)

Seminar on selected topics in the archaeological study of past social organization. Topics will vary. Examples include settlement patterns, household organization, economic processes, urbanism, and world systems. Topics will be approached in terms of methods, theories, and comparative analysis. May be repeated for credit.

A Ant 433 Mesoamerican Archaeology (3)

Archaeological study of the ancient peoples and cultures of Mesoamerica from the earliest inhabitants to the Spanish conquest. Coverage is chronological and evolutionary, with application of anthropological models of cultural change. Emphasis on the major transformation such as the origin of agriculture, the rise of cities, and the expansion of states and empires. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

A Ant 434 Seminar in Mesoamerican Writing Systems (3)

Seminar on selected Mesoamerican writing systems. Focus varies, but Classic Mayan writing is usually emphasized. Topics include the structure and evolution of the scripts; relations between writing and other communication systems; and anthropological research using hieroglyphic evidence. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): course work in Mesoamerican archaeology, ethnology, or linguistics is recommended.

A Ant 435 Archaeological Surveys (3)

Survey of the archaeology of a selected region of the world. Topics vary according to the regional specialty of the professor in charge. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.

A Ant 438 Museum Research and Curation (3)

The course emphasizes collections management and research with existing collections, including database management, basic museum methods for anthropologists, and approaches to problems of using data collected by other researchers. Students design and complete projects using existing collections. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 104.

A Ant 450 Medical Anthropology (3)

Advanced medical anthropology. In-depth examination of selected issues and conflicting values pertaining to health care. Presentations, frequently by outside speakers actively working in their fields, on alternative medical belief systems as well as moral and ethic dilemmas caused by developments in modern medicine. Emphasizes practical applications for health care providers. A Ant 450Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 450; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor.

A Ant 450Z Medical Anthropology (3)

A Ant 450Z is the writing intensive version of A Ant 450; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor. [WI]

A Ant 480 Introduction to Ethnographic Field Research (3)

Ethnographic fieldwork experience for qualified undergraduates. Study of fieldwork methodology and principles together with actual fieldwork on selected topics under faculty supervision. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor.

A Ant 481 (= A Lcs 491) Research Projects (3–6)

Introduction to basic research skills required to answer questions on human behavior, with special emphasis on cross-cultural communication and learning and dynamics of cross-cultural interaction. Specific research projects familiarize students with the basic research methods including data collection, processing, and analysis. Only one of A Ant 481 &A Lcs 491 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor.


A Ant 482 Senior Honor Thesis Seminar (3)

Students in the honors program should enroll in both A Ant 482 for a total of 6 credits during the fall and spring of their senior year. Students will write an honors thesis under the supervision of a member of the Anthropology Department, present periodic progress reports, and deliver an oral summary of the completed thesis. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Anthropology Department honors program.

A Ant 490 (= A Cla 490) Internship in Archaeological Conservation and Documentation (3–9)

Supervised placement in an agency engaged in conservation and documentation of archaeological artifacts, such as the New York State Museum or State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical experience and cannot be counted among the 9 elective credits above the 300 level required for Mediterranean archaeology majors. Anthropology majors may use up to 3 credits toward major elective credit. May be taken by majors in Greek and Roman civilization and anthropology only. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. S/U graded. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A Ant 493 Fieldwork in Mesoamerica: An Orientation (1)

General overview of the social and economic contexts of an ethnographic field site in Mesoamerica. Emphasis is on the pragmatics of living in another cultural setting and preparing for a one-month intensive ethnographic research project. Discusses IRB guidelines and the specific ethnographic field project. Specific content of the course varies according to location of ethnographic project and location of that project. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Specific content of the course varies according to ethnographic project and location of that project. S/U graded.

A Ant 497 Topics in Anthropology (3)

Advanced course on selected topic in anthropology. May focus on geographic or theoretical area. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor.

A Ant 498 Independent Study in Anthropology (1–6), (1–6)

Independent reading or research on selected topics under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

A Ant 499 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3)

Seminar on selected topics in anthropology, Open to seniors with permission of instructor. Recommended for majors planning graduate work. May be repeated for credit.