Courses in Sociology

A SOC 115/115Z Introduction to Sociology (3)
Nature of culture and of human society, personality development, groups and group structure, social institutions, the processes of social change. Only one version of A SOC 115 may be taken for credit.

A SOC 180/180Z Social Problems (3)
Applies the concepts, methods, and ethics of sociology to the analysis of “social problems.” Only one version of A SOC 180 may be taken for credit.

A SOC 200 Political Sociology (3)
Analyzes the social bases of political power and the origin, course of development, and duration of social movements; the role of propaganda, communication, and public opinion in political behavior; the structure of political organizations. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 203 (= R CRJ 203) Criminology (3)
Introduction to the study of crime, including the development of criminal law, the relationship between crime and social structure, and the individual and social causes of crime. Only one of A SOC 203, 381, R CRJ 200, 203 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 210 Sociology of Culture (3)
How do individuals and groups make sense of and find meaning in the world? This course will expose students to common forms of culture analysis in sociology and the study of meaning in the social world. Mass media and other forms of communication, elite and popular culture in music, art, and fashion, and the existence and significance of cultural distinctions such as race, ethnicity, gender, class, and lifestyle will be examined. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.       

A SOC 215/215Z Social Origins of the Modern World (3)
How have attitudes toward family, sex, death and politics changed over the past 500 years? When did humans come to believe that they could understand and transform the natural world? When did governments decide that they could and should reform citizens who commit crimes or behave in socially unacceptable ways? This course answers these questions by looking at historical and contemporary moments when individuals' beliefs and government policies changed in fundamental ways. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.       

T SOC 215 Social Origins of the Modern World (3)
T SOC 215 is the Honors College version of A SOC 215; only one version may be taken for credit.

A SOC 220 Introduction to Social Research (3)
Examination of the assumptions and techniques of social research: problems of design, data collection, quantitative and qualitative analysis; review of current research in professional journals; the uses of survey research; application of concepts through individual and class projects. A SOC 220 is restricted to A-E grading after matriculation at Albany. A SOC 220 must be completed with a C or better for the major in Sociology. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 221 Statistics for Sociologists (3)
Introduction to quantitative analysis of sociological data: methods of summarizing and describing univariate distributions including the use of tables and graphs; methods of examining relationships between two or more measures; statistical inference and hypothesis testing. For Sociology majors and intended majors. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for R CRJ 281. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 225/225W/225Y/225Z (= A LCS 225/225W/225Y/225Z) Global Migration and Transnationalism (3)
The course is an introduction to global migratory patterns in the contemporary period. The course covers: basic concepts and approaches to migration studies; global and regional migratory patterns and major forces shaping them with a specific focus on the twentieth century; and how individuals and families mobilize during the processes of international migration. Geographically, the course covers several areas of the world. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.       

A SOC 235 Sociological Theory (3)
Overview of major schools of theory influencing current sociological inquiry. Discussion of selected works of classical and contemporary theorists. The influence of values on theorizing and the issue of value neutrality. An evaluation of the role of theory in the growth of the discipline. A SOC 235 must be completed with a C or better for the major in Sociology. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

T SOC 240Z Contemporary Immigration and the Second Generation (3)
Examines various aspects of immigration from Asia, Latin America and the Caribbeans since 1965, including migration processes, community and identity, race/ class/ gender intersections, socio-economic and residential mobility, transnationalism, and assimilation into "mainstream" America. The course will explore the social, economic, cultural and political contexts within which immigrants and their children have been incorporated into American society and the various theoretical perspectives that have been proposed to explain their possible future. Open to Honors College students only. T SOC 240Z is the Honors College version of A SOC 440Z. Only one version may be taken for credit.

A SOC 250/250W/250Z Sociology of Families (3)
This course is an introduction to the study of families including discussion of social change and families; attitudes about family issues; diversity of families; partnerships, cohabitation, and marriage; childbearing and parenthood; families and work; union dissolution; stepfamilies; kin and intergenerational relations; economic issues and social policy. The primary focus is on contemporary family patterns in the U.S. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.      

A SOC 255 Mass Media (3)
The role of newspapers, radio, television, and motion pictures in American society. Changes in these media and their functional relationship to education, the economy, the political process, and public opinion. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 260/260Z Social Psychology (3)
Survey course covering both theories and topical areas in the field. Both sociological and psychological perspectives are represented, although the former is emphasized. Topical areas include the self, face-to-face interaction, attitudes, communication, interpersonal relationships, small group processes, social structure, and personality. Only one version of A SOC 260 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115 or A PSY 101.

