Undergraduate Bulletin, 2002-2003

School of Business


Dean
Richard A. Highfield, Ph.D.
University of Chicago

Associate Dean
Paul A. Leonard

Assistant Dean
Albina Y. Grignon

Assistant Dean
Linda M. Krzykowski

Assistant Dean
John S. Levato

Assistant to the Dean
Susan Maloney

Assistant to the Dean
Ellie Moore


Faculty

Distinguished Professor Emeritae/i

William K. Holstein, Ph.D.
Purdue University


Professors Emeritae/i

Donald D. Bourque, Ph.D.
University of Washington

Hugh T. Farley, J.D.
American University

Ronald W. Forbes, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Buffalo

Richard Hughes, Ph.D.
Purdue University

Enrico Petri, Ph.D.
New York University


Professors

Michael J. Kavanagh, Ph.D.
Iowa State University

Giri Kumar Tayi, Ph.D.
Carnegie Mellon University

Charles M. Schaninger, Ph.D.
University of Rochester

Hany A. Shawky, Ph.D.
Ohio State University

Thomas D. Taber, Ph.D.
University of Illinois

Gary A. Yukl, Ph.D.
University of California


Associate Professors Emeritae/I

Donald D. Ballou, Ph.D.
University of Michigan

Harold L. Pazer, M.B.A.
University of Washington

John P. Seagle, Ph.D.
Stanford University


Associate Professors

Salvatore Belardo, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Rita Biswas, Ph.D.
Texas A. & M. W. Christian Buss, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Jakov J. Crnkovic, Ph.D.
University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia

William D. Danko, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Peter Duchessi, Ph.D.
Union College

Saurav K. Dutta, Ph.D.
University of Kansas

Cecilia Falbe, Ph.D.
Columbia University

Jagdish Gangolly, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh

Hal G. Gueutal, Ph.D.
Purdue University

Raef A. Lawson, Ph.D.
New York University

David J. Marcinko, Ph.D.
Boston College

Nicholas Mastracchio, Jr., Ph.D.
Union College

Paul Miesing, Ph.D.
University of Colorado

Lakshmi Mohan, Ph.D.
Columbia University

Paul H. Schurr, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Indushoba Chengalur-Smith, Ph.D.
Virginia Tech

David M. Smith, Ph.D.
Virginia Tech

Scott I. Tannenbaum, Ph.D.
Old Dominion University


Assistant Professors

Deborah Archambeault, M.S.
University at Albany

Wendy S. Becker, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University

Christophe Faugere, Ph.D.
University of Rochester

Sanjay Goel, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Janet H. Marler, Ph.D.
Cornell University

Eliot H. Rich, M.P.P.
Harvard University

Kinsun Tam, Ph.D.
University of Connecticut

Sang-Gyung Jun, Ph.D.
University at Buffalo


Visiting Assistant Professors

Martin L. Fogelman, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Lester Hadsell, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute


Lecturers

Deborah Archambeault, M.S.
University at Albany

Thomas Collura, J.D.
Albany Law School of Union University

Valentin A. DeMarco, Jr., M.B.A.
University at Albany

Ingrid Fisher, M.S.
University at Albany

Laurie Jackson, M.B.A.
University at Albany

Jane Reich, M.B.A.
Boston University

Peter J. Ross, M.B.A.
University at Albany

Adjuncts (estimated): 15
Teaching Doctoral Assistants (estimated): 5-6


The School of Business offers degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels that prepare students to enter managerial and professional careers. All programs are accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business.

All School of Business courses are preceded by the prefix letter B. The following School of Business courses are considered "Liberal Arts and Sciences" courses by the University: B Bus 250, B Law 200, B Law 220, B Mgt 341, B Mgt 343, B Mgt 465, B Mgt 481, B Mkt 351, B Msi 215, B Msi 220.

No more than six credits from these courses may be counted as "Liberal Arts and Sciences" courses by students majoring in business administration or accounting.

At the undergraduate level, the school offers Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees in accounting and in business administration. The B.S. degree is granted only to students who have been formally admitted to the School of Business prior to taking their upper division courses in business.

At the graduate level, the school offers a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), a Master of Science in Accounting (M.S.), and a Master of Science in Taxation (M.S.). The M.B.A. is a two-year program open primarily to non-business undergraduates. A combined B.S.-M.B.A. program (five years) is available to business students (Preprofessional Program). In addition, the School offers a Ph.D. in Organizational Studies and participates in the Information Sciences Ph.D. Both programs are offered in cooperation with other academic units. Information on these graduate programs in the School of Business is available in the Graduate Bulletin.

The School of Business at Albany has developed a national reputation for the quality of its undergraduate programs. The school is unable to accommodate all undergraduate students who wish to enroll as upper-division majors.


Application and Admission

The following guidelines have been developed as a means of selecting the best-qualified students to study accounting or business administration.

Initial Admission of Freshmen to the School of Business: All students admitted to the University for summer 1995 or thereafter whose basis of admission is "FRESHMAN" can be admitted to the School of Business by declaring their major as "School of Business." To do so, they must sign a School of Business major declaration form and submit this to their Advisement Services Center/Undergraduate Studies (ASC/US) or Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) academic adviser.

Most students who declare a major in the School of Business do so during their initial meeting with their academic adviser at orientation. However, students who fill out the form by December 15th of a fall semester or May 1st of a spring semester will also be considered during the next review for admission to junior standing in the School of Business.

