Undergraduate Bulletin, 2002-2003

The New General Education Program

The New General Education Program applies to all students admitted to the University with basis of admission "FRESHMAN" in fall 2000 and thereafter and with basis of admission "TRANSFER" in fall 2002 and thereafter. Lists of courses that meet each requirement will be provided to students in the fall.

All other students should refer to the section of the Undergraduate Bulletin entitled "The Continuing (1992) General Education Program."

The New General Education Program at the University at Albany proposes a set of knowledge areas, perspectives, and competencies considered by the University to be central to the intellectual development of every undergraduate. The Program is divided into three areas-Disciplinary Perspectives, Cultural and Historical Perspectives, and Communication and Reasoning Competencies. In addition, there are requirements in Mathematics and Statistics and in Foreign Language. The characteristics of and the rationale and goals for the specific requirements of the General Education Program are discussed in greater detail below.

In conjunction with students' majors and minors, the General Education Program is designed to develop capacities for critical thinking and judgment. Whether selecting and pursuing a major or choosing how to fulfill a General Education category, students need to think critically about why and how choices contribute to one's education at the University. As Albany continually seeks to improve its programs, students are not discouraged from questioning the value of any given requirement, since developing the capacity for such questioning is a key goal of general education.

Students are also encouraged to reflect on their general education program as a whole, to explore the relation of requirements to each other, to measure any given course against the stated goals for its specific category and for the program, and to use the experience of general education to develop their own understanding of what constitutes a meaningful university education.

Characteristics of General Education Courses

To be approved for inclusion in the General Education Program, courses should contribute to the following objectives to the extent that they are applicable in the different disciplines:

General education offers introductions to the central topics of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields. Approved courses also may satisfy major or minor requirements, but their primary purpose is to inform students who do not plan to pursue more advanced coursework in that field.

General education offers explicit rather than tacit understandings of the procedures, practices, methodology and fundamental assumptions of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields. Approved courses seek to explain what it means to be practitioners of disciplines and fields by encouraging both faculty and students to reflect about the nature of disciplinary knowledge. This characteristic is particularly relevant to courses within the category of Disciplinary Perspectives.

General education recognizes multiple perspectives on the subject matter, reflecting our pluralistic culture within and beyond the university.

General education emphasizes active learning in an engaged environment that enables students to be producers as well as consumers of knowledge. At the University at Albany, a public research university, engaged learning may involve student participation in cutting-edge research, but all courses seek to engage students in the active generation and evaluation of knowledge."

General education promotes critical inquiry into the assumptions, goals, and methods of various fields of academic study; it aims to develop the interpretive, analytic, and evaluative competencies characteristic of critical thinking.

The General Education Program at the University at Albany consists of a minimum of 30 credits of coursework in the following areas: disciplinary perspectives, cultural and historical perspectives, communication and reasoning competencies, mathematics and statistics, and foreign language.

The General Education Program is summarized in the following table:

Requirements of the General Education Program

Disciplinary Perspectives:
   Arts(min. 3 crs)
   Humanities(min. 3 crs)
   Natural Sciences(min. 6 crs)
   Social Sciences(min. 6 crs)
Cultural and Historical Perspectives:
   U.S. Historical Perspectives(min. 3 crs)
   Europe(min. 3 crs)
   Regions beyond Europe(min. 3 crs)
   Global and Cross-Cultural Studies(min. 3 crs)
   U.S. Diversity & Pluralism (min. 3 crs)
Communication and Reasoning Competencies:
   Information Literacy(min. 1 course)
   Oral Discourse(min. 1 course)
   Written Discourse:
      Lower-level Writing(min. 1 course)
      Upper-level Writing(min. 1 course)
Mathematics and Statistics:
   one semester of collegiate study, or the equivalent, of mathematics at or
   above the level of pre-calculus and/or probability, statistics, and data analysis
Foreign Language:
   two semesters of collegiate study, or the equivalent, of a foreign language

While the majority of General Education courses are at the 100 and 200 level, particularly in the category of Disciplinary Perspectives, the General Education Program at the University at Albany is conceived as extending throughout the four years of undergraduate study. Indeed, certain requirements, such as those in U.S. History, Global and Cross-Cultural Studies, and Oral Discourse, may be more appropriately completed during the junior and senior year. Students are encouraged, however, to complete the requirements in the category of Disciplinary Perspectives during their first two years. In addition, the Information Literacy and the lower- level writing requirement are expected to be completed within the freshman or sophomore year.

Students may not use the same course to fulfill both the Arts and the Humanities categories. Otherwise, if a course fulfills more than one category, students may use the course to fulfill all of those categories. Although such "double counting" may reduce the number of credits needed to fulfill General Education, to graduate from the University each student must have satisfactorily completed a minimum of thirty (30) graduation credits in courses designated as General Education requirements. If a course fulfilling a General Education category also meets a major or minor requirement, there is no prohibition against counting the course toward General Education and the major or minor.


Overview of the General Education Categories

The humanities and arts, natural sciences, and social sciences are commonly considered to be the core of a liberal arts education. Courses in the category of Disciplinary Perspectives are designed to familiarize students with the objectives, assumptions, subject matters, methods, and boundaries of knowledge organized in terms of academic disciplines. Requirements in this category seek to introduce students to a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and areas of knowledge.

Equally central to a liberal arts education is an understanding of history-the recognition that the world we inhabit today had its origins in and has been shaped by the events of the past, and that to understand our current situation we must try as best we can to understand the past. Of similar importance is an understanding of the origins, development and significance of human cultures, and the recognition of cultural distinctiveness and multiplicity. Courses in the category of Cultural and Historical Perspectives are designed to increase students' understanding of the history of this nation (U.S.), of its cultural diversity (U.S. Diversity and Pluralism), of histories and cultures that have played a major role in the development of the U.S. (Europe), and of cultures and histories beyond those of the U.S. and Europe (Regions beyond Europe).

