Department of Chemistry

Faculty

Distinguished Professor

Harry L. Frisch, Ph.D.
Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn

Professors Emeritae/i

Shelton Bank, Ph.D.
Purdue University

Alfred Finkelstein, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Robert E. Frost, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Henry Kuivila, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Eugene Mclaren, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Washington University

Professors

Eric Block, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Frank M. Hauser, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina

Bernard J. Laurenzi, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Yash P. Myer, Ph.D.
University of Oregon

Ramaswamy H. Sarma, Ph.D.
Brown University

Charles P. Scholes, Ph.D.
Yale University

Lawrence C. Snyder, Ph.D.
Carnegie Institute of Technology

John T. Welch, Ph.D.
Case Western Reserve University

Andrew J. Yencha, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles

Professor of Education and Chemistry

Audrey Champagne, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh

Associate Professors Emeritae/i

Glenn W. Humphreys, M.S.,br. Saint Bonaventure College

Arthur O. Long, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin

Associate Professors

Lawrence H. Daly, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Paul J. Toscano, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University

Assistant Professors

Rabi A. Musah, Ph.D.
University of Arkansas

Adjuncts (estimated): 4
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 25

The objective of the department is to provide students with a broad, fundamental knowledge of modern theoretical and experimental chemistry enabling graduates to embark immediately on professional careers in chemistry or to continue study at an advanced level toward higher degrees. The general program in chemistry is approved by the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society. For students interested in engineering, 3–2 programs with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Clarkson University are available.

Careers

Careers graduates have pursued include: industrial production chemist, industrial control chemist, analytical chemist (industrial and governmental laboratories), research assistant, technical sales and service representative, secondary school teacher, science writing and editing, forensics, chemical business, patent law, information science, toxicology, and even investment counseling and public relations.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Chemistry

General Program: B.A.: (combined major and minor sequence) (51 credits): A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A, 122B, 216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225, 320, 321, 420a, 430, and 6 credits in advanced chemistry including at least 3 credits in courses other than A Chm 424, 425, or 426; A Mat 111 or 112 or 118 and 113 or 119; A Phy 105N, 106, 108N, and 109. Note: A Phy 120N and 124N will substitute for A Phy 105 and 108 sequence.

General Program: B.S.: Within the Chemistry Bachelor of Science Program, a student has a choice of three tracks: Chemistry Emphasis (66 credits); Chemistry/Polymers Emphasis (67 credits); and Chemistry/Materials Emphasis (67 credits). The specific requirements for individual tracks are outlined below.

Chemistry Emphasis: B.S.: (combined major requirement and minor sequence) 66 credits: A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A, 122B, 216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225, 317, 340A, 340B, 341Z, 341B, 420A, and 6 credits in advanced chemistry including at least 3 credits in courses other than A Chm 424, 425, or 426; A Mat 111 or 112 or 118,113 or 119, and 214; A Phy 120N,124N, 220, and 221.

Chemistry/Polymers Emphasis: B.S.: (combined major requirement and minor sequence) (67 credits): A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A, 122B, 216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225, 340A, 340B, 341Z, 408, 420A, and 496; A Mat 111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119, and 214; A Phy 120N, 124N, 220, 221, and 462; XRPI 300 (RPI 72-464, Polymer Science Laboratory—student cross- registers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for the course).

Chemistry/Materials Emphasis: B.S. (combined major requirement and minor sequence) (67 credits): A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A, 122B, 216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225, 340A, 340B, 341Z, 408, 420A, and 495; A Mat 111 or 112 or 118,113 or 119 and 214; A Phy 120N, 124N, 220, 221, 462 and 464; XRPI 300 (RPI 72-464 Polymer Science laboratory) may be substituted for A Phy 464.

Teacher Education Program

B.S. (combined major requirement and minor sequence) (69 credits): A Chm 120N, 121N, 122A, 122B, 216A, 216B, 217A, 217B, 225, 340A, 340B, 341Z, and 342, or 420A, or 440A; A Mat 111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119, and 214; A Phy 120N, 124N, 220, and 221; A Bio 110F and 111N; 6 credits in geological and/or atmospheric sciences as advised.

Students interested in a career in secondary school teaching must apply for and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program administered by the Department of Educational Theory and Practice before they can be officially enrolled in this major in the teacher education program. Qualified students may apply after satisfactorily completing one year of undergraduate study and a minimum of 24 graduation credits. Admission requirements are described in this bulletin under the section headed “Department of Educational Theory and Practice.” Students admitted to the program must complete the teacher education professional requirements described in this bulletin under “Undergraduate Professional Requirements” within the section headed “Department of Educational Theory and Practice.” They must also complete those courses within the major and related fields which are listed in this section.

Combined B.S./M.S. Program

The combined B.S./M.S. program in chemistry provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of the junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.S. and M.S. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.S., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minimum 60- credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.S., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.S. and M.S. programs.

The undergraduate requirement of 420A may be satisfied by A Chm 520A. Likewise, the requirement of 6 credits in advanced chemistry may be satisfied by two 500-level graduate courses.