To remain a School of Business major during the freshman and sophomore years, each student must meet the retention standards set by the School of Business. These standards require students to maintain a B (3.00) overall average at the University at Albany and at least a B- (2.70) average for the designated admission core course categories taken at Albany.

To remain a School of Business major, students must also have satisfactorily completed any five of the seven admission core course categories after three semesters at the University, and all seven (7) of the admission core course categories after four (4) semesters at the University. (Note: all core course categories not completed prior to matriculation must be taken at the University and graded on an A-E basis.) These categories are: (1) B Acc 211, (2) B Msi 215 or A Csi 101N or A Csi 201N, (3) A Mat 108 or B Msi 220 or A Eco 320; (4) A Eco 110M, (5) A Eco 111M, (6) A Psy 101M, and (7) A Soc 115G or 115M or A Ant 108G or 108M. In addition, students must have completed a total of at least 56 degree applicable credits after four semesters at the University to remain a School of Business major.

Students' records will be evaluated after their second semester, and those falling below the retention standards will receive a warning letter indicating they are in jeopardy of losing their status as a School of Business major. Students' records will again be evaluated after their third and fourth semester to determine that all of the above retention standards have been met.

Students in the School of Business who have attained junior standing (i.e., 56 degree applicable credits) and who have met all the retention standards shall be eligible to enroll in the upper division School of Business courses.


Initial Admission of Transfers with Sophomore Standing or Above to the School of Business:

All students admitted to the University for summer 1995 or thereafter whose basis of admission is "TRANSFER" can be admitted to the School of Business by declaring their major as either Accounting or Business Administration at the time of their application to the University as long as they will have met the following criteria:

Students must have completed a total of at least 24 degree applicable credits by the end of the spring semester preceding their summer or fall admission to the University, or by the end of the fall semester preceding their spring admission to the University. They must also have a final cumulative average of B (3.00) or higher and have maintained at least a B- (2.70) average in any designated core course categories completed elsewhere prior to matriculation.

To remain a School of Business major, each student must meet the retention standards set by the School of Business. These standards require students to maintain a B (3.00) overall average at the University at Albany and at least a B- (2.70) average for the designated admission core course categories taken at Albany.

To remain a School of Business major, students must also have satisfactorily completed all seven of the admission core course categories after two semesters at the University. These categories are: (1) B Acc 211, (2) B Msi 215 or A Csi 101N or A Csi 201N, (3) A Mat 108 or B Msi 220 or A Eco 320; (4) A Eco 110M, (5) A Eco 111M, (6) A Psy 101M, and (7) A Soc 115G or 115M or A Ant 108G or 108M. (Note: all core course categories not completed prior to matriculation must be taken at the University and graded on an A-E basis.) They must also have achieved 56 degree applicable degree credits after two semesters at the University.

Students in the School of Business who have attained junior standing (i.e., 56 degree applicable credit) and who have met all the retention standards shall be eligible to enroll in the upper division School of Business courses.


Subsequent Admission to the School of Business:

Students who did not declare their major as "School of Business" by the deadlines stated above but whose basis of admission is "FRESHMAN" or who were admitted to the University as a "TRANSFER" with fewer than 24 degree-applicable credits (freshman standing) may directly apply (or reapply) for admission to the School of Business once they have attained junior standing (i.e., 56 degree applicable credits) and have satisfactorily completed all seven of the admission core course categories. These categories are: (1) B Acc 211, (2) B Msi 215 or A Csi 101N or A Csi 201N, (3) A Mat 108 or B Msi 220 or A Eco 320; (4) A Eco 110M, (5) A Eco 111M, (6) A Psy 101M, and (7) A Soc 115G or 115M or A Ant 108G or 108M.

Applicants must have maintained a B (3.0) overall average at the University at Albany and at least a B- (2.7) average for the designated admission core course categories taken at Albany. (Note: all core course categories not completed prior to matriculation must be taken at the University and graded on an A-E basis.)

Other "TRANSFER" students who were admitted with 24 or more degree-applicable credits but who were not initially admitted to the School of Business may still be considered for admission within the following guidelines:

  1. Students who can demonstrate that their previous transfer record would have qualified them for admission had they applied initially to the School of Business will be admitted under the conditions and criteria described above for other sophomore or junior transfers.

  2. Students who do not initially qualify for admission as a transfer student to the School of Business may contact the school for individual consideration. Some students may be granted conditional status, with admission to the school contingent upon satisfactory completion of a specific academic contract.


Appeals:

Special Admissions:  Students not admissible by any of the established criteria but who believe they have extenuating circumstances may write a letter of appeal to the School of Business. Contact the Assistant Dean in the Office of Student Services, BA-361A for the procedure.


Degree Requirements for the Major in Accounting

Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements   Credits  
Writing (A writing intensive course outside the School of Business)3
Social and Behavioral Sciences 
A Psy 101M Intro to Psychology3
A Soc 115M or 115G Intro to Sociology or
A Ant 108M or 108G Intro to Cultural Anthropology
3
A Eco 110M and 111M Principles of Economics 6
A Eco 300 Intermediate Theory 1: Microeconomics 3
Mathematics: Calculus A Mat 106, 111, 112, 118 or equivalent 3
B Mgt 341 Behavioral Foundations of Management 3
    
 24

 
General Education RequirementsCredits
Additional credits required of an accounting major to fulfill completely the
University’s General Education requirements.
 
