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Undergraduate Bulletin 2004-2005

Department of Public Administration and Policy



Distinguished Service Professor

David F. Andersen, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Distinguished Teaching Professors

David P. McCaffrey, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
State University of New York at Stony Brook

Professors

Sue R. Faerman, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University at Albany

Irene Lurie, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Jeryl L. Mumpower, Ph.D.
University of Colorado

George P. Richardson, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

John W. Rohrbaugh, Ph.D.
University of Colorado

Frank Thompson, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Associate Professors

Mitchel Abolafia, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Stony Brook

Thomas A. Birkland, Ph.D.
University of Washington

Sharon Dawes, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Helen Desfosses, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Boston University

James W. Fossett, Ph.D.
University of Michigan

Gerald R. Marschke, Ph.D.
University of Chicago

Judith Saidel, Ph.D.
University at Albany, SUNY

Holly Sims, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

James H. Wyckoff, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Assistant Professors

Alethia Jones, Ph.D.
Yale University

R. Karl Rethemeyer, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Patricia Strach, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin

Research Professors

Terrence A. Maxwell, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Theresa Pardo, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Thomas Stewart, Ph.D.
University of Illinois

Lecturers

Sydney S. Gatto-Cresswell, M.A.
University at Albany

Public Service Professors

Patrick J. Bulgaro, M.A
Siena College

Paul Castellani, Ph.D.
Syracuse University

Thomas Constantine, M.A.
University at Albany

Dall Forsythe, Ph.D.
Columbia University

Frank Mauro, M.P.A.
Syracuse University

Robert McEvoy, M.P.A.
Syracuse University

Steven G. Poskanzer, J.D.
Harvard University

Peter D. Salins, Ph.D.
Syracuse University

Professor Emeritae/I

Walter L. Balk, Ph.D.
Cornell University

James J. Heaphey, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Lester G. Hawkins, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Joseph M. Heikoff, Ph.D.
University of Chicago

Byron Hipple, M.A
Syracuse University

Richard I. Nunez, Ph.D.
Syracuse University

Lewis Welch, Ph.D.
Syracuse University

 

Public administration and public policy are concerned with the formulation and implementation of governmental policies and programs. The approach of the department is interdisciplinary, drawing on various social and behavioral sciences. The courses focus on such topics as the role of bureaucracy in society, management of finances in the public sector, organizational theory and development, the political and legal environment of administration, and public policy research and analysis.

The B.A. in Public Policy

The B.A. in Public Policy is offered by the Department of Public Administration and Policy. The Public Policy program is a joint major/minor program designed to help intellectually mature and motivated students understand and respond to changes in government and society. The program helps students understand how public problems are defined, and how policies are made and implemented to address those problems.

Public policy making affects everyone and involves questions of politics, economics, administration and management. A B.A. in public policy will help the student develop a broad interdisciplinary understanding of the forces that affect what government does and why.

Combining a student-designed concentration with field experience, the combined major and minor in Public Policy assists students through an interdisciplinary approach to develop analytic ability, research skills, and substantive competence in a specific public policy area. Student-selected technical and theoretical courses help develop skills and background desirable to future employers.

Concentrations

Typical policy concentrations include business-government relations, civil rights policy, criminal justice policy, environmental policy, foreign policy and international relations, health policy, labor relations and personnel policy, law and policy, policy and politics, public administration and management, social welfare policy, urban policy, and women and public policy. Students may work with their adviser to develop a concentration in other issue areas.

Careers

The Public Policy curriculum combines a strong academic program with opportunities to develop expertise in a particular policy area and hone communications and analytical skills. The program is excellent preparation for graduate study, law school, or employment in the public, private or nonprofit sectors. Graduates of the Public Policy program are employed in the state legislature, the executive branch, and have gone on to graduate study and careers in business, law, and management.

Internships

The internship is an integral part of the Public Policy degree. The University's location in the state capital affords students with unique opportunities for internships directly related to their fields of interest. These internships can be in the legislature, state agencies, private firms, and nonprofit organizations. The internship can give students practical experience, useful recommendations, and substantial advantages in graduate admissions and job placement.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Public Policy

General Program B.A.:

The major in public policy is a combined major and minor program requiring a minimum of 54 credits as follows: Required courses (30 credits):

R Pub 140,A Eco 110 A Eco 111, R Pad 204, R Pad 303, R Pub 316, R Pad 329, R Pub 340, R Pub 397 (or R Pos 342), R Pub 499 (or R Pos 495Z).

Plus two elective courses (6 credits) must be selected from the following courses:

R Pad 302, R Pub 303 /R Pad 304, R Pad 307, R Pub 321, R Pad 324, R Pub 325 or R Pos 325, R Pub 328 or R Pos 328, R Pub 330, R Pub 399, R Pad 414/R Pub 414, R Pad 424.

Approved concentration (18 credits): In addition to the 36 credits of core courses, each public policy major shall take 18 credits (of which at least 9 credits must be at or above the 300-level) in one of the following nine concentrations. No course may count toward both the concentration and as an elective course. The student-defined concentration must be approved by the Director of the Public Policy Program.

