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Undergraduate Bulletin 2006-2007
 
Bulletin Homepage |Academic Information | Undergraduate Academic Regulations

Undergraduate Academic Regulations

As one of the Councils of the University Senate, the Undergraduate Academic Council recommends policy concerning undergraduate academic programs and regulations. To assist in academic governance, individual schools and colleges have collateral committees that can recommend academic policy to this council. It is the responsibility of each undergraduate student to be knowledgeable concerning pertinent academic policy. The University encourages students to accept the widest responsibility for their academic programs. For clarification and interpretation of the regulations contained in this section, students should contact the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, LC 30.

Policy Exceptions

In rare cases and for extraordinary reasons, exceptions to University, college, school, and department academic regulations may be granted to individual students. A student who wishes an exception to an existing regulation should, in the case of a college, school or department regulation, consult with the head of the unit in question for the approved procedure for submitting an appeal. For exceptions to University regulations, students should contact the Committee on Academic Standing through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30).

Standards of Academic Integrity

Throughout their history, institutions of higher learning have viewed themselves and have been viewed by society as a community of persons not only seeking truth and knowledge, but seeking them in a truthful and ethical fashion. Indeed, the institution traditionally trusted by the public and the one to which it most often turns when unbiased, factual information is needed is the university. Thus, how a university behaves is as important as what it explores and learns.

The University at Albany expects all members of its community to conduct themselves in a manner befitting this tradition of honor and integrity. They are expected to assist the University by reporting suspected violations of academic integrity to appropriate faculty and/or administration offices. Behavior that is detrimental to the University’s role as an educational institution is unacceptable and requires attention by all citizens of its community.

These guidelines, designed especially for students, define a context of values within which individual and institutional decisions on academic integrity can be made.

It is every student’s responsibility to become familiar with the standards of academic integrity at the University. Claims of ignorance, of unintentional error, or of academic or personal pressures are not sufficient reasons for violations of academic integrity. The following information, supplied by University Libraries ,provides additional information.

You have access to many other research and information literacy resources here at the University at Albany.

Take an information literacy course. These courses will help you to locate and evaluate information effectively —skills that will help you not only with your studies, but also in the workplace. For more information, check the list of courses (http://www.albany.edu/gened/inflit.html) that meet the General Education Information Literacy Requirement. The University Libraries offer two such courses, one targeted towards the sciences. More information is available on both courses at: http://library.albany.edu/usered/unl205/index.html

Check out helpful tip sheets and other tutorials (http://library.albany.edu/usered/). The University Libraries provide a wide array of guides and other instruction to answer your research-related questions. These include help on the research process, citation tip sheets, explanations of types of resources, information on how to locate a wide range of materials and how to evaluate them effectively, and much more. You will also find up to date Internet Tutorials (http://library.albany.edu/internet/) that will help make you a pro at searching the Web!

The University Libraries homepage (http://library.albany.edu/) will provide you with access to all sorts of resources for doing research, including the online catalog and a wide variety of research databases. You will find links to contact librarians and to ask for help, and a great deal more. Take a look!

The following is a list of the types of behaviors that are defined as examples of academic dishonesty and are therefore unacceptable. Attempts to commit such acts also fall under the term academic dishonesty and are subject to penalty. No set of guidelines can, of course, define all possible types or degrees of academic dishonesty; thus, the following descriptions should be understood as examples of infractions rather than an exhaustive list. Individual faculty members and the judicial boards of the University will continue to judge each case according to its particular merit.

Plagiarism

Presenting as one’s own work the work of another person (for example, the words, ideas, information, data, evidence, organizing principles, or style of presentation of someone else). Plagiarism includes paraphrasing or summarizing without acknowledgment, submission of another student’s work as one’s own, the purchase of prepared research or completed papers or projects, and the unacknowledged use of research sources gathered by someone else. Failure to indicate accurately the extent and precise nature of one’s reliance on other sources is also a form of plagiarism. The student is responsible for understanding the legitimate use of sources, the appropriate ways of acknowledging academic, scholarly, or creative indebtedness, and the consequences for violating University regulations.

Examples of plagiarism include: failure to acknowledge the source(s) of even a few phrases, sentences, or paragraphs; failure to acknowledge a quotation or paraphrase of paragraph-length sections of a paper; failure to acknowledge the source(s) of a major idea or the source(s) for an ordering principle central to the paper’s or project’s structure; failure to acknowledge the source (quoted, paraphrased, or summarized) of major sections or passages in the paper or project; the unacknowledged use of several major ideas or extensive reliance on another person’s data, evidence, or critical method; submitting as one’s own work, work borrowed, stolen, or purchased from someone else.

Cheating on Examinations

Giving or receiving unauthorized help before, during, or after an examination. Examples of unauthorized help include collaboration of any sort during an examination (unless specifically approved by the instructor); collaboration before an examination (when such collaboration is specifically forbidden by the instructor); the use of notes, books, or other aids during an examination (unless permitted by the instructor); arranging for another person to take an examination in one’s place; looking upon someone else’s examination during the examination period; intentionally allowing another student to look upon one’s exam; the unauthorized discussing of test items during the examination period; and the passing of any examination information to students who have not yet taken the examination. There can be no conversation while an examination is in progress unless specifically authorized by the instructor.

Multiple Submission

Submitting substantial portions of the same work for credit more than once, without the prior explicit consent of the instructor(s) to whom the material is being (or has in the past been) submitted.

Forgery

Imitating another person’s signature on academic or other official documents (e.g., the signing of an adviser’s name to an academic advising form).

Sabotage

Destroying, damaging, or stealing of another’s work or working materials (including lab experiments, computer programs, term papers, or projects).

Unauthorized Collaboration

Collaborating on projects, papers, or other academic exercises that is regarded as inappropriate by the instructor(s). Although the usual faculty assumption is that work submitted for credit is entirely one’s own, standards on appropriate and inappropriate collaboration vary widely among individual faculty and the different disciplines. Students who want to confer or collaborate with one another on work receiving academic credit should make certain of the instructor’s expectations and standards.

Falsification

Misrepresenting material or fabricating information in an academic exercise or assignment (for example, the false or misleading citation of sources, the falsification of experimental or computer data, etc.).