Other Liberal Arts and Sciences electives
 36
     
Total Liberal Arts & Sciences credits 60

Business RequirementsCredits
B Acc 211 and 222 Financial and Managerial Accounting 6
B Fin 300 Financial Management 3
B Fin 301 or Eco 350 3
B Law 220 Business Law 3
B Law 321 Law of Business Organization 3
B Msi 215 Computer Applications in Business (or A Csi 101N or A Csi 201N)3
B Msi 220 Introduction to Business Statistics (or A Mat 108 or A Eco 320) 3
B Acc 422 Statistical Applications in Accounting and Auditing 3
B Msi 330 Operations Research Applications I 3
B Mkt 310 Marketing Principles and Policies 3
B Mgt 481 Strategic Management 3
     
 36

Additional Accounting RequirementsCredits
B Acc 311 and 312 Financial Accounting Theory I and II 6
B Acc 331 Cost Accounting 3
B Acc 381 Financial Information Systems 3
B Acc 411 Financial Accounting Theory III 3
B Acc 441 Income Tax Accounting I 3
B Acc 442 Income Tax Accounting II 3
B Acc 461Z Auditing 3
     
 24
     
Total business credits 60
     
Total credits (minimum) 120*

NOTE:  The following courses are not acceptable toward the CPA exam requirements: physical education courses; health courses; Information Science and Policy courses; School of Education courses; and courses not classified by the School of Business as liberal arts and sciences.

*NOTE:  CPA Examination—New York State is planning to adopt the 150-credit requirement for admission to the CPA Examination. Students planning to take this examination will be asked to take the additional credit beyond the 120 currently required. You should consult your adviser for details on this change.


Degree Requirements for the Major in Business Administration

The programs in business administration, combining a major-minor sequence, are designed for students planning careers in management science, marketing, and finance or combinations of these three major areas.

Liberal Arts and Sciences RequirementsCredits
Writing (A writing intensive course outside the School of Business) 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences 
A Psy 101M Intro to Psychology 3
A Soc 115M or 115G Intro to Sociology or
A Ant 108M or 108G Intro to Cultural Anthropology
3
A Eco 110M and 111M Principles of Economics 6
Economics elective at the 300-level or above where A Eco 110M and 111M are prerequisites, excluding A Eco 320, 458, 496 and 497 3
Mathematics: Calculus A Mat 106, 111, 112, 118 or equivalent 3
     
 21

General Education RequirementsCredits
Additional credits required of a business administration major to fulfill completely the University’s General Education requirements,  
Other Liberal Arts and Sciences electives
 39
     
Total Liberal Arts & Sciences credits60

Business RequirementsCredits
B Acc 211 and 222 Financial and Managerial Accounting 6
B Fin 300 Financial Management 3
B Law 200 Legal Environment of Business or B Law 220 Business Law 3
B Mkt 310 Marketing Principles and Policies 3
B Msi 215 Computer Applications in Business (or A Csi 101N or A Csi 201N) 3
B Msi 220 Introduction to Business Statistics (or A Mat 108 or A Eco 320) 3
B Msi 330 Operations Research Applications I 3
B Mgt 341 Behavioral Foundations of Management 3
B Mgt 481 Strategic Management 3
     
 30

Approved Concentration*Credits
Marketing
Financial Analysis
Management Science
Management Information Systems
Combination (from two of the above)
15-18

Unrestricted ElectivesCredits
(These may be Liberal Arts and Sciences courses or other Electives.) 12-15
     
Business + Unrestricted total . 60
     
Total credits (minimum) 120

* For more detailed information on concentrations, courses, departments, placement and other services to students that are available in the University at Albany's School of Business, please visit the school web page:  www.albany.edu/business/


Preprofessional Program

This program is designed for outstanding Business Administration majors who wish to obtain the M.B.A. degree in five years. A formal application to the coordinated senior year must be submitted during the second semester of the junior year. Students must submit a Graduate Management Admission Test Score as a part of their application. Those interested in this program should contact the Assistant Dean for Student and Alumni Services, Office of Student Services, BA-361A, for more specific information.


Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements

Students should complete the following liberal arts courses to be considered for admission to the program-A Eco 110M and 111M; A Mat 106 or 111 or 112 or 118 or equivalent; A Psy 101M; A Ant 108M or 108G or A Soc 115M or A Soc 115G, upper level Eco course, a writing intensive course, and additional required General Education courses.


Business RequirementsCredits
B Acc 211 Financial Accounting 3
B Acc 222 Managerial Accounting 3
B Fin 300 Financial Management 3
B Law 200 or 220 Business Law 3
B Mgt 341 Behavioral Foundations of Management 3
B Mkt 310 Marketing Principles and Policies 3
B Msi 215 Computer Applications in Business (or A Csi 101N or 201N)3
B Msi 220 Introduction to Business Statistics (or A Eco 320 or A Mat 108) 3
B Msi 322 Statistics for Business Research 3
B Msi 330 Operations Research Applications 3
     
 30


Combined Bachelor's/ Master's in Business Administration Program

The early M.B.A. option is designed for students majoring in selected areas of the liberal arts and sciences who wish to obtain the M.B.A. degree in five years. Undergraduates at the University at Albany may apply for early admission to the School of Business M.B.A. program during their junior year. Students interested in this option are encouraged to contact Susan Maloney during their sophomore year.

