Department of East Asian Studies

Faculty

Professors

Charles M. Hartman, Ph.D.
Indiana University

Alvin Magid, Ph.D.
Michigan State University (associate faculty)

Christopher J. Smith, Ph.D.
University of Michigan

Jogindar S. Uppal, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota (associate faculty)

Associate Professors

James M. Hargett, Ph.D.
Indiana University

Assistant Professors

Shirley Chang, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Anthony DeBlasi, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Susanna Fessler, Ph.D.
Yale University

Robert M. Garvin, Ph.D.
Columbia University (associate faculty)

Lecturer

Michiyo Kaya Wojnovich, M.S.
University at Albany

Teaching Assistants: 4

The Department of East Asian Studies offers courses in the languages and cultures of the three major civilizations of East Asia: China, Japan and Korea. The department provides instruction in elementary, intermediate and advanced Chinese and Japanese, and in elementary Korean. There are also courses taught in English on Chinese and Japanese literature, philosophy, history, geography, economics and political science.

Careers

Graduates of the Department traditionally enter careers in teaching, international trade, U.S. government security, and the travel industry. The degree is also excellent preparation for professional graduate programs in business administration (M.B.A.), law, librarianship, and Teaching English as a Second Language. The department strongly encourages students interested in East Asian Studies to double-major. Combinations with particularly strong employment potential are East Asian Studies and economics, business, and political science.

Special Programs or Opportunities

The University maintains exchange programs in China with Beijing University, Fudan University, Nanjing University, and Nankai University. These programs provide students an opportunity to study Chinese language and selected topics in the humanities and social sciences in China for one academic year. The university also maintains a similar exchange program with Kansai University in Japan and with Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. All departmental majors are strongly encouraged to participate in these exchange programs in order to gain first-hand experience of life in contemporary East Asia.

B.A. in Chinese/M.BA. Degree Program

The Department of East Asian Studies and the School of Business offer a five-year B.A./M.B.A. Degree Program in Chinese and Business Administration. Students in this program fulfill requirements for the Chinese major during their freshman, sophomore, and junior years. The junior year is spent at Fudan University in Shanghai, where students receive additional language training and participate in internship programs arranged with international businesses. The fourth and fifth years focus on completing the requirements for the M.B.A. degree.

Degree Requirements

The Department of East Asian Studies offers three concentrations or degree tracks. Each is a separate and distinct course of study leading to the B.A. degree. These are 1) the Major in Chinese Studies, 2) the Interdisciplinary Major in East Asian Studies, and 3) the Interdisciplinary Major in Japanese Studies. Requirements for these programs are as follows:

Major in Chinese Studies

B.A. A minimum of 34 credits, to include at least 12 at or above the 300 level as follows: 1) a minimum of 16 credits in Chinese language courses above A Eac 102L; 2) 6 credits in required core courses A Eas 103L-104L; 3) 6 credits from A Eac/A His 379 (or 379Z)-380 (or 380Z); 4) 6 additional credits from any A Eac or A Eas course (except A Eas 220) or from the following courses: A Phi 344, R Pos 373, R Pos 374, R Pos 376.

Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major with a Concentration in East Asian Studies

B.A. A minimum of 34 credits, to include at least 12 at or above the 300 level as follows: 1) 6 credits in required core courses A Eas 103L-104L; 2) 10 credits in any single or combination of East Asian language(s); 3) 6 credits from A Eac 210L, A Eac 211L, A Eac 212L, A Eac389, A Eaj 210L, A Eaj 212L, A Eaj 389, A Eaj 410, A Eaj 411; 4) 6 credits from A Eac/A His 379 (or 379Z)-380 (or 380Z), A Eaj/A His 384 (or 384Z)-385 (or 385Z), A Eac 170, A Eaj 170; 5) a minimum of 6 additional credits from any A Eac, A Eaj, or A Eas course (except A Eas 220) not used for the above requirements, A His 177 (or 177Z), A His 484 (or 484Z), A His 485 (or 485Z), A Phi 344, A Phi 346, R Pos 373, R Pos 374, R Pos 376.

Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major with a Concentration in Japanese Studies

B.A. A minimum of 34 credits, to include at least 12 at or above the 300 level as follows: 1) a minimum of 16 credits in Japanese language courses above A Eaj 102L: 2) 6 credits in required core courses A Eas 103L-104L; 3) 6 credits from A Eaj/A His 384 (or 384Z)-385 (or 385Z); 4) 6 additional credits from any A Eaj or A Eas course (except A Eaj 130 and A Eas 220) or from the following course(s): A Phi 346.

Courses in Chinese Studies

A Eac 101L Elementary Chinese I (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
An introduction to modern Chinese (Mandarin) with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing. Basic fluency in the spoken language is developed through intensive use and repetition of fundamental sentence patterns and vocabulary. Students learn both traditional full-form characters and the simplified versions in use on mainland China. May not be taken by students with any previous knowledge of any Chinese language.

A Eac 102L Elementary Chinese II (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Continuation of A Eac 101L. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 101L.

A Eac 150L China Through Western Eyes (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
American and European perceptions of China from the 13th century to the present, emphasizing the origin(s) and influence of these Western perspectives. Readings range from the travel journals of Marco Polo to recent reports.

A Eac 160M (same as A Gog 160M) China: People and Places in the Land of One Billion (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & SS
An introduction to the human and physical geography of China. After a brief survey of China’s historical geography and development, the course focuses on post-liberation China and the urban, economic, social and demographic problems associated with modernization. A Eac 160G & A Gog 160G are the writing intensive versions of A Eac 160M & A Gog 160M; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit.

A Eac 160G (same as A Gog 160G) China: People and Places in the Land of One Billion (3)
Meets General Education: CHP, SS & WI
A Eac 160G & A Gog 160G are the writing intensive versions of A Eac 160M & A Gog 160M; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit.

A Eac 170L China: Its Culture and Heritage (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Survey of the essential elements of traditional Chinese civilization and their transformation in the 20th century. Focus is on the development of basic Chinese social, political and aesthetic ideas. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Chinese required.

A Eac 199 Introduction to the I-Ching (same as A Rel 199) (3)
The I-Ching, which is probably the oldest book in existence, is a repository of concepts basic to Chinese culture and its development of a uniquely Chinese world view. This course will focus on the central position of the I-Ching in Chinese intellectual and spiritual life and provide a system of knowledge whereby man can analyze the pattern of changes in life governed by the Immutable Law of Change. Only one of A Eac 199 & Rel 199 may be taken for credit. May not be offered during 1998-99.

A Eac 201L Intermediate Chinese I (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Speaking, reading, and writing modern Chinese, including continued study of both full-form and simplified characters, introduction to dictionaries, principles of character formation and classification, and the phonetic writing system (chu-yin-fu-hao). Prerequisite(s): A Eac 102L or equivalent.

A Eac 202L Intermediate Chinese II (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Continuation of A Eac 201L. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 201L or equivalent.

A Eac 210L Survey of Classical Chinese Literature in Translation I (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
An introduction to the major works of Chinese literature from The Book of Songs (1100–600 B.C.) to poetry and prose writings of the Sung dynasty (960–1279).

A Eac 211L Survey of Classical Chinese Literature in Translation II (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
An introduction to the major works of Chinese literature from the Yuan dynasty (1279–1368) to the Ch’ing period (1644–1911), with emphasis on plays, poems and fiction.

A Eac 212L Modern Chinese Literature in Translation (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Survey of literature in China from the May Fourth Movement (1919) to the present, including works written after the Cultural Revolution in the 1960’s. Special attention is called to the impact of the West on modern Chinese writers in the 1920’s and 1930’s.