Bribery

Offering or giving any article of value or service to an instructor in an attempt to receive a grade or other benefits not legitimately earned or not available to other students in the class.

Theft, Damage, or Misuse of Library or Computer Resources

Removing uncharged library materials from the library, defacing or damaging library materials, intentionally displacing or hoarding materials within the library for one’s unauthorized private use, or other abuse of reserve-book privileges. Or, without authorization, using the University’s or another person’s computer accounts, codes, passwords, or facilities; damaging computer equipment; or interfering with the operation of the computing system of the University. The Computing Center has established specific rules governing the use of computing facilities. These rules are available at the Center and it is every student’s responsibility to become familiar with them.

Penalties and Procedures for Violations of Academic Integrity

When a faculty member has information that a student has violated academic integrity in a course or program for which he or she is responsible and determines that a violation has occurred, he or she will inform the student and impose an appropriate sanction. A faculty member may make any one or a combination of the following responses to the infractions cited above:

Warning without further penalty; requiring rewriting of a paper containing plagiarized material; lowering of a paper or project grade by one full grade or more; giving a failing grade on a paper containing plagiarized material; giving a failing grade on any examination in which cheating occurred; withholding permission to withdraw from the course after a penalty has been imposed; lowering a course grade by one full grade or more; giving a failing grade in a course; imposing a penalty uniquely designed for the particular infraction.

If a faculty member announces a failing grade in the course as a possible result of academic dishonesty, the student receiving such a penalty will not be permitted to withdraw from the course unless the grievance or judicial system rules in favor of the student.

Any faculty member encountering matters of academic dishonesty in an academic program or class for which he or she has responsibility may, in addition to, or in lieu of, the actions cited above, refer a case to the University Judicial System. After considering the case under the procedures provided by the University, the appropriate University judicial body will recommend the disposition of the case that can include disciplinary probation, suspension, or expulsion from the University.

Faculty members are expected to report in writing to the Offices of Graduate or Undergraduate Studies, as appropriate, all sanctions they impose, along with a brief description of the incident. A copy of the report is to be given to the student. These offices will maintain a copy of such reports for the duration of a student’s enrollment at the University. Upon graduation or separation of the student from the University, these confidential reports will be destroyed. Violations of academic integrity by graduate students are reported by faculty directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions and Policy for appropriate action. This office replaces the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education in all matters involving graduate student violations of academic integrity.

Students who feel they have been erroneously penalized for an academic integrity infraction or think that a penalty is inappropriate may grieve these issues through procedures developed for each college, school, program, or department of the University. Copies of the procedures are maintained in Deans’ offices, in the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education or Graduate Studies, and in the Office of the Vice President for Student Success. A copy of the disposition of any grievance arising in matters of academic dishonesty will be attached to the faculty correspondence in the Offices of Undergraduate or Graduate Studies.

When a student violates academic integrity in more than one academic exercise, whether those infractions occurred during the same or different periods of time or in the same or different courses, the University regards the offense as an especially serious subversion of academic integrity. The matter becomes particularly severe when the student has been confronted with the first infraction before the second is committed. Whenever the Office of Undergraduate or Graduate Studies receives a second academic integrity report on a student, the Dean will request a hearing before the University Judicial System.

The Director of Libraries or the Computing Center, upon a finding of theft, damage, or misuse of facilities or resources, will forward all such cases to the University Judicial System for review and disposition, which can include suspension or expulsion from the University. The Director of the Library or the Computing Center may, in individual cases, limit access to the library or computing center pending action by the University Judicial System. In all other cases of academic dishonesty that come to the attention of any staff, faculty, or student, it is expected that the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education will be notified of such infractions. The Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education will process all such alleged matters of academic dishonesty and refer them to the University Judicial System.

The University Judicial System was established by the governing bodies of this campus and is administratively the responsibility of the Vice President for Student Success. Any questions about the procedures of the University Judicial System may be secured by inquiry to that office.

Policy for Freedom of Expression

The University reaffirms its commitment to the principle that the widest possible scope for freedom of expression is the foundation of an institution dedicated to vigorous inquiry, robust debate, and the continuous search for a proper balance between freedom and order. The University seeks to foster an environment in which persons who are on its campus legitimately may express their views as widely and as passionately as possible; at the same time, the University pledges to provide the greatest protection available for controversial, unpopular, dissident, or minority opinions. The University believes that censorship is always suspect, that intimidation is always repugnant, and that attempts to discourage constitutionally protected expression may be antithetical to the University’s essential missions: to discover new knowledge and to educate.

All persons on University-controlled premises are bound by the Rules and Regulations for Maintenance of Public Order, which deal in part with freedom of expression (adopted by the Board of Trustees of the of the State University of New York June 18,1969; amended 1969,1980). Members of the University community should familiarize themselves with those rules and regulations. In addition, University faculty are protected by and bound by Article XI, Title 1, Sec. I of the Policies of the Board of Trustees (adopted January 1987), entitled “Academic Freedom.”

University officials or other members of the University community in a position to review posters, publications, speakers, performances, or any other form of expression may establish legitimate time, place, and manner regulations for the maintenance of an orderly educational environment; however, they may not prohibit expression for any reason related to the content of the expression, except as permitted in those narrow areas of expression devoid of federal or state constitutional protection.

Speakers invited to campus by University groups or individuals, and other speakers who may be legitimately present on campus, will be given the utmost protection to communicate their messages without disruptive harassment or interference. Opponents to those speakers enjoy the same protections for expressing their dissent.

All members of the University community share the duty to support, protect, and extend the commitment to the principle of freedom of expression, and to discuss this commitment with groups or individuals who seek to take part in University life. While all persons may seek to peacefully discourage speech that may be unnecessarily offensive to particular individuals or groups, speech that may be antithetical to the University’s values, those persons must support the legal right of free speech.

Under Section 1.5 of its charge, the Council on Academic Freedom and Ethics will serve as a hearing body available to those members of the University community who feel their freedom of expression has been unfairly suppressed. The Council will report its findings to the President for further review and action.