Admission Requirements

  1. By May of the junior year, an applicant must have completed the Graduate Management Admission Test and achieved a minimum score of 575.

  2. During the fall of the junior year, students may make an appointment to see Susan Maloney, Assistant to the Dean for Student Services to discuss the application/admission criteria.

  3. During the spring of the student's junior year, the student must submit an application for admission to the early admission M.B.A. option. Applications are available in the Graduate Studies Office in the University Administration Building Room 121 (all application criteria in effect for the M.B.A. Program must be followed).

  4. At the conclusion of the junior year, an applicant for the early-admission program must have achieved a cumulative GPA at the University at Albany of 3.30.

  5. Students may not be admitted to this option if 100 or more undergraduate degree credits have been accumulated.

  6. Completed applications must be returned to the Graduate Studies Office in the University Administration Building Room 121. All applications will be reviewed and processed by the Graduate Affairs Committee. Applicants will be interviewed by the GAC as part of an admission process.

  7. At the end of the 120 credits used for the BA, the cumulative grade point average at Albany must be at least 3.00.


Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements

Students should complete the following liberal arts courses to be considered for admission to the program: A Eco 110M and 111M; A Mat 106 or 112 or equivalent; A Psy 101M; A Ant 108G or 108M or A Soc 115M or A Soc 115G; upper level Eco course; a writing intensive course, and additional General Education requirements.

Requirements:  Undergraduate Courses

  1. General Education Requirements (24 credits) Courses in the Disciplines (18 credits); Two courses (6 credits) each in Humanities and the Arts, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences. One course in Human Diversity (3 credits). One course in Cultural and Historical Perspectives (3 credits).

  2. Major Requirements
    (30 to 36 credits)


Approved Bachelor's Degree/Master's of Business Administration Programs

College of Arts and Sciences

African/Afro-American Studies (General Program: B.A.)
Anthropology (General Program: B.A.)
Art (General and Departmental Programs: B.A.)
Asian Studies (General Program: B.A.)
Biology (General Program: B.A. degree only)
Chinese Studies (General Program: B.A.)
Computer Science (General Program: B.A.)
Economics (General Program: B.A. degree only)
English (General Program: B.A.)
French (General Program: B.A.)
Geography (General Program: B.A.)
Greek and Roman Civilization (General Program: B.A.)
History (General Program: B.A.)
Interdisciplinary Studies (General Program: B.A. or B.S.)
Italian (General Program: B.A.)
Latin American Studies (General Program: B.A.)
Linguistics (General Program: B.A.)
Mathematics (General Program: B.A.)
Music (General and Departmental Programs: B.A.)
Philosophy (General Program: B.A.)
Psychology (General Program: B.A.)
Puerto Rican Studies (General Program: B.A.)
Rhetoric and Communication (General Program: B.A.)
Russian (General Program: B.A.)
Russian and East European Studies (General Program: B.A.)
Sociology (General Program: B.A.)
Spanish (General Program: B.A.)
Theatre (General Program: B.A.)
Women's Studies (General Program: B.A.)


Nelson A. Rockefeller College

Criminal Justice (General Program: B.A.)
Political Science (General Program: B.A.)


Courses in Accounting

B Acc 211 Financial Accounting (3)
Basic principles of accounting theory and practice, nature of assets and equity; income measurement and statement preparation. Not open to freshmen. Intended accounting majors are encouraged to enroll in B Acc 211 in the first semester of their sophomore year. Offered fall semester only.

B Acc 222 Accounting Systems for Managerial Decisions (3)
Emphasizes the uses of accounting data by management. Budgeting, cost concepts and analysis, cost-volume-profit relationships, and funds flow analysis. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 211. Offered spring semester only.

B Acc 311 Financial Accounting Theory I (3)
Examination of the general theory and concepts of accounting and the generally accepted accounting principles as applied to assets. Includes a study of the environment of accounting, the relationships between asset valuation and income determination with emphasis on alternative capital maintenance concepts, asset valuation and revenue recognition basis. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 211.

B Acc 312 Financial Accounting Theory II (3)
Examination of generally accepted accounting principles as applied to liabilities. Topics include leases, pensions, tax allocation, troubled debt, restructuring, current and long-term liabilities. Emphasizes the official financial accounting pronouncements. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 311.

B Acc 331 Cost Management Systems (3)
Cost accounting theory and practice including job order, process, and standard cost systems. Joint and by-product costing. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 222, B Msi 215, or A Csi 101N or 201N, and B Msi 220 or A Mat 108. Offered spring semester and summer session only.

B Acc 381 Financial Information Systems (3)
Analyzing, designing, implementing, and evaluating computer-based and non-computer-based financial information systems. Blending and combining accounting, computers, information, management and organization, and the systems approach to a unified body of knowledge and practice. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 222 and B Msi 215 or equivalent. Offered fall semester only.

B Acc 411 Financial Accounting Theory III (3)
Examination of generally accepted accounting principles as applied to entities and in respect to financial reporting disclosures. Topics include consolidations, earnings per share, interim and segmented financial statements. Emphasizes the official financial accounting pronouncements. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 312.

B Acc 422 Statistical Applications in Accounting and Auditing (3)
Application of statistical methods to selected topics in managerial and cost accounting. Introduction to statistical audit sampling techniques. The microcomputer will be used extensively in the applications. Prerequisite(s): B Msi 220; corequisites: B Acc 311 and 331. Offered fall semester only. May not be offered during 2002-2003.