In addition, these courses seek to introduce students to the complex intersections of the local and global, and to the different perspectives that emerge from a focus on the national, the regional, the global, and the cross-cultural. 21st century students will inhabit an environment increasingly characterized by global dynamics in which decisions made in the United States will affect the lives of people elsewhere and decisions made elsewhere will affect the lives of people in the United States. Moreover, they will inhabit an environment increasingly shaped by forces that transcend national borders and that are reconfiguring the globe's regions and cultures in the service of various economic and political interests. Courses approved for Global and Cross-Cultural Studies provide students with an opportunity to examine the global forces that give rise to and shape nations, cultures and regions, and to explore the larger perspectives that emerge from cross-cultural comparisons. The Foreign Language requirement is also designed to enhance students' global awareness and to expand their knowledge of different cultures.

The U.S. Diversity and Pluralism requirement reflects the University at Albany's long-standing commitment to respect for difference, to civic dialogue as a means of negotiating conflicts in cultural and political values arising from human diversity, to understanding the relation of cultural pluralism to political democracy, and to the development of socially responsible citizens. Courses in this category are designed to introduce students to the diversity of cultures that make up the United States, as well as to the historical, political, and economic forces that have led these cultures to develop differently and to be accorded different significance. Approved courses frequently focus on key issues of current concern (e.g., the gay rights movement), setting these issues in the context of how a democratic society defines majorities and minorities and understands the rights and responsibilities of each.

The General Education Program is designed to provide students with a set of competencies essential both for academic success and for becoming effective citizens of the 21st century, including the requirement in Mathematics and Statistics, the Information Literacy requirement, and the Written and Oral Discourse requirements.


Definition of Each General Education Category

DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES CATEGORIES

The Arts:  Approved courses provide instruction in or about a medium of creative expression. Courses may focus on the physical practice and techniques of the medium, on its critical and theoretical interpretation, on its historical development, or on a combination of these approaches. Courses explicate the methods used to study and critique the medium as a vital element of personal or cultural expression and exchange.

Approved courses generally fall into one of four categories (for majors and/or non-majors):

Courses about the development and interpretation of a medium:

  1. introductions to the disciplines;

  2. introductions to subfields in the disciplines;

    Courses on the physical practice of a medium (studio art, creative writing, music composition or performance, dance, and theatre acting, directing or stagecraft);

  3. instructional courses on the skills and methods required and their critical evaluation;

  4. courses focussed upon performance.

Note:  The requirement calls for three credits. In the case of categories 3 and 4 (skills and performance), where approved courses may bear only one or two credits, the requirement may be fulfilled through two or three courses with a minimum total of three credits.

Humanities:  Approved courses are concerned with defining and disputing that which is understood to be quintessentially "human": studying language, texts, thought, and culture; their definition, interpretation, and historical development; and their reflection of human values, beliefs, and traditions. Courses in a variety of disciplines explicate the underlying assumptions, methods of study, practices, theories, and disputes appropriate to those disciplines.

Approved courses generally fall into one of three categories (all open to majors and non-majors):

  1. introductions to basic materials and methods in the disciplines;

  2. introductions to subfields or groupings of materials in the disciplines;

  3. literature and culture courses taught in a foreign language higher than the third-semester level.

Natural Sciences:  Approved courses show how understandings of natural phenomena are obtained using the scientific method, including data collection, hypothesis development, employment of mathematical analysis, and critical evaluation of evidence. Courses provide an overview of major principles and concepts underpinning a discipline's current base of knowledge and discuss major topics at the current frontiers of disciplinary knowledge. Courses show how answers to fundamental questions in science can change the world in which we live and often explore how social issues can influence scientific research. Opportunities for scientific inquiry within laboratory and/or field settings may be provided.

Approved courses generally fall into one of three categories:

  1. introductions to scientific disciplines, designed for majors, non-majors, or both;

  2. introductions to disciplinary subfields, designed for majors, non-majors, or both;

  3. courses open to majors and non-majors on broad topics that are addressed by one or more scientific disciplines and which may focus on the application of science to practical issues.

Social Sciences:  Approved courses provide theory and instruction on the role of institutions, groups and individuals in society. The focus of these courses is on the interaction of social, economic, political, geographic, linguistic, religious, and/or cultural factors, with emphasis on the ways humans understand the complex nature of their existence. Courses include discussion of skills and practices used by the social sciences: data collection, hypothesis development, employment of mathematical analysis, and critical evaluation of evidence. Opportunities to experience social science methods in the field may be provided.

Approved courses generally fall into one of three categories:

  1. introductions to the various disciplines of the social sciences;

  2. introductions to disciplinary subfields, designed for majors, non-majors, or both;

  3. courses open to majors and non-majors on broad topics that are addressed by one or more social scientific disciplines.


CULTURAL AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES CATEGORIES

U.S.:  Approved courses focus on specific narratives or themes in the historical unfolding of the United States, including political, economic, social, cultural and/or intellectual dimensions. All courses will feature an explicitly historical organization; deal with topics of national, as opposed to regional or local, import; and consider a topic of sufficient specificity for the course to be coherent, but over a period long enough to ensure that the historical dynamic is clearly visible. Students should acquire knowledge of substance and methods for comprehending the narratives or themes presented.

Certain of these courses will balance topical focus and chronological breadth. A student who has achieved a score of 85 or above on the Regents Examination in "United States History and Government" will be considered to have fulfilled the chronological breadth criterion. Therefore, such a student has the choice of fulfilling the requirement by completing a course chosen from the basic list available to all students or from a list of more specialized courses. Each of the more specialized courses covers to some extent a knowledge of common institutions in American society and how they have affected different groups, provides an understanding of America's evolving relationship with the rest of the world, and deals substantially with issues of American history.