Notification of Rights under FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, dean, or head of the academic department [or appropriate official] written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes is inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

  4. Upon request, the University discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

  5. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605


Release of Student Information by Registrar

The following is the policy of control of student academic information to released by the Office of the Registrar:

  1. Only the following information may be released to any outside source not officially connected to the State University of New York or one of its agents:

    1. Any information listed as “directory information” by the University.
    2. Dates of attendance
    3. If the student received a degree, and if so, which degree.

  2. Any office of the State University of New York or its agent may have released to it any information kept on a student on a “need-to-know” basis

  3.  No further information will be released without the written consent of the student. Absolutely no transcript of students’ records will be released outside the University without their signed authorization.

Official Notifications to Students

Official University notifications to students are sent to their permanent addresses on file with the Registrar. Students are responsible for insuring that their permanent addresses are kept up-to-date by reviewing and changing as appropriate their address information on MyUAlbany.

Students' Official University e-mail Account

Since some University offices will send important information to students by e-mail using their official University e-mail account (mailto:NetID@albany.edu, students are also responsible for activating that account and checking it on a reasonably frequent basis.

A word of warning: Although it is possible for a student to have this mail forwarded to a student's private e-mail account, students with some providers have found that documents sometimes do not forward accurately or completely or with important attachments, and as a result the students have missed important deadlines and other notifications.

School or College Enrollment

Most students are advised in the Advisement Services Center/Undergraduate Studies during their freshman year. When students have been accepted to a major, they are enrolled in the school or college offering study in the desired major field, these are the College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Business, Criminal Justice, Public Affairs, and Social Welfare. In line with policy developed by the Committee on Academic Standing, a particular department, school or college within the University may permit a student to enroll as a major who has not completed a minimum of 24 graduation credits. Upon approval of the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council additional conditions of initial and continued enrollment as a major may be required by individual departments, schools, or colleges.

Class Standing

Students are classified by the Registrar’s Office on the basis of graduation credits, as follows:

 Freshmen  Fewer than 24 crs
 Sophomore  24–55 crs
 Junior  56–87 crs
 Senior  88 or more crs


Attendance and Timely Compliance with Course Requirements

Students are expected to attend all classes and all examinations and to complete all course requirements on time.

Faculty have the prerogative of developing an attendance policy whereby attendance and/or participation is part of the grade. As noted in the following section, “Syllabus Requirement,” instructors are obliged to announce and interpret all course requirements, including specific attendance policies, to their classes at the beginning of the term; an instructor may modify this or other requirements in the syllabus but “must give notice in class of any modification” and must do so “in a timely fashion.”

Students will not be excused from a class or an examination or completion of an assignment by the stated deadline except for a compelling reason. Students who miss a class period, a final or other examination, or other obligations for a course (fieldwork, required attendance at a concert, etc.) must notify the instructor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education of that compelling reason and must do so in a timely fashion.

Although the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education provides letters to instructors asking that students with compelling reasons be granted consideration in completing their work, faculty are strongly encouraged to use their best judgment when students have appropriate documentation for legitimate absences and not to rely on the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education when it is not necessary.

If the student foresees a time conflict in advance that will prevent attendance at a class or examination or completion of an assignment, the student is expected to bring this to the attention of the instructor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education as soon as the conflict is noted. In the case of an unforeseen event, the student is expected to notify the instructor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education at the student’s first opportunity to do so after the fact.

This timeliness is important since if the reason cited by the student is not considered a sufficient excuse, the student will need to know this as soon as possible. Even if the reason warrants granting the excuse, a student’s delay in contacting the instructor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education may make it more difficult for the University to assist the student with acceptable options of making up the work that was missed.

Although University officials will consider each student’s request on its own merits and not attempt to define ahead of time the validity of all the possible reasons a student might give for missing a class or an examination, there are three types of reasons for which excuses will generally be granted: (a) illness, tragedy, or other personal emergency; (b) foreseeable time conflicts; and (c) religious observance. It shall be the student’s responsibility to provide sufficient documentation to support any request. (In this context, it should be noted that fraudulent excuses are considered violations of academic integrity and are grounds for academic or disciplinary penalties,)

  1. ILLNESS AND EMERGENCIES: If the cause is documented hospitalization or other significant medical reason, a tragic or traumatic experience, or other personal emergency, the student should contact the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30) as soon as the student is able to do so. Depending on the nature of the problem, the student may be requested to provide additional documentation. If the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education grants the student an excuse, the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education will notify the instructor(s) involved of this fact and of the date(s) for which the student has been excused. An instructor in this case may not penalize the student academically for the absence and is expected to provide reasonable assistance to the student concerning instruction and assignments that were missed. If an examination was missed, the instructor must administer a make-up examination or offer an alternative mutually agreeable to the instructor and the student. Any conflicts between student and faculty in accepting the alternative may be presented for resolution to the Chair of the department in which the course is offered.

  2. COMPELLING TIME CONFLICTS: If the cause of the absence is a major academic conference at which the student has a significant participation, a varsity athletic contest (excluding practice sessions and intra-squad games), a field trip in another course, or some other compelling time conflict, the student must notify the professor involved as soon as possible, providing verification of the conflict. When a student clearly would have been able to notify the instructor well in advance of the conflict, the student is required to do so. If an excuse is granted, the instructor is expected to provide, if at all possible, an alternative by which the student will not be penalized as a result of the conflict. Any conflicts between student and faculty in accepting the alternative may be presented for resolution to the Chair of the department in which the course is offered.

  3. RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE: Absences for religious observance are covered by Section 224-a. of the Education Law: “Students unable because of religious beliefs to register or attend classes on certain days.”

 

  1. No person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he or she is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to register or attend classes or to participate in any examination, study, or work requirement on a particular day or days.

  2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to attend classes on a particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work requirements.

  3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to make available to each student who is absent from school, because of his religious beliefs, an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study, or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such equivalent opportunity.

  4. If registration, classes, examinations, study, or work requirements are held on Friday after four o’clock post meridian or on Saturday, similar or makeup classes, examinations, study or work requirements or opportunity to register shall be made available on other days, where it is possible and practicable to do so. No special fees shall be charged for these classes, examinations, study or work requirements or registration held on other days.

  5. In effectuating the provisions of this section, it shall be the duty of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to exercise the fullest measure of good faith. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his availing himself of the provisions of this section.