A SOC 262 (= A WSS 262) Sociology of Gender (3)
This course examines how gender is socially constructed in contemporary U.S. society. The course examines how gender orders our everyday lives, our sense of self, our friendships, romances, conversations, clothing, body image, entertainment, work, sexuality, and parenthood. Students will learn how conceptions about gender create and enforce a system of gender difference and inequality. This course will examine the lives, experiences, and representations of heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and queer (LGBTQ) persons. The course will reveal the “common sense” world of gender that surrounds us by exposing the workings of institutions such as the family, the classroom, the workplace, and the media. Throughout the course we will emphasize the ways in which people experience gender opportunities and constraints differently according to their race, gender, class, and sexuality. Only one version of A SOC 262 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115 or permission of instructor.

A SOC 270 Social and Demographic Change (3)
This is a computer-based course that investigates how major social, economic, and political changes have affected the demographic structure of the national population in the past four decades. The focus is on gaining an understanding of how major dimensions of the nation’s social and demographic structures have changed from 1950 to the present. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

T SOC 274/274Z U.S. Foreign Policy in Comparative Perspective (3)
Why do nations fight wars? How do governments get the human and financial resources to fight wars? We will answer those questions first by briefly looking at the historical development of nation states and trace their growing abilities to force men into armies and to tax citizens. We will then turn to three recent U.S. military confrontations: the Cuban missile crisis, the Vietnam War and the ongoing "war on terrorism." We will look at how and why the U.S. government made the decisions it did in each circumstance, and examine the extent to which public opinion affects foreign policy. Students will write several essays based on course readings and films. There are no exams. Open to Honors College students only.

A SOC 282 (= A LCS 282) Race & Ethnicity (3)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the sociological study of race and ethnicity in the United States. Specifically, the course emphasizes understanding the social, demographic, economic, political, and historical forces that have resulted in the unique experiences of different groups of Americans. Further, the student will be provided with the opportunity to analyze and discuss the impact of public policy on issues that pertain to various racial and ethnic groups. Only one version of A SOC 282 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 283 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
The purpose of this course is to examine the unique aspects of the juvenile justice system and theoretical explanations of delinquent behavior. The course is divided into three sections: 1) conceptual and methodological issues in the study of delinquency; 2) explanations of delinquent behavior; 3) the control of delinquency. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 289 (= A LCS 289) Special Topics in Ethnicity (1–3)
This course is an intensive examination of the culture and lifestyle of a single ethnic group within American society. The specific ethnic group varies from semester to semester and is indicated by the course subtitle; e.g., Asian American Communities. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.       

A SOC 299 Special Topics in Sociology (3)
Investigation of a special topic in Sociology. The topic varies from semester to semester, and is indicated by the course subtitle. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 320 Population Changes (3)
Many of the challenges the world and the United States will face in the 21st century are related either directly or indirectly to issues of population. Examples include migration and immigration, aging, inequality, health and nutrition, environment, population growth or decline, and mortality. Using the framework of social demography, this course will explore a variety of these issues to demonstrate that while demography is hardly destiny, the basic population processes of birth, death, and migration are fundamental to understanding the global word of the 21st century. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 325/325Z Sociology of Science (3)
Characteristics of scientific belief systems: social background of the development of science; the social organization of scientific activity; the impact of science on society. Only one version of A SOC 325 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 326 (= A WSS 326) Sociology of Race, Gender, and Class (3)
Examination of contemporary social constructions of race, gender, and class (primarily) in the United States. Analysis of race, gender, and class as interlocking systems that stratify society. Discussion of key institutions that construct race, gender, and class – especially the media, education, and the political economy. Focus on: both oppressed and privileged positions in the social hierarchies; how we learn about our own and others’ race/ethnicity, gender, and social class; how being a member of a particular social category (e.g., a woman or a man; a white person or a person of color; rich, poor or middle class) affects perspectives and opportunities. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 340 Social Control (3)
Examines how societies maintain social order and discusses ways that governments define and respond to deviance. Primary emphasis is on the sociological study of conflict management, punishment, and crime control. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 341 Social Inequality (3)
Diverse forms of inequality in human society; causes and consequences of inequality; sociological approaches to the study of inequality. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 342/342Z Organizations in Society (3)
Analysis of the structure and processes of different types of organizations (e.g., banks, schools, government agencies, computer firms); intra- and inter-organizational relationships; organizations and their environments; organizational effectiveness. Only one version of A SOC 342 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 344/344Z (= A WSS 344/344Z) Sociology of Women in the Political Economy (3)
The different economic roles women play. The socio-historical determinants of these roles and their implications for the individual and society. Only one version of A SOC 344 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115 or permission of instructor.