EUROPE:  Approved courses focus on the development and distinctive features of the institutions, economies, societies, and cultures of Europe. Approved courses offer either an explicitly historical approach or emphasize the narratives whereby European cultures have come to gain their specific identity. Preferably, approved courses will have a broad cultural or historical perspective; courses with a more narrow chronological focus or a more specialized narrative topic will relate these interests to larger issues in the history and cultural development of Europe.

REGIONS BEYOND EUROPE:  Approved courses focus on specific cultures (other than those of the United States and Europe) or the world's regions. Courses emphasize the features and processes whereby cultures and regions gain their specific identity. Approved courses will offer an explicitly historical organization, and will balance topical focus with chronological breadth. Courses may also engage students in considerations of the "local" as opposed to the "global."

GLOBAL AND CROSS-CULTURAL STUDIES:  Approved courses engage students in comparative and integrative analyses. Courses offer global perspectives on historical or contemporary events or comparisons between societies or regions. Courses emphasize the dynamic interaction between and among cultures and regions and the global forces that give rise to and define cultures and regions.

U.S. DIVERSITY AND PLURALISM:  Approved courses must meet each of the following six criteria:

The course should relate directly to contemporary United States experiences of students or contain components that compare, on a fairly regular basis, aspects of other cultures to those experiences.

The course should compare and relate aspects of racial and/or ethnic diversity, including gender-related concerns, to the topic of the course. In this context, the terms "racial" and "ethnic" may include groups that are self- and/or societally defined on such bases as nationality, religion, etc.

The course should provide substantial knowledge of diversity as expressed through sociopolitical, ideological, aesthetic, or other aspects of human endeavor. This criterion is intentionally defined broadly to accommodate a variety of approaches. It is not a requirement or expectation that the content will focus on controversy or those aspects that result in conflict with other persons, groups, or cultures; see, however, the next criterion.

The course should provide sufficient knowledge to permit the student to understand better the sources and manifestations of controversy and conflicts in cultural values arising from human diversity.

Opportunities for student writing and discussion are central to the objectives of the program. The course should include at least one writing component. For discussions to be effective, classes of sixty or more students should require discussion sections, breakout sessions, in-class groups or comparable mechanisms permitting discussions within groups of twenty students.

The course should focus on the theories, histories, dynamics, mechanisms, and results of human and social diversity, drawing on the experience of specific groups to illustrate those principles. Thus, whatever specific cultural heritages the students study should be placed in the larger context of cultural diversity.


COMMUNICATION AND REASONING COMPETENCIES CATEGORIES

INFORMATION LITERACY:  Approved courses introduce students to various ways in which information is organized and structured and to the process of finding, using, producing, and distributing information in a variety of media formats, including traditional print as well as computer databases. Students acquire experience with resources available on the Internet and learn to evaluate the quality of information, to use information ethically and professionally, and to adjust to rapidly changing technology tools. Students must complete this requirement within the freshman or sophomore year.

Approved Criteria for Information Literacy Courses:  Courses that satisfy the Information Literacy requirement will have three characteristics:

Classroom activities on finding, evaluating, citing, and using information in print and electronic sources from the University Libraries, World Wide Web, and other sources. Courses should address questions concerning the ethical use of information, copyrights, and other related issues that promote critical reflection.

Assignments, course work, or tutorials that make extensive use of the University Libraries, World Wide Web, and other information sources. Assignments should include finding, evaluating, and citing information sources.

At least one research project that requires students to find, evaluate, cite, and use information presented in diverse formats from multiple sources and to integrate this information within a single textual, visual, or digital document.

WRITTEN DISCOURSE:  Students must satisfactorily complete with grades of C or higher or S a lower division Writing Intensive course, which is expected to be completed within the freshman or sophomore year, and a Writing Intensive course at or above the 300 level, normally completed within the student's major. These courses use writing as an important tool in the discipline studied and are not designed primarily to teach the technical aspects of writing. The emphasis is on using writing as a means of sharpening critical thinking in and understanding of the subject.

Approved courses must meet each of the following four criteria:

A Substantial Body of Finished Work:  This is generally expected to be a total of 20+ double-spaced pages in at least two, preferably more, submissions. It may be in a variety of forms-journal, reports, essays, research papers, etc.-not all of which need to be graded.

Opportunity for Students to Receive Assistance in Progress:  Such assistance may take several forms, from visits to the Writing Center (HU-140) to conferences with the instructor.

Opportunity to Revise Some Pieces:  As revision is an essential characteristic of good writing, students should be able to revise some portion of their work.

Response to Student Writing:  Such response may take several forms-from extended comments from the instructor to peer evaluation in student groups. It is expected, however, that the instructor will respond in detail to some extended work of the student.

Note:  Transfer students who enter the University with credit for an "English Composition" course or a two-semester combined literature and writing course will be considered to have completed the lower-level writing intensive requirement at this University.

ORAL DISCOURSE:  Approved courses provide opportunities for students to develop the oral communication skills they need to participate more effectively in public and academic debates and discussions. Courses offer opportunities to participate in a variety of communication contexts and to reflect on the principles and theory relevant to specific oral communication activities. Approved courses include instruction on presentation, as well as feedback and evaluation of oral performance.

Approved courses generally have a minimum of two exercises in which oral performance is required and graded. An oral performance exercise can be accomplished in any of the following activities, either live or in a crafted recording:

  1. A stand-up monologue presentation of a minimum of 3-5 minutes

  2. A debate where each participant speaks for a minimum of 3-5 minutes

  3. A question and answer dialogic process where the student fields a succession of questions or asks a succession of questions that build on and comment upon prior answers

  4. A discussion within a group, where each member will be required to make 3-5 "paragraph-length" contributions in the course of the discussion.

