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University at Albany Undergraduate Bulletin - 2003-2004

Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures


David Wills, Chair

The Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures includes the three programs French Studies, Hispanic and Italian Studies, and Slavic and Eurasian Studies. Each of these programs is fully described in the following three sections of the bulletin. In addition, the department offers courses in Danish and Dutch.



French Studies


Faculty

Professors

Herman P. Salomon, Ph.D.
New York University

David Wills, doctorat
Universiti de Paris-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Mary Beth Winn, Ph.D.
Yale University


Associate Professors

Susan Blood, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University

Eloise A. Brihre, Ph.D.
University of Toronto

Jean-Frangois Brihre, Ph.D.
York University

Cynthia A. Fox, Ph.D.
Indiana University, Bloomington

George V. Santoni, Ph.D.
University of Colorado


Lecturer

Mark Fisher, M.A.
University of New York at Albany

Mary Jane Highfield, Ph.D.
Cornell University


Professors Emeritae/i

Arnolds Grava, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska

Robert W. Greene, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Martin Kanes, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Frederick W. Moore, Ph.D.
Yale University

Carl J. Odenkirchen, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina

Raymond J. Ortali, Ph.D.
University of Michigan


Associate Professor Emeritus

Jack Richtman, Ph.D.
Columbia University


Adjuncts (estimated): 4
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 8


French Studies offers a wide range of courses in language, literature, civilization, mass media, Francophone studies, French cinema as well as in business French. The program combines innovative and traditional approaches leading to teaching, international trade, graduate work or other career objectives requiring a comprehensive background in French studies.

Full B.A. and M.A. and Ph.D. programs in French are available as well as a combined B.A./M.A. program. A combined B.A. in French/M.B.A. is also available.

A number of courses of general interest, given in English and requiring no knowledge of French, are also regularly scheduled.


Careers

Graduates enter careers in teaching, government service, translating, editing, interpreting, library science, international business, foreign service and computer-related technologies. Any field of work that requires a broad liberal education, linguistic skill and a knowledge of French-speaking cultures will offer job opportunities for majors. Combinations with particularly strong employment potential are French Studies and economics, political science and business.


Special Programs and Opportunities

The University maintains summer, semester and year-long exchange programs in France with the University of Montpellier, a program which provides students an opportunity to study French language at any level (no language prerequisite), literature and culture as well as business and economics in either French or English. An array of programs are available for study elsewhere in France, Quebec and other French-speaking parts of the world. The Office of International Programs provides students with guidance in choosing the right program.

The program sponsors a "Face to Face" series which brings to campus an important figure in contemporary French thought, letters, film or art.

Opportunities to use French and to exchange ideas outside of class are provided through Le cercle français, lecture and film series, and other activities.

Paris Chamber of Commerce Exam
The French Studies Program trains students to take both the written and oral parts of the international exam offered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Diplôme supérieur francais des affaires) on the Albany campus, when numbers warrant it. Recipients of the "Diplôme supérieur" enhance their employment potential in international business and management.

B.A. in French/M.B.A. Dual Degree Program
The French Studies Program and the School of Business offer a five-year B.A./M.B.A. Degree Program in French and Business Administration taken on the Albany campus and at the University of Montpellier. The program is open to students with 4 years of high school French (or A Fre 221 or 222L in the University in the High School Program.) Students fulfill requirements for the French major during their freshman, sophomore and junior year. Students formally apply for admission into the M.B.A. at the end of their sophomore years. The junior year is spent at the University of Montpellier where students take courses in French, European Economics, Management and Marketing, International Management and Finance. They also participate in internship/community service projects. The fourth and fifth years focus on completing the requirements for the M.B.A. degree.

Language Placement
How do I know what level French is for me?

Students wishing to enroll in French for the first time at the University at Albany should enroll in French 101 if they have never studied French before. Any student who has studied French in high school or at another university, or who has grown up in a French-speaking environment, must take the French placement test to determine which course to take. The placement test is given during summer advisement and during the first week of classes in the fall. Students without placement test scores should use the following guidelines in selecting the appropriate course. Please note that students taking a lower level course after having completed a course at a higher level will not receive graduation credits for that course.

A Fre 101L Students who have no previous experience with French or whose experience is the equivalent of less than one year of high school level French; placement test score 0-279.

A Fre 102L Students who have completed one year of high school level French or its equivalent; placement test score 280-340.