A Eac 272 The Chinese and the Chinese World View (3)
Meets General Education: HD
In this course we will examine those beliefs, values, and behaviors which characterize the “Chinese.” Focus is given to those major belief systems which have shaped, and continue to shape, the Chinese understanding their place in the cosmos and their relationship with others: the Chinese World View. May not be offered during 1998-99.

A Eac 280L (same as A Arh 280L) Chinese Painting (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Introduces students to the major works of traditional Chinese painting and analyzes those works to arrive at an understanding of life in traditional China. The major class activity will be viewing, discussing and analyzing slides of Chinese paintings. Only one of A Arh 280L & A Eac 280L may be taken for credit.

A Eac 290 Ideology and Reality in Contemporary China (2–3)
The roles of literature and politics from the Yenan Forum of 1942 to the present. Ideological and social forces that have shaped the literature of the period into a political and moral weapon in national wars, class struggles, and in effecting social reforms. Knowledge of Chinese not required. May not be offered during 1998-99.

A Eac 301 & 302 (formerly A Eac 300A and B) Advanced Chinese I & II (3, 3)
A survey of a wide variety of materials written in modern Chinese, including selections from the works of major 20th-century writers, newspaper articles from both Taiwan and mainland China, and readings from the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. Students will view and study at least one full-length Chinese movie. Equal emphasis is placed on enhancing reading, writing and oral communication skills. Class is conducted entirely in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 202L or equivalent for A Eac 301; A Eac 301 or equivalent for A Eac 302.

A Eac 310 Classical Chinese I (3)
Introduction to the literary Chinese language and classical Chinese culture through readings of simple texts selected from early classics, including the Chuangtzu and Records of the Grand Historian. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 202L. A Eac 311 Classical Chinese II (3)
Continuation of A Eac 310. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 310.

A Eac 344 (same as A Phi 344 & A Rel 344) Chinese Philosophies (3)
Introduction to Chinese philosophies from the Chou period to contemporary thought. Only one of A Eac 344, A Phi 344 & A Rel 344 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

A Eac 379Z (same as A His 379Z) History of China I (3)
Meets General Education: WI
This course offers a general survey of Chinese history to 1644, with emphasis on political, economic, and social developments. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or History.

A Eac 380Z (same as A His 380Z) History of China II (3)
Meets General Education: WI
This course offers a general survey of Chinese history from 1644 to the present, with emphasis on China’s relations with the West and on political and economic developments. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or History.

A Eac 389 Topics in Chinese Literature, History, and Culture (3)
This course will focus on a selected topic or major work of traditional or modern Chinese literature or history for intensive study. This course is conducted solely in English; knowledge of Chinese is not required. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A Eas 103L or A Eac 170L or A Eac 210L or A Eac 211L or A Eac 212L or permission of the instructor.

A Eac 410 Readings in Vernacular Literature (3)
Extensive readings in Chinese vernacular literature in classical and modern periods. Lecture and discussion conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite(s): A Eac 202L. May not be offered during 1998-99.

A Eac 470Z (same as A Gog 470Z) China After Deng Xiaoping(3)
Meets General Education: WI
This course examines some of the issues associated with modernization and economic development in Post-Deng Xiaoping China. The course focuses on the era of economic reform associated with Deng, and is particularly concerned with the social, spatial and political ramifications of China’s entry into the global economy. Prerequisite(s): any of the following: A Eac 160M/G or 170L, or A Gog 102G/M or 220M. May not be offered during 1998-99.

A Eac 497 Independent Study in Chinese (1–6)
Projects in selected areas of Chinese studies, with regular progress reports. Supervised readings of texts in Chinese. May be repeated once for credit when topics differ. Prerequisite(s): two 300-level Chinese courses or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Courses in Japanese

A Eaj 101L Elementary Japanese I (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Designed for the acquisition of a basic competence in modern standard Japanese in the areas of speaking, reading and writing. Format will be lecture with drill and discussion. Five class hours a week will be enhanced with a one hour language lab. Not open to students with previous knowledge of the Japanese language.