Students will be made aware of the criteria that will be used for evaluation of these performances, such as contact/ relationship with the audience, vocal punctuation and expressiveness, oral language style suited to the exercise, appropriate volume and pace of speech, poise and comfort, vocal fluency, eye contact. The final grade in oral intensive courses will include the grade for oral performance as a key component.


MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS CATEGORY

Approved courses introduce students to or extend their knowledge of pre-calculus, calculus, discrete mathematics, probability, statistics and/or data analysis. Courses may be offered in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and in other departments that have expertise in quantitative reasoning and data analysis and that offer appropriate courses, particularly in statistics or discrete structures.

A student who has achieved a score of 85 or above on the Regents Examination in "Mathematics Course III" or on a recognized standardized examination indicating readiness to enter pre-calculus will be considered to have fulfilled this requirement.


FOREIGN LANGUAGE CATEGORY

Basic proficiency in the understanding and use of an ancient or modern human language other than English as demonstrated by:

the satisfactory completion of the second college semester (i.e., level Elementary II) of foreign language study or its equivalent; or

passing a Regents "Checkpoint B" Examination or a Regents-approved equivalent with a score of 85 or above; or

demonstration of competency in a language other than English, including languages not currently offered for formal instruction at this university; or

satisfactory completion of at least one college semester in a study abroad program in a country where English is not the primary language of instruction.


Transition and Implementation

A.  Students admitted to the University whose basis of admission is "FRESHMAN":

The new requirements will apply to all students whose basis of admission is "freshman" who matriculate at the University in Fall 2000 or thereafter.

B.  Students admitted to the University whose basis of admission is "TRANSFER":

The new requirements do not apply to students whose basis of admission is "transfer" who matriculated at an accredited college or university prior to Fall 2000; these students instead are required to meet the "Continuing" (1992) General Education requirements for transfer students.

The new requirements will apply to all other students whose basis of admission is "transfer" and who matriculate at the University in Fall 2002 or thereafter.

For at least the next four years, the Office of Undergraduate Studies will provide through the print and web versions of the Undergraduate Bulletin and through other media as deemed necessary, a full description for both the current and the new general education requirements. Students who feel their placement within either system of general education requirements is inappropriate to their circumstances or may cause undue hardship may appeal to the General Education Committee through the Office of Undergraduate Studies.

In accordance with the Trustees' policies, if a student from a SUNY state-operated campus or SUNY community college has fulfilled, as determined by the policies of the other SUNY campus, one or more of the Trustees-mandated general educational categories, the University at Albany will also consider the student to have fulfilled that category or those categories. This is true even if 1) Albany requires more credits or courses for the given category; 2) the requirement is fulfilled by a course whose Albany equivalent does not fulfill the same requirement; 3) the student received a non-transferable but minimally passing grade in the course; 4) due to limits on total transferable credits, the student is unable to include that course among those transferred to Albany; 5) the student was waived from the requirement based on high school achievement or other standards different from those employed by Albany; or 6) the student was covered by a blanket waiver of the requirement by the SUNY Provost because the other SUNY campus was not yet able to implement the given requirement.

The same principle of reciprocity should apply to students who transfer from non-SUNY schools. If a course approved for transfer from a non-SUNY school is deemed to be equivalent to a University at Albany course that meets a general education requirement, the student shall be considered to have fulfilled the Albany general education category represented by that course. This is true even if 1) Albany requires more credits or courses for the given category; 2) the student receives a non-transferable but minimally passing grade in the course; or 3) due to limits on total transferable credits, the student is unable to include that course among those transferred to Albany.

The foregoing conditions only apply to prematriculation credits.

The only exception to the policies outlined above are the University's Global and Cross-Cultural Studies requirement, the U.S. Diversity and Pluralism requirement, and the upper division Writing Intensive requirement. These requirements shall be considered "local" campus requirements, independent of the SUNY Trustees' system of General Education, and shall be required of all students whose basis of admission is "transfer" who matriculate at the University in fall 2002 or thereafter. Students may continue to present credit for courses the University deems equivalent to these requirements, but for the transfer course to fulfill the upper division writing requirement it must be completed with a grade of C or better or a grade of S.

Students who feel they have not been appropriately accorded equivalence for any given course or courses are encouraged to consult with their academic adviser; if the academic adviser determines that the student has not been awarded appropriate equivalency, the student or the adviser may then appeal the decision through established procedures. Students who believe their transfer work or academic circumstances may justify a waiver or substitution for part of the general education requirements may appeal to the General Education Committee through the Office of Undergraduate Studies (LC 30). As the new requirements are implemented, the units considering transfer equivalencies should, if there is demonstrable ambiguity, decide in favor of the transfer student.

C.  Transfer Credit D Grades:

Except for the University's writing requirements, for which a grade of C or higher or S is required, either pre- or postmatriculation transfer work graded D+, D or D- in a course that applies to one or more of the University's General Education requirements may be applied toward fulfilling the requirements, even if the student receives no graduation credit for the course.


Administration of the Program

The Dean of Undergraduate Studies is responsible for the administration of the program, including interpretation of legislation, assessing the number of seats required and communicating that information to Deans, evaluation of courses, faculty development and program assessment. The Dean shall also have the explicit authority to grant waivers and make appropriate substitutions for individual students, and to decertify courses that do not meet the program's standards. The Dean shall have sufficient material and human resources to meet these responsibilities.

The General Education Committee, appointed by the Dean, will advise the Dean on these matters. The General Education Committee shall have between 12 and 15 members, with broad representation across the University, and shall be chaired by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies with specific responsibility for the General Education Program.