Students are considered as undergraduates until completion of 120 graduation credits and satisfactory completion of all B.S. requirements. Upon meeting B.S. requirements, students are automatically considered as graduate students.

Students may apply for admission to the combined degree program in chemistry after the successful completion of 56 credits, but no later than the accumulation of 100 credits, and after the satisfactory completion of A Chm 340A. A cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration.

Courses

A Chm 100N Chemical ABCs: Atoms, Bonds, and Citizen Consumers (3)
Meets General Education: NS
Introduction to chemistry emphasizing its applications to problems in modern society, consumer goods, and life-related topics. Lecture and demonstration only. Does not yield credit toward the major or minor in chemistry.

A Chm 110N The DNA Double Helix and the Chemistry of Cancer (3)
Meets General Education: NS
Chemistry of the origin of life and the evolution of the DNA double helix as the genetic material; chemistry of cancer genes, tumor viruses, the immune systems, the technology of recombinant DNA, interferon. How anticancer drugs work. Life- style, environment, and cancer. How chemicals in the environment cause cancer. Does not yield credit toward the major or minor in chemistry.

A Chm 120N General Chemistry I (3)
Meets General Education: NS
Atomic theory, quantitative relationships in chemical change, electronic structure of atoms and chemical periodicity, chemical bonding, and states of matter.

A Chm 121N General Chemistry II (3)
Meets General Education: NS
Elementary principles of chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics; electrochemistry; descriptive chemistry of the elements and their compounds. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 120N.

A Chm 122A and B General Chemistry Laboratory (1, 1)
Introduction to laboratory techniques, experiments demonstrating chemical principles and properties of elements and compounds. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 122B: A Chm 122A; corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s) for A Chm 122A: A Chm 120N; for A Chm 122B: A Chm 121N.

A Chm 123A and B Problem Solving: General Chemistry (1, 1)
Applications of the principles and methods studied in General Chemistry. Assignments selected from the subject matter of General Chemistry are aimed at aiding the student to develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s) for A Chm 123A: A Chm 120N; for A Chm 123B: A Chm 121N. May not be offered during 1998-99.

A Chm 215 Principles of Organic Chemistry (3)
Introduction to organic chemistry emphasizing the principles pertinent to the understanding of biochemistry and modern biology. Does not yield credit toward the major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121N. May not be offered during 1998–99.

A Chm 216A and B Organic Chemistry (3, 3)
Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principal classes of organic compounds stressing the underlying principles of reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 216A: A Chm 121N and A Chm 122B; for A Chm 216B: A Chm 216A.

A Chm 217A and B Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1, 1)
Laboratory techniques in organic chemistry, including extraction, crystallization, distillation, and chromatography, exemplified by the application of these techniques to the synthesis and qualitative analysis of organic compounds. Applications of infrared and NMR spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 217B: A Chm 217A; corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s) for A Chm 217A: A Chm 215 or 216A; for A Chm 217B: A Chm 216B.

A Chm 225 Quantitative Analysis (3)
Theory of quantitative analysis based on modern chemical principles. Practical application to typical gravimetric, volumetric, and colorimetric analysis. Two class periods, one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121N and A Chm 122B.

A Chm 307 (same as Atm 307) Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry (3)
Chemical principles and concepts leading to understanding the composition and change in the chemical/atmospheric environment; sources and sinks of chemical constituents; chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere; measurement and theory; greenhouse gases; global pollution and ozone depletion. A Atm 307Z is the writing intensive version of A Atm 307 and A Chm 307; only one may be taken for credit. Does not yield credit toward the major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A Mat 113 or 119; A Phy 124N; and A Chm 121N.

A Chm 317 Advanced Synthesis Laboratory (2)
Experimental investigation of advanced syntheses of organic and inorganic compounds including their separation and analysis. The development of skills and understanding for the application of complex procedures and methods common in current practice. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 217B.

A Chm 320 Introduction to Physical Chemistry (3)
Behavior of gases chemical thermodynamics (including solution equilibria, phase equilibria and electrochemistry), dynamics of chemical reactions (reactions, mechanisms, theory) and fundamentals of quantum chemistry with focus on chemical bonding, molecular structure and spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 121N; corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Mat 113 or 119 and A Phy 108N. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. major in chemistry.

A Chm 321 Introduction to Experimental Physical Chemistry (1)
Experimental illustration of physical principles and introduction to instrumentation. Techniques of physical measurements, treatment of experimental data and generalization of results to illustrate the fundamental principles. Corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Chm 320. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. major in chemistry.

A Chm 340A and B Physical Chemistry (3, 3)
Mathematical description of physiochemical systems and their interpretation in terms of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, reaction rates and statistical mechanics. Atomic and molecular structure from the viewpoint of quantum theory with special emphasis on bonding and spectra. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 340A: A Phy 124N, A Mat 214, and A Chm 216B; for A Chm 340B: A Chm 340A or consent of instructor.