  6. Any student who is aggrieved by the alleged failure of any faculty or administrative official to comply in good faith with the provisions of this section shall be entitled to maintain an action or proceeding in the supreme court of the county in which such institution of higher education is located for the enforcement of his rights under this section.


    6-a. It shall be the responsibility of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to give written notice to students of their rights under this section, informing them that each student who is absent from school, because of his or her religious beliefs, must be given an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to such student such equivalent opportunity.

  7. As used in this section, the term “institution of higher education” shall mean any institution of higher education, recognized and approved by the regents of the University of the state of New York, which provides a course of study leading to the granting of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Such term shall not include any institution which is operated, supervised or controlled by a church or by a religious or denominational organization whose educational programs are principally designed for the purpose of training ministers or other religious functionaries or for the purpose of propagating religious doctrines. As used in this section, the term “religious belief” shall mean beliefs associated with any corporation organized and operated exclusively for religious purposes, which is not disqualified for tax exemption under section 501 of the United States Code.

As amended by Laws of 1992, chapter 278

Syllabus Requirement

The instructor of every section of an under graduate class at the University at Albany shall provide each student in the section a printed or web-published copy of the syllabus for that section distributed during the first week of the class (preferably on the first regularly scheduled day the section meets) This syllabus must contain at least the information defined below. Each instructor retains the right to modify the syllabus and give notice in class of any modifications in a timely fashion. Students are responsible to apprise themselves of such notices. This requirement becomes effective with the fall 2002 semester.

Minimum Contents of a Class Syllabus:

Catalog number and title of the course
Term and class number of the section
Location(s) and meeting times of the section
Instructor’s name and title
If applicable, name(s) of teaching assistants in the class
Instructor’s contact information (e.g., e-mail address, office phone number, office location, fax)
Instructor’s office hours
Course description, overview and objective(s)
If applicable, General Education category/categories met by the course and how the course fulfills those General Education objectives
Prerequisites of the course
The instructor should specifically indicate those prerequisites that are critical to success in the class and that are enforceable.
Grading scheme
Whether the course is A-E or S/U graded
Overall method by which grades will be determined (“weights” of exams, class participation, etc.)
Course requirements, including but not limited to:
Required textbooks
Other required materials, purchases; fees (when applicable)
Projected date and time of class exams, papers, projects, midterm, and final
Attendance policies for the class
General paper, project, and test requirements
Requirement of Internet for course work, when applicable
Safety policies (when applicable)

The course syllabus may also include such additional information as the instructor deems appropriate or necessary.

Academic integrity: “While it is strongly recommended that faculty specify in their syllabi information about academic integrity, as well as a description of the possible responses to violations, claims of ignorance, unintentional error, or personal or academic pressures are not sufficient reasons for violations of academic integrity. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the standards and behaving accordingly, and UAlbany faculty are responsible for teaching, modeling and upholding them. Anything less undermines the worth and value of our intellectual work, and the reputation and credibility of the University at Albany degree.” (University’s Standards of Academic Integrity Policy)

Course Enrollment

Students ordinarily enroll in courses at the level appropriate to their class.

Individual departments have the authority to require a C or S grade in courses that are prerequisite for advanced courses in that area.

Senior Enrollment in 100-Level Courses: Students with senior status (credits completed plus credits in progress equal to or exceeding 88) shall be allowed into courses at the 100 level only during the Program Adjustment period as defined by the University Calendar. This restriction does not apply to Music Performance courses and any summer session courses. Other exceptions may be granted by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30).

Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit: A senior with a superior academic record may register for a 500-level course for undergraduate credit with the approval of the major department chair and the course instructor. In exceptional circumstances, seniors may be authorized to register for 600-level graduate courses provided they have completed most of the upper division undergraduate and other courses essential to their major and require a graduate course to strengthen it. To qualify for such enrollment the senior must have a superior record, particularly in his or her major field. To register for a 600-level course, students must have the approval of their adviser and obtain the written consent of their department chair and the instructor offering the course. The department chair should arrange for copies of these consents to be distributed to the persons involved and to be filed in the student’s official folder.

Graduate Courses for Graduate Credit: Seniors of high academic standing in the University may receive graduate credit for graduate courses taken in excess of undergraduate requirements in the last semester of their senior year provided not more than 6 credits are needed to complete the student’s undergraduate program. Consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies is required and must be obtained in advance of registration to receive such credit. Seniors who are permitted to take courses for graduate credit in their last semester also must make formal application for admission to a graduate program and be accepted as a graduate student before registering for study in the final semester.

Auditing Courses

Informal Audit: This category of audit permits any student or resident of the state to visit any course (except those listed here). The informal auditor visits courses without tuition, fees, examinations, grading, or credit; and no record is maintained. The instructor determines the level of participation of the informal auditor. A student matriculated at Albany confers with the instructor of the course and requests consent to visit the course. An individual not matriculated at this University must first contact the Office of General Studies and then obtain consent of the individual instructor of the course. NOTE: Informal Audit is not allowed during Summer Session.

Formal Audit: This category of audit allows any student to formally audit any course (except those listed here). The formal auditor pays regular tuition and fees, and the course is entered on the transcript of the student with the grade of N (noncredit) or W (withdrawn) according to 6. as follows.

Exceptions: Generally, the following types of courses cannot be formally audited: practica, internships, research and independent study courses, field courses, clinical courses, workshops, and foreign study programs. Students who feel they have an extraordinary need to audit these courses must prepare a written rationale and submit it to the chair of the department in which the course is offered. Formal audit of graduate-level courses is restricted as outlined in 3. below. If a course is filled and has auditors in it, a student wishing to take the course for credit may displace the auditor.

Formal Audit Policies

  1. The student must register for the courses during the program adjustment period.

  2. Students must pay the regular tuition and fees based on their academic status. Fees and tuition will be based on the student’s total load, including courses formally audited. Credits taken by formal audit will not count toward full-time status for the purposes of academic retention.