A Fre 221L Students who have completed two years of high school level French or its equivalent; placement test score 341-394.

A Fre 222L Students who have completed three years of high school level French or its equivalent. These students should see the Undergraduate Adviser to discuss the possibility of majoring or minoring in French; placement test score 395 and above.

A Fre 240 Students who have completed four years of high school level French or its equivalent. These students should see the Undergraduate Adviser to discuss the possibility of majoring or minoring in French.

Exceptions:

  1. Students may elect to enroll one level higher or lower than the level suggested by the above guidelines. Factors which could be taken into consideration in making this decision are: the length of time which has elapsed since last formal study of French; additional travel or home experience with the language; quality of previous program of study; grades earned (overall performance) in previous study. Note, however, that the Language Placement rules of the Undergraduate Bulletin state that A Fre 101L may not be taken for credit by students who have taken three years of high school French or passed the Regents examination within the last five years.

  2. Students who wish to be placed more than one level higher or lower than the placement suggested by these guidelines must have written permission from the Language Program Director.

  3. Students who have completed A Fre 200L or A Fre 221L through the University in High School Program should enroll in A Fre 222L; students who have completed A Fre 210L or A Fre 222L should enroll in A Fre 240.

  4. Students who have received Advanced Placement (AP) credit should see the Language Program Director to discuss their program of study.

  5. Students whose experience with French has not been primarily through organized study in an American high school setting should consult with the Language Program Director or the Undergraduate Adviser for help in selecting an appropriate class.

Students are strongly encouraged to see the Language Program Director if they feel they are in the wrong class or if they have any questions about placement. Decisions to change courses should be made no later than the fourth week of classes.


Degree Requirements for the Major in French

General Program B.A.: a minimum of 36 credits above A Fre 222L. These include: 21 credits of core courses (A Fre 240, 241E, 306, 340Z, 355, 360, 440Z); 15 credits of elective courses at the 300 level and/or 400 level, including at least 6 credits at the 400 level.

A Fre 306, 355, and at least one 400-level course must be taken in residence at the Albany campus. Credits earned through study abroad programs will not fulfill this requirement.

Teacher Education Program:
As of Fall 2000, the Teacher Education minor will no longer be offered for the incoming freshman class. To obtain teacher certification, students must complete the French major plus an M.A. in Education, due to revisions in the New York State Education Department regulations for teacher certification. Students admitted prior to Fall 2000 and transfer students may still be able to complete the Teacher Education minor. Students interested in teaching as a profession should contact the Academy for Initial Teacher Preparation at 442-5144.

Honors Program in French

The honors program in French is designed to promote opportunities for advanced work to highly motivated, mature undergraduate majors and prepare them to do independent work.

Students may apply for admission to the Honors Program after the beginning of the second semester of their sophomore year. To gain admission to the program students must have formally declared a major in French and have completed at least 12 credits toward their major, including A Fre 241 and 355. In addition, they must have an overall GPA of at least 3.25, and 3.50 in their major, both of which must be maintained in order to graduate with honors.

Students must complete a minimum of:

  1. (1) 12 credits of courses in the major above A Fre 241 and 355,

  2. (2) a 3-credit independent study course (A Fre 397), and

  3. (3) a 6-credit major project or series of projects, to be completed during the junior and senior year. Prior to beginning the project, the student must have written approval from the Academic Committee of French Studies. The project will be evaluated not later than the third quarter of the senior year and submitted in final form by the end of the fourth quarter.


Combined B.A./M.A. Program

The combined B.A./M.A. program in French provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of the undergraduate and master's degree programs from the beginning of their junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements for the major listed previously, the minor requirement, general education requirements, the minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits, and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students are considered as undergraduates until completion of 120 graduation credits and satisfactory completion of all B.A. requirements. Upon meeting B.A. requirements, students are automatically considered as graduate students.

Students may apply for admission to the combined degree program in French at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits, but no later than the accumulation of 100 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration. In exceptional cases, students with more than 100 undergraduate credits may apply to the program for exemption from the 100-credit rule.


Combined B.A.in French/M.B.A.in Five Years

Freshmen at the University at Albany who have taken four years of French in high school (or A Fre 222I or 222L through the University in the High School Program) have the unique opportunity to combine a BA in French and a MBA and to receive two degrees in five years. Students formally apply for admission into the MBA at the end of their sophomore year. The junior year is normally spent studying in France. By the end of their junior year, students have completed requirements for the French major. Completion of requirements for the MBA takes place during the fifth year.

