Courses in Finance/Financial Analysis

T FIN 200 Global Business (3)
This interdisciplinary business course introduces students to today's business environment with special emphasis on globalization of markets and globalization of production. It covers the national differences in political economy, and in business cultures and ethics. It considers recent geopolitical and economic events around the world and how they relate to globalization. Finally, the course examines the impact of globalization on businesses, including international trade, global marketing and global human resources management. Students are exposed to various world-wide institutions and their respective roles: the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations and its auxiliary organizations. Does not yield credit toward the major in business administration or accounting or the minor in business. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

B FIN 210 Personal Finance (3)
The goal of this course is to develop financial literacy and empower students to make wise financial decisions. The course provides an understanding of the basics of investing in the stock and bond markets, tax planning and tax form preparation, personal budgeting and credit card debt, student loans, and how to build and maintain a credit score. Decisions about what types and amounts of insurance to buy, and tax and estate planning are also examined. As instructional methods, the course uses a combination of textbook and outside readings, lectures by the instructor and other financial planning practitioners, case studies, and spreadsheet exercises. Open to all University at Albany students. Does not yield credit in the majors or minor in the School of Business.

B FIN 236 (= R PAD 236) Institutions and Policy in Business Regulation (3)
This course examines the public regulation of business, surveying the field in general but with special attention to regulatory controls in financial markets. Its subjects include the justifications and critiques of government regulation, ethical considerations in regulatory decisions, international dimensions of regulatory policy and management, and how political, legal, and technological processes shape regulation. Only one version of R PAD 236 may be taken for credit.

B FIN 300 Financial Management (3)
Introductory course that surveys the basic concepts in financial management. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, operating and financial leverage, capital budgeting, cost of capital, bond and stock valuation models, and working capital management. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 211.

B FIN 301 Corporate Financial Policy and Strategy (3)
Continuation of B FIN 300, focusing on various investment and financing decisions of the firm. Topics include financial analysis, risk measurement, capital budgeting, capital structure, and dividend policy decisions made in an environment of uncertainty. Case course supplemented with a text and extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300. Not open to students who are concurrently registered for or who have completed B FIN 400.

B FIN 333 Investment Management (3)
This course covers equity and equity-linked derivative securities, and portfolio management. Examines the institutional environment in which investment decisions are made. Topics include portfolio theory, the behavior of equity securities prices, and various models for the pricing of common stock and equity derivative instruments. Term project requires presentation of securities selection and portfolio management strategy. Extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300 and 301. Not open to students with concurrent enrollment in B FIN 380 or who have successfully completed B FIN 380.

B FIN 375 Money and Capital Markets (3)
This course covers money and capital markets and the analysis of fixed-income securities. Topics include the functions of the Fed and its monetary policy, valuation of bonds, management of interest rate risk, and the pricing of derivatives such as interest rate swaps credit analysis, fixed income portfolio management. The use of computer spreadsheets is emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300. Not open to students who are concurrently registered for or who have completed B FIN 410.

B FIN 380 Investment Valuation and Analysis (3)
Intensive course in valuation of equity and derivative securities, and principles of portfolio management. Topics include equity valuation, option pricing, hedging, and speculation methods, creation of investment policy statements, construction of performance benchmarks, and performance attribution methods. Skills such as the use of financial modeling software, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300 and B ACC 313. Open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analyst Honors. Offered spring semester only.

B FIN 400 Financial Case Problems (3)
Intensive case analyses of and discussions about organizations facing a variety of financial issues, including value maximization, measurement of cost of capital, analysis of capital projects, mergers and acquisitions, and risk management. All of these topics will be covered under the overarching theme of corporate valuation. Skills such as the use of computer spreadsheets, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 313, B FIN 300. Open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analyst Honors. Offered spring semester only.

B FIN 404 Entrepreneurial Finance (3)
The course focuses on valuing and financing young high-growth potential entrepreneurial firms. The course addresses this topic from two perspectives: users (entrepreneurs) and suppliers (venture capitalists and other private equity investors) of capital. This course is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on identifying opportunities and valuing those opportunities by using various techniques. The second part focuses on financing of entrepreneurial firms, such as venture capital, venture lending, angel, and other alternative sources. The last part of the course considers exit strategies including taking the venture public, merging it with another company, or through a leverage buyout. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300, B FIN 301, B MKT 310, and B BUS 400. Offered fall semester only.