B Acc 441 Income Tax Accounting I (3)
Concepts of taxation and of taxable income. Interpretation and application of present tax laws as they pertain to taxpayers. Tax savings and planning. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 211 and senior standing.

B Acc 442 Income Tax Accounting II (3)
Theory and practice of taxation as applied to partnership, corporate entities, and fiduciaries. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 441.

B Acc 461Z Auditing (3)
Fundamental analysis of auditing and its contribution to financial reporting, with primary emphasis upon the independent public accountant's attest function. Application of audit tools; i.e., systems flowcharting, statistical sampling, and EDP, integrated with the coverage of audit working papers. Analyzes problems of legal liability. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 311 & 381. [WI]

B Acc 495Q Independent Study in Accounting (3)
Individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the department chair in conference with the student. Written and oral progress reports required. Prerequisite(s): Open only to qualified senior accounting students in the School of Business. May not be repeated for credit. An application must be filed through the Office of Student Services in BA 361A. S/U graded.


Courses in Finance

B Fin 300 Financial Management (3)
Introductory course that covers the basic concepts essential to a comprehensive understanding of financial management. Topics to be covered include valuation models, financial statement analysis, operating and financial leverage, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and working capital management. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 211.

B Fin 301 Corporate Financial Policy and Strategy (3)
Continuation of B Fin 300, focusing on financial statement analysis and various investment and financing decisions of the firm. Topics include financial analysis, risk measurement, and capital budgeting, capital structure, and dividend policy decisions made in an environment of uncertainty. Case course supplemented with a text and extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300.

B Fin 333 Investment Management (3)
Development of the fundamental approach to the valuation of equity securities. Examines the institutional environment in which investment decisions are made. Reviews the concept of portfolio theory, and contrasting theories of the behavior of equity securities prices. Develops various models for the pricing of common stock and equity derivative instruments. Term project requiring written and oral presentation of a securities analysis. Extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300 and 301.

B Fin 375 Money and Capital Markets (3)
Rigorous examination of the U.S. financial system, stressing the importance of financial markets, financial securities, and market participants. Emphasizes the factors that influence the level and structure of interest rates, including monetary policy actions of the Federal Reserve System and financial regulation. Develops models for the pricing and analysis of bonds and various fixed income derivative instruments. Extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300. Offered spring semesters only.

B Fin 380 Investment Valuation and Analysis (3)
Intensive course in valuation of fixed income, equity, and derivative securities, and principles of portfolio management. Topics include bond pricing and yield analytics, various forms of equity valuation, option pricing, hedging, and speculation methods, creation of investment policy statements, construction of performance benchmarks, performance attribution methods, and development of effective regulatory compliance procedures. Skills such as the use of financial modeling software, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s) B Fin 300. Open only to students whose concentration is "Finance," or "Financial Analysis."

B Fin 400 Financial Case Problems (3)
Intensive case analyses of and discussions about organizations facing a variety of financial issues, including value maximization, measurement of cost of capital, analysis of capital projects, evaluation of merger opportunities, capital structure and dividend decisions, and risk management, among others. Skills such as the use of spreadsheet macros and user-defined functions, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 312, B Fin 380. Open only to students whose concentration is "Finance," or "Financial Analysis."

B Fin 436Z International Financial Management (3)
Designed to expose students to the problems faced by financial managers of multinational firms. The basics of currency risk will be discussed with emphasis on exchange rate determination and hedging practices. Elements of working capital management, capital budgeting, and financing aspects will be discussed in an international context. Includes lectures and case studies. Students will be required to prepare a paper dealing with an important aspect of international financial management. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300 and 301. [WI]

B Fin 470Z Special Topics in Finance (3)
Integrates the tools and concepts developed in preceding finance courses. Topics vary by semester and instructor., and may include equity and fixed income analysis, derivatives, portfolio management, investment banking, financial case studies, or bank management, among others. Heavy emphasis on computer applications of financial concepts. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 333, 375. May be repeated once for credit when topic is different. [WI]

B Fin 475Z Management of Financial Institutions (3)
Comprehensive examination of the major financial institutions that comprise the U.S. financial system. The course focuses on the management concepts and issues central to all financial institutions, including asset-liability management, liquidity and capital management, and investment securities portfolio management. The management policies of commercial banks are emphasized. Management concepts are applied through case studies. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300 and B Fin 375. May not be offered during 2002-2003. [WI]

B Fin 490Z Financial Analysis Seminar and Thesis (3)
The first half of the course prepares students for thesis development. Seminars present leading-edge financial topics, review basic research methods, and introduce various financial databases. Thesis development is accompanied by work-site tours, and mock interviews with University at Albany alumni. At semester's end, students present their completed theses to faculty and alumni, on the Albany campus. Skills such as spreadsheet use, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 312, B Fin 380. Open only to students whose concentration is "Finance," or "Financial Analysis."[WI]


Courses in Law

B Law 200 Legal Environment of Business (3)
Stresses the basic legal concepts around which our society is structured; their applications in modern business society; legal procedures; terminology, and legal principles in operation.

B Law 220 Business Law (3)
Legal principles underlying business relations, including contracts, commercial paper, significant articles of the Uniform Commercial Code, and government and business. Accounting majors must complete this course and not B Law 200.

B Law 321 Law of Business Organization (3)
Legal concept of agency, partnership, corporations and bankruptcy, the Uniform Partnership Act, and Business Corporation Law.