  3. Registration for the formally audited course must be approved by the student’s academic adviser (for nonmatriculated students, either the Office of General Studies or the Office of Admissions) and the course instructor. A senior with a superior academic record may formally audit a 500-level course with the approval of the academic adviser, the major department chair, and the course instructor. In exceptional circumstances, a senior may be authorized to formally audit a 600-level graduate course provided the student has completed most of the upper-division undergraduate and other courses essential to the major field. To formally audit a 600-level course, students must have the approval of their adviser and obtain the written consent of their department chair and the instructor offering the course. The department chair will arrange for copies of these consents to be distributed to the persons involved and to be filed in the student’s official folder.

  4. A student may not change from credit to audit or from audit to credit after the last day to add a course.

  5. The formal audit option is limited to a maximum of two courses per term for each student.

  6. An individual who formally audits a course must participate in appropriate ways as determined by the instructor. It will be the responsibility of the student to ascertain from the instructor the degree of participation required. The course will appear at the end of the term on the transcript of the student with a grade of N (noncredit). A formal auditor may withdraw from a course not later than one week after the mid-semester date as stated in the academic calendar and be assigned a W. A student failing to participate satisfactorily will be withdrawn and assigned a W.

  7. Although not recommended, formally audited undergraduate courses may be taken for graduation credit at a later date. Formally audited graduate courses may not be taken again for graduate credit.

Adding Courses

All students must drop and add courses on the Web via www.albany.edu/myualbany.

From the first class day through the sixth class day of the semester, enter MyUAlbany on the web and enter the class number of the course. If the course is closed or restricted, a Permission Number from the instructor is also necessary. From the seventh class day through the tenth class day of the semester, a Permission Number from the instructor is required for all adds. Enter MyUAlbany on the web, enter the class number and the Permission Number for the course.

Subject to the approval of the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, after the tenth class day of the semester, a Section Key Number from the instructor must be obtained before the Program Adjustment can be accepted by the Registrar’s Office. After the tenth class day of the semester, all late adds must be done in person at the Registrar’s Office, CC-B25. A fee will be charged for this Program Adjustment.

In the event permission to late add a course after the tenth day of class is denied, a student may appeal that decision for any reason to the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council.

A “class day” is here defined to be any day from Monday through Friday in which classes are in session. The above methods of adding a course apply to quarter (“8 week”) courses and summer session course work on a prorated basis, determined by the length of the course in question.

Dropping Courses

All students must drop and add courses on the Web via www.albany.edu/myualbany.

From the first class day through the tenth class day of the semester, enter MyUAlbany on the web and enter the class number of the course. During this time, a dropped course will be removed from the student’s record. A “class day” is defined as in “Adding Courses” above.

After the tenth class day through the “last day to drop a course” (as specified in the Academic Calendar) a student may drop a course entering MyUAlbany on the web and entering the class number of the course. During this time, a dropped course will remain on the student’s record and an indicator of W will be entered in the grade column. The W will be entered regardless of whether the student has ever attended a class.

If a faculty member announces a failing grade in the course as a possible result of academic dishonesty, the student receiving such a penalty will not be permitted to withdraw from the course unless the grievance or judicial system rules in favor of the student.

A student still enrolled in a class after the “last day to drop” is expected to fulfill the course requirements. The grade recorded for the course shall be determined on this basis. A student who registers for a course but never attends or ceases attendance before the tenth class day, as reported by the instructor, yet does not officially drop the course shall have an indicator of Z listed in the grade column on his/her record. The above methods of dropping a course apply to quarter (“8 week”) courses and summer session course work on a prorated basis, determined by the length of the course in question.

Exceptions to this policy may be granted by the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council.

Note: Students receiving financial assistance through state awards should refer to Academic Criteria for State Awards in the Financial Aid and Estimated Costs sections of this bulletin before withdrawing from courses.

Policies to Deregister Students

Failure to Attend Class

Beginning on the seventh class day, instructors may deregister students who fail to attend class, explain absence, or officially drop within the first six days of classes of a term unless prior arrangements have been made by the student with the instructor. The policy to deregister students is limited to the add period at the beginning of the semester. For courses that meet only once each week, including laboratory courses, the instructor may deregister students who do not attend the first scheduled class.

The above policy also applies to quarter (“8 week”) courses and summer session courses on a prorated basis, depending on the length of the course in question. A “class day” is defined as in “Adding a Course” above.

Beginning with the Spring 2000 semester: For courses that meet only once each week, including laboratory courses, the instructor may deregister students who do not attend the first scheduled class.

WARNING: Not all faculty exercise this prerogative. The fact that you didn’t attend doesn’t guarantee that your professor dropped you from the course. Students must take the responsibility for dropping a course on the Web via www.albany.edu/myualbany.if they wish to avoid an E or U in that course.

Lack of Prerequisite(s)

Students may be deregistered who lack the prerequisite(s) of the course at any time within the term or quarter the course is being taught. The Registrar will assign students who have been deregistered after the program adjustment period a grade of W for the course.

Transfer of Credit After Matriculation

Since not all courses are acceptable for transfer credit, students wishing to take courses at other institutions for credit toward the degree at this University should have prior approval in writing from their academic advisers. Such written approval must be filed with The Registrar’s Office, and an official transcript of work satisfactorily completed at the other institution(s) must be received by that office before credit will be awarded.

Full-Time, Part-Time Defined

A student registered for a minimum of 12 credits within the semester is classified as a full-time student. Students registered for fewer than 12 credits are classified as part-time students for the semester.

Credit Load

A normal semester load is 15 credits. The maximum number of credits for which a student registers in a semester is an individual matter. The maximum credit load for a student in a given semester is determined with the advice and consent of that student’s academic adviser. It is incumbent upon students to present a rationale to their academic adviser for registration for more than 15 credits.

No undergraduate may register for more than 19 credits.

The Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30) may authorize students to register for more than 19 credits. Students must present compelling academic justification and have the approval of their academic adviser or major department for a request to exceed 19 credits to be considered.

Repeating Courses

Courses that can be repeated for graduation credit are so indicated within the course descriptions contained in this bulletin.

The following shall apply to students who enroll more than one time in a course that cannot be repeated for credit:

  1. Appropriate registrations in the course, as of the last day to add a course in a term as specified in the academic calendar, shall be listed on the student’s Academic Record; all A–E grades for such courses will be computed in the average.

  2. The total graduation credit applicable toward the student’s degree shall only be the credit for which that course has been assigned; i.e., graduation credit for the course can only be counted once.