Course proposals originate in departments or programs, pass through appropriate College curriculum committees, and are reviewed by the General Education Committee. It is the responsibility of the Dean and of the General Education Committee to insure that course proposals meet the values and criteria of the general education program. New course proposals must also be approved by the Undergraduate Academic Council of the University Senate; revisions to existing courses designed to qualify them for the general education program will be reviewed only by the General Education Committee pursuant to the procedure outline above.

The General Education Committee will review approved courses on a regular cycle of three years. At the end of the review process, the committee will continue the course for another three-year cycle, suggest revisions necessary for its continuance, or designate the course to be discontinued as a general education course, effective at the end of the spring term of the next academic year. Any decision to discontinue a course must provide sufficient opportunity for appeal and revision.


New General Education: Course Lists by Category:

Arts

AAnt268LEthnology of Pre-Columbian Art
AArh170LSurvey of Art in the Western World I
AArh171LSurvey of Art in the Western World II
AArh230The Art of Medieval Knighthood
AArh260Introduction to Cinema
AArh265History of Photography
AArh266Photography from 1970 to Present
AArh274Islamic Art and Architecture
AArh280Chinese Painting
ACla207LEgyptian Archaeology
ACla208LGreek Archaeology
ACla209Roman Archaeology
AEas140East Asian Cinema
AEac280Chinese Painting
AEng102Introduction to Creative Writing
AEng233Modern Drama
AEng325American Drama
AHis263EArt, Music, and History A Multimedia Approach I
AHis264EArt, Music, and History A Multimedia Approach II
ALcs216LMusic and Society in Latin America
ALcs268LEthnology of Pre-Columbian Art
ALcs315LLatin America through Film
AMus100LIntroduction to Music
AMus102LThe Golden Age of Piano Music
AMus115LJazz: America's Music
AMus170LSecondary Performance
AMus178LMajor Performance Study I
AMus180LChamber Ensembles
AMus182LPercussion Ensemble
AMus184LJazz Ensemble
AMus185LUniv-Community Symphony
AMus186LUniv-Community Symphonic Band
AMus187LThe University Chorale
AMus208LIntroduction to Opera
AMus211LThe Concerto
AMus212LChamber Music
AMus213LSurvey of Symphonic Music
AMus214LAmerican Music
AMus216LMusic and Society in Latin America
AMus230Music History I
AMus231Music History II
AMus270LSecondary Performance
AMus278LMajor Performance Study III
AMus287LUniversity Chamber Singers
AMus289LElectronic Music Ensemble
AMus320Intro to Music Composition
AMus325Electronic Music
AMus334LSurvey of American Music
AMus338LSurvey of Opera
AThr107LIntroduction to Dramatic Art
AThr120Understanding Design for the Performing Arts
AThr221LDevlpmt of Theatre & Drama I
AThr222LDevlpmt of Theatre & Drama II
AThr224LContemporary Issues in Modern Drama
AThr225LAmerican Theatre History
AThr230LGreat Drama on Film & Video
AThr235LFundamentals of Theatrical Design
AThr322LDevelopment of Theatre and Drama III
AThr380LHistory of Costume


Humanities

AAas142LAfrican/African-American Literature
AAnt175LAnthropology and Folklore
AAnt268LEthnology Pre-Columbian Art
ACla207LEgyptian Archaeology
ACla208LGreek Archaeology
ACla209Roman Archaeology
AClc105LMyths of the Greek World
AClc110LClassical Roots: Great Ideas of Greece and Rome
AClc223LMasterpieces of Greek Tragedy and Comedy
AEac150LChina Through Western Eyes
AEac170China: Its Culture and Heritage
AEac210LSurvey of Classical Chinese Lit in Translation I
AEac211LSurvey of Classical Chinese Lit in Translation II
AEac212LModern Chinese Literature in Translation
AEaj170Japan: Its Culture and Heritage
AEaj210LLSurvey of Traditional Japanese Literature
AEaj212LModern Japanese Literature in Translation
AEas103LSources of East Asian Civilizations I
AEas104LSources of East Asian Civilizations II
AEng121LReading Literature
AEng122LReading Prose Fiction
AEng123LReading Drama
AEng124LReading Poetry
AEng144LReading Shakespeare
AEng215LMethods of Literary Criticism
AEng222LMasterpieces of Literature
AEng223LShort Story
AEng226LStudy of Literary Theme, Form, or Mode
AEng232LModern Novel
AEng233LModern Drama
AEng234LModern Poetry
AEng241LPopular Literature
AEng242LScience Fiction
AEng260LForms of Poetry
AEng261LAmerican Poetic Tradition
AEng291LThe English Literary Tradition I
AEng292LThe English Literary Tradition II
AEng295LClassics of Western Literature I: Epic to Modern Drama
AEng296LClassics of Western Literature II: Epic to Modern Novel
AEng325LAmerican Drama
AEng362LCritical Approaches to Women in Literature
AEng368LWomen Writers
AFre 201Perspectives on the Modern World:  Medieval Women
AFre241LIntroduction to French Studies
AFre361Readings in French Literature
AHis263EArt, Music, and History a Multimedia Approach I
AHis264EArt, Music, and History a Multimedia Approach II
AHis297Religion in Society and History
AIta223LIntroduction to Literary Methods
AJst231Modern Jewish Thought
AJst242The Bible as Literature
AJst272Modern Hebrew Literature in Translation
AJst273The Arab in Israeli Literature
AJst274Love & Sex in Hebrew Literature
AJst373/ZThe Arab in Israeli Literature
AJst374/ZLove & Sex in Hebrew Literature
ALcs216LMusic & Society in Latin America
ALcs268LEthnology Pre-Columbian Art
ALcs315LLatin America through Film
AMus216LMusic & Society in Latin America
APhi110LIntroduction to Philosophical Problems
APhi111LThe Mind and the World
APhi112LIntroduction to Reasoning and Analysis
APhi114LMorals and Society
APhi115LMoral Choices
APhi116LWorld Views
APhi210LIntroduction to Logic
APhi212LIntroduction to Ethical Theory
APhi218LUnderstanding Science
ARel100LIntroduction to Study of Religion
ARel116LWorld Views
ARel175LAnthropology and Folklore
ARel200LIntroduction to the Bible
ARel231Modern Jewish Thought
ARel297LReligion and Society in History
ARus171LWomen in Russian Culture
ARus251LMasterpieces of 19th-Century Russian Literature
ARus252LMasterpieces of 20th-Century Russian Literature
ARus253LContemporary Russian Lit
ARus261LDostoevsky and Tolstoy in English Translation
ARus354LThe Russian Novel in Its Western Context
ASpn223LIntro to Literary Methods
ASpn312Representative Spanish Authors II
AThr221LDevelopment of Theatre and Drama I
AThr222LDevelopment of Theatre and Drama II
AThr224LIssues Modern Drama
AThr225LAmerican Theatre History
AThr230LGreat Drama on Film & Video
AWss362LCritical Approaches to Women in Literature
AWss368LWomen Writers
RPos103Political Theory
RPos306Contemporary Democratic Theory
UUni101Foundations of Great Ideas I
UUni151LHuman Identity and Technology I
UUni156LHuman Identity and Technology I