In order to complete all requirements for this program in five years, students should plan to enter the program at the beginning of their freshman year and take all courses as scheduled on the BA in the French/MBA program chart (available from the department). They should consult with their undergraduate adviser before registering for courses.



Hispanic and Italian Studies


Faculty

Associate Professors

Armand F. Baker, Ph.D.
University of Iowa

Silvia Nagy-Zekmi, Ph.D.
Evtvvs Lorand University (Budapest)

Olimpia Pelosi, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina

Joana Sabadell-Nieto, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Maurice Westmoreland, Ph.D.
University of Illinois


Assistant Professors

Luis Paris-Molina, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Buffalo

Lotfi Sayahi, Ph.D.
Universidad Complutense Madrid


Lecturers

Maria Keyes, M.A. State University of New York at Albany

Aida Torres-Horwitt, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Albany


Adjuncts (estimated): 4
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 12


The Hispanic and Italian Studies program expects its students to become highly proficient in speaking, understanding, reading and writing the foreign language, as well as to develop a thorough knowledge of and an appreciation for the literature and civilization. Proficiency in language skills is regarded not only as an end in itself but also as a means of studying a foreign culture. Full programs are offered leading to the B.A. in Spanish and Italian: sufficient Portuguese courses are offered to permit an undergraduate minor sequence.


Careers

Combining Italian with another foreign language taught in schools, such as Spanish, French or English, at the undergraduate or graduate level would provide students with strong credentials for teaching positions. Opportunities for occupations requiring Italian or bilingual background would also be enhanced. Graduates usually teach Italian or are involved with bilingual education. Others work for airlines that fly to Italy and with American companies doing business there.

Occupational areas in which Spanish majors have been employed are teaching, public relations, state and federal service, foreign service of the U.S., airlines, travel agencies, and in businesses dealing with Spanish-speaking countries.


Special Programs or Opportunities

The Hispanic and Italian Studies program also participates in interdisciplinary studies in conjunction with programs in Latin American studies, linguistics, the School of Education, and the Departments of Art, Classics, History and Music.

A year abroad program was initiated at the International Institute in Madrid, Spain in 1970. Study abroad programs also are available in Campinas, Brazil; Medellin, Colombia; Costa Rica; and Cuernavaca, Mexico. For more information, see Office of International Programs. Use of the foreign language and the exchange of ideas are fostered through language clubs, colloquia, lectures and other activities in the program.


Degree Requirements for the Major in Italian

General Program B.A.:  A minimum of 34 credits including A Ita 103L, 104L, 206, 207, 223L, 301Z, 311, 312 and nine additional credits at or above the 300 level, six of which must be at the 400 level.


Honors Program in Italian

The honors program in Italian is designed to promote opportunities for advanced work to highly motivated, mature undergraduate majors and prepare them to do independent work.

Students may apply for admission to the Honors Program after the beginning of the second semester of their sophomore year. To gain admission to the program students must have formally declared a major in Italian and have completed at least 12 credits toward their major. In addition, they must have an overall GPA of at least 3.25, and 3.50 in their major, both of which must be maintained in order to graduate with honors.

Students must complete a minimum of 41 credits, including a 4 credit Honors Thesis (A Ita 499), as well as 34 credits normally required for the major, and a 400-level literature course in addition to those required for the major. Specific requirements are as follows: Italian core: (22 credits) A Ita 103L, 104L, 206, 207, 301Z, 311, and 421.

Fifteen additional credits must be at the 300 level or above, including 6 credits of literature courses at or above the 400 level. In addition, the student must write a thesis based on Italian literature or culture.


Degree Requirements for the Major in Spanish

General Program B.A.:  A student wishing to major in Spanish may choose one of three sequences offered by the program. All students must take a minimum of 36 credits in Spanish courses above the 104L level, including A Spn 205 or A Spn 206, A Spn 207, A Spn 223L, A Spn 301 or 301Z, A Spn 312L and A Spn 316. Students must also take additional courses in Spanish, unless otherwise indicated, according to the requirements of their sequence, as follows.

Literature Concentration *
A minimum of 18 credits to include the following: (1) 1 literature course at the 300 level; (2) 2 literature courses at the 400 level; (3) 2 language courses above A Spn 301Z; (4) one civilization course.