B Law 421 Law of Property (3)
Law of real and personal property, including mortgages and conveyances, landlord and tenant relationships. Prerequisite(s): B Law 220.

B Law 422 Trust and Estate Law (3)
Covers presentation of material concerning living and testamentary trusts; analysis of the requirements of a will, including its preparation, execution, and probate; administration of estates of individuals dying with and without wills.


Courses in Management

B Mgt 341 Behavioral Foundations of Management (3)
This survey course provides an overview of research and theory about behavior in organizations. Specific topics may include decision making, communication, group processes, power and influence, motivation and job attitudes, conflict and cooperation, organizational politics, leadership, organization structure, organization change and development, and international differences affecting behavior in organizations. Prerequisite(s): A Psy 101M and either A Soc 115M or A Soc 115G or A Ant 108M or A Ant 108G.

B Mgt 430 Management of Human Resources (3)
Introduces the concepts and techniques of human resource management, with an emphasis on knowledge relevant for practicing managers. Topics may include human resource planning, human resource information systems, employee recruitment and selection, employment interviewing, equal opportunity and affirmative action, compensation and benefits, incentive programs, performance appraisal, training and development, quality of work-life programs, employee counseling and career planning, labor relations, safety, ethical and legal issues in HRM, and international differences in HRM. Prerequisite or corequisite: B Mgt 341. Offered spring semester only.

B Mgt 450Z Managerial Leadership and Decision Making (3)
Builds on concepts in B Mgt 341. Review of major concepts and findings in managerial leadership, with a focus on the functions and skills of middle and lower-level managers. Topics may include nature of managerial work, managerial skills and behavior, motivating and influencing people, leading decision groups, participative leadership and delegation, management by objectives, action planning, problem solving and crisis management, time management, managing conflict, team building, and transformational leadership. Prerequisite(s): B Mgt 341. Not offered in 2002-2003. [WI]

B Mgt 470 Motivation, Productivity, and Change Management (3)
This course will focus on theory and practice involved with motivation, productivity, and change management in the work environment. In the management of any organization, motivation and productivity of both management and the employees is of central concern to the effectiveness of the organization. How to improve employee motivation and productivity is the focus of change management. Topics will include major theories on motivation work, practical techniques of change management such as action research and survey-guided feedback, and practical techniques to increase employee involvement and motivation such as Total Quality Management (TQM), garnishing, employee ownership, and self management teams. B Mgt 470Z is the writing intensive version of B Mgt 470; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): B Mgt 341.

B Mgt 470Z Motivation, Productivity, and Change Management (3)
This course will focus on theory and practice involved with motivation, productivity, and change management in the work environment. In the management of any organization, motivation and productivity of both management and employees is of central concern to the effectiveness of the organization. How to improve employee motivation and productivity is the focus of change management. Topics will include major theories on motivation at work, practical techniques of change management such as action research and survey-guided feedback, and practical techniques to increase employee involvement and motivation such as Total Quality Management (TQM), garnishing, employee ownership, and self-management teams.. B Mgt 470Z is the writing intensive version of B Mgt 470; only one may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): B Mgt 341. [WI]

B Mgt 471 Human Resource Information System (3)
Focuses on the interface of the Human Resource Management function of organizations with computer technology. Examines the use of computers as tools to analyze and assist in decision regarding the effective utilization of human resources of any organization. Explores specific human resource topics in depth using computer analysis as a managerial decision aid in area such as strategy, selection, employment discrimination, training, and compensation. Prerequisite(s): B Mgt 341 and B Mgt 430.

B Mgt 471Z Human Resource Information System (3)
Focuses on the interface of the Human Resource Management function of organizations with computer technology. Examines the use of computers as tools to analyze and assist in decision regarding the effective utilization of human resources of any organization. Explores specific human resource topics in depth using computer analysis as a managerial decision aid in areas such as strategy, selection, employment discrimination, training, and compensation. Prerequisite(s): B Mgt 341 and B Mgt 430. [WI]

B Mgt 480 Special Topics in Management (3)
Study of selected topics involving the effective management of organizations, with the emphasis on improvement of organizational effectiveness in large and small businesses. Topics may include management of technology and innovation, executive leadership and decision making, entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship, organization culture, diagnosis of organizational effectiveness, design of organizations, organization change, management of company-wide productivity and quality improvement programs, and international management. B Mgt 480Z is the writing intensive version of B Mgt 480. May be repeated once for credit with change in topic. Prerequisite(s): B Mgt 341 and B Mgt 430.

B Mgt 480Z Special Topics in Management (3)
Study of selected topics involving the effective management of organizations, with the emphasis on improvement of organizational effectiveness in large and small businesses. Topics may include management of technology and innovation, executive leadership and decision making, entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship, organization culture, diagnosis of organizational effectiveness, design of organizations, organization change, management of company-wide productivity and quality improvement programs, and international management. B Mgt 480Z is the writing intensive version of B Mgt 480. May be repeated once for credit with change in topic. Prerequisite(s): B Mgt 341 and B Mgt 430. [WI]

B Mgt 481 Strategic Management (3)
This capstone course develops an overall management viewpoint and integrates various specialized functions such as Marketing, Finance, Accounting, Management Information Systems, and Human Resource Management. Topics include industry analysis, global competitiveness, international management, strategies for adjusting to the social, political and economic environment, approaches for developing and implementing strategic plans in organizations, managerial values and ethics, and social issues in business. Prerequisite(s): senior standing in the School of Business and permission of the Office of Student Services.