Natural Sciences

AAnt110NIntroduction to Human Evolution
AAnt111NIntroduction to the Primates
AAnt119NThe City and Human Health
AAtm100NThe Atmosphere
AAtm101NThe Upper Atmosphere
AAtm102NScience and Major Environmental Issues
AAtm105NOceanus and Gala
AAtm107The Oceans
ABio102NGeneral Biological Sciences
ABio110FGeneral Biology I
ABio110NGeneral Biology I
ABio111NGeneral Biology II
ABio117NNutrition
ABio208NMarine Biology
ABio209NThe Human Organism
ABio230NPeople and Resources in Ecological Perspective
ABio241NThe Biology of Sex
AChm100NChemical ABCs: Atoms, Bonds, Citizen Consumers, Chemistry of Cancer
AChm120NGeneral Chemistry I
AChm121NGeneral Chemistry II
AGeo100FPlanet Earth
AGeo100NPlanet Earth
AGeo105NEnvironmental Geology
AGeo190NEarth Resources: Problems and Choices
AGeo201NEnvironmental Analysis
AGog101NIntroduction to the Physical Environment
AGog201NEnvironmental Analysis
AGog304NIntroduction to Climatology
APhy100NContemporary Astronomy: Cosmic Connection
APhy102NApplicatns Modern Physics in Art History and Archaeology
APhy103NExploration of Space
APhy104NPhysical Science for Humanists
APhy105NGeneral Physics I
APhy108NGeneral Physics II
APhy140NIntroductory Physics I
APhy150NIntroductory Physics II
APhy202NEnvironmental Physics
UUni154NHuman Identity and Technology II
UUni158NHuman Identity and Technology II
AWss109NWomen, Biology and Health


Social Sciences

AAnt108MCultural Anthropology
AAnt131MAncient People of the World
AAnt160MSymbol and Human Nature
AAnt220MIntroduction to Linguistics
AAnt240MThe North American Indian
AAnt341MEthnology of Mesoamerica
ACla131MAncient People of the World
ACom100MHuman Communication
AEac160MChina: People and Places in the Land of One Billion
AEas321MExploring the Multicultural City
AEco110MPrinciples of Economics I: Microeconomics
AEco111MPrinciples of Economics II: Macroeconomics
AEco202MThe American Economy: Its Structure and Institutions
AEng217MIntroduction to Linguistics
AGog102MIntroduction to Human Geography
AGog160MChina: People and Places in the Land of One Billion
AGog220MIntroduction to Urban Geography
AGog321Exploring the Multicultural City
AHis220MPublic Policy in Modern America
ALcs282MRace and Ethnicity
ALcs321MExploring the Multicultural City
APln220MIntroductory Urban Planning
APsy101MIntroduction to Psychology
APsy102MAdvanced Introduction to Psychology
ASoc115MIntroduction to Sociology
ASoc180GSocial Problems
ASoc180MSocial Problems
ASoc210MSociology of Culture
ASoc262MSociology of Gender
ASoc282Race and Ethnicity
ASoc283Juvenile Delinquency
ASoc359GMedical Sociology
ASoc359MMedical Sociology
AWss220GPerspectives on Women
AWss220MPerspectives on Women
AWss262MSociology of Gender
EAps400United States Educational Governance, Policy, and Administration
RPos101MAmerican Politics
RPos102MComparative and International Politics
RPos103MPolitical Theory
RPos240MIntroduction to Public Policy
RPos340MIntroduction to Political Analysis
UUni152MHuman Identity and Technology I
UUni157MHuman Identity and Technology II