Repeating Courses to Meet Program Admission Requirements

For the purposes of calculating admissions requirements into restricted majors or programs, once a student has received the grade of B- or higher in a course, no future grade in that course or its equivalent will be used in determining the student’s average for admission to that major or program.

An “equivalent” course, for purposes of this policy, is any course for which the student cannot receive credit by virtue of his or her having satisfactorily completed the original course.

Final Examinations

General Policy: In many courses, final examinations are an integral part of the learning and evaluative process. Some courses, by virtue of the structure, material, or style of presentation, do not require a final examination. The following policy in no way requires an instructor to administer a final examination.

Final examinations in semester-long undergraduate courses in the University are to be given only during the scheduled final examination period in accordance with the official schedule of examinations as published by the Registrar’s Office.

The term “final examination” as used here shall be defined as any examination of more than one-half hour’s duration that is given in the terminal phase of a course. As defined, “final examinations” may be either comprehensive, covering the majority of the content of a course, or limited to only a portion of the content of a course.

No examinations of more than one-half hour’s duration are to be given during the last five regularly scheduled class days of a semester. Instructors seeking any exceptions to the above policy must submit a written request through their respective department chair to their college dean, or directly to their dean in those schools with no departmental structure. If the dean approves the exceptions, the instructor must notify the class of the new scheduled final examination date at least three weeks before the last regularly scheduled class day of the semester. At the end of each semester, each college and school dean must submit to the vice president for academic affairs a summary of all exceptions granted to the final examination policy.

The above regulations notwithstanding, the instructor in any course should always retain the freedom to reschedule a final examination for an individual student should such a student present a case of unquestionable hardship in his or her scheduled examinations. Such rescheduling should, however, be done in the final examination period if at all possible.

Three Finals on One Day: If a student has three examinations in one day as a result of a departmental exam or of the official rescheduling of an examination after the initial final examination schedule has been published, then that student has the right to be given a makeup examination for the departmental or rescheduled examination. The request for such an exam must be made to the instructor in the appropriate course no later than two weeks before the last day of classes of the given semester. If possible, the makeup examination should be given within the final examination period.

Retention of Exams: Each instructor shall retain the final examination papers in his/her courses for one semester so those students wishing to see their papers may do so. This regulation does not apply in those instances in which the instructor chooses to return the papers to the students at the end of the course.

Grading

The undergraduate grading system for the University will include the following grades: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, E.

The normative grading pattern is A–E. However, students may receive S/U grades in two circumstances:

In sections and/or courses that have been designated by departments or schools as S/U graded.

In courses normally graded A–E in which the student selects S*/U* grading.

Students who matriculated in fall 1991 and thereafter are limited to a maximum of 2 courses of S* by student selection, and these courses must be below the 300-level. These 2 courses of S* may be in addition to all S grades received in department or school designated S/U graded sections or courses. Note: in specific courses approved by the UAC Curriculum Committee, a department, school, or program may require A–E grading for majors. See also “Grading Option Deadline” below.

A–E grades are defined as follows: A–Excellent, B–Good, C–Fair, D–Poor, and E–Failure. The grade of E is a failing grade and cannot be used to fulfill graduation requirements.

For students matriculating before Fall 1997: The grade of D can be used to fulfill graduation requirements only if it is balanced at the same institution by credit with the grades of A or B. Note that, for each credit of B one credit of D is balanced, and for each credit of A two credits of D are balanced. For balancing purposes, pluses and minuses associated with a grade are ignored.

Beginning with the Fall 1997 semester, the grade of S is defined as equivalent to the grade of C or higher and is acceptable to fulfill graduation requirements. The grade of U (C- or lower) is unsatisfactory and is not acceptable to fulfill graduation requirements.

Transfer D Grades:

  1. Students matriculating before Fall 2000 can transfer in D’s if they are balanced at the same institution by a grade of B or better, whether the transfer course was taken before or after they matriculated.

  2. Students matriculating in Fall 2000 through Summer 2001 can transfer in balanced D’s from prematriculation course work, but they cannot transfer any D’s for postmatriculation transfer courses.

  3. Students matriculating in Fall 2001 and thereafter cannot transfer in any grades of D.

  4. However, except for the University’s writing requirements, for which a grade of C or higher or S is required, transfer work graded D in a course that applies to one or more of the University’s General Education requirements may be applied toward fulfilling the requirements, even if the student receives no graduation credit for the course.

Other Grades and Indicators:

Additionally, the following grades and indicators may be assigned:

I Incomplete. No graduation credit. A temporary grade requested by the student and assigned by the instructor only when the student has nearly completed the course requirements but because of circumstances beyond the student’s control the work is not completed. The date for the completion of the work is specified by the instructor, but may not be longer than one month before the end of the semester following that in which the incomplete is received. The instructor assigns the appropriate academic grade no later than the stated deadline, or extends the existing incomplete grade to the next semester. Any grade of I existing after the stated deadline shall be automatically changed to E or U according to whether or not the student is enrolled for A–E or S/U grading. Except for extenuating circumstances approved by the Office of Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, these converted grades may not be later changed. (Students receiving financial assistance through state awards should refer to Academic Criteria for State Awards in the expenses and financial aid section of this bulletin before requesting grades of I.)

N Noncredit.

W An indicator assigned by the appropriate administrative officer indicating a student withdrew from the University, withdrew from an entire course load for a summer session, or dropped a course after the last day to add. For information and completeness, the W is placed on the permanent academic record. The W is not used in any computation of quality point or cumulative average totals.

Z An indicator assigned by the appropriate administrative officer indicating a student enrolled in a course, never attended or failed to attend after the last day to add, and took no official action to drop the course. For information and completeness, the Z is placed on the permanent academic record. The Z is not used in any computation of quality point or cumulative average totals.

Grade Changes

An instructor may not permit students in an undergraduate course to submit additional work or to be reexamined for the purpose of improving their grades after the course has been completed. Also, The Registrar’s Office may not enter a change of grade without the approval of the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, except, of course, for changes of I to a final grade.

A grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, E, S, or U may not be changed to a grade of I. On a case-by-case basis and for good cause, the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education continues to have the power to allow grade changes for reasons deemed legitimate.