A Eaj 102L Elementary Japanese II (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Continuation of A Eaj 101L. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing will be emphasized. The format will be lecture will drill and discussion, and one hour in the language lab. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 101L or permission of instructor.

A Eaj 130 Beginning Business Japanese (3)
Introduction to the basics of spoken and written Japanese, focusing on daily life and office/business situations. Designed for working professionals, students in business and related fields, and those who plan to work in Japanese companies.

A Eaj 170L Japan: its Culture and Heritage (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Survey of the essential elements of traditional Japanese civilization and their transformation in the post-Meiji era and twentieth century. Focus on the development of basic Japanese social, political, and aesthetic ideas. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required.

A Eaj 201L Intermediate Japanese I (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Concentrates on the reading and analysis of language texts. A large amount of time is devoted to the understanding of Japanese grammar and oral practice. The format will be lecture with drill and discussion. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 102L or permission of instructor.

A Eaj 202L Intermediate Japanese II (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Continuation of A Eaj 201L. The course will concentrate on the reading and analysis of language texts. A large amount of time is devoted to the understanding of Japanese grammar and oral practice. The format will be lecture with drill and discussion. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 201L or permission of instructor.

A Eaj 210L Survey of Traditional Japanese Literature (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA This course presents a survey of the major works of traditional Japanese literature from the 9th to the 19thcentury, including the Tosa Journal, the Pillow Book, and Essays in Idleness. The course is conducted solely in English; knowledge of Japanese is not required.

A Eaj 212L Modern Japanese Literature in Translation (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Survey of prose literature in Japan from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Emphasis is placed on pre-war writers and their quest for modernity.

A Eaj 301 & 302 (formerly A Eaj 300A & B) Advanced Japanese I & II (3,3)
Acquisition of complex structures through intensive oral/aural and reading/writing practice. Discussion, authentic written materials, videotapes and audio tapes are incorporated. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 202L or equivalent for A Eaj 301; A Eaj 301 or equivalent for A Eaj 302.

A Eaj 384Z (same as A His 384Z) History of Japan I (3)
Meets General Education: WI
This course will cover Japanese history from prehistory through the Nara, Heian, Kamakura, Ashikaga, and Tokugawa periods, ending at the Meiji Restoration of 1868. Focus will be on political and economic trends. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or History.

A Eaj 385Z (same as A His 385Z) History of Japan II (3)
Meets General Education: WI
This course will cover modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 through the Meiji, Taisho, and present Heisei eras. Focus will be on political and economic trends, and Japan’s development as a modernized country. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or History.

A Eaj 389 Topics in Japanese Literature, History, and Culture (3)
This course will focus on a selected topic or major work of traditional or modern Japanese literature or history for intensive study. This course is conducted solely in English; knowledge of Japanese is not required. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A Eas 104L or A Eaj 170L or A Eas 210L or A Eas 212L or permission of the instructor.

A Eaj 410 Readings in Modern Japanese Literature (3)
This is an advanced course in Japanese language for students who have completed at least three years of college Japanese. The class will read selected passages from major works of modern Japanese literature. Lecture and discussion will be in Japanese. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 302 or permission of instructor.

A Eaj 411 Readings in Modern Japanese Literature (3)
This is a continuation of A Eaj 410. Class will read selected passages from major works of Japanese literature. Lecture and discussion will be in Japanese. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 410 or permission of instructor.

A Eaj 423 Practicum in Teaching Japanese (2)
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of teaching Japanese as a foreign language, designed for those who contemplate a career teaching Japanese at the secondary or college level. Focus is on attaining practical experience through class observation and a supervised classroom practicum. Prerequisite(s): fluency in Japanese; permission of instructor. S/U graded. May not be offered during 1998-99.

A Eaj 497 Independent Study in Japanese (1–6)
Projects in selected areas of Japanese studies, with regular progress reports; or supervised readings of texts in Japanese. May be repeated once for credit when topics differ. Prerequisite(s): A Eaj 302 or permission of instructor.