United States Historical Perspectives

The following courses have been approved for ALL students to fulfill the U.S. Historical Perspectives General Education Requirement:
AHis100American Political and Social History I
AHis101American Political and Social History II
RPos101American Politics
AHis311History of American Foreign Policy I
AHis312History of American Foreign Policy II
AHis317History of the American City to 1860
AHis318History of the American City since 1860
AHis321American Social History to Civil War
AHis322American Social History: Civil War to Present
AHis327The Roles of Law in American History
AHis328Lawyers in American Life, 1607 to Present
The following courses have been approved for students who received an 85 or above on the NYS Regents Exam to fulfill the U.S. Historical Perspectives General Education Requirement
AAas213History of Civil Rights Movement
AAas220Black and White in America
AAnt351Ethnicity in North America
AEas180Asian America
AGog125The American City
AGog180Asian America
AGog240Patterns of American Immigration
AGog356Geography of the United States
AHis100American Political and Social History I
AHis101American Political and Social History II
AHis300History of American Indians
AHis311History of American Foreign Policy I
AHis312History of American Foreign Policy II
AHis313Constitutional History of the United States
AHis316Workers and Work in America: 1600-Present
AHis317History of the American City to 1860
AHis318History of the American City since 1860
AHis321American Social History to Civil War
AHis322American Social History: Civil War to Present
AHis325The Quest for Equality in American History
AHis327The Roles of Law in American History
AHis328Lawyers in American Life, 1607 to Present
AJst221The American Jewish Experience
AJst260Jews and the Immigrant Experience in America
AJst351Ethnicity in North America
AWss106U.S. Women Who Changed Our World
AWss260History of Women and Social Change
RPos101American Politics
RPos426American Constitutional Law


Europe

AArh170Survey of Art in the Western World I
AArh171Survey of Art in the Western World II
AClc110Great Ideas of Greece and Rome
AClc133History of Ancient Greece
AClc134History of Ancient Rome
AClc301Rome and the Mediterranean World
AClc310Women in Antiquity (Wss 311)
AFre201Perspectives on the Modern World: Medieval Women
AFre360Evolution of French Literature and Civilization
AHis130History of European Civilization I
AHis131History of European Civilization II
AHis235Early Medieval Christianity
AHis253Medieval Jews Among Muslims and Christians (Jst/Rel 253)
AHis263Art, Music, and History I
AHis264Art, Music, and History II
AHis275Anti-Semitism in Historical Perspective (Jst 275)
AJst252Jews Hellenism, and Early Christianity (Rel 252)
AJst253Medieval Jews Among Muslims and Christians (His/Rel 253)
AJst275Anti-Semitism in Historical Perspective (His 275)
AMus230Music History I
AMus231Music History II
ARel252Jews Hellenism, and Early Christianity (Jst 252)
ARel253Medieval Jews Among Muslims and Christians (His/Jst 253)
ARus161Russian Civilization
AThr221Development of Theatre and Drama I
AThr222Development of Theatre and Drama II
AWss311Women in Antiquity
RPos301History of Political Theory I
RPos302History of Political Theory II


Regions Beyond Europe

AAas269Caribbean: Peoples, Histories, Cultures (Lcs/Ant 269)
AAas286African Civilizations (His 286)
AAas287Africa in the Modern World (His 287)
AAnt233Aztec, Incas and Mayans (Lcs 233)
AAnt236American Indian Archaeology
AAnt240The North American Indian
AAnt243Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (Jst 243)
AAnt269Caribbean: Peoples, Histories, Cultures (Lcs/Aas 269)
AAnt341Ethnology of Mesoamerica (Lcs 341)
AEac170China: Its Culture and Heritage
AEaj170Japan: Its Culture and Heritage
AEas103Sources of East Asian Civilization I
AEas104Sources of East Asian Civilization II
AHis170Intro to Caribbean History (Lcs 102)
AHis176Cultures & Societies of Asia I
AHis177Cultures & Societies of Asia II
AHis257Jews, War and Revolution: West European Jewry, 1770-1918
AHis258Jews, War and Revolution: East European Jewry, 1772-1918
AHis286African Civilizations (Aas 286)
AHis287Africa in the Modern World (Aas 287)
AHis364ZCulture and the French Revolution
AJst243Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (Ant 243)
AJst251Early Israel & Biblical Civilization
AJst257Jews, War and Revolution: West European Jewry, 1770-1918
AHis258Jews, War and Revolution: East European Jewry, 1772-1918
AJst285Hero and Antihero in Scripture
ALcs102Intro to Caribbean History (His 170)
ALcs233Aztec, Incas and Mayans (Ant 233)
ALcs269Caribbean: Peoples, Histories, Cultures (Aas/Ant 269)
ALcs341Ethnology of Mesoamerica (Ant 341)
ARel285Hero and Antihero in Scripture
RPos373Government and Politics in the Republic of China


Global and Cross-Cultural Perspectives

AAnt108Cultural Anthropology
ACas141Concepts of Race and Culture in the Modern World
ACas150Cultural Diversity and the Human Condition
AEco130Third World Economies: An Interdisciplinary Profile
AGog102Introduction to Human Geography
AGog225World Cities
AHis158The World in the 20th Century
AHis255The Holocaust: Lessons in Legacies (Jst 255)
AHis275Anti-Semitism in Historical Perspective (Jst 275)
AHis293History of Women in the Americas
AHis297Religion and Society in History (Rel 297)
AJst150Survey of Jewish Civilization
AJst254Jews in the Modern World (Rel 254)
AJst255The Holocaust: Lessons in Legacies (His 255)
AJst275Anti-Semitism in Historical Perspective (His 275)
AJst291Messiah/Messianism in Judaism and Christianity (Rel 291)
ALcs359Globalization in the Americas
APhi214World Religions (Rel 214)
APln320International and Urban Planning
ARel214World Religions (Phi 214)
ARel254Jews in the Modern World (Jst 254)
ARel291Messiah/Messianism in Judaism and Christianity(Jst 291)
ARel297Religion and Society in History (His 297)
AWss308Global Perspectives on Women
RPos102Comparative and International Politics
RPos355Government and Politics in Sub-Saharan Africa
RPos370International Relations: Theory
RPos371International Relations: Practice
RPos374America and Asia: Whose Leadership?
RPos385Vietnam: The Politics of Intervention
RPos461Comparative Ethnicity
RPos473Economic Relations in the Global System