A Chm 341Z and B Physical Chemistry Laboratory (3, 3)
Meets General Education (A Chm 341Z only): WI
The experimental understanding of the basic principles of physical chemistry and development of familiarity with instrumentation. Includes thermodynamics; chemical kinetics; hydrodynamic, electrochemical, and optical properties; and searching of the chemical literature, computer processing of experimental data, and writing laboratory reports. One lecture and two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 341Z: A Chm 225; for A Chm 341B: Chm 341Z. Corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s) for Chm 341Z: Chm 340A; for Chm 341B: Chm 340B.

A Chm 342 (same as A Bio 365) Biological Chemistry (3)
The chemistry and biochemical interrelationship of carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; enzyme catalysis and introduction to metabolism. Only one of A Chm 342 & A Bio 365 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 215 or 216B.

A Chm 343 Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory (1)
Experiments illustrating the fundamentals of biochemistry as discussed in A Chm 342. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 217A; corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Chm 342. May not be offered during 1998–99.

A Chm 408 (same as A Phy 408) Survey of Polymer Chemistry (3)
Structure, synthesis, and morphology of polymers; polymerization reactions; molecular weight determination; introduction to thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties; design of polymers, graft and copolymers; processing and selected applications including adhesion, coatings, and films. Only one of A Chm 408 & A Phy 408 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 340B or permission of instructor.

A Chm 411A Computer Applications in Chemistry (3)
An introduction to microcomputing in chemistry. An introduction to the principles of microcomputers; programming using BASIC/TURBOBASIC, instrumental interfacing and the use of commercially available microcomputer programs related to chemistry. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A Chm 320 or 340A or permission or instructor.

A Chm 411B Computer Applications in Chemistry (3)
An introduction to mainframe computing in chemistry. An introduction to programming using FORTRAN, LISP, and BASIC for applications of numerical methods of analysis and use of large scale system programs such as MATHEMATICA, MACSYMA, IMSL, BMDP, DISSPLA, SCRIBE, and quantum chemistry programs. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A Chm 320 or 340A or permission of instructor.

A Chm 420A and B Inorganic Chemistry (3, 3)
Bonding and reactivity in inorganic systems including ionic solids, metals, covalent molecules, and coordination complexes; acid-base chemistry; descriptive chemistry of the elements and their compounds. A Chm 420B includes main group chemistry, transition metal complexes, organometallic chemistry, catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 420A: A Chm 320 or 340B; for A Chm 420B: A Chm 420A.

A Chm 424 Retrieval and Presentation of Chemical Information (1)
Instruction and practice in modern methods of searching the chemical literature. Students are required to develop their skills in preparing written presentations and speeches. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. S/U graded.

A Chm 425 Introduction to Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (2)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems A printed or typewritten final report is required. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. May not be repeated for credit. Not more than 3 credits of A Chm 425 and/or A Chm 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor. Corequisite(s) or prerequisite: A Chm 424. S/U graded.

A Chm 426 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (3)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 3 credits of A Chm 425 and/or A Chm 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor; corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A Chm 424. S/U graded.

A Chm 430 Instrumental Analysis (3)
Theoretical principles and chemical applications of selected methods of instrumental analysis. Main emphasis is on electroanalytical methods including polarography, conductance, potentiometry, and coulometric methods, and on trace methods of analysis such as spectrograph emission, flame emission, atomic absorption, and fluorometric analysis. Two class periods, one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 225; prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A Chm 320 or 340B or permission of the instructor.

A Chm 436 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)
Organic chemistry at an advanced level, including introduction of theoretical background and application in synthesis. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A Chm 320 or 340B.

A Chm 440A and B Comprehensive Biochemistry (3, 3)
Chemical characteristics of living matter, amino acids, polypeptides and proteins, supramolecular assembly and membrane structure; enzyme mechanisms and kinetics; bioenergetics and the chemistry of metabolism; electron transport and other transports across membranes; biosynthesis, storage, and expression of genetic information. Prerequisite(s): A Chm 216B or permission of instructor. May not be offered during 1998–99.

A Chm 441A and B (formerly 330A and B) Physical Chemistry for Biochemical Sciences (3, 3)
Foundations of the physical principles and their application to biochemical systems. Topics include: thermodynamics, general kinetics, enzyme kinetics, transport phenomena, quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, and macromolecular conformation. Does not yield credit toward the major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s) for A Chm 441A: A Chm 121N, A Phy 124N, and A Mat 113 or 119 (A Chm 216A or B, and A Chm 342 or A Bio 365 recommended); for A Chm 441B: A Chm 441A.

A Chm 495 Materials Independent Study (3)
Individually selected topic of independent study in materials science-(chemistry) culminating in a comprehensive written report. The material covered is to be beyond that offered in any other formal undergraduate course. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, A Chm 408 and A Phy 462. S/U graded.

A Chm 496 Polymer Independent Study or Research (3)
Individual library or laboratory based research project, or a selected topic of independent study in polymer chemistry culminating in a comprehensive written report. The material covered is to be beyond that offered in any other formal undergraduate course. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and A Chm 408. S/U graded.

A Chm 497 Independent Study (3)
Individual, independent study of selected topics above or beyond those offered in formal undergraduate courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor. S/U graded.


Undergraduate Bulletin — Table of Contents
University at Albany
State University of New York