Grading Option Deadline

Students may change their option (A–E or S/U) for courses not departmentally designated for S/U grading until two weeks after the last day to add courses. Changes in grading selections cannot be authorized beyond the date specified. The grading option may be changed by filing the appropriate form with The Registrar’s Office by the date specified in the academic calendar. When discussing with an instructor their progress in a course, students should inform the instructor if they are taking the course S/U.

Academic Average

The grades of A, A- B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, and E shall be the only grades used to determine an average. Grades shall be weighted as follows: A = 4.0, A- = 3.7, B+ =3.3, B = 3.0, B- = 2.7, C+ = 2.3, C = 2.0, C- = 1.7, D+ = 1.3, D = 1.0, D- = 0.7, and E = 0.0. The student’s academic average is the result of the following calculation:

  1. The number of credits for courses receiving A–E grades is totaled.

  2. Each grade’s weight is multiplied by the number of credits for the course receiving that grade.

  3. The results of these multiplications are totaled to yield a weighted total.

  4. The weighted total is divided by the total number of credits receiving A–E grades to yield an academic average.

Student Academic Record

A student’s official progress records are maintained by the Registrar’s Office. Grades for the semester are available to the student via MyUAlbany following the posting of grades by the Registrar.

Academic Retention Standards

Since the University requires that students have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 and an average of 2.0 in the major and the minor in order to earn a bachelor’s degree, the grade point average is an important indicator of the ability to achieve a bachelor’s degree. Thus, the following policies are in effect for students whose performance indicates that they are in danger of failing to meet the conditions necessary to earn a degree.

IMPLEMENTATION NOTE: Although these revised policies have been implemented for all undergraduates, entirely replacing the former Academic Probation, Terminal Academic Probation, and Academic Dismissal standards for both non-EOP and EOP students, no student who matriculated prior to fall 2000 shall be dismissed or deregistered under the new standards if that student’s record under the former standards would not have resulted in dismissal or deregistration, respectively.

Academic Warning

A student whose semester grade point average falls below a 2.0 (but above a 1.0) will receive an Academic Warning from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, with a copy sent to the academic adviser. This action will not subject the student to any further penalty but is intended to remind the student of the University’s policies as well as to inform the student of the resources available to ensure good progress in achieving an undergraduate degree.

Academic Probation

  1. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below a 2.0 will be placed on Academic Probation for the following semester. A student placed on academic probation will be notified by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, with a copy sent to the academic adviser, and will be advised of the resources available to assist students in improving their academic standing.

  2. Students on Academic Probation will be expected to improve their academic performance immediately. They must raise the cumulative GPA to at least 2.0 to be removed from academic probation. Students who fail to meet this condition will be placed on Terminal Probation in the following semester.

Terminal Probation

  1. A student will be placed on Terminal Probation for the following semester if either of the following occur:

    the student’s semester GPA is below 1.0

    the student has a cumulative GPA below 2.0 for a second semester

  2. Students on Terminal Probation for a semester are in danger of academic dismissal at the end of that semester. Therefore, as a condition of continuing their enrollment at Albany, they must complete an “Academic Improvement Plan” to improve their academic performance in consultation with their academic adviser, and must file this plan with the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education by the end of the Add/Drop period. (Failure to file this form could result in immediate deregistration from the University.)

  3. If the student achieves a semester GPA and cumulative GPA of at least 2.0, the student will be removed from Terminal Probation.

  4. If the student’s semester GPA is at least a 2.0 but the cumulative GPA remains below 2.0, the student will remain on Terminal Probation and must continue to meet the conditions described in section 2) above. The student must raise the cumulative GPA to at least 2.0 to be removed from Terminal Probation.

  5. If the student earns a semester GPA below a 2.0 while on Terminal Probation, the student will be dismissed.

Academic Dismissal

Academic dismissal will occur only if a student has been on Terminal Probation and fails to earn a semester GPA of at least 2.0. The student’s record will have the notation “Academic Dismissal.” Students who have been academically dismissed have the right to seek reinstatement to the University by submitting a written petition to the Committee on Academic Standing through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, LC 30.

Academic Dismissal Policy: Educational Opportunities Program Students

Students enrolled at the University through the Educational Opportunities Program will be granted an additional semester on Academic Probation before they are subject to Terminal Probation, even if their cumulative GPA is below a 2.0.

Good Academic Standing

The term “in good academic standing” (satisfactory academic standing) means that a student is making satisfactory progress toward a degree and is eligible or has been allowed to register and take academic course work at this campus for the current term. Students placed on “Academic Probation” or “Terminal Academic Probation” are considered to be in good academic standing since they are making satisfactory progress toward a degree and are still authorized to continue studying toward their degrees. Academic Probation only serves as an academic warning that a student is in danger of not meeting minimum academic retention standards and being terminated from the University. Only those students who are officially terminated from the University are considered not to be in good academic standing.

(The above definition should not be confused with the academic standing criteria for eligibility for New York State financial awards as detailed in the Financial Aid section of this publication.)

Academic Grievances

The Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council is responsible for insuring and reviewing procedures for individual student academic grievances at the school and college level. Most academic grievances are expected to be resolved at the school or college level. However, if (1) the student feels due process was not followed at the school or college level or if (2) the student feels the decision rendered at the school or college level warrants further review, the student may address a petition to the Committee on Academic Standing of the UAC for a review of the case The action of this committee is final except in grievances arising out of grades assigned due to violations of academic integrity. CAS action on academic integrity grievances will be reviewed by and must be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs before implementation.

If the case has also been submitted to the student judicial system for University action, the Vice President for Academic Affairs will consult for the Vice President for Student Success before rendering a final decision.

Each school and college shall have established procedures for considering student academic grievances. Copies of the established procedures shall be available to students upon request. Students should contact the office of the dean of the academic unit involved if further information is desired or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, LC 30.

Students challenging an academic grade must first discuss their grievances with the instructor involved. If not resolved to the student’s satisfaction at this level, the grievance must then be discussed with the appropriate department chair. Failure to obtain satisfactory resolution at this level shall lead to the school or college review as stated in its procedures. Any such requests on the school or college level must be appropriately reviewed and a decision rendered.