Language Concentration *
A minimum of 18 credits to include the following: (1) 1 literature course above A Spn 316; (2) A Spn 401 or 402; (3) 2 language or linguistics courses at the 400 level; (4) 2 additional courses as advised. A Lin 220M may be counted as one of these courses.

Secondary Education Concentration *
A minimum of 18 credits to include the following: A Spn 401 (formerly 305) and 403 and (1) 1 literature course at the 300 level; (2) 1 literature course at the 400 level; (3) 1 civilization course; (4) 1 additional course as advised.


* Course Categories for Spanish Major Concentrations

Language courses include A Spn 302, 401 (formerly 305), 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 410Z.

Civilization courses include A Spn 314, 315, 317, 318, 322, 453, 454.

Literature courses include A Spn 319, 320, 325, 326, 333, 344, 410Z, 414, 418, 445, 446, 447, 448, 449, 481, 482.


Honors Program in Spanish

The honors program in Spanish is designed to promote opportunities for advanced work to highly motivated, mature undergraduate majors and prepare them to do independent work.

Students may apply for admission to the Honors Program after the beginning of the second semester of their sophomore year. To gain admission to the program students must have formally declared a major in Spanish and have completed at least 12 credits toward their major. In addition, they must have an overall GPA of at least 3.25, and 3.50 in their major, both of which must be maintained in order to graduate with honors.

Students must complete a minimum of 40 credits, including a 4 credit Honors Thesis (A Spn 499), as well as 36 credits normally required for the major. Specific requirements are as follows:

Spanish core:  (18 credits) A Spn 205 or 206, 207, 223L, 301 or 301Z, 312, and 316.

  1. Students who choose the Literature Sequence are required to take at least three Literature courses at the 400 or 500 level, and they must write a thesis on a topic dealing with literature.

  2. Students who choose the Language and Civilization Sequence must take at least one civilization course at the 400 level, and they must also write a thesis on a topic dealing with Hispanic culture.

  3. Students who choose the Linguistics Sequence must take at least one 400-level linguistics course in addition to A Spn 402, and they must write a thesis on a topic dealing with linguistics.

  4. Students who choose the Secondary Education Sequence will be required to take both A Spn 403 and 404, and they must either write a thesis or they must complete a research project dealing with education.


Combined B.A./M.A. Program

The combined B.A./M.A. program in Spanish provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master's degree programs from the beginning of their junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirement, the minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students are considered as undergraduates until completion of 120 graduation credits and satisfactory completion of all B.A. requirements. Upon meeting B.A. requirements, students are automatically considered as graduate students.

Students may apply for admission to the combined degree program in Spanish at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits, but no later than the accumulation of 100 credits. Students entering the University with advanced standing in Spanish may be admitted after satisfying the core requirements (A Spn 205 or 206, 207, 223L, 301 (or 301Z), 312, and 316). A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration.




Portuguese


A minor in Portuguese is available to students who complete 18 credits of course work with an A Por prefix.

The Portuguese program offers instruction in the Portuguese language and in Portuguese and Brazilian literature and culture. By extending career opportunities to Brazil, Portugal and African countries where Portuguese is an official language, study in the Portuguese program can be an important adjunct to academic preparation in Latin American studies, social sciences, natural sciences, business and other fields.



Slavic and Eurasian Studies


Faculty

Professor Emeritus

Alex M. Shane Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley


Professors

Henryk Baran, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Toby W. Clyman, Ph.D.
New York University

Sophie Lubensky, Ph.D.
University of Leningrad

Associate Professors

Rodney L. Patterson, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles

Charles P. Rougle, Ph.D.
University of Stockholm


The study of Russian and other Slavic languages and literatures is offered not only for its intrinsic interest, but also as a means toward understanding the peoples and cultures of the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Major programs lay a firm foundation for postgraduate study in diverse fields or for various professional occupations.


Careers

In addition to traditional careers in teaching and in government agencies, graduates are finding employment in business, telecommunications, banking, and the legal profession, as consultants in a wide variety of areas related to commerce, democratization, and economic development in Russia and the other states of the CIS, as journalists, investment fund analysts, travel agents, cultural exchange coordinators, exhibit guides, translators and interpreters, and in many other fields.