B FIN 410 The Fixed Income Securities Market (3)
Intensive course on the analysis of fixed income securities. Topics include bond pricing, duration, convexity, the term structure of interest rates, corporate, Treasury, and municipal securities, asset-backed securities, credit analysis, and interest rate swaps. Key skills include spreadsheet usage, teamwork, and oral and written communication. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 313 and B FIN 300, and open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analyst Honors. Offered spring semester only.

B FIN 435 (= R PAD 435) Law in Financial Market Regulation (3)
This course examines the rationales and main features of regulatory law in financial markets, focusing on banking, securities, futures, options, and other capital markets. It discusses approaches to regulating investor and customer protection, financial institutions, and market structure. It examines relationships among change in financial markets such as financial innovations and regulatory structure and practice. The course discusses the roles of federal and state regulation, self-regulatory organizations and private associations, and firms within the regulatory system. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): prior coursework in study of regulation and/or finance highly recommended.

B FIN 436 International Financial Management (3)
This course exposes students to the problems faced by financial managers of firms operating in an interconnected global business environment. After covering the basics of international finance theory and institutions, this course focuses on foreign exchange risk management and the valuation of cross-border cash flows. Various hedging practices and elements of working capital management, capital budgeting, and financing aspects are discussed in an international context. Includes lectures and case analyses. Skills such as the use of computer spreadsheets, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300 and either B FIN 301 or B FIN 400. Offered spring semester only.

B FIN 439 (= R PAD 436) Technology in Financial Market Regulation (3)
The development, operation, and regulation of technological systems shape modern financial markets.These systems are developed and overseen by market centers, clearing organizations, and other market infrastructure organizations, as well as sell-side financial firms, institutional investors and other buy-side participants, corporations, technology providers, and public and private regulators. Market controls, technological development, and regulation shape this system individually and interactively. This course examines the central features of technology in financial markets and how market and regulatory controls and social and behavioral conditions produce and interact with them. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): prior coursework in study of regulation and/or finance highly recommended.

B FIN 470 Special Topics in Finance (3)
Integrates the tools and concepts developed in preceding finance courses. Topics vary by semester and instructor and may include equity and fixed income analysis, derivatives, portfolio management, investment banking, financial case studies, or bank management, among others. Heavy emphasis on computer applications of financial concepts. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 333 and B FIN 375 or B FIN 380 and B FIN 410.

B FIN 485 Derivatives and Risk Management (3)
Intensive examination of risk measurement in organizations and portfolios, and methods for managing those risks. Among the financial instruments examined are option, forward, futures, and swap contracts, including the characteristics of each instrument, market structure, institutional rules, pricing models, and strategies for use in investing and hedging. A variety of learning methods are employed, including lecture and discussion, case study, and computer spreadsheet analyses. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 301, B FIN 333 and B FIN 375 or B FIN 380, B FIN 400 and B FIN 410.

B FIN 490Z Financial Analysis Honors Seminar and Thesis (3)
The first half of the course prepares students for thesis development. Seminars present leading-edge financial topics, review basic research methods, and introduce various financial databases. At semester’s end, students present their completed theses to faculty and alumni on the Albany campus. Skills such as spreadsheet use, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 380, 400 and 410. Open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analyst Honors. Offered fall semester only.

B FIN 494 Introduction to Equity Analysis (1)
Students in the UASBIG student-managed investment fund learn equity research techniques and the use of research tools that may include Bloomberg, FactSet, ValueLine, and EDGAR. Students learn the basics of top-down analysis. Students must become Equity Certified on the Bloomberg Terminal. Prerequisite(s): restricted to University at Albany School of Business Investment Group (UASBIG) members. S/U graded.

B FIN 495 Introduction to Financial Modeling (2)
Using SEC filings and Excel, students in the UASBIG student-managed investment fund model companies' financial statements and produce discounted cash flow and relative valuation estimates. Each student must complete at least one research report and stock recommendation, and pitch it to UASBIG's Advisory Board. Prerequisite(s): successful completion of Bloomberg Terminal Equity Certification. Restricted to University at Albany School of Business Investment Group (UASBIG) members. S/U graded.

B FIN 496 Applied Concepts in Equity Analysis and Financial Modeling (3)
Students in the UASBIG student-managed investment fund apply skills from B FIN 494 and 495, as well as portfolio management and trading concepts. Students learn valuation techniques including EV/EBITDA and Sum-of-Parts analysis, and the modeling of acquisitions and divestitures, and gain experience mentoring junior analysts. Each student must submit at least one professional-quality report and stock recommendation, and demonstrate leadership and assume a mentoring role in UASBIG. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 495. S/U graded.