Courses in Management Science

B Msi 215 Computer Applications in Business (3)
Introduction to basic concepts of computer hardware and software, the Internet, and spreadsheet software. Emphasis on principles of computer programming and development of programming skills using the Visual Basic application development tools. Students will design, code, test and debug business-oriented applications using Visual Basic. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A Csi 201N. Only one of B Msi 215 and A Csi 101N may be taken for credit. Not open to freshmen.

B Msi 220 Introduction to Business Statistics (3)
Fundamentals of statistical analysis oriented toward business problems. Elementary probability theory, frequency distributions, central measures and dispersion, sampling distributions. Classical and Bayesian decision making, estimation, and tests of hypotheses. Prerequisite(s): intermediate algebra or A Mat 100. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A Eco 320. Only one of B Msi 220 and A Mat 108 may be taken for credit. May not be offered during 2002-2003. [MS]

B Msi 322 Statistical Decision Systems (3)
This course is designed to expose students to decision-making models in the presence of uncertainty. Students will learn how to build multi-parameter models that can be input into decision support systems. Forecasting as well as quality control systems will be covered. Statistical techniques such as multiple regression, analysis of variance, and chi-square tests will be taught with the aid of software packages. Prerequisite(s): B Msi 220 or equivalent; B Msi 330 or concurrent enrollment.

B Msi 330 Information Decision Systems I (3)
An introductory course in managerial decision making with particular emphasis on building decision models and the use of computer information systems to facilitate implementation of these models in a variety of production management contexts such as Resource Allocation, Forecasting, Inventory Control, and Project Planning. Prerequisite(s): A Mat 106 and B Msi 215 or their equivalents; B Msi 220 or A Mat 108 or A Eco 320 (or concurrent enrollment).

B Msi 331 Information Decision Systems II (3)
Students will use current application building software to construct personal computer applications for typical business needs. Additional topics include the development of simulation models and the concepts and design of model based decision support systems. Prerequisite(s): B Msi 330. Offered Spring and Summer only.

B Msi 390 Management of Production Systems (3)
This course brings a strong modeling orientation to bear on the process of obtaining and utilizing resources to produce and deliver useful goods and services so as to meet the goals of the organization. Decision oriented models such as linear programming, simulation, inventory control and forecasting are discussed and then implemented utilizing spreadsheets. Prerequisite: Good standing in 3/2 program. Note: This course is taken as a replacement for MSI 330. Completion of this course with a grade of B or higher waives B Msi 510 and B Msi 511. May not be offered during 2002-2003.

B Msi 391Z Decision Support Systems (3)
This writing intensive course includes the topics of database modeling, systems analysis, information resource management, and decisions support systems. Experience with computer modeling is gained through group projects with integrate database technology with modeling techniques such as simulation. Prerequisite: Good standing in 3/2 program and MSI 390.Note: This course is taken as a replacement for MSI 331. Completion of this course with a grade of B or higher waives B Msi 520 and B Msi 521. May not be offered during 2002-2003. [WI]

B Msi 415Z Management Information Systems I (3)
Planning, design, and implementation of computer-based information decision systems. Techniques for analyzing and specifying system requirements. Data base management concepts and applications. Behavioral and economic aspects of system design and implementation. Prerequisite(s): B Msi 322 or concurrent enrollment, B Msi 331. Offered Fall only. [WI]

B Msi 416 Management Information Systems II (3)
This course provides an introduction to several information system technologies and techniques. Material covered includes topics such as telecommunications (concepts, protocols, and hardware), computer networking (client-server, LANs, OSI model), distributed database, and expert systems. Prerequisite(s): B Msi 415Z. Offered Spring only.

B Msi 434 Decision Support System Applications (3)
This is a project-based course where students work in teams to develop model based decision support systems for clients in the local or regional community. Enrollment is limited and by application. Prerequisite(s): B Msi 322 or concurrent enrollment, B Msi 331.


Courses in Marketing

B Mkt 310 Marketing Principles (3)
Effective marketing policy is the key determinant of success in business. This course is designed to provide a broad-based foundation to the 4 P's of marketing: product development, pricing, promotion, and places of distribution. In addition, students are exposed to marketing research, marketing strategy, Internet and global marketing, consumer and organizational behavior, retailing, and market segmentation.

B Mkt 312 Marketing Research (3)
The tasks of introducing new products or modifying existing products regularly challenge decision-makers in a firm. To this end, the main purpose of this course is to provide an overview of marketing research issues so that decision-makers can avoid costly mistakes by "getting it right the first time." A project that requires data collection, hypothesis testing and applied statistics with SPSS is a key element of the course. Prerequisite(s): B Mkt 310 and B Msi 220 or equivalent.

B Mkt 351 Buyer Behavior (3)
This is a marketing course, not a consumer psychology course. It focuses on how a company develops its basic strategy-identifying, evaluating, and targeting market segments whose needs are not currently being met by existing products. The main goal of this course is to provide a broad, content based, "gestalt" understanding of macro consumer segments and how to best market and communicate with them. As such, it is intended to provide the platform from which more advanced courses in marketing are developed. Prerequisite(s): B Mkt 310 and either A Psy 101M or A Soc 115M or A Soc 115G.