Concentrations

a) Public Administration

18 credits chosen from: B Law 220, A Com 204, R Pad 304 or R Pub 303 or R Pos 303, R Pad 307, R Pad 324, R Pub 325 or R Pos 325, R Pad 302 or B Mgt 341 or A Soc 342, A Soc 345, A Eco 355, A Soc 357, R Pad 414, R Pad 424.

b) Study of Society

18 credits chosen from: R Pos 101 or A Soc 115, A Soc 180, A Aas 219, A Soc 200, R Pos 320, R Pos 321, R Pos 325 or R Pub 325, R Pos 328 or R Pub 328, R Pub 330, R Pos 339, R Pos 365, R Pad 302 or B Mgt 341 or A Soc 342, A Soc 344, A Soc 350, A Wss 360, R Pub 410, A Aas 435, R Pos 438Z.

c) Urban Issues

18 credits chosen from: R Pos 101 or A Soc 115, A Soc 180, A Gog 102, A Gog 125, A Gog 220, A Pln 220, A Gog 225Z, A His 317, R Pos 321, A Gog 321, R Pos 323, A Aas 333, A Eco 341, A Eco 355, A Eco 356, A Soc 373, A Soc 375, R Pos 424.

d) Economics

18 credits chosen from: A Eco 300, A Eco 301, A Eco 330, A Eco 350, A Eco 370, A Eco 341, A Eco 355, A Eco 356, A Eco 455, A Eco 360.

e) Women, Gender & Policy

18 credits chosen from: A Soc 115, A Wss 220, A Wss 240, A Wss 260, A Wss 262, A Wss 360, R Pos/A Wss 333, A Soc 344, R Pos 346, A Wss/R Pos 433, A Aas 440.

f) International

18 credits chosen from: R Pos 102, A Lcs 100 or A Lcs 102 or A Lcs 150, A Aas 150, R Pos 351, A Lcs 357, R Pos 359, A Lcs 360, A Eco 360, A Eco 361, R Pos 370, R Pos 371, R Pos 373, R Pos 375, R Pos 383, R Pos 395, A Wss 330, R Pub 398, A Wss 451, R Pos 473.

g) Environment and Society

18 credits chosen from: A Ant 119, A Atm 100 or A Atm 101 or A Atm 102, A Atm 107, A Bio 230, A Geo 100, A Geo 250, A Geo 260, A Gog 101, A Phy 202, A Atm 300Z, A Atm 304, A Atm 307Z, A Bio 311, A Bio 319, A Bio 320, A Atm 407, A Atm 414.

h) Education Policy

18 credits chosen from: A Soc 180, A Aas 220, A Aas 240, E Edu 275, E Est 300, E Est 301, A Eco 341, A Eco 380, R Crj 308, E Psy 441, E Aps 400, E Aps 470.

i) Student-Defined Concentration

With the agreement of the Director of the Undergraduate Public Policy Program, a student may create a concentration that combines a set of existing policy-related subjects to establish a coherent program of study in a defined area of public policy to form a concentration composed of 18 credits.

Administration

The Director of the Undergraduate Public Policy Program administers the honors program, advises students, and helps students in selecting thesis advisers. The thesis is discussed in a forum involving the adviser, the honors director, and other faculty members selected by the student and the adviser upon its completion in the senior year.

Major Honors Program in Public Policy

The honors program in public policy combines recognition of general academic excellence with demonstrated achievement in a specific area of public policy.

Selection and Evaluation

The student must have declared public policy as a major/minor and have completed at least 12 credits of course work in the major/minor in public policy. The student must have an overall grade point average not lower than 3.25 and a grade point average of 3.50 in the core subjects in public policy is required for admission to the honors program. The student may apply to the Honors Program during the sophomore or during the first semester of their junior year.

Upon satisfactory completion of the honors curriculum and of courses required of all majors, students will be recommended by the Director of Public Policy to graduate with honors in public policy. The student must maintain at least the same grade point average overall and the same average in the major as were required for admission to the honors program to graduate with honors.

Thesis Requirements

Each student must complete a 25 to 30 page honors thesis. This paper should involve original research on a topic related to public policy. It should have a clearly defined thesis statement, a review of the existing literature on the chosen topic, original evidence offered to support the thesis, consideration of alternative rival hypothesis, and a conclusion of the consequence for public policy research of these findings. The paper is to be created in conjunction with a faculty mentor approved by the Director of Public Policy (and the paper may be co-authored with the chosen faculty mentor). The paper is to be submitted to the Director of the Undergraduate Public Policy Program.

Course Requirements

Students are required to take 63 credits. These 63 credits include:

Three 4-credit honors versions of existing 300-level courses (R Pad 300-level + 1-credit R Pub 300 or R Pad 300-level + 1-credit R Pub 300). In addition to attending classes and doing the same assignments as the other students in the course, they will earn the additional fourth credit through a tutorial with the faculty member teaching the course that will include extra reading and writing assignments.

Pub 494 Honors Research (at least 3 credit and taken in the Fall of the Senior year or the Spring of the Junior year) to engage in research with a faculty member designated by student and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Public Policy Program in order to generate the research necessary to complete their honors thesis.