U.S. Diversity and Pluralism

AAas142LAfrican/African-American Literature
AAas213History of the Civil Rights Movement
AAas220Black and White in America
AAas240Classism, Racism & Sexism: Issues
AAnt100Culture, Society, and Biology
AAnt172Community and Self
AAnt351Ethnicity in North America
ACas125Diversity of Voices in Literature & the Arts
ACas131Diversity and Equity in America
ACas141Concepts of Race and Culture in the Modern World
ACas150Cultural Diversity and the Human Condition
ACas240Images & Issues of Diversity in Visual Arts
ACom371Theories of Intercultural Communication
AEac272The Chinese & Chinese World View
AEas180Asian America
AEco130The Third World Economies: Interdisciplinary Profile
AEng240Growing Up in America
AFre208New World Cultural Diversity
AFre281Francophone Cultures: New World and Third World
AGog125MThe American City
AGog180Asian America
AGog240Patterns of American Immigration
AHis158The World in the 20th Century
AHis225Hollywood and the Jews
AHis275Antisemitism in Historical Perspective
AJst155Judaism: Traditions and Practices
AJst221The American Jewish Experience
AJst225Hollywood and the Jews
AJst260Jews and Immigrant Experience in America
AJst270Jewish-Christian Relations
AJst275Antisemitism in Historical Perspective
AJst351Jewish American Ethnic Groups
ALcs201Hispanic Cultures in the United States
ALcs216LMusic and Society in Latin America
ALcs240Classism, Racism, and Sexism : Issues
ALcs282Race and Ethnicity
ALcs302Las Culturas Latinas en los Estados Unidos
ALcs375Latino Politics in the United States
AMus216LMusic and Society in Latin America
APhi214World Religions
APhi328Philosophy and Race
ARel100LIntro to the Study of Religion
ARel155Judaism: Traditions and Practices
ARel214World Religions
ARel270Jewish-Christian Relations
ARel275Social Morality and Citizenship Education in a Pluralistic Society
ASoc262MSociology of Gender
ASoc282Race and Ethnicity
ASoc375U.S. Urban Neighborhood Diversity
ASpn322Las Culturas Latinas en los Estados Unidos
RSsw220Value Issues in Social Welfare
AThr228Voices Diversity Contemp Amer Theatre/Drama
AWss101Introduction to Feminisms
AWss106U.S. Women Who Changed the World
AWss202Introduction to Lesbian and Gay Studies
AWss240Classism, Racism and Sexism : Issues
AWss262MSociology of Gender
EEdu275Social Morality and Citizenship Education in a Pluralistic Society
EEdu375Social Responsibility and Citizenship Education in Pluralistic Society
RCrj210Policies of Crime in Heterogeneous Societies
UUni153Human Identity and Technology II
UUni230An Introduction to Disability Studies


Information Literacy

ACsi198TMicrocomputer Consulting Service in the University Library
ALin100MUnderstanding Language
RIsp100Internet and Information Access
RIsp301Introduction to Information Science
UUni100The Freshmen Year Experience
(UUni15_)Four-Course Project Renaissance Sequence
UUnl205Information Literacy


Oral Discourse

ACom203Speech Composition and Presentation
ACom212Argumentation and Debate
AEac210LSurvey of Classical Chinese Lit in Translation I
AEac211LSurvey of Classical Chinese Lit in Translation II
AEac212LModern Chinese Literature in Translation
AEas321MExploring the Multicultural City
AGog321MExploring the Multicultural City
AGog330Principles of Environmental Management
ALcs321MExploring the Multicultural City
APln320ZInternational Urban Planning
APln330ZPrinciples of Environmental Management
AThr240Acting I
AThr242Voice I
AThr310Reader's Theatre
AThr340Acting II
AThr341Acting III
AThr343Voice II
AThr440Acting IV
UUni153Human Identity and Technology I
UUni157Human Identity and Technology II
UUni301Foundations of Great Ideas II


Writing Intensive

Writing Intensive courses are designated by the suffix letters E, F, G, and Z. A 100- or 200-level course with one of those suffixes may be used to meet the lower division requirements; a 300-level or above course with one of those suffixes, the upper division requirement.


Mathematics and Statistics

RCrj281Introduction to Statistics in Criminal Justice
AEco210Tools of Economics
AMat101Algebra And Calculus
AMat105Finite Mathematics
AMat106Survey of Calculus
AMat108Elementary Statistics
AMat109Applied Matrix Algebra
AMat111Algebra and Calculus II
AMat112Calculus
AMat118Honors Calculus
APhi210Introduction to Logic
APsy210Statistical Methods in Psychology
ASoc221Statistics for Sociologists
BMsi220Introduction to Business Statistics
OEop13AMath I
OEop13BMath II
OEop13CMath III
RPos416Research Models in Political Science I


Foreign Language

AClg102Elementary Greek II
ACll102Elementary Latin II
ADch102Elementary Dutch II
AEac102Elementary Chinese II
AEaj102Elementary Japanese II
AEak102Elementary Korean II
AFre102Beginning French II
AHeb102Elementary Hebrew II
AIta101Elementary Italian II
APol102Elementary Polish II
APor101Elementary Portuguese II
APor102Intensive Elementary Portuguese
ARus102Elementary Russian II
ARus104Russian for Bilingual Students II
ARus105Intensive Introduction to Russian
ASpn101Elementary Spanish II
ASpn105Intensive for Bilinguals I
AUkr102Elementary Ukrainian II

NOTE:  More than one printed and electronic version of approved course lists for the New General Education Program appeared in the past year. Students who believed they were fulfilling a requirement by taking a course which no longer appears on the list for that requirement category should bring this to the attention of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, LC 30.

The General Education Committee continues to receive applications from faculty who wish their courses to count toward one or more of the New General Education categories. Although the printed copy of the Undergraduate Bulletin only comes out once a year, as new courses are approved for categories they will be added to the University's New General Education web page: http://www.albany.edu/gened/newgened.html


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