B Mkt 376 International Marketing (3)
This course extends marketing principles to the global arena. Through active participation and projects, you will learn about the problems of implementing a marketing mix globally and how to evaluate the social, legal, political, and ethical concerns in operating a global enterprise. Prerequisite(s): B Mkt 310.

B Mkt 411Z Marketing Management (3)
To survive, every organization needs customers. Marketers develop, price, promote, and distribute products and services for the purpose of creating equitable exchanges with customers. As such, marketing is a long-term process that focuses on customer needs and the ability of the firm to satisfy those needs. A key assignment in this course is to develop a defensible business plan. Prerequisite(s): B Mkt 351. [WI]

B Mkt 430Z Sales Management (3)
In this course, you will learn how to create relationships with customers, meet practitioners, and learn about the negotiation process. Topics include how styles of interpersonal communication differ; prospecting, presenting, and closing a sale; and integrative negotiation techniques. Prerequisite(s) B Mkt 310. [WI]

B Mkt 432 Integrated Marketing Communications (3)
Through projects and active participation in this course, you will learn how people receive and process messages; why some efforts work while others fail; how to integrate your efforts and target an audience through advertising, public relations, direct marketing, and information systems; how to assess communication options systematically and formulate integrated marketing communication plans; and how an integrated marketing communication plan can win and keep customers. Prerequisite(s) B Mkt 351.

B Mkt 437 Business Marketing (3)
Helps students understand how organizations interact with one another. Marketing analysis, planning, and strategy is studied in business-to-business buying and selling situations. The environment of business marketing and the process of organizational buying are examined. Traditional topics, such as target marketing and the marketing mix, are often combined with advanced topics such as negotiation, relationship development, quality control, logistics, and international marketing. Prerequisite(s): B Mkt 310. May not be offered during 2002-2003.

B Mkt 480 Selected Topics in Marketing (3)
Intensive study of topics in marketing. Topics may include project management, new product development, management of innovation, use of microcomputers for marketing decisions, retailing, and industrial marketing. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Open only to senior business administration majors. Prerequisite(s): permission of School of Business.

B Mkt 480Z Internet Marketing Strategy (3)
In this course, you will learn how to think and plan as a Web marketing manager. You will create an internet strategy that builds on the strength of existing marketing programs; build a brand on the Web using proven techniques for Internet marketing strategy; recognize the situations in which a Web strategy will work; and make improvements to functioning sites that are not achieving expected results. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Open only to senior business administration majors. B Mkt 480Z is the writing intensive version of B Mkt 480. Prerequisite(s): permission of School of Business. [WI]


Special Courses

Students interested in independent study in business (B Bus 495Q and B Bus 496Q) should contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Business (BA-361A) for application forms and requirements.

B Bus 200 Selected Topics in Business (3)
This course is devoted to selected topics in business, strategic management, career management, and/or organizational behavior. This course may not be repeated for credit, nor does it yield liberal arts and sciences credit. Not open to freshmen. Prerequisite(s): A Psy 101M or G, A Soc 115M or G, or 3 credits of economics.

B Bus 250 Business in Society (3)
This course examines economic value systems and structures and their impact on society. Business fundamentals are examined particularly as they relate to the development of American cultural values. The course will also analyze the relationship between literature, philosophy, sociology, psychology and successful business practices. Does not yield credit toward the Accounting or Business Administration majors. Prerequisite(s): A Ant 108M or G or A Psy 101M or G or A Soc 115M or G.

B Bus 398 Business Consulting Services (1-3)
Classroom instruction on the practical aspects of computing on the personal, network and mainframe computer environment, including word processing, data communications, networking and various operating systems. Training is followed by continuing consulting work experience in the public user rooms. Work schedules are determined on an individual basis during the first two weeks of class. May be repeated for a total of six (6) credits. Does not yield liberal arts and sciences credit toward graduation. Not open to accounting majors. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor, junior status, and School of Business major. S/U graded.

B Bus 495Q Independent Study in Business I (1-3)
Individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the dean in conference with the student. Written and oral progress reports required. Prerequisite(s): Open only to qualified students who have senior status in the School of Business. May not be repeated for credit. May not be used in the concentration. An application must be filed through the Office of Student Services, BA-361A. Open only to students with senior status. S/U graded.

B Bus 496Q Independent Study in Business II (1-3)
Advanced or expanded individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the dean in conference with the student. Written and oral progress reports required. Prerequisite(s): B Bus 495Q. May not be repeated for credit. May not be used in the concentration. An application must be filed with the Office of Student Services. BA-361A. Open only to students with senior status. S/U graded.

B Bus 497 Internship in Business I (1-3)
Internships involving off-campus participation in the work of an agency, institution, or corporate body other than the University, with collateral academic study. Prerequisite(s): Contingent on the approval of a University at Albany School of Business full-time instructor willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student's progress. Approval of the Undergraduate Affairs Committee also required. Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00. Open only to School of Business majors with a minimum of 75 completed degree credits who have completed the 300-level foundations courses. S/U graded.

B Bus 498 Internship in Business II (1-3)
Internships involving off-campus participation in the work of an agency, institution, or corporate body other than the University, with collateral academic study. Prerequisite(s): Contingent on the approval of a University at Albany School of Business full-time instructor willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student's progress. Approval of the Undergraduate Affairs Committee is also required. Minimum cumulative GPA requirement is 3.00. Open only to School of Business majors with a minimum of 75 completed degree credits. Internship experience must be different from that of B Bus 497. S/U graded.


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