A SOC 346 Medicine, Technology, and Society (3)
Over the last few decades, new technologies have radically transformed medicine, surgery, and health care delivery. The course addresses how radical technologies, such as MRIs, lasers, CT scans, digital video monitors, computers, and others, move through medicine and stabilize. The course examines how medicine and health care is organized as a professional occupation with a well-developed division of labor, and how interested actors both within - i.e., doctors, surgeons, and nurses - and outside of - i.e., patients and communities - these systems respond to the promises and challenges that such new technologies bring. Addressing these and related issues will increase the understanding of how medicine and technology work to deliver health care in contemporary society. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 350 Social Movements (3)
Mobilization of social, ethnic, national, and gender groups is the focal concern. Both macro and micro approaches will be employed. Motivations, resources, ideologies, patterns, and outcomes will be discussed. Major theoretical models will be presented and evaluated. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 357 Sociology of Work (3)
Nature and outcome of work for the individual and the society; considerations of gender, age, race, and ethnicity as they interact with employment and unemployment and career patterns; relationships between work and family; the potential for changing work, and the role of power in the workplace. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 359/359W/359Y/359Z Medical Sociology (3)
Comprehensive introduction to sociological factors in disease etiology and illness behavior and to the sociology of the organization of medical practice and the health professions. Only one version of A SOC 359 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 362 (= A WSS 363) Sociology of Sexualities (3)
This course reviews the core of the sociology of sexuality from a sociohistorical perspective. Among the topics to be discussed are the theoretical approaches to sexuality, the making of sexual identities, the relationship between sexuality and social institutions, and sexual politics and ethics. Specific examples include hip-hop sexualities, gay marriage, sexual tourism, transgender identities, and heterosexual intimacy. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 369 Special Topics in Social Psychology (3)
Basic exploration of a specific area in social psychology, with primary emphasis on exposure to relevant theoretical and research literature. Topic varies from semester to semester and is indicated by course subtitle. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115 and another 3 credits in sociology (a total of 6 credits in sociology) and permission of instructor.

A SOC 370 Social Demography (3)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an in-depth introduction to the field of demography and population studies. Specifically, the course emphasizes the impact of population processes and events on human societies. Sociology, along with other social science disciplines, will be employed to facilitate the understanding of how social and demographic factors interact to create problems throughout the world. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 373 Community and Urban Sociology (3)
Approaches to the study of community and urban form and process. The city as a coercive product and as a social artifact. The impact of urbanization and other changes on the physical and social structure of communities. The impact of the urban setting upon social institutions, city, metropolis, and megalopolis, the future of cities. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 374 The American Welfare State (3)
This course introduces students to the American social welfare state. The course explores the key characteristics of the U.S. social welfare state and how those features have changed since the 1960s' War on Poverty. The course also identifies the major debates about social provisions for the poor; investigates the social forces and demographic factors molding social welfare policies; discusses the impact of race and gender on the formulation and implementation of social policies; and critically examines private sector responses to deprivation and poverty. Through community engagement activities and outreach, readings, discussion, media presentations, and student participation the course can provide students with a deeper understanding of the U.S. welfare state and the populations of families and children that are served, underserved, and possibly dis-served by the system. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 380 (formerly A SOC 480) Sociology of Deviant Behavior (3)
Explores various aspects of deviance: causes of deviant behavior, sources and nature of reactions to deviants, impact of social reaction on deviants, relationships between deviance and social structure. Theories of deviance and selected areas of deviant behavior are discussed. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 382Z Criminal Victimology (3)
Intensive investigation of a range of issues within the field of victimology from a sociological perspective. Exploration of many topics related to criminal victimization, including the history and theory of victimology, the extent and nature of victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, the effects of crime on victims and services available to deal with those effects, the interaction between victims of crimes and the system of criminal justice, victim blaming versus victim defending, the treatment of victims by society and the media, and alternative ways of defining and responding to victimization. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 384 Sociology of Aging (3)
A broad introduction to aging as a social phenomenon and its implications for both individuals and societies. Specific topics include: historical, cross-cultural, and racial/ethnic differences in the social meanings and consequences of aging, conceptual issues and empirical patterns related to work and retirement, family, residential location, and death and dying; and program and policy issues associated with aging, including retirement and health care policy. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 385 Sociology of Law (3)
The course will examine theoretical and conceptual issues of law and the operation of the criminal justice system. The course is designed to be analytical rather than descriptive. It emphasizes theoretical and research work that has been done on the law and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 386 The Social Worlds of Children and Youth (3)
How do experiences of childhood vary historically and cross-culturally? What inequalities are most salient in children's lives? At what age do children understand things like race and gender? This course answers these questions and more by exploring various aspects of the social worlds of children and youth. The course considers theoretical approaches to studying children's experiences from a sociological perspective, and how socialization and the new Sociology of Childhood perspective differs from dominant narratives in other disciplines. The course also covers how children and youth navigate different social settings including relationships within their families, in their peer groups and in their schools. Finally, the course critically examines the ways that social inequalities among and between groups of children shape their experiences both as children and over the life course. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 389 Special Topics in Sociology of Culture (3)
Examination of a specialized topic in the area of sociology of culture. Topic varies each semester, but might include sociology of the arts, literature, leisure, religion, or in areas such as Eastern European, Chinese, or Latin American culture. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.       