Courses in Korean

A Eak 101L Elementary Korean I (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
An introduction to modern Korean, with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing. Format will include both lecture and drill sessions. Not open to students with any previous knowledge of the Korean language.

A Eak 102L Elementary Korean II (5)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
Continuation of A Eak 101L.

Courses in East Asian Studies

A Eas 103L Sources of East Asian Civilizations I (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
A basic introduction to the primary texts that have contributed to the formative cultural foundations of Chinese and Korean civilizations. Readings will include the Analects of Confucius, the Tao te ching, and the Journey to the West.

A Eas 104L Sources of East Asian Civilizations II (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
A basic introduction to the primary texts that have contributed to the formative cultural foundations of Korean and Japanese civilizations. Readings will include selections from the Tale of Genji and Basho’s Narrow Road to the Deep North.

A Eas 140L Introduction to East Asian Cinema (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HA
This course offers an introduction to East Asian cinema, with emphasis on movies produced in China and Japan. Lectures and class discussions will focus on the interpretation of cinematic texts, especially as they relate to cultural dynamics and social change.

A Eas 180 (same as A Gog 180) Asian America (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & HD
This course examines the history of the Asian experience in the United States (especially that of the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Southeast Asian communities). Topics include immigration, legal status, the transformation of Asian-American communities, their relationship with their native lands, and Asian-American self-representation in literature and film.

A Eas 220 Chinese and Japanese Calligraphy (3)
Practical instruction in the artistic design and the different styles of written Chinese and Japanese with the traditional implements: brush, rice paper, ink plate and ink bar. Knowledge of Chinese or Japanese is not required.

A Eas 270 (same as A Wss 270) Women in East Asian Literature (3)
Meets General Education: CHP
Female persona in East Asian literature will be examined in relation to their cultural background as well as the genres in which they appear. Women as rulers and lovers; as goddesses and prostitutes; exemplars and shrews. Conducted in English; no knowledge of the East Asian languages or cultures is required. Only one of A Eas 270 & A Wss 270 may be taken for credit.

A Eas 321M (same as A Lcs 321M and A Gog 321M) Exploring the Multicultural City (3)
Meets General Education: CHP & SS
This course will explore the human dimensions and implications of ethnic diversity in the United States, focusing on New York City. The course utilizes a variety of methods to introduce students to the multicultural city, beginning in the classroom but ending with field work in a specific New York neighborhood. A Eas 321M is equivalent in content to A Lcs 321M and A Gog 321M; only one of the three courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Gog 102M or 102G; or A Gog 120Z, or A Gog 125M, A Gog 160M or 160G; or A Gog 220M, or A Gog 240.

A Eas 350 (same as A Gog 350) Geography and Development in Pacific Asia (3)
Meets General Education: CHP
This course provides an introduction to the economic and social geography of Pacific Asia. The course uses a comparative framework to investigate the problems and prospects associated with economic development in the region, focusing on Japan and China, as well as Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korean, Taiwan, Vietnam and Thailand. Only one of A Eas 350 & A Gog 350 may be taken for credit.

A Eas 362 (same as A Eco 362) The Political Economy of Japan and Korea (3)
A study of the development of Japan and Korea. Emphasis will be given to the role of the state, and institutions, in the selection and implementation of growth strategies, and to the relationship of natural resources, population, capital and technology to the expansion of total output and economic welfare. A Eas 362Z & A Eco 362Z are the writing intensive versions of A Eas 362 & A Eco 362; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M or permission of instructor.

A Eas 362Z (same as A Eco 362Z) The Political Economy of Japan and Korea (3)
Meets General Education: WI
A Eas 362Z & A Eco 362Z are the writing intensive versions of A Eas 362 & A Eco 362; only one of the four courses may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Eco 110M and 111M or permission of instructor.


Undergraduate Bulletin — Table of Contents
University at Albany
State University of New York