R Pub 495 Honors Seminar a 3-credit class that highlights the dominant intellectual arguments occurring currently in the area of public policy research.

R Pub 496 Honors Thesis a 3-credit class designed to facilitate students in constructing their honors thesis into the appropriate format.

Honors Program B.A.: The Honors in Public Policy is a combined major and minor program requiring a minimum of 63 credits as follows: Required courses (39 credits):

R Pub 140, A Eco 110, A Eco 111, R Pad 204, R Pub 300 Honors Credit (on 3 separate occasions), R Pad 303, R Pub 316, R Pad 329, R Pub 340, R Pub 397, R Pub 494, R Pub 495, R Pub 496.

Plus two elective courses (6 credits) must be selected from the following courses: R Pad 302, R Pub 303/R Pad 304, R Pad 307, R Pub 321, R Pad 324, R Pub 325, R Pub 328, R Pub 330, R Pub 399, R Pad 414/R Pub 414, R Pad 424.

Approved Concentration (18 credits): In addition to the 36 credits of core courses, each public policy major shall take 18 credits (of which at least 9 credits must be at or above the 300-level) in one of the following nine concentrations. No course may count toward both the concentration and as an elective course. The student-defined concentration must be approved by the Director of the Public Policy Program.

CONCENTRATIONS

a) Public Administration

18 credits chosen from:

B Law 220, A Com 204, R Pad 304 or R Pub 303 or R Pos 303, R Pad 307, R Pad 324, R Pub 325 or R Pos 325, R Pad 302 or B Mgt 341 or A Soc 342, A Soc 345, A Eco 355, A Soc 357, R Pad 414, R Pad 424.

 

b) Study of Society

18 credits chosen from:

R Pos 101 or A Soc 115, A Soc 180, A Aas 219, A Soc 200, R Pos 320, R Pos 321, R Pos 325 or R Pub 325, R Pos 328 or R Pub 328, R Pub 330, R Pos 339, R Pos 365, R Pad 302 or B Mgt 341 or A Soc 342, A Soc 344, A Soc 350, A Wss 360, R Pub 410, A Aas 435, R Pos 438Z.

 

c) Urban Issues

18 credits chosen from:

R Pos 101 or A Soc 115, A Soc 180, A Gog 102, A Gog 125, A Gog 220, A Pln 220, A Gog 225Z, A His 317, R Pos 321, A Gog 321, R Pos 323, A Aas 333, A Eco 341, A Eco 355, A Eco 356, A Soc 373, A Soc 375, R Pos 424.

 

d) Economics

18 credits chosen from:

A Eco 300, A Eco 301, A Eco 330, A Eco 350, A Eco 370, A Eco 341, A Eco 355, A Eco 356, A Eco 455, A Eco 360.

 

e) Women, Gender & Policy

18 credits chosen from:

A Soc 115, A Wss 220, A Wss 240, A Wss 260, A Wss 262, A Wss 360, R Pos/A Wss 333, A Soc 344, R Pos 346, A Wss/R Pos 433, A Aas 440.

 

f) International

18 credits chosen from:

R Pos 102, A Lcs 100 or A Lcs 102 or A Lcs 150, A Aas 150, R Pos 351, A Lcs 357, R Pos 359, A Lcs 360, A Eco 360, A Eco 361, R Pos 370, R Pos 371, R Pos 373, R Pos 375, R Pos 383, R Pos 395, A Wss 330, R Pub 398, A Wss 451, R Pos 473.

 

g) Environment and Society

18 credits chosen from:

A Ant 119, A Atm 100 or A Atm 101 or A Atm 102, A Atm 107, A Bio 230, A Geo 100, A Geo 250, A Geo 260, A Gog 101, A Phy 202, A Atm 300Z, A Atm 304, A Atm 307Z, A Bio 311, A Bio 319, A Bio 320, A Atm 407, A Atm 414.

 

h) Education Policy

18 credits chosen from:

A Soc 180, A Aas 220, A Aas 240, E Edu 275, E Est 300, E Est 301, A Eco 341, A Eco 380, R Crj 308, E Psy 441, E Aps 400, E Aps 470.

 

i) Student-Defined Concentration

With the agreement of the Director of the Undergraduate Public Policy Program, a student may create a concentration that combines a set of existing policy-related subjects to establish a coherent program of study in a defined area of public policy to form a concentration composed of 18 credits.

 

Administration

The Director of the Undergraduate Public Policy Program administers the honors program, advises students, and helps students in selecting thesis advisers. The thesis is discussed in a forum involving the adviser, the honors director, and other faculty members selected by the student and the adviser upon its completion in the senior year.

 


Combined B.A./M.A. Program

The combined B.A./M.A. program provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master's degree programs from the beginning of the junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within 10 semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 148 credits, of which at least 40 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and school requirements, including the requirements of the major described previously, the minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all University and school requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 40 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students may apply to the combined degree program at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits, but no later than the accumulation of 100 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration.

 

 

 

 

 
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