A SOC 395 Capitalize on Community (3)
Community forums, focus groups, and face-to-face interviews will be utilized to understand why there is a disconnect between the faith-based community, healthcare providers and the population most at-risk of HIV/AIDS. Students will have an opportunity to provide leadership in the development of programs and policies to enhance efforts to prevent the spread of this dread disease. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A SOC 398 Research Proseminar (3)
Covers sociological investigation including: topic selection, theoretical issues, review of literature, research design, collection and analysis of data, and presentation of results. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, or permission of instructor.

A SOC 399 Special Topics in Sociology (3)
Intensive investigation of a specialized topic in sociology. The topic varies from semester to semester and is indicated by the course subtitle. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.       

A SOC 410W/410Z Selected Topics Seminar in the Sociology of Culture (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic in the area of the sociology of culture, including significant exposure to primary literature and critical class discussion. Possible topics include functions of art in society, the mass media, art, and religion. Only one version of A SOC 410 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 420W/420Z Selected Topics Seminar in Research Methods (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic in sociological research. Topics include survey analysis and reporting, qualitative methods, multivariate analysis, experimental design. Only one version of A SOC 420 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 430W/430Z Selected Topics Seminar in Sociological Theory (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic in the area of sociological theory, including significant exposure to primary literature and critical class discussion. Only one version of A SOC 430 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 440W/440Z Selected Topics Seminar in Stratification: Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Class (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic relating to stratification or inequality among social groups defined by categories of race, ethnicity, gender, or class. Topics will vary from term to term. Only one version of A SOC 440 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 441W/441Z Selected Topics Seminar in Comparative Sociology (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic in the area of sociological theory, including significant exposure to primary literature, and critical class discussion. Topics include: comparative peasant societies, the origins of capitalism, comparative world religions, revolutions and social movements. Only one version of A SOC 441 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 449W/449Z Selected Topics Seminar in Social Order and Change (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic in work and organizations (such as family, comparative organizations, industrial automation). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 450W/450Z Selected Topics Seminar in Political Sociology (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic in the area of political sociology, including significant exposure to primary literature and critical class discussion. Only one version of A SOC 450 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 460W/460Z Selected Topics Seminar in Social Psychology (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic in the area of social psychology, including analysis of relevant literature and critical class discussion. Topic varies from semester to semester as is indicated by course subtitle. Only one version of A SOC 460 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 470W/470Z Selected Topics Seminar in the Sociology of Families (3)
A specialized course in the sociology of the family. Topics might include: work and family, aging families, gender and families, cross-cultural studies in the family. Only one version of A SOC 470 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 473W/473Z Selected Topics Seminar in Community and Urban Sociology (3)
A specialized course in community and urban sociology. Topics might include segregation, the under class, American neighborhoods, suburbanization, evolution of cities, the third world urbanization, and urban policy. Only one version of A SOC 473 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 475W/475Z Selected Topics Seminar in Demography (3)
A specialized course in demography. Topics might include: fertility, mortality, migration, population policy, family demography, historical demography. Only one version of A SOC 475 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 481W/481Z Selected Topics Seminar in Crime and Deviance (3)
An intensive examination of how to use data on deviance and crime in evaluating social theories and policies about deviance and crime, including significant exposure to primary literature and critical class discussion. Only one version of A SOC 481 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 484W/484Z Selected Topics Seminar in the Sociology of Aging (3)
A specialized course in sociology of aging. Topics might include: aging families, cross-cultural and sub-cultural differences, work and retirement, intergenerational relationships, death and dying, and social policy issues. Only one version of A SOC 484 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 485W/485Z Selected Topics Seminar in Health and Medicine (3)
An intensive examination of a specialized topic in the area of health and medicine, including significant exposure to primary literature and critical class discussion. Only one version of A SOC 485 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 488W/488Z Research Proposal Seminar (3)
This writing intensive seminar is intended for students who wish to acquire experience in sociological research, are considering writing an honors thesis in sociology (A SOC 498), or may be interested in graduate studies in sociology. Topics covered include the choice of a research question, theoretical issues, review of literature, research design, collection and analysis of data, and presentation of results. A research proposal is written under the supervision of a member of the department of sociology. Only one version of A SOC 488 may be taken for credit. Students may not take both R CRJ 490 and A SOC 488 for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235; and an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 490 Internship in Sociology (3)
Individually designed internships for students who wish to acquire experience in a field or area of sociology that interests them. Student-instructor conferences are arranged at regular intervals. May be taken only once for credit. Open to senior sociology majors only, with permission of instructor. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, 235; one sociology course directly related to the internship; an overall GPA of 3.0; and permission of Internship Director. S/U graded.