Leave for Approved Study

  1. Students may apply for permission to pursue a Leave for Approved Study with the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, LC 30, 518-442-5821. That office shall ascertain that the student has been informed of University residency requirements, including major, minor and senior residency minima. Students interested in pursuing an approved leave must submit an application and other necessary paperwork prior to the beginning of the semester following their departure from the University. Completion of the semester prior to the commencement of the leave is required.

  2. Study must be in an approved program at another college or university.

  3. A leave for approved study is granted for only one semester and can be granted for a maximum of two semesters. A request for a leave implies an intent to return to the University in the next successive semester after completion of the leave.

  4. Adviser approval is necessary for the leave to be approved. If the student was admitted through the EOP program, approval of the EOP director is necessary.

  5. A student may pursue part-time or full-time course work during the leave.

  6. A student who has satisfied the previous conditions and whose University at Albany cumulative average, as well as the GPA in the major and minor, is at least 2.00 at the time the proposed leave would begin will be granted a Leave for Approved Study.

  7. A student who has satisfied the previous conditions and whose University at Albany cumulative average is less than 2.00 at the time the proposed leave would begin has the right to seek prior approval for a Leave for Approved Study by written petition to the Committee on
    Academic Standing.

  8. Academically dismissed students are not eligible for leaves for approved study.

Withdrawing from the University

Students may voluntarily withdraw from the University up to and including the last day of classes in a semester as indicated by the academic calendar.

The date of withdrawal is generally defined as the date the student signs a withdrawal form in the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30). For students seeking to withdraw due to medical/ psychological reasons, the date of withdrawal will be set by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, in consultation with the University Health Center or University Counseling Center, as appropriate.

Drops will be done for each currently registered course reflecting the withdrawal date. After the last day of classes, the appropriate academic grade will be assigned by the instructor for each registered course, regardless of class attendance. Academic retention standards will be applied.

Withdrawals from the University due to medical/ psychological reasons must be recommended by the University Health Center or University Counseling Center upon review of documentation supplied by a licensed health care practitioner or treatment facility. In order for action to be taken on an application for readmission submitted by a student who withdrew for medical/psychological reasons, clearance must be granted by the University Health Center or University Counseling Center.

POLICIES CONCERNING WITHDRAWING FROM THE UNIVERSITY

The following are the withdrawal policies and procedures currently in effect for matriculated undergraduates:

  1. A student withdrawing from an entire semester’s course load must complete a Withdrawal Form in the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education.

  2. Students who voluntarily leave the University with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or above may automatically return within six semesters from the date of withdrawal.

  3. Students who voluntarily leave the University with a cumulative grade point average of less than 2.00 will be withdrawn effective with the date they initiate their withdrawal.

  4. A student with a cumulative grade point average of less than 2.0 who withdraws from the University more than 15 class days after the mid-point of the semester is not eligible for readmission for the following semester. Should the student wish to petition for readmission for the next term, the petition must be submitted to the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education no later than the last day of finals as published in the Academic Calendar for the semester in which the withdrawal was initiated. (See Academic Calendar.)

  5. Grade assignment will be based on the following: If the withdrawal drops occur by the last date to drop without receiving W’s, no grade will be recorded. If the withdrawal drops occur after that date, a grade of W will be assigned for each currently registered course through the last day of classes for the semester. After the last day of classes, the appropriate academic grade will be assigned by the instructor for each registered course, regardless of class attendance. Academic retention standards will be applied.
  6. Retroactive withdrawal/drop dates normally will not be granted. Requests for exceptions will be considered by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30) only for extraordinary, fully documented circumstances.

  7. A student who registers and receives grades of “Z” for all course work for the semester will incur full financial liability.

  8. Withdrawals from the University due to medical reasons, active military duty and disciplinary suspensions or disciplinary dismissals must be administered by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30)

  9. A student eligible for an automatic return who fails to register after a period of six semesters will be administratively withdrawn by the University. Such action will require submission of a readmission application should the student wish to return at a future time.

 

Questions regarding financial obligations or refunds as a result of leaving the University should be directed to the Office of Student Accounts in CC 26 or by calling (518-442-3202). Students living in residence halls who find it necessary to leave the University must contact the Office of Residential Life in State Quad, or call  (518-442-5875).


Return/Readmission Procedure

Formerly matriculated undergraduates who left the University with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 may automatically return within six semesters from the date of withdrawal.

Students who were academically dismissed or whose University at Albany cumulative grade point average is less than a 2.00 must petition the Committee on Academic Standing as part of the readmission process. Applications for readmission as well as petition forms are available from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduates Education, LC 30 (518-442-5821).

The appropriate subcommittee of the Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing will make a recommendation concerning the readmission of any student who was dismissed for academic reasons and/or whose cumulative grade point average at the University is less than 2.00. The admitting officer of the University may find it necessary to deny readmission to a student for whom there has been a positive recommendation, but the admitting officer of the University shall not readmit any student contrary to the recommendation of the subcommittee of the Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing.

Readmission is based upon the student’s prior academic record as well as recommendations from other involved offices.

Returning students who left on academic probation, terminal probation, or who were on special conditions at the time of withdrawal will return to the University under the same academic probationary conditions.

Students who resume study within a six semester period of time will meet degree requirements indicated in the Undergraduate Bulletin in effect upon their initial matriculation. Students who resume study after a six-semester period of time will meet degree requirements as indicated by the Undergraduate Bulletin in effect when they return.

Students with previous holds or obligations to the University should take measures to clear these obligations as soon as possible.

Returning students who have not been dismissed and who left the University with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better must return to the same major being pursued at the time of withdrawal, unless a change of major is initiated.

Formerly matriculated undergraduates who have not yet completed a Baccalaureate degree may only return to the University as matriculated undergraduates. Any requests for exception to this policy will be considered by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education.

Degrees in Absentia

Formerly matriculated undergraduates who have almost completed their degree and cannot return here to finish remaining requirements may apply for permission to finish their degree in absentia.

Their cumulative University at Albany grade point average, as well as their GPA in the major and minor, must be at least a 2.00. In addition, a waiver of residence requirement(s) and departmental support may be necessary.

An application as well as other necessary forms for this process are available upon request by calling 518-422-5821 or writing the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30).