Special Opportunities

To provide access to the riches of Russian literature to all undergraduates, regardless of their interest in language study, the Slavic and Eurasian Studies program offers a wide range of courses in Russian literature in translation. These courses, described in detail later, assume no prior knowledge of the Russian language or Russian literature and are intended also for students who are not majoring in Russian. Students interested in these courses are advised to consult the program for current offerings and course descriptions.

Opportunities to spend a semester in Russia are made possible through close cooperation between the SUNY and Moscow State University.


Language Placement

Experience indicates that students with one year of high school Russian will usually place in A Rus 101L or 102L, with two years in A Rus 102L, with three years in A Rus 102L or 201L, and with four years in A Rus 201L. Placement is contingent upon an active assessment of language skills made by the instructor in the course no later than the second class or in consultation with the undergraduate program director.

A student may not earn graduation credit for a course in a language sequence if it is a prerequisite to a course for which graduation credit has already been earned.

Students earning advanced placement credits from high school, and those earning credits in the University at Albany's University in High School Program, will be expected to register for the next course in the language sequence.

Transfer students are expected to register for the next level course in the language sequence. Placement is contingent upon an active assessment of language skills made by the instructor in the course no later than the second class or in consultation with the undergraduate program director.


Degree Requirements for the Major in Russian

General Program B.A.:  A minimum of 36 credits of Russian language (above A Rus 102L), literature, or culture courses. Two alternative tracks lead to the degree: (A) Language, (B) Literature and Culture. Each program consists of a common core of 28 credits plus at least 8 credits in the area of concentration.

Core Program (28 credits)
Language: A Rus 201L (5), 202L (5), 301 (3), 302 (3), 312 (3) (19 credits.

Literature and Culture:  Three courses, at least one of which in literature, from among A Rus 251, 252, 253, 161Z, 162Z, 280 or as advised by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (9 credits).

Area Concentration:  (8 credits)

(A) Language:A Rus 311 (3) plus 5 credits in Russian language courses or in literature courses taught in Russian at the 300 level or above.

(B) Literature and Culture: A Rus 311 (3), at least one course in Russian literature at the 300 level or above, and at least one course as advised from among A Rus 380 (3), A His 354 (3), 355 (3), A Pos 354 (3) 356 (3), 452Z (3) or other courses.


B.A./M.B.A. Program

Beginning in the fall semester 1996, Russian has participated with the School of Business in a five-year program leading to a B.A. degree in Russian and an M.B.A. Candidates spend two years on the Albany campus studying language and culture and lower-level business courses and satisfying General Education requirements. The junior year is spent studying at Moscow State University, followed by two years in Albany completing the business degree.


Honors Program

The honors program in Russian is designed for outstanding Russian majors enrolled in either the general program (language, literature or culture track) or the teacher education program.

Students may apply for admission to the honors program by submitting a letter of request to the program no later than April 15 of the sophomore year (for admission in the fall) or November 15 of the junior year (for admission in the spring). Junior transfers may apply for consideration at the time of their admission to the University.

Combined B.A./M.A. Program

The Combined B.A./M.A. Program in Russian provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master's degree programs starting from the beginning of their junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students will meet all University and college requirements, including the requirement for any of the B.A. programs in Russian described above, the minor requirement, the minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students will meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completing a minimum of 30 graduate credits, and any conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, or other professional experience where required, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students will be considered as undergraduates until completion of 120 graduation credits and satisfactory completion of all B.A. requirements. Upon satisfying requirements for the B.A., students will automatically be considered as graduate students.

Students may apply for admission to the combined degree program at the beginning of their junior year, or after the successful completion of 56 credits, but no later than the accumulation of 100 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration. Students will be admitted to the combined program upon the recommendation of the Graduate Admissions Committee (Slavic) of Slavic and Eurasian Studies.


Advanced Study in Russia

Through cooperation with the State University of New York Office of International Programs, Slavic and Eurasian Studies provides advanced students with an opportunity to spend one semester in Russia. Students accepted for the program reside and study at Moscow State University and follow a curriculum comprised of advanced Russian language, Russian and Soviet literature and Russian culture. Students are eligible to apply for the program in their third year of Russian study or later.


Other Slavic Languages

The program provides instruction in Slavic languages other than Russian. In recent years, it has offered courses in Bulgarian, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, and Ukrainian. Courses in Yugoslav and Bulgarian culture (in English) and Polish and East European literatures have also been offered.


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