A SOC 491 Research Practicum in Experimental Methods I (3)
This course and its sequel, A SOC 492, are designed to give undergraduate students an opportunity to learn about and actively participate in the sociological research process. This will be accomplished in two ways. First, students will gain practical experience in the use of experimental methods to test sociological principles. Second, students will work collectively to develop and test experimentally an idea of their own related to research program of the course instructor. In the fall semester A SOC 491 students will focus primarily on choice of topic and research design and procedure. In the spring semester (A SOC 492) students will focus primarily on performance of the proposed experiment, data analysis, and preparation of the research report. [Note that A SOC 491 and 492 do not satisfy the Department of Sociology's 400-level seminar requirement for majors.] Prerequisite(s): students may enroll in the practicum with the permission of the instructor. Prior completion of A SOC 260 or A SOC 460 (Selected Topics Seminar in Social Psychology) is preferred, but not required.

A SOC 492 Research Practicum in Experimental Methods II (3)
Together with A SOC 491, this course is designed to give undergraduate students an opportunity to learn about and actively participate in the sociological research process. This will be accomplished in two ways. First, students will gain practical experience in the use of experimental methods to test sociological principles. Second, students will work collectively to develop and test experimentally an idea of their own related to research program of the course instructor. In the fall semester (A SOC 491) students will focus primarily on choice of topic and research design and procedure. In the spring semester (A SOC 492) students will focus primarily on performance of the proposed experiment, data analysis, and preparation of the research report. [Note that A SOC 491 and 492 do not satisfy the Department of Sociology's 400-level seminar requirement for majors.] Prerequisite(s): students must take A SOC 491 prior to A SOC 492. Enrollment is with the permission of the instructor. Prior completion of A SOC 260 or A SOC 460 (Selected Topics Seminar in Social Psychology) is preferred, but not required.

A SOC 495Z Special Topics Seminar in Sociology (3)
Intensive examination of a specialized topic in sociology. The special topic varies from semester to semester and is indicated by course subtitle. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115, 220, 221, and 235, and permission of instructor.

A SOC 497 Independent Study in Sociology (1-3)
Independent reading or research on a selected experimental, theoretical, or applied problem under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s) for sociology majors: A SOC 115, 12 additional credits in sociology, and junior or senior standing. Prerequisite(s) for non-sociology majors: senior standing and two courses in sociology. All students must have a contractual agreement with a departmental instructor to supervise project.

A SOC 498 Senior Honors Thesis (3)
Honors Thesis written under the supervision of a member of the sociology department. The student presents proposals and periodic progress reports. The thesis is presented to the adviser and Honors Committee in the final semester of the senior year. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 488Z (Research Proposal).